Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Similar Journals
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Journal of Career Assessment
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.914
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1069-0727 - ISSN (Online) 1552-4590
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • A Multiple Mediational Meta-Analysis of the Influence of Proactive
           Personality on Subjective Career Success at the Career Exploration Stage

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      Authors: Haibo Yu, Zhenhua Dong, Xiaoyu Guan, Changli Yan, Xia Su, Long Cheng
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on the career construction theory model of adaptation, this meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) examines the effects of proactive personality on the subjective career success of adolescents and emerging adults. We identified 46 studies that covered 52 independent samples and 24,092 participants through literature retrieval. Based on these studies, we created an integrative model linking proactive personality with career adaptability, student career construction, and subjective career success. The results of the meta-analysis showed that all bivariate relationships among proactive personality, career adaptability, student career construction, and subjective career success were significantly positive. The results of the MASEM indicated that career adaptability intervened in the relationship between proactive personality and subjective career success, but student career construction, as a suppressor, carried out the negative association between proactive personality, career adaptability and subjective career success in the sequence of adaptation. We also discuss the research implications and provide directions for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T01:09:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221106069
       
  • The Relationship Between Parental Career-Related Factors and
           Adolescents’ Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making: A Longitudinal
           Mediation Study

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      Authors: Shengnan Li, Qianqian Pan, Yangang Nie
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Our current research aimed to investigate the mediating relationship between Parental Career-Related Factors, adolescents’ Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy, and Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making with a total of 605 students from China. We collected data at three different time points, with a 6-month interval between each time point. Then we applied a Cross-Lagged Panel Model using data from all three waves, and the results showed that a higher level of support in Parental Career-Related Behaviors and Adolescent Parent Career Congruence measured at time 1 positively predicted Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy at time 2; Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy at time 2 negatively predicted Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making at time 3; and the indirect effect of support in Parental Career-Related Behaviors and Adolescent Parent Career Congruence on Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making was significant. Therefore, Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy mediated the relationship between support in Parental Career-Related Behaviors and Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making and between Adolescent Parent Career Congruence and Ambivalence in Career Decision-Making. The implications, limitations, and future direction are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T05:53:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221107678
       
  • Development of a Three-Dimensional Measure of the Calling Work
           Orientation: Assessing Craftsmanship, Kinship, and Serving

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      Authors: Gargi Sawhney, Thomas W. Britt, Kristen J. Black, Chloe Wilson
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Although conceptualized as a multidimensional construct, the majority of measures of calling are unidimensional. In order to further expand the operationalization of calling, this study developed and validated a measure of the three dimensions of calling, namely, craftsmanship, kinship, and serving using three separate samples. Using a sample of 85 undergraduate students, the pilot study established content validity for the three dimensions of calling. Study 1 aimed to refine the developed measure while assessing its dimensionality across 379 participants from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk). Furthermore, Study 2 provided evidence of construct and criterion-related validity, as well as test-retest reliability over a period of 3 months across 301 MTurk participants. Recommendations for future research utilizing the more focused dimensions of calling are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T08:13:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221106150
       
  • An Examination of Psychology of Working Theory With Immigrant Workers in
           the United States

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      Authors: Taewon Kim, Kelsey Autin, Blake A. Allan
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      As the proportion of immigrant workers in the United States grows, understanding how contextual constraints restrict immigrant workers from securing decent work is critical. Therefore, drawing from psychology of working theory (PWT), this study examined relations from contextual barriers (economic constraints and acculturative stress) to psychological mechanisms (work volition and career adaptability) to decent work with a sample of immigrant workers in the United States. We also conducted multigroup analysis to explore whether the model varied depending on race. Diverging from previous PWT studies, we found that economic constraints directly predicted decent work and that career adaptability predicted both acculturative stress and decent work. Importantly, multigroup analysis found the relations from career adaptability and work volition to decent work were stronger for the white group than the POC group. Our findings encourage psychologists to advocate for working immigrants, including working immigrants of color, to reduce marginalization and economic constraints.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T04:19:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221105023
       
  • Construction and Initial Validation of the Higher Education Orientations
           Questionnaire

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      Authors: Tirza Willner, Yuliya Lipshits-Braziler, Itamar Gati
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Attaining higher education continues to be important for successful integration into the 21st-century world of work. The goal of the present study was to develop and test a 5-dimensional model and a corresponding measure of individuals’ orientations toward higher education––the Higher Education Orientations (HEO) questionnaire. The proposed model comprises five orientations: Profession (attaining an occupation), Knowledge (expanding knowledge and intellectual horizons), Social (expanding social affiliation and integration), Prestige (attaining social status), and External (pleasing significant others). Study 1a (N = 798) supported the HEO questionnaire’s psychometric properties, and an EFA supported its five-factor structure. The results of a CFA in Study 1b (N = 748) confirmed the HEO’s five-dimensional structure. Study 2 (N = 395) supported the psychometric qualities of the HEO’s English version. In Study 3 (N = 713), using SEM, we found the HEO associated with (a) career decision status, (b) career decision-making difficulties, and (c) coping strategies, supporting its validity. Implications for research and counseling are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-21T02:22:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221090621
       
  • Work Volition Scale for Chinese Working Adults: A Cross-Cultural
           Validation Study

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      Authors: Yuanmei Lan, Doudou Liu, Chaoping Li, Jiayan Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The present study aims to validate the Chinese version of the Work Volition Scales (WVS), an instrument that assesses three components of work volition: volition, financial constraint, and construct constraint. In Study 1 (N = 498), the WVS was translated into Chinese, and an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted resulting in that three factors were consistent with the original scale. In Study 2 (N = 442), the confirmatory factor analysis showed that the bifactor model provided the most parsimonious fit to the data. The measurement invariance test then revealed that the WVS is equivalent across gender, age, education level, and job tenure. In addition, convergent and concurrent validity supported the finding that the WVS and three subscales are linked with related variables. The results support significant incremental validity in predicting career satisfaction, meaningful work, and life well-being. The findings suggest that the WVS is a valuable instrument for researchers and career counselors who seek to explore work volition among Chinese working adults.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T10:44:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221099803
       
  • How Dispositional Gratitude Shapes Employee Well-being and Organizational
           Commitment: The Mediating Roles of Leader-Member Exchange and Coworker
           Exchange

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      Authors: Teng Zhao, Hairong Li, Lu Zheng, Yuyan Zhang
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Dispositional gratitude has recently emerged as a variable of interest in organizational contexts. However, it remains unclear whether dispositional gratitude is predictive of employee well-being, with limited theoretical and empirical elucidation of the underlying mechanisms. To address these limitations, the present study investigated dispositional gratitude as a predictor of employee well-being and organizational commitment. Drawing on the broaden-and-build theory of positive affect, the study also examined whether the social bonding resources of leader-member exchange (LMX) and coworker exchange (CWX) mediated these effects. The participating employees (N = 300) completed the survey in three waves at one-week intervals. The results of structural equation modeling (SEM) confirm that dispositional gratitude is positively related to employee well-being and organizational commitment and that these effects are mediated by LMX and CWX. The paper concludes by discussing the theoretical and practical implications of these findings, the study’s limitations, and future research directions.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T07:40:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221099867
       
  • A Bifactor Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling Representation of the
           Structure of the Decent Work Scale: Evidence from China

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      Authors: Doudou Liu, Yuanmei Lan, Chaoping Li, Yan Xu, Jie Yang
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The present study investigates the psychometric properties of decent work utilizing the bifactor exploratory structural equation modeling (Bifactor-ESEM) approach. Using a sample of 701 Chinese employees who completed the multidimensional Decent Work Scale (DWS: Duffy et al., 2017), this study reveals the superiority of the Bifactor-ESEM representation of DWS compared to alternative representations of the data (ICM-CFA, Bifactor-CFA, and ESEM). Additionally, the results of measurement invariance in the MIMIC framework indicate the DWS is equivalent in various age and job tenure samples of participants. Finally, the results provide evidence for the criterion validity by confirming the importance of accounting for both the G-factor (representing the global level of decent work) and the S-factors (representing the specific level of decent work), which shows that specific types of decent work explained variance in covariates (i.e., work well-being, life well-being, engagement, and turnover intention) over and above the variance already explained by the G-factor.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T11:48:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221096487
       
  • The Structure of the Career Decision-Making Difficulties Questionnaire
           Across 13 Countries

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      Authors: Nimrod Levin, Shagini Udayar, Yuliya Lipshits-Braziler, Itamar Gati, Jérôme Rossier
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Assessing the causes of career indecision is among the first steps in career counseling. Gati et al. (1996) proposed a multidimensional taxonomy of career indecision and developed the Career Decision-Making Difficulties Questionnaire (CDDQ), consisting of 10 scales that cohere into three higher-order clusters and a total score. However, studies investigating the CDDQ reported cross-cultural variations in its factor structure. To examine the cross-cultural generalizability of the CDDQ, we compared four alternative factor models using data from 39 diverse samples from 13 countries with nine language versions (N = 19,562). Using weighted least squares mean- and variance-adjusted estimation, a robust estimator for nonnormal data, comparison of fit indices supported the original CDDQ structure across countries and languages. These findings support the cross-cultural generalizability of the structure of the CDDQ and the use of 10 scale scores, three cluster scores, and a total score, consistent with the taxonomy underlying the CDDQ.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T04:01:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221099226
       
  • A Longitudinal Study of Relationships Between Vocational Graduates’
           Career Adaptability, Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy, Vocational
           Identity Clarity, and Life Satisfaction

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      Authors: Lucia Kvasková, Petr Hlado, Petr Palíšek, Václav Šašinka, Andreas Hirschi, Stanislav Ježek, Petr Macek
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Career construction theory proposes that high career adaptability leads to positive adaptation outcomes during career transition. However, the specific pathways of how this happens remain underexplored. Drawing on the career construction model of adaptation, we hypothesized that career decision-making self-efficacy mediates the link of career adaptability with vocational identity clarity and life satisfaction as two measures of adaptation outcomes. We conducted a three-wave survey with an initial sample of 3126 Czech upper-secondary vocational graduates transitioning from vocational school to the labor market. Structural equation modeling revealed that career decision-making self-efficacy fully mediated the relationship between career adaptability before graduation and vocational identity clarity 20 months later. In contrast, the mediation effect of career decision-making self-efficacy on the relationship between career adaptability and life satisfaction was not supported. Additionally, in contrast to the previous literature, career adaptability was not directly related to vocational identity clarity and life satisfaction. Nevertheless, our findings demonstrated a positive long-term association of career adaptability with adaptation outcomes within the working life domain. Practical implications and future directions are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T09:05:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221084106
       
  • Critical Consciousness in Vocational Psychology: A Vision for the Next
           Decade and Beyond

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      Authors: Germán A. Cadenas, Ellen H. McWhirter
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      We offer a vision for a vocational psychology that places a larger focus on critical consciousness (CC) to be more responsive to marginalized communities (e.g., immigrants, low-income workers, Black, Indigenous, and other People of Color). CC describes how marginalized people analyze systems of oppression, act toward social justice, and become agentic and hopeful. In this article, we review extant theoretical frameworks that have laid a strong foundation for embedding critical consciousness in research, practice, education and training. We then offer suggestions for promoting critical consciousness within vocational psychology over the next decade. We highlight the promise of transformative, intersectional, and action research with and for marginalized communities; of career interventions that respond to oppression and liberation; and of training that prepares future vocational psychologists to engage in praxis in a complex world. We argue that a greater focus on CC is aligned with vocational psychology’s foundational social justice aspirations.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T12:51:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221086553
       
  • Understanding Contextual and Personality-Related Factors Predicting
           Student Career Certainty in Work Placement Learning

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      Authors: Cornelius Ofobuisi Okorie, Felix Monday Nwankwo, Harrison Onuwa Iwuala, Ugochukwu Chinonso Okolie
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study builds on the social cognitive career theory model of career self-management (SCCT-CSM) to examine the effects of faculty-based supervisor informational support, parental instrumental support and classmate emotional support on student career certainty during work placement learning. It also examined the mediating effects of self-esteem and career decision self-efficacy in the relationships. Using data collected at three-time points from undergraduate students undertaking work placement learning in 109 Nigerian organizations, we test an SCCT-CSM-driven model of contextual factors (i.e. supports), core SCCT variable (self-efficacy), personality-related variable (i.e. self-esteem) and career-related action (i.e. student career certainty) in work placement learning context. The results suggest that perceiving higher informational and instrumental support from faculty-based supervisors and parents stimulated students’ career decision self-efficacy and self-esteem in learning career-related skills, consequently leading to higher student career certainty. The findings have important implications for faculty-based placement learning supervisors, parents, students and placements host organizations to acknowledge the role of support in enhancing student career certainty. Thus, support should be highly considered during work placement learning to improve student career certainty.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T02:58:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221090616
       
  • What Do Interest Inventories Measure' The Convergence and Content
           Validity of Four RIASEC Inventories

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      Authors: Chu Chu, Mary T. Russell, Kevin A. Hoff, Wei Ming Jonathan Phan, James Rounds
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the widespread use of RIASEC interest inventories, little is known about whether these inventories actually measure the same core constructs and provide similar career recommendations to individuals. This study investigates the construct validity among four major interest inventories—the Self-Directed Search (SDS), O*NET Interest Profiler (IP), ACT Interest Inventory (UNIACT), and Strong Interest Inventory (SII). Results showed that RIASEC interest scores from the four inventories were highly correlated, but the measures often gave respondents different high-point codes. Item content analysis revealed that the basic interests reflected in each RIASEC scale both overlapped and diverged across inventories, providing an explanation for why RIASEC inventories are not interchangeable. We integrate findings across our analyses to offer cautionary notes for choosing among established RIASEC inventories and interpreting interest results. Furthermore, we also provide recommendations for constructing the next generation of basic interest inventories.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T03:41:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221081554
       
  • Multicultural Vocational Research: Critique and Call to Action

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      Authors: Neeta Kantamneni, Nadya A. Fouad
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Vocational psychology has long argued that career opportunities differ for individuals from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds. Yet, despite decades of research, are we closer to understanding the role of race and ethnicity in career development' The purpose of this article is to systematically review and critique research on racial/ethnic minorities in vocational psychology since critique of the research, with a particular emphasis on whether research with racial/ethnic minorities is theory-based, incorporates an intersectional framework, focuses on aspects of identity, and examines environmental and societal aspects of career development. We use our conclusions from that review to make a set of recommendations that we hope will stimulate future research.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T03:32:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221084002
       
  • Testing the Career Construction Model of Adaptation in a Sample of
           Afghanistan’s Working Adults: A Longitudinal Study

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      Authors: Zane Asher Green, Murat Yıldırım, Rahmatullah Jalal
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study tested the Career Construction Model of Adaptation (CCMA) in a sample of Afghanistan’s working adults amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The measures of adaptation were applied at three time points, that is, positive orientation toward future (adaptive readiness) at Time 1, career adaptability (adaptability resources) and competence need satisfaction at work (adapting responses) at Time 2, and meaningful work (adaptation result) at Time 3. Testing the model through Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) indicated that the indirect effect of positive orientation toward future at Time 1 on meaningful work at Time 3 via the combination of career adaptability and competence need satisfaction at work at Time 2 was significant and positive. Results support Afghan employees’ career construction over time. Theoretical contribution of the results and strategies for assisting Afghan employees in crafting their careers in the current political situation are discussed. Study limitations and prospects for future research are also discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T02:31:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221084291
       
  • Facilitating International Research on Career Indecision: Developing
           Career Indecision Profile-Short-5 in China and the U.S.

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      Authors: Hui Xu, Runqiu He
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      While five-factor model of career indecision proposes five cross-culturally important indecision factors, a psychologically sound brief measure of career indecision that corresponds to the five-factor model is lacking. Thus, using a Chinese college sample (n = 588) and an U.S. college sample (n = 762), this study developed and validated the Career Indecision Profile-Short-5 factor (CIP-Short-5) in China and the U.S. Applying item response theory, the CIP-Short-5 consists of five items each for the five overarching domains of career indecision. It showed desirable option occurrence patterns and minimal gender-oriented differential item functioning in both China and the U.S. Additionally, the scale supported the five-factor model over an alternative, four-factor model of career indecision in both China and the U.S. The convergent and discriminant patterns of the CIP-Short-5 with criteria were largely supported in China and the U.S. Last, the results supported the configural and metric invariance of the CIP-Short-5 but did not fully support the scalar invariance of the CIP-Short-5 across China and the U.S. Together, the results offer psychometric evidence for the CIP-Short-5, which has important implications for research and practice on career indecision in the international context in general and in China in specific.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T08:30:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221080449
       
  • Test of a Social Cognitive Model of Proactive Career Behavior

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      Authors: Robert W. Lent, Taylor R. Morris, Ruogu J. Wang, Bhanu P. Moturu, Emily R. Cygrymus, Jeffrey G. Yeung
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      We applied the social cognitive model of career self-management (CSM) to the study of proactive career behavior, referring to workers’ active attempts to guide their own career development. Within the CSM framework, proactive behavior is conceived as a key agentic ingredient linking cognitive, social, and personality mechanisms with a variety of career advancement and sustainability outcomes. A sample of 511 early to mid-career adult workers in the U.S. completed an online survey including measures of proactive career behavior, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations; proactive personality; supervisory support; and three positive career self-management outcomes (perceived career success, growth in work rewards, and job marketability). We tested measurement and structural models, respectively, examining the factor structures of, and hypothesized paths among, the constructs. These models offered good overall fit to the data and were found to be invariant across gender. We consider the implications of the findings for future inquiry on career sustainability from a social cognitive perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-03-23T07:27:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221080948
       
  • Career Development in Highly Sex-typed Postsecondary Vocational Technical
           Education Programs: A Social Cognitive Analysis

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      Authors: Maria Paola Sevilla, Virginia Snodgrass Rangel
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Using social cognitive career theory (SCCT), we examined the career development of students in sex-typed postsecondary Vocational Technical Education (VTE) programs in the Chilean context. We assessed the moderating effects of students’ socioeconomic background, sex, membership to the sex-atypical group, and the intersection of these attributes across SCCT measures and the model’s predicted relationships. The results showed that students in sex-atypical careers, particularly low-income students, perceived supports and barriers differently, and that supports and barriers have different effects on self-efficacy and outcome beliefs. We also found differences between female and male students in these careers path, which suggests that the former face more challenges. However, we also found that their career development process unfolds similarly, suggesting that strategies designed to support these groups may be equally helpful for female and male students. We discuss the findings in light of prior literature and offer practical implications for VTE institutions.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T11:34:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221074871
       
  • Academia During the Time of COVID-19: Examining the Voices of Untenured
           Female Professors in STEM

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      Authors: Marianne Dunn, Margo Gregor, Simone Robinson, Anthony Ferrer, Devynn Campbell-Halfaker, Javier Martin-Fernandez
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This paper highlighted the diverse voices of 84 female-identifying professors in STEM fields who responded to a series of open-ended questions regarding work, family, and tenure experiences in the context of the current global pandemic. The current paper is part of a longitudinal study of the vocational experiences of tenure-track women in STEM that has examined the “leaky pipeline” in women’s academic careers. Consensual Qualitative Research-Modified (CQR-M; ) was implemented to analyze the data. The findings suggested that participants perceived the precarious balance between work and family to have increased in difficulty in the face of COVID-19. Among untenured female faculty with children, an added layer of challenge was noted related to loss of childcare in the wake of the pandemic. The pre-existing, pervasive barriers (i.e., institutional, systemic, and psychological) were further exacerbated by familial barriers for female STEM faculty seeking tenure during COVID-19. Overall, the results indicated missed opportunities within higher education to implement supportive policies for untenured female faculty in STEM. Clinical implications, future research directions, and social advocacy interventions in the context of COVID-19 are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T04:55:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211057441
       
  • Experiencing Meaningful Work as a Lower Socioeconomic Status Worker: An
           Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

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      Authors: Yerin Shim, Bryan J. Dik, James H. Banning
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Meta-analytic evidence suggests that experiencing one’s work as meaningful is associated with many psychological benefits. The experience of meaningful work in people with lower socioeconomic status (LSES), however, is underrepresented in the literature. This study examines how LSES individuals describe their experience of meaningful work (MW) in their unique contexts through an interpretative phenomenological analysis approach. Eight LSES workers in the Western United States from diverse backgrounds were interviewed. Data analysis resulted in five domains and 17 nested super-ordinate themes which captured participants’ definitions and experiences of MW, psychosocial and contextual conditions that support or hinder MW, and the impact of MW in their personal lives. LSES individuals navigated their own way to experience MW in their unique contexts despite socioeconomic barriers. Implications for future research and practice for LSES workers are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T09:52:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727221074891
       
  • Instrumental Support, Relational Attachment, and Subjective Career
           Success: The Moderating Role of Personal Support

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      Authors: Yasir Mansoor Kundi, Ubedullah Khoso, Nadia Adnan
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Support at work has been linked to a wide range of positive individual and organizational outcomes. However, research to date has overlooked its influence on career-related outcomes. Drawing on attachment theory, we examined the relationship between instrumental support and two aspects of subjective career success—job satisfaction and career satisfaction—and the mediating and moderating roles of relational attachment and personal support, respectively. Results from survey data collected from employees working in Poland provide support for our hypothesized relationships. The findings contribute to a richer understanding of how and when employee subjective career success is influenced by social support and positive relationships in work life. Our findings have theoretical implications for social support, positive workplace relationships, and career success literatures.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T05:21:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211069291
       
  • Evidence for “Pushed Out” and “Opt Out” Factors in Women’s
           Career Inclusion Across the World of Work in the United States

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      Authors: Alex Glosenberg, Tara S. Behrend, Terence J. G. Tracey, David L. Blustein, Jenna McChesney, Lori L. Foster
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      There is an ongoing debate over the extent to which women “opt out” and/or are “pushed out” of various occupations (Kossek et al., 2017). To advance this debate, we explore the correspondence of women’s interests in stereotypically masculine work activities with the work activities of their occupations/occupational-aspirations. We examine 42,631 responses to a survey of employed and unemployed persons in the United States and analyze associations along all six of Holland’s () interest/work-activity dimensions. Overall, we find support for a “pushed out” perspective as women’s interests in hands-on/practical, analytic/scientific, and managerial/sales-related work activities are less strongly associated with being employed in occupations with those activities – in comparison to similarly interested men. However, these effect sizes are small and we find support for “opt out” dynamics in relation to hands-on/practical occupations. Altogether, our results indicate the need to continue looking beyond women’s vocational interests as explanations of their underrepresentation.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T09:17:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211054179
       
  • Measurement Invariance of the Occupational Engagement Scale – Student
           and Career Adapt-Abilities Scale across Veterans and Civilians

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      Authors: Arpita Ghosh, Christopher R. Niileksela, Elizabeth R. Grzesik
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Veterans of the U.S. military experience unique difficulties when reentering the civilian workforce, which may inform their post-military career development in different ways than civilians. The purpose of this study was to examine the measurement invariance of the Occupational Engagement Scale-Student (OES-S) and the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-USA Form (CAAS) across adults with and without a military background. A sample of 418 U.S. military veterans and 411 civilians were recruited. Multiple group confirmatory factor analysis (MG-CFA) was used to examine factorial invariance of scores obtained from the OES-S and CAAS with veterans and civilians. Findings suggested the measures were invariant across veteran and civilian samples. These scales appear to measure the same constructs for veterans and civilians and can likely be used for veterans in both research and practice. Implications for career assessment and counseling are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T10:49:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211059735
       
  • Economic Justice and Vocational Psychology: Towards Community Change

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      Authors: Saba R. Ali, David Drustup, Yunkyoung Loh Garrison, Duhita Mahatmya
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      In the present paper, we join the current dialogue in the field of vocational psychology regarding how neoliberal economic trends across the world have influenced the development of theory and approaches to vocational psychology. We propose an alternative perspective, that viewing career development from an economic justice lens, can provide an alternative to the existing neoliberal influence. An economic justice lens may aid us in moving from solely focusing on individual interventions and outcomes to those that help to create community-level change which in turn help create a more just economy for all. This is more than simply providing interventions to individuals in a community but requires shifting the locus of change to the community level. We detail four proposed career outcomes that center community-level change: Networking, Conscientization, Participation, and Liberation. Opportunities to utilize participatory action research, social network analysis, and other practice methods are encouraged. Finally, we offer examples of how vocational psychologists can take active roles in an economic justice approach to vocational psychology.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:54:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211069535
       
  • Young Adults’ Self-Regulatory Responses to Positive Career Goal
           Discrepancies: Testing Cross-Lagged Relationships

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      Authors: Sari Z. Akmal, Michelle Hood, Peter A. Creed, Amanda L. Duffy
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Researchers have assessed young people’s outcomes when they do not meet their career goals, but little is known about the consequences when they do better than expected (positive discrepancies). We (a) tested the cross-lagged relationships between positive career goal discrepancies and the career-related outcomes of upward goal revision, career exploration, and career coasting, and (b) assessed the indirect relationships between positive career goal discrepancy and outcomes through self-efficacy and outcome expectations. Using a sample of 314 young adults (76% female, Mage 19.13 years), we found that the standard causation model was the most parsimonious. Positive discrepancies predicted more upward goal revision and exploration and less coasting after a 6-month time lag, both directly and indirectly through outcome expectations. The findings highlight the importance of positive career goal appraisals in career goal-setting, exploration, management and clarify the roles of agency (self-efficacy and outcome expectations) as explanatory mechanisms in these relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:53:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211068106
       
  • Applying the Psychology of Working Theory for Understanding Adaptive
           Career Progress of Youth

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      Authors: Maureen E. Kenny, Richard F. Haase, Brenda W. Tsai, Mary Beth. Medvide, Alekzander Davila
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study extends existing research on psychology of working theory by assessing components of the model among two community samples (N = 364) of high school youth. We examined structural models linking student perceptions of external barriers to higher education to three indices of adaptive career progress, work volition, career adaptability, and school motivation. We also assessed the roles of student perceptions of proactive personality, critical motivation, and teacher social support as moderators of perceived external barriers for the three career progress indices. The findings reveal main effects, rather than moderating contributions for critical motivation and proactive personality, with only teacher support being a significant moderator for career adaptability and work volition. The moderating effect was inconsistent with theoretical expectations, however. The results are discussed with attention to further research and applicability for vocational intervention.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:52:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211067699
       
  • How to Optimize the Job Search Process: Development and Validation of the
           Job Search Quality Scale

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      Authors: Edwin A. J. van Hooft, Greet Van Hoye, Sarah M. van den Hee
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Job search quality is important for unemployed individuals pursuing reemployment. To comprehensively measure job search quality, we develop and test a 20-item Job Search Quality Scale (JSQS), using four samples of unemployed individuals (pilot sample, N=218; exploration sample, N=3372; confirmation sample, N=3372; and replication sample, N=434). Results show a four-dimensional structure, composed of (a) goal establishment and planning, (b) preparation and alignment, (c) emotion regulation and persistence, and (d) learning and improvement. Substantial evidence was found for its reliability, convergent and discriminant validity. Building job search quality’s nomological net, conscientiousness, learning goal orientation, self-efficacy, employment commitment, autonomous job search motivation, and social support emerged as positive correlates. Supporting its criterion-related validity, the JSQS predicted key job search and employment outcomes. Moreover, usefulness analyses supported its incremental validity beyond extant job search measures. Our findings have important implications for studying and measuring job search quality in future research and career counseling practice.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T07:32:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211052812
       
  • Development and Validation of the Career Identity Development Inventory

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      Authors: Elodie Wendling, Michael Sagas
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The primary aims of this study were to address existing measurement concerns in the neo-Eriksonian identity literature and fill a gap in the vocational identity literature by developing and validating the Career Identity Development Inventory (CIDI). As the processes of identity formation and career development share close conceptual ties, we introduced an integrated conceptual model of career identity development from which CIDI was developed to be comprised of two subscales, CIDI-E and CIDI-C, that were each composed of four career identity dimensions. In Study 1, we delineated how CIDI was constructed and reported initial evidence of validity and reliability using a sample of 398 US college graduates. We further tested the psychometric properties of CIDI in Study 2 using confirmatory factor analyses with another sample of 419 US college graduates. Implications for using CIDI at the variable and person level, and future research directions are provided to further the understanding of the career identity development process.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T03:39:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211063374
       
  • Career Calling and Task Performance: The Moderating Role of Job Demand

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      Authors: Michelangelo Vianello, Anna Dalla Rosa, Sophie Gerdel
      First page: 238
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Work as a Calling Theory (WCT) predicts that career calling fosters job performance. A quantitative summary of previous work supports this prediction and shows that the relation between calling and job performance is moderate in size (ρ = .29, K = 11, N = 2286). Yet, the environmental conditions that modulate this relation are completely unknown. According to an interactionist perspective, we argue that calling may predict performance only when job demand is low. Results of a multisource study on salesmen and managers dyads (N= 965) partially supported this prediction. We observed that highly demanding work environments, characterized by pressure to perform, high workload, and unachievable deadlines, suppress the positive relation between calling and self-reported performance. Job demand directly impairs performance and suppresses the positive effect of career calling. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-18T06:54:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211039454
       
  • “More than a Job, it’s a Purpose”: A Psychology of Working
           Perspective of the Working Experiences for Individuals with Intellectual
           and Developmental Disabilities

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      Authors: Carly B. Gilson, James Sinclair, Mary L. Whirley, Yi-Fan Li, David L. Blustein
      First page: 367
      Abstract: Journal of Career Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) aspire to work, though they are often excluded from the workforce. However, little is known about the perspectives and work experiences of adults with IDD viewed through a vocational psychology lens. Our study focused on the Psychology of Working theoretical (PWT) framework, which is anchored in inclusivity, lived experiences, and equity. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 adults with IDD across the United States to understand how they make meaning of work and the extent to which their lived experiences aligned with the PWT taxonomy. We employed consensual qualitative research to analyze participants’ views within the three functions of the PWT taxonomy (i.e., power and survival, social connection, and self-determination). Our findings affirm the taxonomy as an appropriate framework to apply to the working experiences of adults with IDD. We discuss implications of this study for research and practice in vocational psychology.
      Citation: Journal of Career Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-27T03:12:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10690727211048898
       
 
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