Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Trabajo : Revista de la Asociación Estatal de Centros Universitarios de Relaciones Laborales y Ciencias del Trabajo     Open Access  
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Human Resource Development Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.509
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 35  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1534-4843 - ISSN (Online) 1552-6712
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1164 journals]
  • Dutch study shows measurement of experienced levels of various components
           of HPWS predicts performance for teams and individuals

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Dutch study shows measurement of experienced levels of various components of HPWS predicts performance for teams and individuals
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-11-16
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0209
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Philippines’ study describes best traits of leaders in the Covid19
           pandemic crisis according to employees

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Smith
      Abstract: The authors wanted to find out what characteristics leaders required to inspire their employees during times of crisis The study was conducted in the Philippines after the Government declared the enhanced community quarantine (ECQ) in March, 2020. The authors found 155 participants (69% female) aged from 21 to 67 years old with an average of 37 from various sectors. The participants filled in online surveys with open-ended questions. The most important one was: “What traits or behaviors did your leaders exhibit during this crisis that were helpful to you and the organisation'” Qualitative analysis was used. The authors divided the best qualities into three groups: The first was “attending to the person”; the second was “taking charge and showing the way”; the third was “sustaining the spirit”. The authors felt their paper was important because it looked at employees’ perspectives, which was rare in earlier research. It also had practical implications, they said.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-11-05
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0193
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Study of Nigerian employees shows effect of change leadership on
           attitudinal support for changes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Smith
      Abstract: The purpose of the research was to examine how change leadership activities could help bring about employee support for planned organizational change. The authors tested their theories on employees at Nigeria’s Federal Ministry of Education (FME), which was undergoing major reforms. The “Ministerial Strategic Plan” was to be implemented over four years from 2018 to 2022. Data came from employees at FME headquarters. Of the 212 respondents to a questionnaire, 58% were females, 85% were principal staff, while 15% were support staff. Analysis showed that of the three hypothesized direct effects from change leadership, only the path from change leadership behaviors to cognitive appraisal (H1a) was statistically significant. The paths from change leadership to emotional response (H1b) and change leadership to intentions to support change (H1c) were not statistically significant. Meanwhile, hypothesis 2, which stated "employee cognition and emotion toward a change serially mediates the relationship between change leadership and employee behavioral intentions toward a planned change" was fully supported. Previous studies had suggested an effect from change leadership behaviors, but there was a lack of the types of empirical evidence gathered in Nigeria. The results could also help managers to plan for changes by revealing the critical role of employees’ cognitive appraisal of the proposals. Change agents should focus on employee attitudes to changes as precursors to desired positive behavior.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-11-05
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0196
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Study of Pakistan manufacturing workers shows entrepreneurial leadership
           is the key to developing creativity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The main was to investigate the effect of entrepreneurial leadership on employee creativity and the mediating influence of psychological empowerment and psychological safety. Data were collected from the manufacturing sector in Pakistan, including textile, chemical and automobile industries. Questionnaires had three parts, one for managers and two for employees. The researchers collected data in three phases with a one-month time interval. First, employees rated statements about entrepreneurial leadership behaviours. Then, employees rated statements about psychological empowerment and psychological safety. Finally, managers rated statements related to employees’ creativity. The final sample comprised of 54 leaders and 280 employees. Results showed that entrepreneurial leadership inspired employee creativity. In addition, psychological empowerment and psychological safety mediated the relationship between entrepreneurial leadership and employee creativity. The study has practical implications. Organizations should hire managers with the entrepreneurial skills to inspire creativity. Leaders should also stress the value of the employee’s work by sharing organisational goals, as well as directing employees when tasks are complex. Meanwhile, organizations need to develop training programmes to help managers to improve their leadership skills. Entrepreneurial leaders can inspire employees by modelling behaviours, which will be psychologically empowering and ensure employees feel secure enough to be creative.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-11-05
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0198
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Participation impacts IT workers’ organisational commitment through the
           mediating roles of internal communication adequacy, burnout and job
           satisfaction

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The author said it was important to study organisational commitment in knowledge-based sectors like IT, where the quality and commitment of employees was critical. In addition, IT workers can easily find new jobs and high turnover is costly for organisations. His goal was to establish the antecedents of EOC Data came from a public IT company (PITC) owned by a large Midwestern US university. PITC employs around 300 people in IT-related services, including engineers, technicians, and systems support personnel. There were 111 completed surveys. Around 61% had a bachelor’s degree and 23% had a postgraduate diploma. The results showed that the three proposed mediators – ICA, burnout and job satisfaction ' were all significantly correlated with organisational commitment. But the data also indicated that there was no direct relationship between EWP and EOC. Instead, the relationship was found to be indirect. There are several important implications for IT managers: first, when participative communication practices fail to increase the adequacy of internal communication, employees' understanding of their jobs, they are unlikely to foster EOC. Second, for EWP to positively impact EOC, it has to reduce employees' emotional exhaustion to the extent that it also increases their job satisfaction. Third, employees should be involved in the design of participation communication practices.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-11-05
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0199
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Taiwanese study shows job crafting is positively related to innovative
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This study aimed to test the cross-level effects of team job crafting on individual innovative work behaviour (IWB) and the mediating role of team psychological capital (PsyCap). Data were collected in two waves from 163 employees of 45 teams in 12 Taiwanese companies. The employees came from financial, IT and administration services. There were 73 women and 90 men. One questionnaire concerned team job crafting and the second questionnaire concerned PsyCap and IWB. Results showed that team-level job crafting had a significant positive effect on IWB. Results also showed that team job crafting had a significant positive influence on the mediator, team PsyCap. Meanwhile, Team PsyCap had a positive impact on IWB. Finally, while testing the mediator, the main effect between team job crafting and IWB was found to be not significant. An indirect effect was found between team-level job crafting and IWB through team PsyCap. The results indicated that team PsyCap mediated the relationship between team job crafting and IWB. The study highlighted a few recommendations for organizations to encourage positive behaviours in the workplace from a team perspective. Job crafting at the team level would encourage team members to display a high level of initiative. When job crafting received support from team members, employees were more likely to gain high self-efficacy, hope, resilience and optimism. The findings suggested that increasing job resources and challenging job demands might be an effective strategy for increasing innovation or creativity.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-11-05
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0200
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A US study shows satisfaction with teammates improves team performance for
           face-to-face teams, and virtual teams

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Smith
      Abstract: The authors wanted to find out how to improve teamwork in both virtual teams and face-to-face teams. They suspected different factors were in play. Hypotheses were tested using data from 1,110 participants. Participants enrolled in management capstone courses at a large public university in the southeastern US between Spring 2009 and Autumn 2016. The final sample was 997 participants in 242 project teams. Each team had three to six members, with an average number of 4.4. About, 55.6% of participants were operating in VTs. Students worked on a semester-long business simulation project called Glo-Bus, which was designed to model ongoing industry practices realistically. The results showed that individual skills were more influential on teammate satisfaction for FtFs than for VTs. Conversely, VT’s interactions were more pivotal regarding teammate satisfaction for VT processes than FtFs. The research results have practical implications for managers. Managers need to focus on developing and selecting employees who are best suited for VTs, or they might become reluctant to continue working in them. But FtFs interact more easily than VTs and managers may prefer to create such teams on the basis of functional skills. It would also be beneficial for managers to assemble teams of individuals more likely to interact and form relationships, even if only via technological mediums such as videoconferencing for VTs.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-11-05
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0201
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Fun in the workplace and training climate: impact on the turnover of young
           adults in the hospitality industry

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of fun in the workplace and training climate on turnover in a European context. Data is gathered from the responses of 902 hotels, restaurant and café workers from Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands to an online survey alongside organizational records of turnover. All employees work part-time and are primarily of college age. This is then analyzed using logistic regression. The findings reported suggest that management support for fun and co-worker socializing at the office level are negatively and significantly related to turnover but not fun activities. In addition, individual level job support is significantly related to turnover but not manager support and organizational support. Therefore, to promote retention managers should encourage the integration of employees with one another, promote fun on the job and create meaningful job responsibilities for young employees. This paper has an original approach by examining the impact of fun in the workplace on turnover in a setting outside the USA and by examining this in relation to training climate.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-10-25
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0197
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Appraisal approval

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Appraisal approval
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-10-24
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0203
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A balancing act

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: A balancing act
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-10-24
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0204
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • What makes a good turnaround leader'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: What makes a good turnaround leader'
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-10-24
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0205
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • How employee attitudes make or break organizational change: understanding
           people's willingness and ability to change as routes to smoother
           transformations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: How employee attitudes make or break organizational change: understanding people's willingness and ability to change as routes to smoother transformations
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-10-24
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0207
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Online job quality quizzes: are they of value'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to compare two methods of data collection on job quality – an online quiz and a random probability survey. Data are from a nationally representative sample of workers in Britain aged 20–65 years. Participants in the survey are randomly selected whereas those completing the quiz are recruited using uncontrolled convenience sampling promoted through trade union websites, newsletters and advertising on social media platforms. The survey and quiz contain the same questions and data from both methods are collected within 14 months of each other. The results show that the sample recruited for participation in the online quiz is skewed towards those working in the public sector, people in higher education and towards younger age groups and women whereas the random probability survey is more representative of the adult working population in the UK. Significant differences in the results obtained by the two collection methods are found which suggests that social desirability bias is having an effect on participant responses. Therefore policy makers should consider the advantages and disadvantages when selecting methods to collect data for tracking changes in job quality. This paper has an original approach by examining the procedures in different methods of gathering data on job quality and the effects of this on the data collected.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2021-0192
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Can’t get no satisfaction: exploring job (dis)satisfaction in Silicon
           Valley through Glassdoor reviews

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. Job satisfaction in the IT sector is linked to reduced employee turnover. The authors explore the factors driving job satisfaction through Glassdoor reviews of the top 15 US based IT companies and find that role ambiguity and conflict, supervisor behaviour and training and development are key factors driving job satisfaction. The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-09-27
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-07-2021-0160
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Leading the way: how project manager strengths can influence team
           resilience

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. The study takes empirical data from three case studies of projects that have faced setbacks to explore the impact of project manager signature strengths on team resilience and finds that four signature strengths, leadership, open-mindedness, persistence and hope, were present in project managers across all three case studies. The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-09-27
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-07-2021-0165
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Portuguese research shows value of entrepreneurial training in developing
           necessary skills

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The goal was to study how entrepreneurship education and training programmes (EETPs) influence the development of entrepreneurial competencies and creation of business venture The authors tested a series of hypotheses on the EETPs designed for the Sabor Entrepreneurship Programme (SEP), in northern Portugal. They used a detailed questionnaire. At the time of the research (2018), the SEP had had five editions across Sabor’s five municipalities. The main aim of the EETPs was to train participants to run their own companies. The study showed that the entrepreneurship education and training programmes (EETP) developed in the Sabor Region in the north helped participants to develop entrepreneurial skills. Despite these positive results, the researchers were unable to prove statistically that the programme had a definite influence on the creation of companies. Too many other factors, such as financing, bureaucracy and access to information proved critical in the formation of new businesses. The researchers were motivated to carry out their research because EETPs have been rapidly expanding throughout the world, but there is no consensus about their effectiveness, or about the best elements to include. To bridge the gaps, the authors examined the role of EETPs in the development of entrepreneurial skills and the creation of businesses.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-06-17
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-02-2021-0043
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Employer branding: HRD indicators and branding practices

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the views of HR managers on employer branding activities and their implementation. Data was gathered from an HR expert from each of three multinational companies located in India. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were carried out either face-to-face or by telephone and responses were analyzed into identified themes using a content analysis technique. The key success criteria from the discussions are themed as meaningfulness and visibility, employer brand awareness and differentiator and HRD parameters. Organizations should be aware of and address the issues of communication breakdown, strategic mismatch, long-term disconnects and sustained success in relation to the employer branding process. This paper has an original approach in considering the relationship between HRD indicators and employer branding.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-09-18
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-03-2021-0054
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Study from Korea shows strong CSR policies significantly increase job
           seekers' application intentions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This study investigated how and when corporate social responsibility (CSR) fosters job seekers’ application intentions. The authors used a “mediated moderation mode” to explore the positive effect of CSR on job seekers’ intention to apply. They considered the moderating role of applicants’ calling and the mediating role of value congruence in the relationship between the person and organization. To test their hypotheses the authors developed a questionnaire and sent it to a sample of 259 college students with a mean age of 22.67 in South Korea. All were either prospective or current job seekers and 55.2pc were female. Two scenarios were developed based on the real-life case of a well-known coffee franchise’s CSR policies. The scenarios were identical except that one had more proactive CSR policies. Results showed that a company’s proactive CSR programs increase job seekers’ intention to apply, which was moderated by their “calling” for the job. The research also demonstrated that “value congruence” between the applicant and the organization fully mediated the interaction between CSR and calling. The results, the authors said, suggested that engaging in active CSR could attract job applicants, providing a potential competitive advantage. The authors said their study contributed to the literature as it took the job seeker’s perspective whereas most previous research on calling focused on employees. They said it was the first study to empirically demonstrate the interaction between a sense of calling and CSR.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-08-2021-0171
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Age-inclusive HR practices and the thriving of older workers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The paper examines the role of occupational future time perspective (OFTP) in the relationship between age-inclusive HR practices (AIHRP) and the thriving of older workers. The author collected data in two waves three months apart. He obtained 310 valid surveys from workers aged between 50 and 70 with an average age of 56. There were 120 males and 190 females. Nearly three quarters were in a relationship and 59pc had attended higher education The results showed that AIHRP were positively related to thriving and learning, as well as vitality. The relationship between AIHRP and OFTP dimensions were also positive and statistically significant, and there were significant indirect effects of AIHRP on overall thriving via a focus on opportunities and also via remaining time. Meanwhile, there were positive indirect effects of AIHRP on learning through focus on opportunities and through remaining time. For the link between AIHRP and vitality, focus on opportunities mediates the effect of AIHRP on vitality, but remaining time was not related to vitality. The results have both theoretical and practical implications. For researchers the paper demonstrates the importance of personal resources like OFTP and is one of the few studies to distinguish between the motivational role of each OFTP dimension in the relationship between HR practices and thriving older workers. For organizations, the lessons are to design HR practices to demonstrate that the organization cares about older workers being successful.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-07-2021-0166
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Study of Indian IT workers shows reverse monitoring and job crafting
           improve work engagement, leading to improved performance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The purpose was to explore the role of work engagement in mediating between the resources of reverse mentoring and job crafting and the potential outcomes of improved performance and work withdrawal behavior The authors investigated the subjects in the Indian IT sector. They administered a survey online to volunteers from 14 software firms. They received 369 completed questionnaires. The majority of respondents were aged between 25 and 34 and 73.7pc were men. Results showed that both reverse monitoring and job crafting increase levels of work engagement, leading to improved performance and less work withdrawal behavior. The study also looked at work engagement as a mediating factor: It partially mediated the relationship between job crafting and both outcomes, fully mediated the relationship between reverse mentoring and withdrawal behavior, and partially mediated the relationship between reverse monitoring and work performance. The results have practical implications. Organizations need to take note that reverse monitoring and job crafting could motivate employees to reciprocate in kind with higher levels of work engagement. By fostering opportunities for reverse monitoring, organizations could stimulate learning and connections across management levels and age groups. Meanwhile, job crafting would help employees to focus on their strengths, or areas of interest, making their work more enjoyable and productive.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-08-2021-0174
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Study in China shows gender role identity is far more significant than
           biological gender in determining management aspirations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The authors wanted to assess the relevance of gender and gender role identity in developing managerial ambitions because of the shortage of females in top positions worldwide. The Chinese context was interesting because of the rapid social changes there. The researchers collected data from participants attending a leadership training programme organized by three Chinese universities in Beijing in 2018. Most were from lower and middle-level managers in various government sectors from all over China. The authors distributed questionnaires with the aid of supervisors. The study confirmed that individuals of either gender with stereotypically masculine characteristics have higher management aspirations. Results also showed people with androgynous traits tend to be more ambitious to be leaders. But female managers who perceive themselves as androgynous and masculine tend to possess higher management aspirations than females who see themselves as exhibiting feminine traits. The authors of the study said the results would help companies to reach a better understanding of how to reduce the disparity in numbers of men and women in management positions.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-07-2021-0163
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Research from China finds no significant difference in impact of public
           service motivation (PSM) in public and private sectors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The authors assumed PSM would be higher in the public sector, but they set up a trial to find out if this was the case. To test their theories, the authors conducted two independent surveys. The first consisted of 220 usable responses from public sector employees in Changsha, China. The second survey involved 260 usable responses from private sector employees taking an MBA course at a university in the Changsha district. A questionnaire was used to assess attitudes. The results found no significant difference between the impact of public sector motivation (PSM) on employee performance across the public and private sectors. The data showed that PSM had a significant impact on self-reported employee performance, but the relationship did not differ much between sectors. Meanwhile, it was in the private sector that PSM had the greatest impact on intention to leave. The authors said the research project was one of the first to test if the concept of PSM operated in the same way across sectors. It also contributed, they said, to the ongoing debate about PSM in China.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-08-2021-0169
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Female American in-house counsel are no more likely to reach senior ranks
           than female counterparts in law firms

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The authors wanted to find out if women in-house lawyers were treated more equitably than their counterparts in law firms and, therefore, reached higher ranks more often. The authors examined 10 years of data about public companies in the ExecuComp dataset. The information includes name, age, gender, job category and numerous compensation measures. Public companies must report their top five earners. The authors narrowed their focus to 2,154 lawyers of whom 1,851 were men and 303 were women. Analysis supported hypothesis 1, showing women are underrepresented in senior legal roles in large corporations. Hypothesis 2, however, was not supported. It was expected that women would be more likely to hold senior positions in female-dominated industries, but this was not the case. Finally, hypothesis 3 was not supported either. It suggested in-house women counsel would earn comparable compensation to their male counterparts. But analysis showed women earned 92.6pc of men earn and their bonuses were only 73.2pc of men’s. The authors say the research has important practical lessons for companies. Many of the remedies for gender disparities in law firms apply also to in-house counsel, they say. A primary mechanism is to integrate more women into senior leadership positions. This will tend to lead to reductions in compensation disparities, as well as greater accountability and transparency.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-07-2021-0164
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Nonprofit organizations and human resource management

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. Nonprofit Organizations (NPOs) have different aims than private or governmental organizations – they aim to provide a service for the good of society rather than for financial gain. As such, they have different human resource management (HRM). Past research reveals current trends in NPO HRM, such as training and turnover; features which are distinct to NPOs (and separate from private/government sectors) such as collaboration and values-based performance systems; and areas where NPO research can develop, such as succession planning and competency training. This leads to a comprehensive overview of NPO HRM, how it is unique, and areas of future potential. The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-09-10
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-11-2020-0250
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Solving the problem'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. This article explores creative problem-solving, outlines its limitations, and suggests that the main key to effective creative problem solving is using an independent facilitator. The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-09-06
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-06-2021-0126
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Unpacking technology's performance potential in education

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. This research paper focuses on the use of technology to augment the management effectiveness of school principals in Canada. The results revealed that, for technology as an informational role enabler, adopting the sub-role of disseminator delivered the most value for the respondents. For technology as a decisional role enabler, adopting the sub-role of negotiator provided the most value for the school principals. Overall, the respondents felt confident that technology solutions made them more capable when operating in their informational management roles. The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-08-31
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-08-2021-0178
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Understanding the currency of reciprocity in high performing employees

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. This research paper concerns itself with the relationship between taking-charge behavior, task-oriented leadership behavior, leader-member exchange (LMX) relationships, and employee performance. The results gleaned from the sales team members at pharmaceutical companies revealed that these employees positively take more charge of their performance when they experience higher LMX, which comes from them outperforming their baseline role expectations in the first place. High performance breeds more high performance through the relationship these employees develop with leaders, and through the reciprocity principle. Task-oriented leaders successfully developed LMX-fueled relationships with high performing employees across three identified stages. The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-08-30
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-08-2021-0179
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Study reveals “dark side” of training in Israeli Defense Force that
           instills conservative values at odds with more progressive organization

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The study was inspired by previous research showing the importance of congruence between declared and actual content. But the authors said there was a dearth of research into incongruence between training content and values of an organization. The study focused on a leadership skills development course in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF). The course was developed and delivered by military clergy. The initial purpose was to investigate the effectiveness of intra-organizational training for developing leadership skills. But qualitative analysis of the data revealed an incongruence between the declared content of the course – to develop leadership skills – and the actual content of the course – instilling conservative values. The authors said that the military clergy in the IDF hold conservative views that are traditional and nationalist, whereas the formal values of the IDF are quite different. They are based on the values of democratic state and military professionalism. The authors say this incongruence “may be harmful and cause a long-term clash of values in the organisation”. The authors said the most important contribution was to illuminate the potential “dark side” of training. Exposing the covert side of training can inspire scholars to search for more hidden in organizational HR routines, they said. Awareness of the potential “dark sides” should also lead to improvements in training, making it more effective in the short and long term. An important practical implication was that a “clash of values” might occur between traditional values and the organization’s formal values.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-08-25
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-06-2021-0125
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Offering undeclared workers financial help during Covid19 pandemic can
           bring them out of shadows into the declared economy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The authors wanted to examine why undeclared workers had not received financial assistance in Europe during the pandemic and find the best way to help them and bring them out of the shadows. To identify those whose paid work is entirely undeclared, a Eurobarometer survey of undeclared work in Europe is reported conducted in September 2019, just prior to the pandemic, and involving 27,565 face-to-face interviews in 28 European countries. The paid work of one in every 132 citizens in Europe comprises wholly of undeclared work and one in 28 work at least some of the time in the undeclared economy. These workers have received no support, but they are more likely to be financially vulnerable. A high percentage of undeclared workers are widowed, divorced and living in households with multiple persons. The authors argue that short-term support for these individuals could not only help them to survive the pandemic financially, but also transform undeclared work into declared work with long-term benefits for individuals and the wider economy.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-08-25
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-05-2021-0114
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Strategies for unlocking the latent superpower of management training:
           motivation from Greece to level up by investing in your managers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. This research paper conveys the multifaceted benefits – for managers and owners of small firms – of investing in their self-development as a way of driving enhanced organizational performance. Managers and owners who received training in effective management saw their change management and job design skills increase, resulting in more motivated, satisfied, and productive staff who stay with the organization longer and have lower absence rates along the way. In contrast, uneducated, untrained managers and owners damaged their staff turnover rates and employee satisfaction levels, and caused employee stress, thereby cumulatively lowering the organization's product quality, customer satisfaction, and profitability. The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.
      Citation: Human Resource Management International Digest
      PubDate: 2021-02-26
      DOI: 10.1108/HRMID-09-2020-0221
      Issue No: Vol. 29 , No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Human Resource Management International Digest

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 54.234.191.202
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-