Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Education + Training
Number of Followers: 22  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 6 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0040-0912 - ISSN (Online) 1758-6127
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Unleashing entrepreneurial potential: venture creation and self-directed
           experiential learning on social media amongst secondary school-aged
           business owners

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vanessa H.C. Jim, Jessie M.L. Chow, Donald F.B. Ward
      Abstract: This research paper aims to explore how secondary school-aged business owners utilise social media to engage in informal learning. The authors make use of the concept of a self-directed experiential learning cycle to empirically explore adolescents’ entrepreneurial learning processes without formal guidance or curriculum. The study adopts a one-on-one interview approach with a critical incident technique in interviewing to examine the experiences of 10 Grade 9–11 business owners who run social media-based businesses on Instagram. The results demonstrate that student business owners were able to capitalise on social media for venture creation and informal learning. They effectively engaged in experiential learning cycles with active help-seeking and mentorship in response to challenges in their business journey. A variety of resources within social media, their social circle and the internet were employed by students, highlighting the role the self-directed element plays in their experiential learning process. The research urges institutions to recognise the potential of informal learning on social media and offer more support to strengthen students’ learning. This research represents the first exploratory study on the potential of school-age teens’ self-initiated informal entrepreneurial learning while testifying the theory of the self-directed experiential learning cycle in the context of social media businesses. The study offers novel insights into the fields of students’ informal learning, entrepreneurial learning and social media learning.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-07-23
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-08-2023-0346
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Not for us' Vocational training in the social and policy space
           in Sierra Leone

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jamelia Harris
      Abstract: This paper explores the attractiveness of TVET in Sierra Leone, a post-conflict West African country. It aims to unpack structural factors which contribute to the low repute of TVET. The paper uses qualitative interviews with employers, government and third sector organisations, focus group discussions with young Sierra Leoneans and analysis of key government policy documents. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data, and the empirical analysis is grounded in Social Learning Theory of Career Decision Making and Social Cognitive Career Theory. The paper is interdisciplinary, drawing on literature from economics, psychology, political science and development studies. The paper argues that TVET is in low repute in Sierra Leone owing to low prioritisation by the national government in terms of policy focus, budgetary allocations and provision of training facilities; the proliferation and continuation of a post-war style of TVET programmes by development partners which initially targeted ex-combatants and thus carry reputational baggage; and colonial legacies of preferences for university education and white-collar jobs. The research contributes to the academic and policy discourse by providing new empirical insights from an under-studied country (and region), and arguably one where evidence-based policy is much needed.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-07-23
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-09-2023-0356
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Entrepreneurial identity as a career compass – An exploration of the
           career narratives of entrepreneurial education graduates

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nils Magne Killingberg
      Abstract: Since there are limited role models and career templates for entrepreneurship education (EE) graduates in the labour market, their careers are largely based on personal preferences, aspirations and values. Few studies have investigated how EE impacts graduates’ career aspirations. The present study addressed this gap by exploring how entrepreneurial identity (EI) manifestations act as career identities for EE graduates. Five graduates from two EE programmes in Norway were purposefully selected based on their career histories. They were interviewed using a life story approach, and the narratives were analysed to explore how their EIs were developed and how the EIs acted as career identities. The study findings revealed three EI manifestations that directed the participants’ careers: change agent, career seeker and maverick specialist. Additionally, the findings showed how EI is developed through EE: by connecting previous aspirations to realistic career alternatives, by being a place where individuals can experiment with provisional selves and by gaining social acceptance and affirmations for a claimed identity. Furthermore, the findings demonstrated how EI manifestations act as career identities that give direction to graduates’ careers. This study has important implications regarding the broader impact of EE on graduates’ careers. Furthermore, by exploring EE graduates’ narratives, this study provides a richer and more nuanced view of how aspirations and career preferences are developed than previous studies.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-07-22
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-09-2023-0364
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Education first' Triggering vs jeopardising entrepreneurial
           intentions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Guillermina Tormo-Carbó, Elies Seguí-Mas, Victor Oltra
      Abstract: Drawing on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TBP) and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), this study delves into how, in entrepreneurship-unfriendly environments, university students’ entrepreneurial intention (EI) is shaped, focusing particularly on the role of entrepreneurship education (EE) and an entrepreneurial family context (EFC). A sample of 688 students at a Spanish university was used for testing our hypotheses using GUESSS project data, through PLS-SEM regression and multigroup analysis (entrepreneurship course vs non-course students). Positive and significant impacts of entrepreneurial attitude (EA) and entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) on EI, and of subjective norms (SN) on EA and ESE, were found in both groups. Conversely, the impacts of an EFC on EA, SN and EI were significant only for course students, and the impact of SN on EI was significant only for non-course students. The impact of EFC on ESE was not significant for either group. This investigation delves into how the TPB components shape university students’ EI in entrepreneurship-unfriendly contexts, and offers an original multigroup analysis to explore the role of EE in such dynamics. A novel contribution of this study is the finding that EE is a relevant catalyser for making entrepreneurial parents become an effective trigger for entrepreneurship. Conversely, EE was, unexpectedly, deemed irrelevant or counter-productive for some aspects of entrepreneurial dynamics. Further research is encouraged, delving into the role of social and cultural contexts.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-07-17
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-10-2023-0420
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • The impact of entrepreneurship education on entrepreneurial intention: the
           moderating role of perceived governmental support

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Saleh Al-Omar, Ammar Alalawneh, Ayman Harb
      Abstract: This paper aims to examine the direct impact of entrepreneurship education on university students' entrepreneurial intention and the moderating role of perceived governmental support in terms of financial support and policies and regulations. The study collected data using questionnaires from students enrolled in compulsory entrepreneurship courses at three public Jordanian universities. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze 1,228 valid questionnaires and test the hypotheses. The study revealed that entrepreneurship education positively and significantly affects students' entrepreneurial intentions. On the other hand, perceived governmental support in terms of financial support and policies and regulations has a nonsignificant moderating role in the relationship between entrepreneurship education and students' entrepreneurial intention. This study enriches the literature with new evidence that entrepreneurship education has a positive, direct impact on students' intention to become entrepreneurs. It also contributes to the body of knowledge as the first to examine the role governments’ play besides encouraging entrepreneurship education through their education policies.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-07-16
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-07-2023-0272
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Ensuring a smooth landing for starting VET teachers: integrating induction
           and HRM practices

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Piety Runhaar, Judith Gulikers, Harm Biemans
      Abstract: The goal of the current paper is to explore how induction of STs in VET schools can be improved by embedding induction in the broader human resources management (HRM) system. To this end, we will present and discuss the theoretical underpinning and the quantitative and qualitative outcomes of an online reflection instrument “Startwijzer,” developed in the Netherlands and which is based on literature on induction on one hand and on HRM literature on the other. In doing so the paper aims to contribute to induction theory and to formulate suggestions as to how provide STs with a smooth landing. In the period 2018–2023, the Startwijzer was filled out by starting teachers (STs), their coaches, HRM officers, team leaders and managers working in various VET schools. Descriptive analyses were done on respondents” (n = 629) scores on 13 indicators, with a three-point-Likert-scale (where 1 = “in order”, 2 = “doubt” and 3 = “in order”) in SPSS. Also differences among stakeholders were examined. Respondents’ explanations of their scores were analyzed thematically, within and across indicators, to reach a deeper understanding of how STs can be provided a smooth landing. With AMO-theory of performance (Appelbaum et al., 2001) – stating that performance is a function of: abilities (A); motivation (M) and opportunities offered to exert expertise (O) – as conceptual model, 13 indicators relevant for effective induction were distinguished. (A): Timely Recruitment; Lesson Observations; Individual Coaching; Personal Development Plan; Reflection on Teaching Practice; Development of Professional Identity; (M): Exchange of Mutual Expectancies; Distinction among Performance Assessment and Guidance; Differentiation among STs; (O) Provision of Practical Information; Enculturation; Appointment of Coaches; Workload reduction. Respondents were generally very positive about the help and care provided informally by colleagues but less satisfied with the formal procedures. The paper bridges the literature on induction and that of human resources management (HRM). While the positive impact of HRM on employee outcomes such as performance, commitment and well-being has been attested by numerous studies (e.g. Combs et al., 2006), it is only recently that the potential benefits of HRM for teachers have been acknowledged (e.g. Runhaar, 2017). The theoretical elaboration as well as the empirical evidence discussed in the current paper suggest that unless induction activities are embedded in school HRM policy, STs already start their careers 1–0 down and it might be difficult for them to catch up.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-07-09
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-09-2023-0385
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • The effect of entrepreneurial education on career choice intentions of
           college students: a social cognitive career theory approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jun Cui, Luwen Gu
      Abstract: This study aims at addressing the impact of entrepreneurial education (EE) by highlighting career choice intentions (CCI) and entrepreneurial mindset (EM) as impact indicators, as well as unpacking the drivers and mediators in the formation of CCI among college students underpinned by social cognitive career theory (SCCT). The hypotheses were tested on a survey sample of 1,198 students from 15 higher education institutions in China. Multinomial logistic regression was used to compare the different effects of EE on CCI, which is a categorical variable with four types of options. The results confirmed the effects of EE on entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE), entrepreneurial outcome expectations (EOE) and EM, as well as the heterogeneity of antecedent connections with students preferring one career choice to the others. The results also revealed the mediating role of ESE and EOE in the model. The study implies that ESE and EM should be integrated into EE learning outcomes and educators should focus on multiple career choice intentions rather than just entrepreneurial intention for college students' sustainable development. The research contributes to the literature by verifying CCI and EM as impact indicators of EE, to a nuanced understanding of the educational development of various options of career paths by comparing different career intentions in a mediating model and to the expansion of SCCT by integrating diverse factors in a coherent model within the context of higher education in China.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-06-19
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-01-2024-0036
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Tech-ready teachers for Agriculture 4.0:
           a teacher–industry partnership case study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amy Cosby, Melissa Ann Sullivan, Jaime Manning, Bobby Harreveld
      Abstract: This case study is based on the Women in Agri-Tech programme, a teacher professional development programme that aimed to build teachers’ capabilities to use Agri-Tech in their agriculture/STEM classes to increase student awareness of agriculture technology and its associated career paths. Teachers and agriculture industry partners co-created Agri-Tech modules, which were implemented and evaluated from teachers’ and students’ perspectives. This paper demonstrates how work-related learning that emphasises technology can increase the visibility of career pathways and how multi-stakeholder benefits can evolve from teacher–industry partnerships. An action research design using quantitative and qualitative methods was used to construct this case study. Data collection methods included surveys, interviews, peer evaluation and teacher reflections. Teacher professional development that incorporates teacher-industry partnerships can increase teachers’ self-efficacy and build confidence to support authentic work-related learning in their classes. Integrating technology into agriculture/STEM classes can increase the visibility of agriculture career paths for students, which is critical given the serious skills shortage in this sector. This study is limited in that the Women in Agri-Tech professional development programme was one standalone programme tailored specifically for women agriculture/STEM teachers through a competitive process. However, the beneficial implications of such programmes that support teacher–industry engagement have far-reaching benefits. Teacher professional development programmes that provide opportunities to partner with industry can support improvements in integrating career-aligned learning into the curriculum and can specifically address industry skills and knowledge gaps by addressing school-based learning requirements for the future workforce. This paper contributes to the literature on education–industry partnerships and considers how teachers can contribute to an early intervention sector workforce development strategy for future industry sustainability.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-06-17
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-05-2023-0166
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • The early bird catches the flywheel: pedagogical components of
           entrepreneurship education in American higher education institutions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chang Wang, Yongchuan Shi, Shihao Jiang
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the core elements and essential characteristics of entrepreneurship pedagogy in American higher education institutions, outlining a model from multiple participants’ perspectives and offering a blueprint for teaching entrepreneurship in higher education settings. Structured interviews were conducted with 26 participants involved in entrepreneurship education in American higher education institutions, including teaching managers, teachers and students. The interview data were transformed into documentary materials and analyzed through grounded theory. The characteristics of the core elements of entrepreneurship education pedagogy in American higher education institutions include unified and distinctive teaching content, diverse and practical teaching methods, disciplinary and interdisciplinary curriculum system, professional and inclusive teaching team, procedural and systematic teaching evaluation. More profoundly, entrepreneurship pedagogy in American universities can be conceptualized as a flywheel model, propelled by the significant autonomy of teachers. Teacher autonomy empowers dynamic interactions among teaching content, teaching method, curriculum development and teaching evaluation, facilitating ongoing innovation in American entrepreneurship pedagogy like a rapidly forward-rolling wheel. This study contributes to a better understanding of the pedagogy of American entrepreneurship education as a mature discipline, which may assist educators in teaching entrepreneurship at the college level. Moreover, a flywheel model of entrepreneurship pedagogy is offered, emphasizing teacher autonomy as a vital but often overlooked role in the development of entrepreneurship education.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-06-07
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-05-2023-0202
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • CompEntre 4.0: developing and validating a competency model
           for Industry 4.0 startups

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dario Wahl, Jürgen Münch
      Abstract: Competency models are widespread in entrepreneurship and help develop educational offerings. Although existing models cater to specific sub-disciplines, the field of Industry 4.0 startups still needs a tailored competency. Therefore, this study aims to bridge this gap by developing a specific competency model to address the unique challenges in Industry 4.0 entrepreneurship. The research approach involved a content analysis and interview study in compiling and categorizing the necessary competencies to succeed in the Industry 4.0 domain. The developed model was subjected to different forms of validation using the Content Validity Index and inter-rater reliability incorporating expert feedback. The described multi-methodological approach resulted in the proposed “CompEntre 4.0” model, which contains 23 crucial competencies for Industry 4.0 startups. The results of this model validation demonstrate that it meets the necessary threshold values, establishing its reliability and potential for future use and further improvement. By providing a structured framework tailored to the specific demands of this domain, the competency model has the potential to guide and empower entrepreneurs, improving their prospects for success in the rapidly evolving landscape of Industry 4.0. While there are specific competency models for the entrepreneurship field and for specific sub-disciplines of entrepreneurship, there is, despite numerous specifics, no competency model for Industry 4.0 entrepreneurship yet.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-09-2023-0369
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • The effect of game-based learning on the development of entrepreneurial
           competence among higher education students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ana Dias Daniel, Yannara Negre, Joaquim Casaca, Rui Patrício, Rodolpho Tsvetcoff
      Abstract: The present study’s goal is to assess the effect of a serious game on the development of entrepreneurial competence, self-efficacy and intention and thereby contribute to clarifying the usefulness of this approach in entrepreneurship education. The study sample and method included 76 graduate students, selected through a convenience sampling technique and collected through a self-administered questionnaire. To examine the impact of the gaming session, a pre-test post-test design approach was employed. Consequently, all students completed a survey both at the beginning and end of the gaming session. Our study found that game-based learning effectively enhances students' entrepreneurial competence, particularly in areas like generating ideas, managing resources and taking action, while also boosting self-efficacy. However, it didn't significantly impact entrepreneurial intentions. The effectiveness depends on students' prior gaming experience, especially in resource management and taking action. Additionally, it positively influences women's self-efficacy more than men. The field of study also plays a role, with design students showing notable development in idea generation, entrepreneurial intentions, and self-efficacy. Overall, game-based learning is a valuable tool for entrepreneurship education, but its effects vary based on prior experience, gender and field of study. Several limitations of the study should be considered. First, the small sample size acquired through convenience sampling and the potential for social response bias, even with respondent anonymity, could limit the generalizability of the study's findings. Second, the study recognizes that the effectiveness of a serious game is greatly influenced by the game's design, making findings from studies with different game-based learning approaches potentially different. Lastly, the impact of student interactions during the game session was not evaluated. The study's practical implications are significant. It demonstrates the effectiveness of game-based learning in cultivating entrepreneurial competence and self-efficacy, particularly benefiting women and design students. These findings emphasize the importance of integrating serious games (SG) into entrepreneurship education to nurture vital entrepreneurial competences essential for students' career development as entrepreneurs or employees. The study encourages the development of SG tailored for use in entrepreneurship classes. Additionally, it underscores the need to educate educators about the advantages of incorporating game-based learning into their teaching strategies, offering a practical pathway to enhance entrepreneurship education and better prepare students for the modern job market. The study's social implications are substantial. It highlights the effectiveness of game-based learning in nurturing entrepreneurial competence and self-efficacy, particularly benefiting women and design students. This underscores the importance of integrating Serious Games (SG) into entrepreneurship education, emphasizing the need for more SG tailored for use in entrepreneurship classes. Furthermore, it calls for increased awareness among educators about the advantages of incorporating game-based learning into their teaching methods. Ultimately, these findings have the potential to positively impact students' career development, whether as entrepreneurs or employees, by equipping them with crucial entrepreneurial skills. This study brings a novel perspective in three distinct ways. Firstly, it centers on the pivotal entrepreneurial competences outlined in the EntreComp framework by the European Commission, addressing the challenge of identifying which competences are most relevant for entrepreneurial education. By doing so, it ensures a focus on competence areas critical for entrepreneurs, such as ideas and opportunities, resources, and action. Secondly, it explores the impact of game experience on the development of entrepreneurial competences, entrepreneurial intention, and self-efficacy, a relationship hitherto unexplored. Thirdly, the study examines how students' demographic and contextual characteristics influence the development of entrepreneurial competence, intention, and self-efficacy through a game-based learning approach. These unique perspectives contribute valuable empirical data to both theory and practice in the field of entrepreneurship education.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-05-28
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-10-2023-0448
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • SWOT analysis of agricultural colleges for entrepreneurship: Delphi-Fuzzy
           and fuzzy hierarchical application

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Somayeh Tohidyan Far, Kurosh Rezaei-Moghaddam
      Abstract: The present study aims to seek the strategic analysis of the entrepreneurship of agricultural colleges (AC). In terms of approach, this research was a combination of exploratory and hybrid methods. The present study was conducted in four stages. In the first stage, an open-ended questionnaire was designed to identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of entrepreneurship in AC (qualitative method). In the second stage, the Delphi-Fuzzy questionnaire was designed based on the results obtained from the first stage. In the third stage, the criteria of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of entrepreneurship of AC were analyzed based on the pairwise comparison (quantitative method) by the sample using a fuzzy hierarchical analysis process (FHAP). In the fourth stage, presented strategies were ranked based on pairwise comparison using FHAP. From the analysis of weaknesses, strengths, opportunities and threats facing AC for entrepreneurship, 12 strategies were presented in 4 groups of aggressive, conservative, competitive and defensive. The literature review showed that no research has been done so far to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats facing university entrepreneurship, especially AC. So the present study analyzes the weaknesses, strengths, opportunities and threats and proposes practical strategies for moving toward the formation of entrepreneurship AC. According to the gaps in providing SWOT of the AC, the results of this research can pave the way for policy makers and planners in this field.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-05-14
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-09-2023-0397
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Construction of a competency evaluation index system for postgraduates of
           educational technology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ling Luo, Hong Ji, Shu-Ning Chen, Xin Chen
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine the competency characteristics required for the employment of master’s degree students in educational technology. A combined qualitative and quantitative method was used to consult multiple experts through a modified Delphi method. Competency characteristics were extracted from Chinese recruitment apps, national recruitment websites and university training programs. Ten senior teacher experts who teach educational technology master’s students were consulted through a questionnaire consultation to validate the proposed competency model. The weights of competency characteristics were determined through a combination of the analytic hierarchy process and entropy method. The results show that when recruiting educational technology master’s students, more emphasis is placed on operational skills. The majority of companies tend to assess practical abilities rather than theoretical knowledge. Relevant knowledge of educational technology, psychology, computer science and education is considered to be the basic knowledge components of educational technology master’s students, while professional skills are the core skills required for their positions. Therefore, universities need to focus on training, educational technology graduate students in these areas of competence. The study also found that professional qualities (such as physical and mental fitness) and personality traits (interpersonal communication and interaction) receive more attention from companies and are essential competencies for educational technology master’s students. A competence model for educational technology master’s students is proposed, which includes aspects such as knowledge, personal skills/abilities, professional qualities and personality traits. The competence elements included in this model can serve as reference indicators for universities to cultivate the competence of educational technology master’s students, as well as reference points for recruiting units to help them select talents. This represents a new dimension in research related to the employment of educational technology master’s students. The study enriches the research objects and competence dictionary in the field of competence research.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-05-02
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-03-2023-0075
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Can vocational interests of students be used to recruit suitable
           candidates for teacher training programmes in technical vocational
           education and training in Germany'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mandy Hommel
      Abstract: In Germany, various approaches have been taken to tackle the current teacher shortage in technical and vocational education and training (TVET). One attempt to remedy the shortage in Bavaria has been the introduction of an engineering education study programme at universities of applied sciences. Ideal candidates for this programme should have an interest in both engineering and social interaction. For effective recruitment, therefore, it is necessary to know applicants’ characteristics such as their vocational interests. In this study, the vocational interest profiles of students in TVET teacher training programmes were identified and their interest profiles and further characteristics were compared with those of other VET students at universities and universities of applied sciences. An online questionnaire based on Holland’s interest theory and adapted from the Allgemeiner-Interessen-Struktur-Test-3 (interest structure test) was administered to 85 students in TVET teacher training programmes at universities and universities of applied sciences in Bavaria. Items regarding reasons for choosing a particular study programme, university location and other personal details were added. The vocational interest profiles of students at universities and universities of applied sciences can be described as similar but weakly differentiated. Insights are provided by the characteristics of students such as the majority being first-time academics in the family. The reasons for choosing the degree programme and university location highlight the fact that a large proportion of students in engineering education would not have chosen a teaching-related degree programme if it had not been offered at the respective university of applied sciences. Although the sample in this study was small and, therefore, limiting, it represented a high proportion of TVET teacher training students in Bavaria and a substantial proportion of first-year students in TVET teacher training programmes at universities and universities of applied sciences in Bavaria (section 2.2 and 3.1). Thus, the findings provide valuable insights into commonalities in interest profiles between engineering education students at universities of applied sciences and other TVET students at universities. With respect to the domain of the chosen vocational specialisation, differentiated profiles emerged that, for example, showed a stronger artistic orientation among students in construction technology/wood. For further analysis, the previous variable-centred orientation of the analysis can be supplemented by person-centred analyses (e.g. cluster analysis and latent variable mixture modelling, LVMM) (cf. Leon et al., 2021). The findings in this study reveal the potential for attracting candidates to universities of applied sciences if they prefer to study in rather rural areas close to their hometowns. With the aim to educate prospective teachers for future work not only in metropolitan regions but in rural areas too, offering bachelor degree programmes in rural areas would seem promising. A regional option can boost the recruitment of new students and attract candidates that otherwise would be unable to pursue studies or a career as a teacher in vocational education. The results of this study and those of previous studies suggest that universities of applied sciences can cooperate with universities to help solve the teacher shortage problem. Overall, it is apparent that the students' interests reached comparatively high values in all interest orientations and thus are only weakly differentiated. If undifferentiated profiles indicate low levels of career readiness, this significantly affects the recruitment of young people for the teaching profession. Assessing career orientation and promoting vocational interests should be prioritised during secondary school education. Vocational orientation measures are essential and should provide insight into typical activities of daily work life in different professions and thus pique and foster interests. This study provides insight into how to respond to the teacher shortage in VET by identifying important characteristics of engineering education students using vocational interest profiling.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-04-16
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-09-2023-0355
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Artificial intelligence for education and its emphasis on assessment and
           adversity quotient: a review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jyoti Mudkanna Gavhane, Reena Pagare
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to analyze importance of artificial intelligence (AI) in education and its emphasis on assessment and adversity quotient (AQ). The study utilizes a systematic literature review of over 141 journal papers and psychometric tests to evaluate AQ. Thematic analysis of quantitative and qualitative studies explores domains of AI in education. Results suggest that assessing the AQ of students with the help of AI techniques is necessary. Education is a vital tool to develop and improve natural intelligence, and this survey presents the discourse use of AI techniques and behavioral strategies in the education sector of the recent era. The study proposes a conceptual framework of AQ with the help of assessment style for higher education undergraduates. Research on AQ evaluation in the Indian context is still emerging, presenting a potential avenue for future research. Investigating the relationship between AQ and academic performance among Indian students is a crucial area of research. This can provide insights into the role of AQ in academic motivation, persistence and success in different academic disciplines and levels of education. AQ evaluation offers valuable insights into how individuals deal with and overcome challenges. The findings of this study have implications for higher education institutions to prepare for future challenges and better equip students with necessary skills for success. The papers reviewed related to AI for education opens research opportunities in the field of psychometrics, educational assessment and the evaluation of AQ.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-03-27
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-04-2023-0117
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Artificial intelligence in entrepreneurship education: a scoping
           review

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Li Chen, Dirk Ifenthaler, Jane Yin-Kim Yau, Wenting Sun
      Abstract: The study aims to identify the status quo of artificial intelligence in entrepreneurship education with a view to identifying potential research gaps, especially in the adoption of certain intelligent technologies and pedagogical designs applied in this domain. A scoping review was conducted using six inclusive and exclusive criteria agreed upon by the author team. The collected studies, which focused on the adoption of AI in entrepreneurship education, were analysed by the team with regards to various aspects including the definition of intelligent technology, research question, educational purpose, research method, sample size, research quality and publication. The results of this analysis were presented in tables and figures. Educators introduced big data and algorithms of machine learning in entrepreneurship education. Big data analytics use multimodal data to improve the effectiveness of entrepreneurship education and spot entrepreneurial opportunities. Entrepreneurial analytics analysis entrepreneurial projects with low costs and high effectiveness. Machine learning releases educators’ burdens and improves the accuracy of the assessment. However, AI in entrepreneurship education needs more sophisticated pedagogical designs in diagnosis, prediction, intervention, prevention and recommendation, combined with specific entrepreneurial learning content and entrepreneurial procedure, obeying entrepreneurial pedagogy. This study holds significant implications as it can shift the focus of entrepreneurs and educators towards the educational potential of artificial intelligence, prompting them to consider the ways in which it can be used effectively. By providing valuable insights, the study can stimulate further research and exploration, potentially opening up new avenues for the application of artificial intelligence in entrepreneurship education.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-02-20
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-05-2023-0169
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Discovering and developing the vocational teacher identity
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sofia Antera, Marianne Teräs
      Abstract: This study explores the role of previous occupational identity in the formation of the (new) teacher identity of vocational teachers. The focus is on how vocational teachers discover their teaching identity, how they describe the connection between their previous occupation and teacher identity and how they describe a competent member of the teaching community. The theoretical approach is inspired by Communities of Practice (CoP) theory. More specifically, the realignment between socially demanded competence in the profession and personal experience as well as identification with the teaching community are discussed. The research material comes from 14 interviews with vocational teachers in different disciplines. Findings indicate first that the process of professional identity (trans)formation was initiated by finding one's teaching self when the individuals became aware of their interest in teaching by discovering that they had already achieved some sort of teaching-related competence. Second, individuals had been connecting their professional identities – finding common competence between their previous occupation and the teaching role. Third, vocational teachers experienced legitimising their competence and their new identity with reference to what their new CoP instructed as important competence (regime of competence). While teachers' vocational competence is not scrutinised, their teaching competence needs to be constantly proved. This imbalance often leads to teachers returning to an aspect of their identity that is well established – their vocational competence. Looking back to their occupational competences constitutes a realignment backwards, when teachers attempt to serve their new professional goal by drawing on old competence.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-02-06
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-09-2023-0363
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Thresholds for dis/trust: exploring the impact of standards-based reforms
           on the process of being and becoming a VET teacher in England and
           Austria

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christina Donovan, Hannes Hautz
      Abstract: This paper seeks to illustrate how interventionist education reforms shape dis/trust-building processes and their impact on teacher professionalism in vocational education and training (VET) across national contexts. Using trust as the object of analysis, we discuss the affective mechanisms of becoming a professional in a standards-based neoliberal environment. Through an analysis of VET teacher narratives in England and Austria, the paper draws attention to the ways in which policy instrumentalism has created a culture of distrust in VET. Drawing upon foundational work on system trust developed by Niklas Luhmann, we illustrate how conditions for trust sit at symbolic thresholds, which set the conditions for professional recognition within VET. Our analysis revealed that attempts to standardise VET strategy are fuelled by the need for existential security and predictability, leading to tensions in the cultivation of system trust. Conditions for professional recognition across both contexts were based on practices of documentation and subordination, narrowly defining modes of legitimate self-expression in organisations. This constitutes a crisis of trust in VET teacher professionalism, which undermines pedagogical autonomy and integrity. We seek to highlight the impact that reduced trust in the governance of VET can have on issues associated with teacher motivation, well-being and retention. The consideration of trust is therefore essential both for policy design and implementation in VET organisations. The application of trust theory offers a distinctive lens through which to understand the impact of accountability, performativity and governance processes upon teacher subjectivity within VET across national contexts.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-02-06
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-09-2023-0386
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • A qualitative analysis of student reflections on public health internships
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cecilia Woon Chien Teng, Raymond Boon Tar Lim, Claire Gek Ling Tan
      Abstract: Reflective practice (RP) is a key skill for developing one’s professional practice. It has, however, not been unanimously prioritised in public health (PH) competency and education frameworks. Reflection activities are often unstructured in higher education. There is also a dearth of literature on the RPs of undergraduate PH students. This study aims to explore in greater depth how RP helps undergraduate PH students explore their own learning in internships. Reflection prompts were designed using the DEAL model. 124 written reflection entries from 32 students were collected and analysed thematically using a deductive-inductive approach. The conceptual framework of internship learning goals by Ash and Clayton (2009) was used to guide the deductive analysis. Three themes were identified: initial engagement with reflective learning; gradual integration of reflective learning, and a transformative phase involving professional development, personal growth, civic learning, growth through struggle, being confronted with differences in expectations, and skill acquisition. This study extends the limited evidence regarding RP in undergraduate non-medical PH education, and contributes toward informing the revision of undergraduate PH programmes, for example, by integrating structured reflection earlier in the curricula, and establishing/supporting mentorship programmes between institutions. The findings call for PH educators to be more intentional in creating opportunities to nurture RP among budding PH professionals.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-05-28
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-07-2023-0302
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 10 (2024)
       
  • All good things come in threes – required skill sets in the graduate
           labour market in Germany

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Emilia Kmiotek-Meier, Tonia Rossié, Konstantin Canora
      Abstract: Our work adds to the debate regarding higher education graduates’ skills required in the labour market in Germany and beyond. Using Q-methodology and the accompanying narrations, we explore German employers’ and employees’ views (N = 26) on characteristics required at the entry level. Our findings show three areas of the labour market with different skill requirements. Whereas the first area, “The world of rules”, applies more likely to the professions and academia, the two other areas, “The middle field” and “The people-oriented and critical market”, can be found throughout the labour market. The disciplinary affiliation does not play a role. In all three areas, soft skills are crucial and specialised knowledge is only highly valued in the area of “The world of rules”. In contrast to previous findings, we do not focus on singular skills. Instead, we focus on skill sets and discuss their relevance from the background of their usability.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-05-06
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-04-2023-0122
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 10 (2024)
       
  • To assess or not to assess an entrepreneurship competence in vocational
           education and training' Results from a case study of Italy

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daniele Morselli
      Abstract: This article focuses on the assessment of entrepreneurship competence by selected vocational teachers in Italy. The exploratory research question addresses the extent to which entrepreneurship assessments are competence based, and the research seeks to identify fully fledged assessment programmes with both a formative and summative component, and the use of assessment rubrics. It also explores the extent to which entrepreneurship competence is referred to in school documentation and later assessed, and the tools and strategies used for such assessment. This case study is part of a larger European research project promoted by Cedefop; in Italy it focused on six selected vocational IVET and CVET programmes and apprenticeship schemes. It used a wide range of instruments to ensure triangulation and multiple perspectives: analysed policy documents and undertook online interviews with experts and policy makers. At VET providers' premises it deployed: analysis of school documents; observations of learning environments; interviews and focus groups with (in schools) teachers, directors and vice directors, learners and alumni (in companies) instructors, company tutors and employers, apprentices and alumni. Assessment tasks were rarely embedded within fully fledged assessment programmes involving both formative and summative tasks, and assessment rubric for grading. Most of the time, entrepreneurship programmes lacked self-assessment, peer assessment and structured feedback and did not involve learners in the assessment process. Some instructors coached the students, but undertook no clear formative assessment. These findings suggest institutions have a testing culture with regard to assessment, at the level of both policy and practice. In most cases, entrepreneurship competence was not directly assessed, and learning outcomes were only loosely related to entrepreneurship. One limitation concerned the selection of the VET providers: these were chosen not on a casual basis, but because they ran programmes that were relevant to the development of entrepreneurship competence. At the policy level, there is a need for new guidelines on competence development and assessment in VET, guidelines that are more aligned with educational research on competence development. To ensure the development of entrepreneurship competence, educators need in-service training and a community of practice. So far, the literature has concentrated on entrepreneurship education at the tertiary level. Little is known about how VET instructors assess entrepreneurship competence. This study updates the picture of policy and practice in Italy, illustrating how entrepreneurship competence is developed in selected IVET and CVET programmes and apprenticeships.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-06-2023-0242
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 10 (2024)
       
  • Understanding influences on entrepreneurship educator role identity
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Candida Brush, Birgitte Wraae, Shahrokh Nikou
      Abstract: Despite the considerable increase in research on entrepreneurship education, few studies examine the role of entrepreneurship educators. Similarly, most frameworks from entrepreneurship education recognize the educator’s importance in facilitating instruction and assessment, but the factors influencing the educator role are not well understood. According to the identity theory, personal factors including self-efficacy, job satisfaction and personal values influence the perspective of self, significance and anticipations that an individual in this role associates with it, determining their planning and actions. The stronger the role identity the more likely entrepreneurship educators will be in effectively developing their entrepreneurial skills as well as the overall learning experience of their students. The objective of this study is to pinpoint the factors that affect entrepreneurial role identity. Drawing upon the identity theory, this study developed a theoretical framework and carried out an empirical investigation involving a survey of 289 entrepreneurship educators across the globe. Structural equation modeling (SEM) technique was applied to analyze and explore the factors that impact the identity of the educators in their role as entrepreneurship teachers. The findings show that the role identity of entrepreneurship educators is significantly influenced by their self-efficacy, job satisfaction and personal values. Among these factors, self-efficacy and job satisfaction have the most significant impacts on how educators perceive their role. The implications of these results and directions for future research are also discussed. The novelty of the current study is derived from its conceptualization of the antecedents of role perception among entrepreneurship educators. This study stands out as one of the earliest attempts to investigate the factors that shape an individual’s scene of self and professional identity as an entrepreneurship educator. The significance of comprehending the antecedents of role perception lies in the insights it can offer into how educators undertake and execute their role, and consequently, their effectiveness in teaching entrepreneurship.
      Citation: Education + Training
      PubDate: 2024-01-16
      DOI: 10.1108/ET-01-2022-0007
      Issue No: Vol. 66, No. 10 (2024)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.226.72.194
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 
  Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.226.72.194
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-