Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Career Assessment
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.914
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1069-0727 - ISSN (Online) 1552-4590
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Invisibility and Negative Career Outcome Expectations among Racially and
           Ethnically Diverse College Students at a Predominantly White Institution

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      Authors: Han Na Suh, Lisa Y. Flores, Remy Johanson-Murray, Sangha Park, Foong Yan Lee
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The present study explored the relationship between invisibility experiences, a component of microaggressions, and negative career outcome expectations among a sample of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) students attending a predominantly White institution of higher education (PWI). Additionally, given that invisibility is experienced differently across gender (i.e., intersecting invisibility), we explored whether the relationship between invisibility experiences and negative career outcome expectations differed across women and men. With a sample of 103 BIPOC college students, the findings supported the hypothesis of a significant positive relationship between invisibility experiences and a negative outlook on career advancement. Using Hayes’ SPSS PROCESS, the results also supported the moderation role of binary gender on the relationship between invisibility experiences and negative career outcome expectations in which the relationship was observed only for self-identified men BIPOC students. Implications include providing more attention to the invisibility experiences of BIPOC students, particularly at PWIs, and placing greater effort in assisting with the career development of BIPOC men college students. Specifically, given the significant moderation by gender relationship, customized interventions based on intersecting invisibility experiences are warranted. Additional discussion of the study’s implications and limitations are further described.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-05-03T11:47:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727231173729
       
  • Social Mobility and Vocational Outcomes: A Psychology of Working
           Perspective

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      Authors: Gianella Perez, Ryan D. Duffy, Haram J. Kim, Taewon Kim
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The current study was aimed at understanding how social mobility relates to vocational outcomes. Drawing from Psychology of Working Theory (PWT), social mobility was operationalized as changes in experiences of economic constraints and marginalization between childhood and adulthood. We used latent profile analysis to create profiles among a sample of employed adults (N = 533) and compared profile membership to PWT informed outcomes: work volition, career adaptability, and decent work. The five profiles of social mobility that emerged were as follows: sustained privilege (low levels of marginalization and economic constraints during childhood and adulthood), downward mobility (low levels of marginalization and economic constraints in childhood, high levels in adulthood), upward mobility (high levels of marginalization and economic constraints in childhood, low levels in adulthood), highly marginalized (high levels of marginalization at both points), and sustained barriers (high levels of marginalization and economic constraints in childhood and adulthood). Participants who belonged to the sustained privilege and upward mobility groups experienced greater work volition and decent work compared to those in groups who experienced higher levels of economic constraints and marginalization throughout their lives. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-03-20T10:32:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727231161380
       
  • Decent Work, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Posttraumatic Growth From
           the Psychology of Working Perspective: A Three-Wave Study of Military
           Personnel

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      Authors: Jeong Hoon Seol, Young Woo Sohn, Minjun Yoo, Yonguk Park
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Scholarly interest in the relationship between decent work and mental health based on the Psychology of Working Theory has recently increased. This study evaluated the indirect effects of survival, social contribution, and self-determination needs satisfaction on the relationship between decent work and trauma-related mental health among military personnel. We conducted a three-wave survey over 1 year. Results showed that decent work predicted satisfaction of the three basic needs. Additionally, survival needs directly predicted posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, while social contribution and self-determination needs directly predicted posttraumatic growth. Finally, decent work had a significant indirect effect on posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms via survival needs, whereas decent work had significant indirect effects on posttraumatic growth via social contribution and self-determination needs. Our findings suggest that the more military personnel perceive their work as decent and feel that their three basic needs are fulfilled, the more posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms diminish, and posttraumatic growth increases. We discuss the implications and need for follow-up studies.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-03-18T07:52:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727231163321
       
  • Mind the Overlap: A Qualitative Exploration of the Vocational Lives of
           Veterans Living With Mental Health and Substance Use Conditions

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      Authors: Brian J. Stevenson, Elizabeth Chamberlin, Camille M. Smith, Taina Teravainen, Ummul Kiram Kathawalla, Lisa Mueller
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Veterans with mental health and substance use conditions have poor employment outcomes and would likely benefit from integrated career, mental health, and substance use related interventions. However, vocational psychology has overlooked this vulnerable population, and vocational interventions are often relegated as less important than other psychotherapeutic interventions that target substance use or symptom reduction. Drawing upon Social Cognitive Career Theory and Psychology of Working Theory, this qualitative study examined how external and internal factors influenced the vocational trajectories of eight veterans with mental health and substance use conditions. Additionally, this study examined participants’ perspective on the usefulness of improving career outcomes in supporting their lives and recoveries. Using Consensual Qualitative Research methodology, this study uncovered how personal, environmental, relational, mental health, and substance use factors impacted the vocational trajectories of veterans living with mental health and substance use conditions. Findings also highlight that veterans want fulfilling employment and more clarity in their vocational lives to support their mental well-being and prevent substance use. Implications for vocational psychology theory and integrative practice are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-03-15T05:52:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727231164646
       
  • Romanian Version of the Career Crafting Assessment: Psychometric
           Properties

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      Authors: Raluca Ioana Chifor, Bogdan Oprea
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The notion of career is no longer understood as a progressive advancement within the same organization, but rather as a lifelong dynamic transition between multiple jobs. Lee et al. (2021) developed Career Crafting Assessment as a means of identifying the proactive behaviors that people engage in when developing their career paths. The aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Romanian version of the scale. In Study 1 (N = 938), Confirmatory Factor Analysis supported the four-factor model of the scale. The results supported the measurement invariance for gender, but not for age. The internal consistency of the scale was adequate. In Study 2 (N = 344), we found significant positive correlations between career crafting and two similar constructs, namely job crafting and organizational career management, supporting the convergent validity of the scale. In Study 3 (N = 213), the criterion validity of the scale was supported by significant positive correlations between career crafting and four of its possible outcomes, namely performance, work engagement, perceived meaningfulness of work, and person-job fit. Our results are in line with the findings of Lee et al. (2021) and suggest that the Romanian version of the instrument is valid.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-03-09T11:55:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727231163322
       
  • A Process Model of Career Decision-Making and Adaptation Under
           Uncertainty: Expanding the Dual-Process Theory of Career Decision-Making

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      Authors: Hui Xu, Lisa Y. Flores
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The dual-process theory of career decision-making (DTC; Xu, 2021a; 2021b) resulted from a synthesized and critical reflection of career decision-making and related models in the contemporary psychosocial context of career development. The DTC features persistent decision uncertainty as a salient condition of contemporary career decision-making, and its theoretical framework and predictive model establish DTC’s conceptual and empirical foundation, respectively. However, the DTC and the career decision-making literature in general still lack a process-oriented prescriptive model that foregrounds decision uncertainty. Consequently, the extant literature fails to prescribe key decision-making components and procedures under decision uncertainty. Thus, drawing on the DTC, decision-making science, and existing models of career decision-making, we propose a four-stage process model, which involves four interlinked macro stages and micro steps within each stage. The model also involves five propositions to explain and predict the effects of important personal and environmental factors on the process and outcomes of each stage. We describe the DTC process model and use a case example to illustrate how the model can be applied in practice. Together, the DTC’s theoretical framework, predictive model, and process-oriented prescriptive model constitute a comprehensive theory regarding dynamic career decision-making and adaption in an uncertain world and offer diverse research and practical implications.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-03-06T07:35:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727231161378
       
  • The Relationship Between Parental Attachment and Career Aspirations in
           Indian Female Undergraduate Students

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      Authors: Avantika Bhatia, Simran Rana, Margo Gregor
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of the present study was to examine the career aspirations of Indian female undergraduate students, by utilizing a theoretical framework integrating Attachment Theory and Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT). Data were collected from 157 female Indian undergraduate students at a Liberal Studies college in India to study the contribution of self-reported maternal and paternal attachment security in predicting career aspirations. In particular, the mediating effects of student-reported self-esteem and career decision self-efficacy were examined in the relationship between their perceptions of maternal and paternal attachment security and career aspirations. Secure attachment to mothers, but not fathers, was found to relate to self-esteem and career decision self-efficacy, which in turn predicted career aspirations. Findings from the study contribute to the literature on career aspirations of women in India and lend support for the integration of attachment theory and SCCT. Future research and practical implications of these findings are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-02-17T01:55:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221129615
       
  • Predicting Decent Work Among US Black Workers: Examining Psychology of
           Working Theory

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      Authors: Tiffany R. Williams, Kelsey L. Autin, Jayla Pugh, Megan E. Herdt, Roberto G. Garcia, Dana Jennings, Taylor Roberts
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The U.S. has a history of marginalizing Black people. Marginalization impedes Black Americans’ ability to secure wealth, education, and meaningful work. The Psychology of Working Theory (PWT) uses a social justice lens to understand how contextual factors inform the labor market experiences of those who work and want to work. PWT highlights the ways economic constraints and marginalization predict access to decent work. We tested the PWT model with two measures of marginalization, general ethnic discrimination, and racial microaggressions, with a sample of 241 Black workers to add to the extant literature about the suitability of the PWT for racial minorities. Diverging from previous studies, we found that marginalization predicted career adaptability. Consistent with previous studies, marginalization and economic constraints predicted Black workers’ work volition and perceived access to decent work. Work volition mediated the relationship between general ethnic discrimination and economic constraints with the perception of attaining decent work.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-01-05T02:03:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221149456
       
  • Job Desperation: Scale Development and Construct Validation

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      Authors: Brent A. Stevenor, Michael J. Zickar
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      We introduce a new construct to the vocational behavior literature: job desperation. Job desperation is defined as a state of despair in which a person feels pressure to find a new job, has a negative evaluation of his/her current employment situation, and will go to extreme lengths to find a new job. Using self-determination theory, we provide a theoretical rationale for job desperation. Across two studies, we developed and validated the job desperation scale (JDS). In Study 1, we generated a pool of items and evaluated them using a combination of psychometric techniques including item response theory. In Study 2, we examined the construct validity of the JDS. Results suggest that job desperation is a strong predictor of job search behavior, predicting unique variance in job search behavior over and above other relevant antecedents such as financial strain and job insecurity. We believe job desperation adds to and expands our knowledge of the antecedents of job search behavior by serving as a unique and relevant explanation for why people search for jobs.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-01-03T04:23:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221149395
       
  • Pre-Occupation: A Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression of Gender Differences
           in Adolescent Vocational Interests

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      Authors: Kristi Baerg MacDonald, Alex Benson, John Kitchener Sakaluk, Julie Aitken Schermer
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Vocational interests have important implications for a range of life outcomes, such as satisfaction with career choice. Extending research on gender differences in vocational interests with adult samples, we sought to evaluate whether a similar pattern emerged during adolescence in a meta-analysis and explored moderators via meta-regression. Examining 41 studies using 3-level meta-analysis, gender differences in vocational interests are substantially accounted for using Holland’s RIASEC framework. Male adolescents have higher interests in Realistic and Investigative careers and female adolescents have higher interests in Social and Artistic careers. The differences were not moderated by year, national gender inequality ratings, or scale type. The study highlights that there are patterns in gender differences in the vocational interests of adolescents, that these differences reflect those found with adult samples, and that the differences have been stable over the past 80 years.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-01-02T04:03:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221148717
       
  • On the Combined Role of Work Engagement and Burnout Among Novice Nurses: A
           Longitudinal Person-Centered Analysis

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      Authors: Nicolas Gillet, Claude Fernet, Yael Blechman, Alexandre J. S. Morin
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the profiles taken by global and specific facets of work engagement and burnout among a sample of novice (M tenure = 3.77 years) nurses (n = 570; 88.4% females; Mage = 29.3 years). This study also investigated the role of psychological need satisfaction in the prediction of profile membership, and the implications of these profiles for attitudinal (job satisfaction), behavioral (in-role and extra-role performance, absenteeism, and presenteeism) and health (perceived health difficulties) outcomes. Latent profile analyses revealed six profiles: High Global Engagement and Low Global Burnout, Moderately High Global Engagement and Moderately Low Global Burnout, Low Dedication and Efficacy and Highly Cynical, Dedicated but Exhausted Burned-Out, Low Efficacy Burned-Out, and Very Low Global Engagement and Very High Global Burnout. Although these profiles were replicated over a 1-year period, profile membership was only weakly stable. The most beneficial outcomes were observed in the High Global Engagement and Low Global Burnout profile, and the most detrimental in the Very Low Global Engagement and Very High Global Burnout profile. Need satisfaction was also associated with profile membership, although associations were stronger for global levels of need satisfaction than for specific levels of autonomy, competence, and relatedness need satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-12-27T07:19:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221148720
       
  • Reciprocal Effects of Career Adaptability and Occupational Self-Efficacy:
           A Three-Wave Longitudinal Study With Varying Time Lags

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      Authors: Judith Volmer, Daniel Spurk, Maximilian Orth, Anja Göritz
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Researchers widely agree upon the pivotal role of career self-management in vocational development. Yet, little is known about how core self-management constructs denoting agentic capacity affect each other reciprocally over time. We address the shortage of existing longitudinal change investigations by proposing and testing a reciprocal model in which career adaptability and occupational self-efficacy as core career self-management constructs are reciprocally interrelated. Cross-lagged panel analyses of three-wave data from a large and heterogeneous sample of employees indicate support for the presence of substantial reciprocal effects of career adaptability and occupational self-efficacy across time lags of three, six, and nine months. From a series of exploratory multigroup analyses, this pattern of results emerges as robust across a range of sociodemographic variables, including gender, age, education, leadership position, and organizational tenure. Moreover, the results remained stable after considering further controls (e.g., future temporal focus, grade point average). Our findings broaden the scope of dynamic vocational research by demonstrating the utility of a change-oriented approach in elucidating the emergence of individuals’ career self-management. We discuss practical implications concerning career intervention strategies, study limitations, and prospects for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T01:52:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221140050
       
  • Trajectories of Change in Career Decision Difficulties During a Manualized
           Individual Career Counseling Intervention: The Influence of Counselor
           Adherence, Working Alliance and Client Personality Traits

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      Authors: Francis Milot-Lapointe, Yann Le Corff
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to identify trajectories of change in client career decision difficulties during a manualized career counseling intervention and examine the role of counselor adherence, working alliance, and personality traits in predicting these trajectories. Participants were 257 individuals who received an average of 7.79 career counseling sessions at a university career services center. Using growth mixture modeling, four class-trajectories were identified. Clients in class 1 had a moderate level of decision difficulties at the beginning of counseling while clients in classes 2, 3 and 4 had moderate-salient initial levels of difficulties. Clients in classes 1 and 2 experienced a very large reduction of their decision difficulties during counseling and left the process with negligible levels of difficulties. Clients in class 3 saw a large reduction of their decision difficulties during counseling and left the process with moderate levels of difficulties. Clients in class 4 did not experience change and left the process with moderate-salient levels of difficulties. Counselor adherence to the intervention manual significantly contributed to discriminate between clients from class 4 and clients from classes 1, 2 and 3. Client level of neuroticism significantly contributed to distinguish clients belonging to class 4 from clients belonging to class 1.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T01:27:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221141983
       
  • The Work Interevention Network (WIN): Foundations of a Holistic Vocational
           Intervention

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      Authors: Kelsey L. Autin, Blake A. Allan, David L. Blustein, Saliha Kozan, Ofer Sharone, Brian J. Stevenson, Rachel Gali Cinamon, Joaquim Ferreira, Mindi N. Thompson
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of the current study was to examine whether the key constructs targeted in the Work Intervention Network (WIN) intervention uniquely predicted well-being outcomes and mediated relations between un/underemployment and these outcomes. Using data from a sample of 462 adults in the U.S., we positioned employment status as a predictor of life satisfaction, well-being, and psychological distress. We also tested four mediators of these relations that operationalized targets in the WIN intervention – career engagement, social support, self-care, and self-blame. Employment status indirectly predicted life satisfaction, life meaning, and psychological distress via self-care and self-blame. Career engagement mediated the relation between employment status and psychological distress but in an unexpected direction. Social support was not directly predicted by employment status but predicted life satisfaction and life meaning. Results provided initial support for the WIN intervention and corroborate the contention that employment status is an important predictor of well-being.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-11-05T01:32:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221138619
       
  • Extending the Psychology of Working Model for Latinx Youth: Incorporating
           Youth Voice

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      Authors: Maureen E. Kenny, Mary Beth Medvide, XiYue Wu, Karley M. P. Guterres, Yunqing Yang
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Psychology of working theory (PWT) emphasizes the role of contextual constraints in career development, as well as promotive factors that might be cultivated to navigate these constraints. Although PWT has implications for promoting youth career development, most research has focused on college students and working adults. We interviewed 12 youth residing in a Latinx community with a high level of poverty and attending a well-resourced private high school with a high degree of college acceptance to explore developmentally and culturally relevant promotive factors that might inform the extension of PWT for youth. Analyses conducted through Consensual Qualitative Research revealed a strong sense of purpose and hope that were grounded in family, school, and workplace supports. Participants reported critical awareness of societal inequities and a focus on challenging inequity through hard work rather than societal change. We discuss implications for extending PWT theory, research, and intervention with Latinx youth.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T06:46:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221138618
       
  • Career Adapt-Abilities Scale–Short Form: Validation among Portuguese
           University Students and Workers

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      Authors: Joana Soares, Maria do Céu Taveira, Paula Barroso, Ana Daniela Silva
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) was recently reduced to a briefer 12-items version, the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-Short Form (CAAS-SF). Considering its advantages in long protocols, we validated CAAS-SF for the Portuguese context. Participants were 314 university students (17–47 years old, Mage = 21.50, SDage = 4.32, 82.8% females), and 899 working adults (17–66 years old, Mage = 40.14, SDage = 11.95, 76.8% females). Sociodemographic, career adaptability, vocational identity, and life satisfaction measures were applied. Confirmatory factor analyses supported CAAS-SF four-factor hierarchical structure, Cronbach alpha estimates supported CAAS-SF good reliability, and Pearson correlations indicated positive associations with CAAS, vocational identity, and life satisfaction. Multigroup analyses indicated CAAS-SF adequate configural invariance, full metric and scalar invariance across genders, and partial scalar invariance across students and workers’ groups. These findings support CAAS-SF usage as a valid and reliable measure to assess career adaptability with Portuguese university students and workers both in research and practice.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T11:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221129281
       
  • Beliefs About the Malleability of Professional Skills and Abilities:
           Development and Validation of a Scale

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      Authors: Antje Schmitt, Susanne Scheibe
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The concept of a professional skills and abilities mindset denotes beliefs that professional skills and abilities are either malleable (growth mindset) or are uncontrollable and difficult to change (fixed mindset). Based on the career construction theory, we argue that employees’ professional skills and abilities mindset represents an indicator of adaptive readiness that predicts career adaptability and adaptive responses in terms of learning and career engagement. Across four studies (total N = 709), we developed the 6-item professional skills and abilities mindset scale. Study 1 establishes a two-factor structure, satisfactory psychometric properties, and convergent validity. Studies 2 and 3 provide evidence of the criterion validity of the growth but not the fixed mindset subscale for career engagement and learning through career adaptability. Study 4 establishes moderate retest reliability across four weeks. This research establishes a previously neglected predictor of career-related resources and behaviors. Findings can inform vocational consulting and coaching.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-09-14T11:50:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221120367
       
  • Development and Validation of the Academic Persistence Outcome
           Expectations Scale

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      Authors: Michael B. Kozlowski, Nadya A. Fouad
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Outcome expectations, an integral theoretical component of social cognitive career theory, remains almost completely unexamined in the domain of academic persistence, or the decision a student makes to remain in college. This study sought to develop a theoretically derived scale to measure outcome expectations. An initial item pool was developed and sent to a sample of college students. A second, confirmatory sample of undergraduate students was collected via an online crowdsourcing platform. Results suggested the presence of a two-factor structure was the most parsimonious solution across both samples. The two factors retained across both samples reflected positive and negative outcome expectations that students perceived about remaining in college for the year. Limitations and implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-09-09T06:46:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221126145
       
  • Development and Initial Validation of the Career Decision-Making Ambiguity
           Scale

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      Authors: Hui Xu
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The dual-process theory of career decision-making (DTC) adds to the conversation about understanding and facilitating career decision-making from a more realistic and inclusive perspective and highlights the joint operation of decision ambiguity and ambiguity management strategies in career decision-making. However, a psychometrically sound measure of decision ambiguity is lacking. Thus, the current study used two samples of U.S. college students to develop and initially validate a measure of decision ambiguity (CDMA). Study 1 (n = 195) developed the CDMA and found initial evidence for a unidimensional structure. Study 2 (n = 271) cross-validated the unidimensional structure of the CDMA and supported the convergent, discriminant, concurrent, and incremental validities of the CDMA. Specifically, the results supported (1) the differential associations of the CDMA with need for information and with neuroticism/negative affectivity, lack of readiness, and interpersonal conflicts, (2) the positive association between the CDMA and choice/commitment anxiety, and (3) the incremental predictions of the CDMA for career decidedness, career certainty, and major satisfaction over and beyond need for information. Therefore, the current study offers a psychometrically sound measure of decision ambiguity, which has potential to facilitate the scientific inquiry and social justice application of the DTC.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-09-06T11:52:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221125886
       
  • Career Adaptability Development in the School-To-Work Transition

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      Authors: Chuhang Fu, Yang Cai, Qiandong Yang, Guoqiang Pan, Dezhen Xu, Wendian Shi
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The development pattern of career adaptability has an important influence on individual mental health and career outcomes. Based on career construction theory, our study explored the development characteristics of the career adaptability of college students during the school-to-work transition and discussed how the notions of future work selves and core self-evaluation affect the development trajectories and development patterns of career adaptability. Our study investigated 429 college graduates at an interval of 6 months over the course of 1 year. The results indicated that the graduates had a positive career adaptability trajectory during the school-to-work transition. There were three different development patterns: rapid growth group, growth group, and stationary group. Future work selves predicted career adaptability positively and dynamically. A higher core self-evaluation predicted a higher initial level of career adaptability and a slower development speed. Our study has important implications for enriching career construction theory and career counseling practice.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T12:20:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221120366
       
  • The Insubordination Scale Among Full-Time Chinese Employees: A
           Cross-Cultural Validation Study

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      Authors: Songke Xie, Xue Meng, Chaoping Li
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The present study aimed to translate the insubordination scale into the Chinese version (ISBD-C) and to test its reliability and validity among 994 full-time Chinese employees. In Study 1 (N = 551), the insubordination scale was translated, and exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted, which revealed a single factor structure of insubordination. In Study 2 (N = 443), the scale’s convergent validity and discriminant validity were supported by confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). Further, measurement invariance was tested and indicated that the ISBD-C was equivalent across gender, age, education level and job position. Finally, the scale’s concurrent validity was demonstrated by positive correlations with general counterproductive workplace behavior and procrastination, and negative correlations with workplace well-being, work engagement, and affective commitment. These findings provide strong evidence that ISBD-C is a useful measure in the Chinese context.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-08-31T11:54:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221125132
       
  • Academic Satisfaction of Women Students of Color in Science, Technology,
           Engineering, and Mathematics: Roles of Discrimination, Proactive
           Personality, and Critical Consciousness

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      Authors: Chan Jeong Park, Patrick J. Rottinghaus
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Underrepresentation of women and students of color has been a longstanding issue in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The present study examined factors that contribute to academic satisfaction among 585 women college students of color (Mage = 21.42, SDage = 3.25; nBlack = 174, nLatina = 171, nAsian = 240), based on the Social Cognitive Career Theory satisfaction model. Experiences of discrimination was selected as an environmental obstacle and proactive personality as a person input in the model. In addition, critical consciousness was included as a personal resource variable. Multigroup measurement invariance tests and multigroup structural equation modeling were conducted to examine the racial/ethnic differences in constructs and their interrelationships. The findings showed that discrimination, proactive personality, and critical consciousness contributed to academic satisfaction via self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and goal progress. Theoretical, clinical, and institutional implications are discussed in light of the findings. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-08-23T06:34:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221116872
       
  • Daily Environments During Emerging Adulthood and Gender Atypical
           Occupational Choices: The Role of Sexist Experiences

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      Authors: Katie M. Lawson, Mackenzie J. Miller, Kanila L. Brown, Chloe M. Woodling
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Past research on occupational choices often focuses on the role of personal attributes. Research is needed that examines whether daily environments and individuals’ reactivity to these environments contribute to occupational choices. This study utilizes experience sampling methodology to examine whether daily sexism and affective reactivity to sexism predict the gender typicality of desired occupations of emerging adults in male-dominated majors (MDMs). 40 women and 40 men college students in MDMs reported desired occupations and experiences of sexism and general mood during the past hour four times a day for 2 weeks – allowing for an examination of whether some individuals report a more negative mood when they recently experienced sexism (i.e., reactivity). Results indicated that higher reactivity to sexism (but not daily sexism) predicted women desiring more female-typed and men desiring more male-typed occupations. Results suggest that career counselors should consider the role of daily sexism in career development.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T03:28:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221118368
       
  • Viewing the Joint Operation of Five Major Decision Difficulties Within the
           Dual-Process Theory of Career Decision-Making

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      Authors: Hui Xu
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      While research has identified a five-factor model of career decision-making difficulty based on meta-analytical evidence and cross-cultural comparison, the field lacks an elaborated theoretical account of the joint operation of the five decision difficulties. The current study drew on the dual-process theory of career decision-making (DTC) to examine the interplay of the five decision difficulties in predicting career decidedness in the Chinese context. Study 1 developed and validated measures of decision ambiguity, advance in narrowing down, and career decidedness in a sample of Chinese college students (n = 180). Study 2 examined the structural model using another sample of Chinese college students (n = 408). Focusing on the relations of the five major decision difficulties to career decidedness, the results did not support the standalone mechanism of confusion management but supported the standalone mechanism of ambiguity management. Additionally, the results supported the crossover mechanism from confusion management to ambiguity management and the crossover mechanism from ambiguity management to confusion management. The results not only shed light on the role of each difficulty but also offer evidence for the interplay of key DTC macro elements. The practical implications based on the joint operation of the five decision-making difficulties are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-08-18T01:38:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221118374
       
  • Does the Attainment of Vocational Aspirations Make Youths Happy'

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      Authors: Hyung In Park, Seunghee Lee, Bora Lee
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The current study aims to investigate the developmental perspective on the relationships between person-vocation (P-V) fit and its criteria (extrinsic job satisfaction, workplace satisfaction, and happiness) using longitudinal data of 1041 youths in South Korea. While most previous studies on P-V fit examined the fit between vocational interests and characteristics of actual vocation, we examined the fit between aspired and attained occupation in its prestige levels. We utilized data collected at two time points with an 8-year interval: when the participants were high school seniors and when they were in early adulthood. Polynomial regression and response surface graphs revealed that the levels of the criteria increased as attained occupation matched with the aspired occupation at a high-high fit compared to a low-low fit. However, P-V misfit did not have a systematic relationship with any criteria. Happiness was the most relevant outcome, suggesting important implications regarding youths’ vocational aspirations and attainment.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-08-14T12:47:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221119800
       
  • A Multi-Group Study of Psychological Capital and Job Search Behaviours
           Among University Graduates With and Without Work Placement Learning
           Experience

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      Authors: Rowland Chukwuemeka Uwakwe, Ugochukwu Chinonso Okolie, Christian Ehiobuche, Chinedu Ochinanwata, Ifeanyi Matthew Idike
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      We build upon the social cognitive career theory model of career self-management (SCCT-CSM) to test the effects of psychological capital constructs (hope, self-efficacy, optimism and resilience) on preparatory and active job search behaviours, mediated by job search goals in a multi-group study of university graduates who undertook work placement learning before graduation and those who did not. Using a two-wave data from 473 university fresh graduates in the one-year national youth service corps (N = 209 who undertook work placement learning before graduation) and (N = 264 who did not undertake work placement learning) in Nigeria, we test an SCCT-CSM-driven model employing structural equation modelling for the multi-group study. The findings revealed positive effects of self-efficacy and optimism on the preparatory and active job search behaviours across both samples but higher effects in the graduates who undertook work placement learning before graduation. Job search goals mediated the effects of self-efficacy and optimism on their preparatory and active job search behaviours in both samples. The serial mediation results show that self-efficacy and optimism indirectly affect the active job search behaviours via job search goals and preparatory job search behaviours. The implications of these results are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-08-14T12:38:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221118376
       
  • Work Needs Satisfaction Scale- Spanish Version: Psychometric Properties
           and Validity Evidence

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      Authors: Kelsey L. Autin, Andrew J. Shelton, Roberto G. Garcia, Willy Anthony Diaz Tapia, Germán A. Cadenas
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      With a growing Latinx workforce in the U.S., many of whom are Spanish-speaking, there is a pressing need to examine key constructs related to vocational well-being in this population. The aim of the current study was to validate a Spanish language version of the Work Needs Satisfaction Scales (WNSS; Autin et al., 2019). The WNSS comprises a set of scales developed to measure satisfaction of survival, social contribution, autonomy, competence, and relatedness needs, all of which are theorized to be key mediators in the link from decent work to well-being and work fulfillment. Using cross-sectional data across two samples of Latinx workers, we tested the reliability and validity of a Spanish language version of the WNSS (WNSS-SV). In Study 1 we conducted an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) with a sample of 195 participants. This resulted in a 19-item scale with five factors mirroring those of the English language scale. In Study 2 (N = 377), we examined factor structure and model fit using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); measurement invariance across gender, language, and social class group; and concurrent validity. Results from Study 2 demonstrated the model was a good fit to the data; showed concurrent validity; and provided support for measurement invariance. Thus, overall results indicated that the WNSS-SV may serve as a useful tool for future research on work-related need satisfaction among Latinx workers. A discussion regarding the importance of these findings and implications for practice and research are provided.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T08:32:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221119798
       
  • I Can’t Quit: Experiences of Black Women in STEM Professions

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      Authors: Margery S. Sendze
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Using job embeddedness theory, this study investigated the off- and on-the-job forces experienced at the axis of race and gender that contribute to Black women staying in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professions. Using purposive, snowball sampling, 13 Black women with STEM degrees and professional experience were selected for semi-structured interviews via Zoom. Tensions in navigating the race–gender intersection were evident in participants’ experiences and informed their perceptions of fit, links, and sacrifices. Moreover, welcoming environments, financial stability, the desire to serve communities as role models, and opportunities to innovate, learn, and grow contributed to participants’ embeddedness in STEM professions. Contrary to previous research, respondents demonstrated high agency and confidence. Organizations can enhance the retention of Black women by providing growth opportunities and welcoming spaces. Specifically, inclusive leadership is essential to retaining a diverse workforce and making the value of Black women visible to drive STEM innovation.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T10:37:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221118696
       
  • Profiles of Decent Work and Precarious Work: Exploring Macro-Level
           Predictors and Mental Health Outcomes

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      Authors: David L. Blustein, Blake A. Allan, Alekzander Davila, Camille M. Smith, Michael Gordon, XiYue Wu, Lauren Milo, Nathan Whitson
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Using a person-centered approach, this study explored the interrelationship between decent work and precarious work via a latent profile analysis (LPA). This investigation sought to replicate the latent profiles from Blustein and colleagues (2020) and extend the results by examining the role of individual lifetime experiences of macro-level factors (economic constraints and marginalization) as predictors and selected mental health indices (depression and anxiety) as outcomes of profile membership. Using a sample of 422 working adults in the U.S., the findings of the LPA yielded four profiles (indecent-precarious, low healthcare-low rights, highly decent, and vulnerability dominant), replicating four out of the five of the profiles identified in Blustein et al. Informed by psychology of working theory (PWT) and precarity theory, we assessed a structural model of the aforementioned predictors and outcomes in relation to profile membership. Consistent with theoretical expectations, economic constraints and marginalization positively predicted profiles that reflected greater instability and precarity. In addition, the profiles that reflected greater instability and precarity predicted both depression and anxiety. Implications for theory, counseling practice, public policy, and new directions in research are presented.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T07:09:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221119473
       
  • Subjective Career Success, Career Competencies, and Perceived
           Employability: Three-way Interaction Effects on Organizational and
           Occupational Turnover Intentions

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      Authors: Surendra Babu Talluri, Nishant Uppal
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Despite a plethora of research on turnover intentions, we know little about the impact of subjective career aspects (e.g., authenticity, recognition, and meaningful work) on turnover intentions. Drawing upon turnover theory, we argue that subjective career success negatively influences organizational and occupational turnover intentions. This negative effect will be stronger in the presence of career competencies and high perceived employability. To test these relationships, we conducted two field studies using a two-wave survey method. Results of both studies indicated that the negative impact of subjective career success on turnover intentions was strongest when the perceived employability and career competencies were high. In Study 1, we found these relationships significant for organizational turnover intentions. Through Study 2, we found significant results for occupational turnover intentions due to their occupational investments in a new profession. We discuss the contributions of findings to the careers and turnover literature.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T02:19:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221119452
       
  • Social Cognitive Predictors of Music Majors’ Academic Well-Being and
           Persistence Intentions

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      Authors: Emily R. Cygrymus, Robert W. Lent
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Vocational psychology has devoted limited attention to factors that promote or hinder the career development of musicians. We combined features of social cognitive career theory’s (SCCT) well-being and choice models to examine the experiences of musicians at a formative point in their career development – the first few years of college, during which many would-be musicians either reaffirm or abandon their career paths. Consistent with SCCT, we posited that academic satisfaction and stress would be predicted by favorable levels of self-efficacy, outcome expectations, social support, goal progress, and trait negative affect. We also expected that satisfaction and stress levels would, along with self-efficacy and outcome expectations, predict intentions to persist in undergraduate music majors. Participants were 260 first- and second-year undergraduate music majors. The hypothesized model and a slightly revised version (which added a direct path from goal progress to persistence intentions) produced good fit to the data and accounted well for variation in academic satisfaction, stress, and persistence intentions.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T10:27:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221113287
       
  • A Multiple Mediational Meta-Analysis of the Influence of Proactive
           Personality on Subjective Career Success at the Career Exploration Stage

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      Authors: Haibo Yu, Zhenhua Dong, Xiaoyu Guan, Changli Yan, Xia Su, Long Cheng
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on the career construction theory model of adaptation, this meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) examines the effects of proactive personality on the subjective career success of adolescents and emerging adults. We identified 46 studies that covered 52 independent samples and 24,092 participants through literature retrieval. Based on these studies, we created an integrative model linking proactive personality with career adaptability, student career construction, and subjective career success. The results of the meta-analysis showed that all bivariate relationships among proactive personality, career adaptability, student career construction, and subjective career success were significantly positive. The results of the MASEM indicated that career adaptability intervened in the relationship between proactive personality and subjective career success, but student career construction, as a suppressor, carried out the negative association between proactive personality, career adaptability and subjective career success in the sequence of adaptation. We also discuss the research implications and provide directions for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T01:09:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221106069
       
  • The Relationship Between Parental Career-Related Factors and
           Adolescents’ Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making: A Longitudinal
           Mediation Study

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      Authors: Shengnan Li, Qianqian Pan, Yangang Nie
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Our current research aimed to investigate the mediating relationship between Parental Career-Related Factors, adolescents’ Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy, and Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making with a total of 605 students from China. We collected data at three different time points, with a 6-month interval between each time point. Then we applied a Cross-Lagged Panel Model using data from all three waves, and the results showed that a higher level of support in Parental Career-Related Behaviors and Adolescent Parent Career Congruence measured at time 1 positively predicted Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy at time 2; Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy at time 2 negatively predicted Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making at time 3; and the indirect effect of support in Parental Career-Related Behaviors and Adolescent Parent Career Congruence on Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making was significant. Therefore, Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy mediated the relationship between support in Parental Career-Related Behaviors and Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making and between Adolescent Parent Career Congruence and Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making. The implications, limitations, and future direction are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T05:53:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221107678
       
  • Development of a Three-Dimensional Measure of the Calling Work
           Orientation: Assessing Craftsmanship, Kinship, and Serving

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      Authors: Gargi Sawhney, Thomas W. Britt, Kristen J. Black, Chloe Wilson
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Although conceptualized as a multidimensional construct, the majority of measures of calling are unidimensional. In order to further expand the operationalization of calling, this study developed and validated a measure of the three dimensions of calling, namely, craftsmanship, kinship, and serving using three separate samples. Using a sample of 85 undergraduate students, the pilot study established content validity for the three dimensions of calling. Study 1 aimed to refine the developed measure while assessing its dimensionality across 379 participants from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk). Furthermore, Study 2 provided evidence of construct and criterion-related validity, as well as test-retest reliability over a period of 3 months across 301 MTurk participants. Recommendations for future research utilizing the more focused dimensions of calling are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T08:13:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221106150
       
 
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