Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Trabajo : Revista de la Asociación Estatal de Centros Universitarios de Relaciones Laborales y Ciencias del Trabajo     Open Access  
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Career Assessment
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.914
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1069-0727 - ISSN (Online) 1552-4590
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1164 journals]
  • Testing Psychology of Working Theory Among Spanish-Speaking Latinx Workers
           in the U.S.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kelsey L. Autin, Andrew J. Shelton, Willy Anthony Diaz Tapia, Roberto G. Garcia, Germán A. Cadenas
      Pages: 379 - 395
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Volume 29, Issue 3, Page 379-395, August 2021.
      Psychology of Working Theory (PWT) has recently gained empirical support; however, its assumptions have yet to be tested for cultural responsiveness in Latinx communities, one of the fastest-growing worker populations in the U.S. The current study had two major aims: (a) to translate and validate instruments measuring PWT constructs from English into Spanish, and (b) to test theorized PWT predictors of decent work in a sample of Latinx workers (N = 287). First, we translated and validated instruments measuring economic constraints, lifetime marginalization, work volition, and decent work using confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). We then tested a structural model predicting decent work. Results partially supported PWT hypotheses, suggesting its utility and cultural responsiveness in studying the work patterns and conditions in Latinx communities. Practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-07-08T09:34:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1069072720976620
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Academic Majors and HEXACO Personality

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kibeom Lee, Michael C. Ashton, Christine Novitsky
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Self-reports on the HEXACO-PI-R scales were examined in relation to academic majors in post-secondary education (N> 73,000). Openness to Experience showed the largest mean differences across academic major areas, with the Visual/Performing Arts and Humanities areas averaging higher and Health Sciences and Business/Commerce averaging lower. Emotionality showed the second largest differences, with the Engineering and Physical Sciences/Math areas averaging lower and Visual/Performing Arts averaging higher; these differences in Emotionality became smaller in within-sex analyses. In addition, Extraversion tended to be higher for Business/Commerce and lower for Physical Sciences/Math, while Honesty-Humility was lower for Business/Commerce. The facet-level analyses provided additional detail, as facet scales in the same domain sometimes showed considerably different means within a given academic major area. In one case, Visual/Performing Art majors averaged lower in Prudence, but higher in Perfectionism, even though both facets belong to the Conscientiousness domain.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T06:12:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211044765
       
  • Openness to Experience and the Career Adaptability of Refugees: How Do
           Career Optimism and Family Social Support Matter'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alexander Newman, Karen Dunwoodie, Zhou Jiang, Ingrid Nielsen
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The present study examines the antecedents of the career adaptability of people from a refugee background. Drawing on career construction theory, it specifically examines whether openness to experience fosters career adaptability through enhancing career optimism. In addition, it examines whether family social support moderates the relationship between openness to experience and career optimism, and moderates the mediated relationship between openness to experience and career adaptability through career optimism. Analysis of three waves of data from people from a refugee background seeking employment in metropolitan Australia found support for the hypothesized relationships. In particular, career optimism was found to fully mediate the relationship between openness to experience and career adaptability. In addition, family social support was found to substitute for low levels of openness to experience.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-10-09T08:05:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211041532
       
  • Learning Goal Orientation and Academic Performance: A Dynamic model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bingjie Lu, Yingxin Deng, Xiang Yao, Zhe Li
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on the reciprocal determinism of self-regulation system, a process-based model is used to examine the relationship of learning goal orientation (LGO) among university students with their academic performance, via reciprocal relationships between initial status and change trajectories in academic self-efficacy and feedback-seeking behaviors. A longitudinal study of 316 Chinese university students throughout their first year in college reveals that students who have high LGO in their first month after entering the university generally have higher academic self-efficacy and seek more feedback. Moreover, initial levels of feedback seeking are positively related to academic performance via linear change in academic self-efficacy over time. Limitations of the study and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-09-23T10:34:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211043437
       
  • Decent Work Among People of Color: The Moderating Role of Critical
           Consciousness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kelsey L. Autin, Tiffany R. Williams, Blake A. Allan, Megan E. Herdt
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The present study examined critical consciousness in a sample of 476 adults of color from a Psychology of Working perspective. Using structural equation modeling, we tested three components of critical consciousness—perceived inequality, egalitarian beliefs, and sociopolitical participation—as moderators of relations between marginalization, economic constraints, work volition, career adaptability, and decent work. As hypothesized, perceived inequality and sociopolitical participation moderated paths from marginalization to career adaptability, work volition, and decent work. Perceived inequality moderated paths from economic constraints to career adaptability and decent work, but in inconsistent directions. We discuss practical implications and future research directions. Our results contribute to the growing support for the Psychology of Working Theory.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-09-06T09:15:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211039811
       
  • The Multidimensional Workaholism Scale in a Korean Population: A
           Cross-Cultural Validation Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nanhee Kim, Jinsoo Choi, Yonguk Park, Young Woo Sohn
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to provide a reliable and valid measure of workaholism for Korean workers. We translated the Multidimensional Workaholism Scale (MWS) into Korean and validated it with a sample of 1020 full-time Korean employees. An exploratory factor analysis revealed a four-factor solution (Study 1; N = 524), and a confirmatory analysis further demonstrated good model fit of the four-factor structure (Study 2; N = 496). The scale’s concurrent and construct validity was supported by positive correlations with other existing measures of workaholism, emotional exhaustion, and work–family conflict (WFC) and by a negative correlation with psychological detachment. Moreover, the MWS demonstrated a moderate association with work engagement, but no significant association with job satisfaction. It further showed significant incremental validity in predicting emotional exhaustion and WFC. The findings support the Korean MWS version’s reliability and validity for measuring workaholism among Korean employees. Theoretical implications for the workaholism literature and practical implications for corporate counselors and human resource practitioners are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-09-06T09:08:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211039957
       
  • Understanding the Dysfunctionality of Dysfunctional Career Decision-Making
           Beliefs: Ambiguity Aversion as a General Mechanism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hui Xu
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Although dysfunctional career decision-making beliefs represent an important assessment and intervention area in career counseling, the empirical foundation and the general mechanism of the dysfunctionality of dysfunctional career decision-making beliefs remain not fully clear. Based on the dual-process theory of career decision-making, the current study used a sample of U.S. college students (n = 200) and examined a longitudinal mediation model in which dysfunctional career decision-making beliefs predict subsequent career decidedness, career commitment, and academic major satisfaction through ambiguity aversion. The results supported the hypothesized mediation model in that dysfunctional career decision-making beliefs negatively predicted subsequent career decidedness, career commitment, and academic major satisfaction, and ambiguity aversion mediated all three links. Therefore, the present study not only shows that dysfunctional career decision-making has a pervasive detrimental role in career decision-making but also sheds light on the intricate relationship between dysfunctional career decision-making beliefs and ambiguity management in career decision-making. The limitations of this study and suggestions for future research are also discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-07-30T08:57:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211036887
       
  • Interest Incongruence and Job Performance: Examining the Moderating Roles
           of Job Crafting and Positive Affect

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Junyi Li, Hui Yang, Qingxiong Weng, Wenyang Gao
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Interest incongruence between employees and work environments has been considered as an adverse working condition; however, the way employees cope with it has rarely been explored. Using the conservation of resources theory, the appraisal theory, and the broaden-and-build theory, this study aims to investigate the moderating roles of job crafting and trait positive affect, separately and interactively, in the relationship between interest incongruence and job performance. Data collected from 384 Chinese employees and their colleagues across two time periods supported our hypotheses. Specifically, findings indicated that the relationship between interest incongruence and job performance was weakened when employees were more engaged in job crafting, or for employees with high positive affect. More importantly, a three-way interaction suggested that the detrimental impact of interest incongruence on job performance was especially mitigated when both job crafting and positive affect were high. Future studies should consider the combined roles of employees’ proactive behaviors and trait affectivity in improving job performance.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T10:11:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211034458
       
  • Validation of Work Need Satisfaction Scales Among Chinese Working Adults:
           A Psychology of Working Theory Perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yan Xu, Chaoping Li, Jiayan Wang, Yuanmei Lan
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study translated the Work Need Satisfaction Scales (WNSS), which was conceptualized in the Psychology of Working Theory (PWT), and tested the reliability and validity of the Chinese version (WNSS-C). In Study 1 (N = 423), the WNSS was translated into Chinese, and an exploratory factor analysis yielded a five-factor solution representing needs related to survival, social contribution, competence, relatedness, and autonomy. In Study 2 (N = 425), confirmatory factor analyses found no significant differences between the correlated five-factor, higher-order, and higher-order self-determination needs models. The results suggest the effectiveness of using a flexible five-factor model. Then, configural, metric, and scalar invariance models were tested, demonstrating that the WNSS-C is equivalent across gender, age, education level, and job position. Finally, we tested the concurrent, convergent, and discriminant validity of the WNSS-C and demonstrated that WNSS-C is a useful tool in the Chinese context.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-07-15T09:31:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211032368
       
  • Centering Matrices of Domination: Steps Toward a More Intersectional
           Vocational Psychology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Melanie Elyse Brewster, David Alejandro López Molina
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The present paper responds to calls to integrate a more explicitly intersectional framework and agenda to vocational psychology. We elucidate how several matrices of domination (i.e., interlocking systems of oppression) may shape the working lives of Americans. Although vocational psychology has made limited progress in exploring two such matrices—the impact of White supremacy and Patriarchy—and expanding research, theory, and clinical work to increasingly diverse populations, we argue that other oppressive systemic forces have been largely overlooked. In response to this gap, a close analysis of how our economic system (i.e., late-stage capitalism, neoliberalism) and Christian hegemony (i.e., protestant work ethic, the prosperity gospel) have impacted the workforce is provided. Finally, to center intersectional perspectives on change, we argue that vocational psychology must pivot to a more activist stance and provide recommendations for research, training, and clinical work.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T09:03:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211029182
       
  • How Decent Work Affects Affective Commitment Among Chinese Employees: The
           Roles of Psychological Safety and Labor Relations Climate

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wenyuan Huang, Jie Shen, Chuqin Yuan
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This two-study research evaluates the validity of the decent work scale (DWS) developed by Duffy et al. (2017) in the United States and the effect of decent work on affective commitment among Chinese employees. Study 1 aims to validate the DWS and examine the predictability of decent work for psychological safety and affective commitment. Drawing from a sample of 307 full-time employees (149 females and 158 males), Study 1 reveals that the bifactor model of the DWS has valid application in the Chinese context, and that decent work is positively related to psychological safety and affective commitment. Study 2 seeks to explore the relationship between decent work and affective commitment, the underlying mechanism, and the boundary condition. With a new sample of 568 full-time employees (268 females and 300 males) collected at two time points, Study 2 demonstrates that decent work is directly and indirectly related to employee affective commitment through the mediation of psychological safety; this indirect relationship is moderated by labor relations climate. This research extends decent work research and psychology of working theory in relation to the DWS validation and predictability for employee workplace attitudes, psychological process, and boundary conditions in a non-Western context.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T09:10:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211029673
       
  • Dream Jobs and Employment Realities: How Adolescents’ Career Aspirations
           Compare to Labor Demands and Automation Risks

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kevin Hoff, Drake Van Egdom, Christopher Napolitano, Alexis Hanna, James Rounds
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Despite a rapidly changing labor market, little is known about how youth’s career goals correspond to projections about the future of work. This research examined the career aspirations of 3,367 adolescents (age 13–18 years) from 42 U.S. states. We conducted a large-scale coding effort using the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) to compile the vocational interests, educational requirements, and automation risk levels of career aspirations. Results revealed that most adolescents aspired to careers with low potential for automation. However, there were large discrepancies between the sample’s aspirations and the types of jobs available when the sample entered the workforce. Almost 50% of adolescents aspired to either an investigative or artistic career, which together account for only 8% of the U.S. labor market. There were also notable trends across age and gender, such that aspirations were more gendered among younger adolescents, whereas older adolescents appeared less influenced by gender stereotypes. Overall, findings indicate important discrepancies between young people’s dream jobs and employment realities. We discuss how lofty career aspirations can have both positive and negative effects, and we present implications for career theories and workforce development initiatives aimed at promoting a more dynamic future workforce.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T10:52:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211026183
       
  • Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Tests of Social Cognitive Model of
           Well-Being in Korean College Students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eun Sul Lee, Yun-Jeong Shin
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the cross-cultural utility of a modified social cognitive model of academic and life satisfaction (Lent & Brown, 2008) by adding independent and interdependent self-construals with Korean college students in a cross-sectional (Study 1) and a longitudinal design (Study 2). In Study 1, 604 participants completed measures of academic self-efficacy, outcome expectations, goal progress, environmental support, positive affect, academic satisfaction, life satisfaction, and self-construals. In Study 2, 171 participants completed the same measures at two time points with a 15-week interval. Results of Study 1 indicated that the modified model provided a good fit to the data and that 21 out of 25 of the hypothesized paths were significant. In Study 2, the bidirectional model, which included three theorized sets of reciprocal relations (i.e., academic satisfaction to life satisfaction, positive affect to both environmental support and self-efficacy, and self-efficacy to both outcome expectations and goal progress) demonstrated an optimal fit to the data. Overall, the findings of the present study provide evidence for the validity of the modified social cognitive well-being model in Korean populations.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-06-21T09:42:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211026187
       
  • Do Unnecessary Tasks Impair Performance Because They Harm Living a
           Calling' Testing a Mediation in a Three-Wave Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Saija Mauno, Jaana Minkkinen, Akihito Shimazu
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This three-wave study explored whether living a calling (at work) mediated the relation between unnecessary tasks (time wasting work tasks) and socio-contextual performance at work (cynicism, organizational citizenship behavior). Participants were 518 Finnish white- and blue-collar employees, who were followed up in 2018, 2019, and 2020. The results of structural equation modeling showed that unnecessary tasks at Time 1 related negatively to living a calling at Time 2, which, in turn, related to cynicism and organizational citizenship behavior at T3. Thus, living a calling mediated the relation between unnecessary tasks and the outcomes. We found no evidence for the moderator role of living a calling between unnecessary tasks and the outcomes. Unnecessary tasks should be minimized in organizations to promote living a calling and subsequent positive outcomes predicted by calling.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-05-24T09:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211018977
       
  • Basic Psychological Need Satisfaction, Autonomous Motivation, and
           Meaningful Work: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kelsey L. Autin, Megan E. Herdt, Roberto G. Garcia, Gabriel N. Ezema
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The present study investigated relations between basic psychological need satisfaction (autonomy, relatedness, and competence), autonomous motivation, and work meaning. With a sample of 462 working adults, we used structural equation modeling to test the incremental validity of including autonomous motivation in a model predicting meaningful work from basic psychological need satisfaction. The satisfaction of autonomy and relatedness needs directly predicted autonomous motivation, while competence need satisfaction directly predicted meaningful work. Mediation analyses supported the incremental contribution of autonomous motivation in the links from autonomy and relatedness to work meaning, but not from competence to work meaning. Our findings provide novel connections between the bodies of literature on Self-Determination Theory and meaningful work. We discuss practical implications for career counselors, organizational leaders, and policymakers, as well as future research directions.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-05-20T09:17:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211018647
       
  • Development and Validation of the Career Crafting Assessment (CCA)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Joo Young Lee, Christopher L. Chen, Eli Kolokowsky, Sharon Hong, Jason T. Siegel, Stewart I. Donaldson
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This research introduces career crafting to describe a set of lifelong career behaviors that individuals engage in when developing their meaningful career paths. The Career Crafting Assessment (CCA), based on the defined criteria of career crafting, was developed to measure the construct and its validity was tested across two studies. Exploratory factor analysis in Study 1 revealed that the CCA is multidimensional, composed of four factors. Confirmatory factor analysis in Study 2 further specified that the CCA is hierarchical, demonstrating a good model fit of a four-factor model with a higher-order factor. Correlational tests indicated that career crafting is positively related to existing career constructs, demonstrating convergent validity. Furthermore, the CCA predicted meaningful work, work engagement, and subjective career success, providing concurrent validity. Finally, a series of hierarchical regression tests revealed that career crafting accounts for more of the variance in meaningful work and work engagement than job crafting but not in subjective career success, partially providing incremental evidence. Overall, study findings suggest that (a) career crafting is a distinct construct, and (b) the CCA is a valid measure for assessing career crafting that can be used to better understand lifelong career behaviors to make one’s career more meaningful and engaging.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-05-13T09:05:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211002565
       
  • Called to Serve: Exploring the Relationship Between Career Calling, Career
           Plateaus, and Organizational Commitment in the U.S. Military

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marco S. DiRenzo, Jennifer Tosti-Kharas, Edward H. Powley
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Experiencing career as a calling has implications for an individual’s career trajectory; yet, little is known about whether calling relates to career plateaus, which have the potential to stall an employee’s career path. This relationship is particularly interesting for members of the U.S. military, who have a relatively prescribed set of career experiences and opportunities. Serving in the U.S. military requires potential sacrifice, loyalty, and a sense of moral duty, all characteristics of what it means to experience one’s career as a calling. Yet, research has largely neglected to examine callings in the context of military service. We address these gaps by examining the relationships between career calling, career plateaus, and organizational commitment. We also examine whether social capital moderates these relationships via complementary or substitution effects. Using a two-wave survey sample of 237 officers, we found that calling negatively related to content career plateaus which in turn mediated calling’s positive relationship to commitment. Social capital moderated this mediation in a manner to suggest substitution effects. We discuss the implications of our findings for research on military careers, career as a calling, and affective commitment, as well as for practicing military officers and their leadership.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T09:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211011379
       
  • Examining the Persistence Intentions of College Students of Color

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pa Her, Mindi N. Thompson
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study used the Social Cognitive Career Theory—Career Self-Management Model (SCCT-CSM) to understand the process by which background variables impact students of color’s intentions to persist in college. Findings from 329 students of color revealed that perceived social status related positively to self-efficacy for self-regulated learning, that increased experiences of racism related negatively to self-efficacy for self-regulated learning, and that self-efficacy for self-regulated learning related positively to intentions to persist in college. Further, self-efficacy for self-regulated learning mediated the relationship between perceived social status and persistence intentions among this sample of college students of color. Lastly, SEM analyses provided support for several pathways of the SCCT-CSM model with students of color. Limitations of the current study are discussed. Implications and future directions for practice and research are presented.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T07:31:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211010382
       
  • Assessing Perceived Future Decent Work Securement Among Chinese
           Impoverished College Students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jingyi Wei, Sow Hup Joanne Chan, Kelsey Autin
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing from Psychology of Working Theory (PWT), the current study sampled 254 college students from impoverished families in China and examined their perceptions of access to future decent work as predicted by subjective social status and marginalization and mediated by work volition and career adaptability. As impoverished college students are socioeconomically disadvantaged and thus cannot afford college expenses, understanding their perception regarding future careers echoes the call for renewing the focus on equity and diversity within vocational psychology. Findings supported subjective social status as an indirect predictor of perceptions of future decent work via work volition. Work volition and career adaptability directly predicted perceptions of future decent work. Additionally, there is a significant conditional indirect effect between subjective social status, work volition, and perceptions of future decent work. Specifically, the effect was only significant for first-year students. Overall, this study adds new evidence on the applicability of the PWT among student populations. Implications for career researchers, vocational counselors, and student affairs professionals are provided.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-04-12T08:04:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211005653
       
  • Living a Calling and Work–Family Interface: A Latent Profile
           Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chunyu Zhang, Bryan J. Dik, Zengyun Dong
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The positive outcomes of calling have been examined in a large and growing number of studies, yet little is known about how calling relates to the work-family interface. In this study, we adopted a person-centered approach using latent profile analysis to explore how living a calling relates to different work-family interface profiles. With a sample of 267 Chinese university counselors, we found three work-family interface profiles: slightly conflictual (51%), experiencing slightly higher than average levels of work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC) and slightly lower than average levels of work-to-family enrichment (WFE) and family-to-work enrichment (FWE); work-to-family conflictual (15%), with higher levels of WFC and lower levels of FWC, WFE, and FWE; and enriched (34%), indicated by higher levels of WFE and FWE and lower levels of WFC and FWC. The results revealed that the greater the extent to which participants were living their calling, the more likely they were to be classified into the enriched profile. Our findings contribute to the literature on calling by offering person-centered insights on the relation between calling and the work-family interface.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-04-01T09:07:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211006701
       
  • Intolerance of Uncertainty, Anxiety, and Career Indecision: A Mediation
           Model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Consuelo Arbona, Weihua Fan, Ayoung Phang, Norma Olvera, Marcel Dios
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) refers to the tendency to fear the unknown and to worry excessively about potential future negative outcomes. In the career decision-making process, college students experience uncertainty regarding the future of occupational opportunities and the evolution of their interests and capabilities. Anxiety is a well-established predictor of career indecision. Therefore, this study examined the role of anxiety as a mediator in the relation of IU and rumination to three dimensions of career decision making difficulties among college students (N = 678). Results of path analyses indicated that as hypothesized, after controlling for age, intolerance of uncertainty was directly and indirectly (though anxiety) related to the three dimensions of career decision making difficulties: lack of readiness, lack of information, and inconsistent information. Results suggested that career choice interventions may be enhanced with a targeted emphasis on coping with the uncertainty involved in career decision making among college students.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T03:09:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211002564
       
  • The Relationship Between Career Adaptability and Job-Search Self-Efficacy
           of Graduates: The Bifactor Approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marijana Matijaš, Darja Maslić Seršić
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Career adaptability is an important resource for dealing with career transitions such as the transition from university to work. Previous research emphasized the importance of focusing on career adapt-abilities instead only on general career adaptability. The aim of this research was to investigate whether career adaptability can be conceptualized as a bifactor model and whether general and specific dimensions of career adaptability have a relationship with job-search self-efficacy of graduates. In an online cross-sectional study, 667 graduates completed the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale and Job Search Skill and Confidence Scale. The CFA analysis showed that the bifactor model of career adaptability had a good fit where general factor explained most of the items’ variance. The SEM analysis revealed that general career adaptability and the specific factor of confidence positively correlated with job-search and interview performance self-efficacy. Control only correlated with interview performance self-efficacy. Neither concern nor curiosity showed a significant relationship with job-search and interview performance self-efficacy.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-03-25T09:01:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211002281
       
  • The Development of the CASVE-CQ: A CIP Perspective on Assessing
           Decision-Making Progress

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Brianna Werner, Emily Bullock-Yowell, Richard Mohn, Melanie Leuty, Eric Dahlen
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The CASVE-Cycle Questionnaire (CASVE-CQ) was developed to assess career decision-making progress and operationalizes the Cognitive Information Processing Theory’s CASVE Cycle decision-making approach. Development occurred across three unique studies. In the pilot study’s college student sample (N = 323) and initial adult sample (N = 427), two exploratory factor analyses supported a theoretically consistent six-factor solution. A confirmatory factor analysis in the second adult sample (N = 342) confirmed the factor structure, resulting in a 42-item measure with six subscales. A second-order factor analysis assessed the utility of a CASVE-CQ total score. Consistent with theory, this model did not converge, and a total score for the CASVE-CQ was not supported. Supporting the validity of the CASVE-CQ as a decision-making progress measure, greater decision-making activity in each phase/subscale was associated with lower career decision-making difficulties, stable vocational identity, and greater career commitment. Continued test development steps and theory, research, and practice implications, are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-03-05T08:59:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1069072721999317
       
  • Examining Classism and Critical Consciousness Within Psychology of Working
           Theory

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Taewon Kim, Blake A. Allan
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Building from psychology of working theory, this study tested how critical consciousness, composed of perceived inequality, egalitarianism, and critical action, moderate the relations between contextual barriers (i.e., economic constraints and classism) and psychological variables (i.e., work volition and career adaptability) with a sample of 403 employees in the United States. Findings suggested that people who had high egalitarianism had a stronger negative relation between economic constraints and work volition. Results also revealed that people who had low egalitarianism had a negative relation between classism and career adaptability. Regarding critical action, people who had low or moderate levels of critical action had a stronger negative relation between economic constraints and work volition. Moreover, people who had low or moderate levels of critical action had a stronger negative relation between classism and career adaptability. Findings encourage practitioners and employers to consider egalitarianism and critical action as potential targets in vocational interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-03-05T08:58:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1069072721998418
       
  • Validation of the Chinese Version of the Multidimensional Workaholism
           Scale

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yan Xu, Chaoping Li
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to translate the Multidimensional Workaholism Scale (MWS) into Chinese and then test its reliability and validity among full-time Chinese employees in two stages. In Study 1 (N = 220), the MWS was translated and exploratory factor analysis was conducted resulting in a four-factor solution consistent with the original MWS: motivational, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral. In Study 2 (N = 425), confirmatory factor analysis showed that a four-factor, bifactor model was the best fit for the data. Configural, metric, and scalar invariance models were tested which demonstrated that the Chinese version of the MWS did not differ across gender, age, and job position groups. Finally, workaholism and engagement were related and distinct from one another, and they correlated with emotional exhaustion, work-family conflict and life well-being uniquely. This study indicated that the Chinese version of the MWS is a valid and reliable tool for Chinese employees, and this has important practical implications for the individual health and career development of Chinese working adults.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T09:25:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1069072721994272
       
  • Prevalence and Demographic Differences in Work as a Calling in the United
           States: Results From a Nationally Representative Sample

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Micah J. White, Dylan R. Marsh, Bryan J. Dik, Cheryl L. Beseler
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Within the last two decades, social science research on work as a calling has rapidly grown. To date, knowledge regarding prevalence and demographic differences of calling in the United States derives from data collected mainly from regionally limited and/or occupationally homogenous samples. The present study used data from the Portraits of American Life Study, a nationally stratified panel study of religion in the United States (U.S.), to estimate calling’s prevalence in the U.S. Our findings represent the first known population estimates of seeking, perceiving, and living a calling in the U.S. Results revealed that calling is a relevant concept for many U.S. adults, with 43% endorsing “mostly true” or “totally true” to the statement “I have a calling to a particular kind of work.” Small differences for presence of and search for a calling emerged across age groups, employment statuses, and levels of importance of God or spirituality. For living a calling, significant differences were identified only for importance of God or spirituality, contrasting with previous findings that suggested that living a calling varies as a function of income and social status. Implications for research and practice are explored.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-02-23T09:53:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1069072721995698
       
  • Internship Experiences Among College Students Attending an HBC: A
           Longitudinal Grounded Theory Exploration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mindi N. Thompson, Jessica Perez-Chavez, Anna Fetter
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Internships are a form of experiential learning whereby students can apply and practice their skills in a professional setting while gaining career and life experience. This study explored internship experiences among students attending an Historically Black College and University (HBCU) in the Southeastern region of the U.S. Using Grounded Theory, 18 students participated in in-person small group interviews at Time 1 and 11 participated in follow-up individual phone interviews 1 year later at Time 2. The grounded theory that emerged from the data depicts the process by which students engaged with, and made meaning from, the internship process. Participants are unique individuals with individual and contextual factors that impact the values and beliefs they bring to the internship process. The internship application process is complex, and support from important others, limitations to internship opportunities, and financial considerations impact students’ experiences. These experiences shape perceptions regarding the value of internships, which informs students’ future projections. In combination, the internship process is a process that unfolds over time and in which students’ experiences mutually influence and inform one another. Implications for internship employers and higher education institutions, applications to career theory, and future directions for research are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T09:03:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1069072721992758
       
  • Corrigendum to ‘A Meta-Analysis of the Antecedents of Career
           Commitment’

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-01-12T10:05:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1069072720987353
       
  • College and Career Ready and Critically Conscious: Asset-Building With
           Latinx Immigrant Youth

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ellen Hawley McWhirter, Christina Cendejas, Maureen Fleming, Samantha Martínez, Nathan Mather, Yahaira Garcia, Lindsey Romero, Robert I. Ortega, Bryan Ovidio Rojas-Araúz
      First page: 525
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      A growing body of evidence supports critical consciousness as a developmental asset for young people, including its benefits for educational and vocational outcomes. National dynamics and policies in the U.S., such as restricting immigration and asylum, have raised the salience of critical consciousness as a protective factor for the career development of Latinx immigrant youth. In this manuscript, we first review the nature and benefits of critical consciousness for Latinx immigrant youth. We then highlight how college and career readiness (CCR) and the components of critical consciousness (CC) can be simultaneously fostered among Latinx immigrant high school students, drawing upon our own work in the context of an afterschool program. We introduce a framework to illustrate this integration, and describe a series of intervention activities and processes designed to simultaneously build CC and CCR. Finally, we provide recommendations and describe caveats and challenges to developing classroom-based career education curricula that integrate CCR and CC.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T09:33:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1069072720987986
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 54.165.57.161
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-