Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Trabajo : Revista de la Asociación Estatal de Centros Universitarios de Relaciones Laborales y Ciencias del Trabajo     Open Access  
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.5
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 24  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 7 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2040-7149 - ISSN (Online) 2040-7157
Published by Emerald Homepage  [361 journals]
  • The transracial aesthetic labour of an international teaching assistant

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      Authors: Vijay A. Ramjattan
      Abstract: This paper introduces the concept of transracial aesthetic labour to understand why and how an international teaching assistant (ITA) vocally changes meanings of his racial identity. The paper uses a narrative analysis to detail instances of transracial aesthetic labour. For the ITA, this labour involved orally distancing from or aligning with particular Indian stereotypes for specific contexts. Transracial aesthetic labour may occur in other industries that deem race an integral part of sounding right or looking good for the job. The findings highlight the need for ITAs and universities to rethink the meaning of transracial to combat racist perceptions of ITAs' speech. The paper advances the aesthetic labour literature by exploring how race is vocally performed for this labour and introducing ITAs as aesthetic labourers.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-25
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2020-0365
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Work experiences of qualified immigrants: a review of theoretical progress
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Ali Dehghanpour Farashah, Tomas Blomquist
      Abstract: Qualified immigrants (QIs) and their work experiences have been studied using a wide variety of theoretical approaches with divergent characteristics. This paper reviews theoretical progress and proposes directions for future research and practice. Using relevant keywords, articles indexed by Web of Science in management, business, industrial relations and applied psychology were systematically searched for and analysed. In total, 60 theoretical articles published during 2008–2018 were included. The theoretical progress and future theoretical and practical challenges were organised based on the notions of equality, diversity and inclusion. Eight theoretical approaches utilised to study QIs' work experiences were recognised: (1) human capital theory, (2) career capital theory, (3) theory of practice, (4) intersectionality, (5) social identity theory, (6) sensemaking, (7) cultural identity transition and (8) the career-centred approach. The contributions and limitations of each theoretical lens were then scrutinised. Overall, research on QIs still lacks a comprehensive theoretical framework. As a step towards that, the paper proposes considering the role of organisations and labour market intermediaries, strategic view over the immigrant workforce, agency–institution play, identity–capital play and host–immigrant play. The focus is on theory development and empirical papers with no clear theoretical foundation are excluded. This review is the first attempt to summarise and direct the divergent research on the topic. The main contribution is setting an agenda for future research, particularly by proposing the elements of a comprehensive theoretical framework for studying QIs in the workplace.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-23
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2019-0046
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Mitigating the COVID-19 pandemic in India: an in-depth exploration of
           challenges and opportunities for three vulnerable population groups

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Joe Thomas, Emma Emily de Wit, R.K. Radhakrishnan, Nupur Kulkarni, Joske G.F. Bunders-Aelen
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic is certain to have an unprecedented impact on the global population, but marginalized and vulnerable groups in low-income countries (LICs) are predicted to carry the largest burden. This study focuses on the implications of COVID-19-related measures on three population groups in India, including (1) migrant laborers (of which a majority come from Scheduled Castes (SCs) and Scheduled Tribes (STs), as well as Other Backward Classes (OBCs)), (2) children from low-income families and, (3) refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs). This study adopts a sequential mixed-method research design. A desk-based study of a selection of government reports was undertaken on the COVID-19-related mitigation measures. The desk study was followed by in-depth interviews with purposively recruited high-ranking experts in specific sectors of policy implementation and service delivery across the country. The outcomes of this study shed light on (1) the most urgent needs that need to be addressed per population group, (2) the variety of state-level responses as well as best practices observed to deal with mitigation issues and (3) opportunities for quick relief as well as more long-term solutions. The COVID-19 pandemic has not only reduced people's means of maintaining a livelihood but has simultaneously revealed some of India's long-standing problems with infrastructure and resource distribution in a range of sectors, including nutrition and health, education, etc. There is an urgent need to construct effective pathways to trace and respond to those people who are desolate, and to learn from – and support – good practices at the grassroot level. The current study contributes to the discussion on how inclusive public health might be reached.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-21
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-09-2020-0264
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A sobering examination of how the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates the
           disparities of vulnerable populations

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      Authors: Lilcelia A. Williams
      Abstract: Intersectionality theory is a social justice theory customarily employed to address inequities which arise in the academic or legal arenas as it relates to race and gender. The application of intersectionality theory extends beyond the convergence of multiple social identities. It provides an invaluable framework to examine the convergence of social identities, the social determinants of health and a global pandemic in communities of historically marginalized and underrepresented persons. The purpose of this paper is to examine how the coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated the disparities experienced by African American and Latinx persons using the principles of intersectionality theory as the schema. A literature review was performed on the scholarly articles examining the disproportionate incidence and mortality rates of African Americans and Latinx persons in America. The current literature confirms that the disparities which existed prior to the onset of the coronavirus pandemic have been magnified by systemic oppression and racism of historically marginalized and underrepresented persons in America. The coronavirus pandemic has spotlighted the disparities in sustainable employment and access to health care for African American and Latinx persons. Employing a social justice theoretical framework of intersectionality provides an opportunity to examine the lived experiences of African American and Latinx persons without race/ethnicity being the primary focal point. Future research will illustrate the urgent need for public health policy reform to eradicate the disparities experienced by African American and Latinx populations.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-15
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2020-0164
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Moving beyond the rhetoric on faculty diversity in higher education: an
           interview with diversity expert Dr Bailey Jackson

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      Authors: Monica C. Gavino
      Abstract: The aim of this article is to provide Dr Bailey Jackson's perspective on institutional and systemic barriers to full inclusion of diverse faculty in higher education through the lens of the multicultural organizational development (MCOD) model. Dr Jackson is renowned for his work on social justice, diversity and multiculturalism. This is a personal interview with Dr Bailey Jackson. This interview provides insight on institutional level change efforts through the MCOD framework, a perspective on why institutions get stuck on the way to becoming a healthy multicultural institutions, and the effect on moving the needle on faculty diversity in institutions of higher education. The institutional obstacles and barriers tend to be centered around misalignment with mission, vision and core values, how those are formulated to include diversity and inclusion. Faculty diversity is only one component in dealing with the health of any organization or the academy as a whole. If institutions focus on diversity faculty in an unhealthy system, they will encounter limitations on how much the institution will develop on the MCOD continuum. The health of the overall system is going to affect the approach to faculty diversity. Dr Jackson provides insight on his work with the MCOD framework and specifically the overall health of the institution as critical to faculty diversity initiatives. Questions to help institutions begin to assess themselves and identify changes required to move toward Multicultural within the context of faculty diversity are provided. Through a series of questions, insight from Dr Jackson on why institutions get stuck in moving the needle on faculty diversity through the lens of the MCOD framework is gained.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-15
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-11-2020-0342
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Skilled immigrant women's career trajectories during the COVID-19 pandemic
           in Canada

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Luciara Nardon, Amrita Hari, Hui Zhang, Liam P.S. Hoselton, Aliya Kuzhabekova
      Abstract: Despite immigrant-receiving countries' need for skilled professionals to meet labour demands, research suggests that many skilled migrants undergo deskilling, downward career mobility, underemployment, unemployment and talent waste, finding themselves in low-skilled occupations that are not commensurate to their education and experience. Skilled immigrant women face additional gendered disadvantages, including a disproportionate domestic burden, interrupted careers and gender segmentation in occupations and organizations. This study explores how the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic impacted skilled newcomer women's labour market outcomes and work experiences. The authors draw on 50 in-depth questionnaires with skilled women to elaborate on their work experiences during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic pushed skilled immigrant women towards unemployment, lower-skilled or less stable employment. Most study participants had their career trajectory delayed, interrupted or reversed due to layoffs, decreased job opportunities and increased domestic burden. The pandemic's gendered nature and the reliance on work-from-home arrangements and online job search heightened immigrant women's challenges due to limited social support and increased family responsibilities. This paper adds to the conversation of increased integration challenges under pandemic conditions by contextualizing the pre-pandemic literature on immigrant work integration to the pandemic environment. Also, this paper contributes a better understanding of the gender dynamics informing the COVID-19 socio-economic climate.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-03
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-09-2020-0255
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • What do participants value in a diversity mentorship program'
           Perspectives from a Canadian medical school

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      Authors: Stephanie Yifan Zhou, Anita Balakrishna, Joyce Nyhof-Young, Imaan Javeed, Lisa Annette Robinson
      Abstract: As medical schools become increasingly diverse, there is a growing demand for schools to support their equity-seeking students. At the University of Toronto, the diversity mentorship program (DMP) is a new program created to support equity-seeking and diverse medical students in first- and second-year through didactic lectures, networking opportunities and mentorship from senior clinicians. This article aims to share participant perspectives on how diversity-focused mentorship benefits them, perceived barriers and insights for other institutions developing a similar program. Using a mixed methods design, students and mentors completed semi-structured surveys to assess broad perceptions of their mentorship experiences. Focus groups were conducted with both groups to gain deeper understandings of participants' experiences. The authors performed thematic analysis to identify qualities of successful experiences and barriers to participation. Most mentors and mentees found the DMP helpful and identified five themes contributing to a positive mentorship experience: (1) accessibility, (2) program diversity focus with clear expectations, (3) career guidance, (4) exposure to different perspectives and (5) community and shared identity. Uncertainty on how to help less assertive mentees, mentorship pair discordance where mentees paired by race did not share racial identities and logistical challenges was identified as barriers to maintaining mentoring relationships. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first qualitative study exploring the feelings and impressions of participants in a mentorship program at a medical school addressing the needs of equity-seeking groups. By understanding the characteristics and value of diversity-focused mentorship, this will inform the creation of similar supportive programs across various professional fields at other schools.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2020-0348
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Individual and situational predictors of intention to hire gay male and
           ultra-orthodox male job applicants

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      Authors: Yael Brender-Ilan, Avi Kay
      Abstract: This paper examines personal and situational factors that may contribute to biases in hiring decisions at the workplace, focusing on willingness to hire male gay or male Jewish ultra-Orthodox Jewish job candidates. 942 Jewish participants in Israel responded to an anonymous online questionnaire regarding a scenario addressing the possible employments of two male applicants: a homosexual and an ultra-Orthodox Jew. A variety of statistical tools, including regression analysis were performed to test hypotheses. Findings show that social dominance orientation, conservatism, gender and religiosity as well as frequency of contact with the “unlike other” impacted on hiring intention of the participants. These relationships varied in strength and direction with regard to the two applicant types in question. The explication of the phenomenon in question has both important theoretical and practical importance in a world where – concurrently – there exists increasing contact among individuals from different backgrounds and (perhaps not coincidently) increased signs of wariness of and discrimination toward those unlike ourselves. In light of economic costs related to discrimination – not to mention the personal costs to those discriminated against – organizations must better understand the dynamics of the phenomenon in question. This is one of the first empirical examinations of the relative impact of personal and situational factors on hiring bias. In addition, it is the first study of its kind in Israel focusing on the mechanisms behind hiring bias toward gay males and ultra-orthodox males.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-05-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-10-2020-0307
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • “My only solution is to work later and sleep less”: exploring the
           perspectives of parenting in academia in Ontario, Canada

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      Authors: Tracy A. Smith-Carrier, Sarah Benbow, Andrea Lawlor, Andrea O'Reilly
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore the experiences of parents who have full professorial positions (in faculties of engineering and nursing) in universities in Ontario, Canada, with a particular focus on the ways in which gender shapes professors' parenting experiences. We employ a case study methodology involving quantitative and qualitative data collected from a survey emailed to full professors in Ontario. Data from the study reveal that numerous strategies, resources (e.g. informal social support networks, supportive partners) and institutional supports (i.e. pausing the tenure clock after child birth) are required to assist academics to meet the extensive demands of their positions, while they perform caregiving responsibilities for their children. The protected ground of family status is inconsistently applied in Canadian human rights policy, considerably reducing its transformative potential. Yet, while family status gains greater recognition in rights-based practice, we argue that it be added to forthcoming institutional equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) action plans across post-secondary institutions to better ensure equity for mothers who shoulder significant paid and unpaid work responsibilities. While there is literature on parenting in academia, family status is rarely featured as an intersection of interest in EDI research. This article aims to fill this gap.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-05-25
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2020-0357
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Diamond in the rough' An “empty review” of research into
           “neurodiversity” and a road map for developing the inclusion agenda

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Nancy Doyle, Almuth McDowall
      Abstract: The aims of the paper were to highlight the dearth of applied practitioner research concerning the expression of neurodiversity at work and develop an epistemological framework for a future research agenda. A systematic empty review protocol was employed, with three a priori research questions, inquiring as to the extent of neurodiversity research within mainstream work psychology, psychology in general and lastly within cross-disciplinary academic research. The results of the final search were quality checked and categorized to illustrate where studies relevant to practice are currently located. The academic literature was found to be lacking in contextualized, practical advice for employers or employees. The location and foci of extracted studies highlighted a growing science-practitioner gap. The research focused on common neurominority conditions such as autism and dyslexia; it is acknowledged that the neurodiversity definition itself is broader and more anthropological in nature. A need for a comprehensive research agenda is articulated, and research questions and frameworks are proposed. Guidance is given on applying disability accommodation to both individual and organizational targets. The disability employment gap is unchanged since legislation was introduced. The neurodiversity concept is no longer new, and it is time for multi-disciplinary collaborations across science and practice to address the questions raised in this paper. This paper offers an original analysis of the neurodiversity paradox, combining systematic inquiry with a narrative synthesis of the extant literature. The conceptual clarification offers clear directions for researchers and practitioners.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-05-25
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2020-0172
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • It is your fault: workplace consequences of anti-Asian stigma during
           COVID-19

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      Authors: Danielle M. Gardner, Caitlin Q. Briggs, Ann Marie Ryan
      Abstract: As COVID-19 cases rose in the US, so too did instances of discrimination against Asians. The current research seeks to understand and document discrimination toward Asians in the US specifically linked to the global pandemic (study 1). The authors test hypotheses based in social categorization and intergroup contact theories, demonstrating perceived pandemic blame is a mechanism for discrimination (study 2). In study 1, the authors survey Asians living in the US regarding experiences and perceptions of COVID-19-related discrimination. In study 2, a two-time point survey examined whether participant perceptions of pandemic blame toward China predict discriminatory behavior toward Asians. Study 1 demonstrated that 22.5% of US-residing Asians report personally encountering pandemic-related discrimination. Study 2 indicated that COVID-19 blame attributions toward China predicted anticipated hiring bias and increased physical distancing of Asians at work, associated with higher levels of US identification. The findings have theoretical implications for research on blame and stigmatization, as well as practical implications regarding bias mitigation. The present studies advance understanding of event-based blame as a driver of prejudice and discrimination at work and suggest organizations attend to bias mitigation in conjunction with uncertainty reduction communications in challenging times.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-05-19
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-08-2020-0252
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Development and implementation of a framework for estimating the economic
           benefits of an accessible and inclusive society

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Emile Tompa, Amirabbas Mofidi, Arif Jetha, Pamela Lahey, Alexis Buettgen
      Abstract: To develop a framework for estimating the economic benefits of an accessible and inclusive society and implement it for the Canadian context. The framework measures the gap between the current situation in terms of accessibility and inclusiveness, and a counterfactual scenario of a fully accessible and inclusive society. The method consists of three steps. First, the conceptual framework was developed based on a literature review and expert knowledge. Second, the magnitudes for each domain of the framework was estimated for the reference year 2017 using data from various sources. Third, several sensitivity analyses were run using different assumptions and scenarios. It was estimated that moving to a fully accessible and inclusive society would create a value of $337.7bn (with a range of $252.8–$422.7bn) for Canadian society in the reference year of 2017. This is a sizeable proportion of gross domestic product (17.6%, with a range of 13.1–22.0%) and is likely a conservative estimate of the potential benefits. Understanding the magnitude of the economic benefits of an accessible and inclusive society can be extremely useful for governments, disability advocates and industry leaders as it provides invaluable information on the benefits of efforts, such as legislation, policies, programs and practices, to improve accessibility and inclusion of persons with disabilities. Furthermore, the total economic benefits and the benefits per person with a disability can serve as inputs in economic evaluations and impact assessments.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-07-2020-0186
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Now protected or still stigmatized' A 25-year outlook on the impact of
           the Americans with Disabilities Act

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      Authors: Felix Y. Wu, Christine Nittrouer, Vinh Nguyen, Mikki Hebl, Frederick L. Oswald, Lex Frieden
      Abstract: In 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law by President George H.W. Bush. This law was intended to prevent discrimination against people with disabilities (PWD) in employment, public accommodations, transportation and other areas of life. However, the degree of impact in these sectors has not been studied in tandem. Addressing these sectors together is the primary objective of this paper. Results are analyzed and presented regarding ADA impacts as well as which organizations provide advocacy services in support to PWD from survey data collected from 1,582 US participants in 2010 (N = 866) and 2015 (N = 716). Results suggest that the ADA has had a positive impact on PWD, yet this law favorably affects people of certain demographics more than others. Moreover, people with and without disabilities have differing opinions on the impact of the ADA, suggesting that what is conveyed to the public and the impact of the ADA on real-life outcomes of PWD are sometimes misaligned. The present study helps add to the current body of knowledge on the impact of the ADA by providing perspectives on advocacy services and impacts from a diverse set of PWD and their counterparts without disabilities.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-05-03
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2020-0173
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Employee engagement and commitment to two Australian autism employment
           programs: associations with workload and perceived supervisor support

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      Authors: Jennifer R. Spoor, Rebecca L. Flower, Simon M. Bury, Darren Hedley
      Abstract: Although there is growing academic and business interest in autism employment programs, few studies have examined employee (manager and coworker) attitudes toward these programs. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of workload changes (a job demand) and perceived supervisor support (a job resource) on commitment to the program and employee engagement more broadly. A total of 229 employees from two Australian public sector organizations completed a survey about the autism employment program in their organization. Perceived workload increases were associated with lower affective commitment and higher continuance commitment to the program. Perceived supervisor support was associated with higher affective commitment to the program and employee engagement, but lower continuance commitment to the program. Perceived supervisor support moderated the effect of workload increase on employee engagement, but not in the expected direction. This research helps to fill a gap in the autism employment literature by focusing on commitment toward autism employment programs among existing employees. The research helps to provide a more complete and nuanced view of these programs within their broader organizational context.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-04-30
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-05-2020-0132
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Queer India “on paper” – decriminalization, recognition and
           visibility of sexual diversity

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      Authors: Michiel Baas
      Abstract: Taking as a point of departure the edited collection Yaraana (1999), ostensibly the first mainstream publication on gay writing from India, the purpose of this article is to trace the way Indian authors have dealt with the growing visibility of nonnormative sexualities. It suggests that from the start this debate has centered on a dyad between local and culturally specific sexual identities vs its globalized opposite, which is held to threaten regionally specific expressions. The continuing struggle for recognition and equality is revealing for a growing divide between those whose sexuality can rely on growing representation in Indian popular media, and those who feel increasingly marginalized. This article revisits important texts that were published and publicly accessible in India from 1999 onwards. All the text considered and discussed were accessible outside academic networks and thus, available in mainstream bookstores, produced by Indian authors or long-term residents and available in English. Considering the vast language diversity of India as well as the complexity of gaining access to locally published materials, the analysis does not include texts that are only available in a vernacular language. Besides this, the article benefits from the direct input of key activists and scholars from India working on this topic. Even if homosexuality has now been decriminalized in India, what emerges from the writing is a concern that globally hegemonic expressions of alternate sexualities might impact, homogenize and eventually eradicate locally specific expressions. Considering socioeconomic equality in India, this raises serious questions about those whose precarious positions may see them further marginalized because of this. While there have been various overviews and analyses of the fight for decriminalization of homosexuality in India, so far there has not been an analysis how this benefited from a growing awareness and discussion in popularly accessible texts. This analysis also raises concerns that the fight for decriminalization might have negative consequences for those in marginalized positions.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-04-29
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-02-2020-0051
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Diversity in disability: leaders' accounts on inclusive employment in the
           Indian context

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      Authors: Vasanthi Suresh, Lata Dyaram
      Abstract: Despite several concerted efforts and directives, Indian organizations have a long road to travel with respect to the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the workforce. Disability taking different forms often impacts organizational decisions on employment and inclusion of persons with disabilities. Acknowledging the role of employers in improving their employment prospects, the purpose of this paper is to examine key factors that direct the decisions regarding targeted recruitment of persons with various types of disabilities. The exploratory study is based on thematic analysis of senior executives' accounts to examine the factors that direct their decisions pertaining to employment of persons with varied types of disabilities. Findings highlight organizational determinants that enable/disable employment of persons with varied types of disabilities. The organizational determinants reported are: knowledge about type of disability; work characteristics; accommodations based on type of disability; accessibility of physical infrastructure and external pressures; whereas, persons with orthopedic, vision, hearing and intellectual disabilities are represented in the employee base. The present study contributes to employer perspectives on workplace disability inclusion toward understanding the nuances of organizational dynamics and human perceptions. Future studies could explore perspectives of other key stakeholders and the conditions under which organizational determinants are perceived as enabling or disabling. The present study highlights how disability type influences leaders' views on recruitment of persons with disabilities, in an under-researched study context of Indian organizations.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-04-29
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-05-2020-0133
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Inclusion of Indigenous workers in workplace mental health
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Robyn A. O'Loughlin, Vicki L. Kristman, Audrey Gilbeau
      Abstract: This paper highlights inclusion issues Indigenous people experience maintaining their mental health in the workplace. Using a grounded theoretical approach, five sharing circles were conducted with the Nokiiwin Tribal Council's community members to better understand inclusivity issues related to workplace mental health. Five themes emerged from the data related to enhancing inclusivity and workplace mental health for Indigenous workers: (1) connecting with individuals who understand and respect Indigenous culture; (2) respecting Indigenous traditions; (3) hearing about positive experiences; (4) developing trusting relationships and (5) exclusion is beyond the workplace. The next step is to finalize development of the Wiiji app and evaluate the effectiveness of the app in helping Indigenous workers feel included at work and to improve workplace mental health. If effective, the Indigenous-developed e-mental health app will be promoted and its benefits for helping Indigenous workers feel included at work and also for providing accessible mental health resources, will be known. In the future, other Indigenous groups may be potentially interested in adopting a similar application in their workplace(s). There is very little known about inclusivity issues related to Indigenous workers' maintaining their mental health. This paper identifies major issues influencing the exclusion and inclusion of Indigenous workers.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-04-13
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-07-2020-0176
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The plight of racialised minorities during a pandemic: migrants and
           refugees in Italy and Australia

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      Authors: Sarah De Nardi, Melissa Phillips
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to draw on data from interviews with six Italian migrant service providers and media stories in Italy and Australia to weave a comparative snapshot of the plight of precarious migrant and refugee communities in these two countries during the COVID-19 pandemic. The article draws attention to prejudicial shortcomings towards vulnerable migrant communities enacted by the states of Italy and Australia in response to COVID-19. While the unequal ecology of the pandemic has flared up the need for the State to strengthen participation and inclusion policies, it has also provided opportunities to foreground the disadvantages vulnerable communities face that also demand policy attention and sustained funding. Governments in migrant-receiving countries like Australia and Italy need to articulate culturally sensitive and inclusive responses that foreground agencies give vulnerable migrants, asylum seekers and refugees clear, supportive messages of solidarity leading to practical solutions. This paper relays preliminary data from the coalface (migrant service providers) and media as the pandemic evolved in the two countries, whose support mechanisms had never before been critically compared and evaluated through the lens of racial inequality in the face of a health and social crisis.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-04-12
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-08-2020-0248
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Market reactions to the inclusion of people with disabilities

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      Authors: Claudia Araceli Hernández González
      Abstract: This study aims to provide evidence of market reactions to organizations' inclusion of people with disabilities. Cases from financial journals in 1989–2014 were used to analyze the impact of actions taken by organizations to include or discriminate people with disabilities in terms of the companies' stock prices. This research is conducted as an event study where the disclosure of information on an organization's actions toward people with disabilities is expected to impact the organization's stock price. The window of the event was set as (−1, +1) days. Stock prices were analyzed to detect abnormal returns during this period. Results support the hypotheses that investors value inclusion and reject discrimination. Furthermore, the impact of negative actions is immediate, whereas the impact of positive actions requires at least an additional day to influence the firm's stock price. Some differences among the categories were found; for instance, employment and customer events were significantly more important to a firm's stock price than philanthropic actions. It was observed that philanthropic events produce negative abnormal returns on average. The event study methodology provides a different perspective to practices in organizations regarding people with disabilities. Moreover, the findings in this research advance the literature by highlighting that organizations should consider policies and practices that include people with disabilities.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-04-06
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2021-0025
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Education online in lockdown: limits and possibilities. The vision of
           families in Spain

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      Authors: Enrique-Javier Díez-Gutiérrez, Katherine Gajardo Espinoza
      Abstract: March 14, 2020, marked the beginning of an unexpected state of emergency in Spain due to the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). From that moment on, the educational system had to adapt so that millions of students could continue their education at home. Through a descriptive study, the reality and perceptions that Spanish families have about the educational actions that took place during the compulsory lockdown of the Spanish population is presented. 3,400 representatives of family units from 17 autonomous communities answered a survey, the data were analyzed using descriptive and frequency statistics. Relevant conclusions were drawn from the results. Despite the efforts of the authorities, the economic, cultural, social and digital divides leave many households without access to the fundamental right of education; families value the support of technologies but consider that they should not replace the face-to-face education that is necessary for the development process of minors; it is necessary to adapt the school content for a future postpandemic, discriminating the expendable from the essential in the school curriculum; priority must be given to the integral well-being of people in educational policies and also to the most vulnerable ones. The study allows progress in the analysis of educational policy proposals in the face of future crisis.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-04-02
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-07-2020-0194
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The impact of COVID-19 pandemic concerns and gender on mentor seeking
           behavior and self-efficacy

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      Authors: Chantal van Esch, William Luse, Robert L. Bonner
      Abstract: This study examined the effects of gender and pandemic concerns on mentorship seeking behavior during the pandemic caused by the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and its relationship to self-efficacy. This study analyzes the data collected from 253 academics in a quantitative survey administered online. Women and those with higher levels of concern about the COVID-19 pandemic were more likely to seek mentorship. During this time of uncertainty role modeling was sought more than career support and psychosocial support. All three functions of mentorship seeking were positively associated with higher levels of self-efficacy. The present study finds that individuals turn to mentors when they are concerned about macro-level events (e.g. a global pandemic). Additionally, individuals who self-identify as women sought mentorship to a greater extent than men. In this way, it is not only the situation that matters (like women having fewer resources and more demands than men) but also the perception of a situation (like how concerned individuals were about the COVID-19 pandemic). Additionally, this paper helps to further develop the understanding of the mentorship function of role modeling. Organizations and mentors ought to be cognizant of role modeling during times of crisis, especially for women, this may be counterintuitive to the inclination to provide career and psychosocial support for mentees. This study examines the gendered implications for mentoring during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study specifically examines mentorship seeking behavior and its influence on self-efficacy during uncertain times.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-03-31
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-09-2020-0279
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • COVID-19 pandemic and the poor in the urban spaces of India with special
           reference to Mumbai

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      Authors: Sujayita Bhattacharjee, Sanjukta Sattar
      Abstract: The lives of the poor in the urban spaces of India are filled with hardships. They live amidst poverty and struggle to survive within other problems such as insecure jobs, lack of proper housing, unsanitary conditions and low levels of health immunity. This vulnerable section of the population has been rendered furthermore vulnerable by the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in ways that were never imagined before. Taking this into consideration, the purpose of this article is to examine the vulnerability of the poor in the urban settings of India with special reference to Mumbai in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The methodology adopted in the study is based on the analysis of secondary data and content analysis of the existing literature. In addition to this, the study also makes use of certain narratives of the urban poor in Mumbai that have been captured by various articles, reports and blogs. The findings of the study reveal how the urban poor of India, with special reference to Mumbai, the financial capital of India, has emerged as the worst sufferers of the socioeconomic crisis caused by the social distancing and lockdown measures imposed for combating the pandemic. The study tries to explore the reality of the urban poor's right to the city in the wake of the pandemic.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-03-26
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-07-2020-0196
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Hiding but hoping to be found: workplace disclosure dilemmas of
           individuals with hidden disabilities

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      Authors: Mukta Kulkarni
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to describe workplace disclosure dilemmas of individuals with hidden mental health conditions who have privately accepted their mental health condition (anxiety and/or depression), but have chosen not to disclose it in their respective workplaces. Interviews were conducted with 15 individuals who experience anxiety and/or depression. These individuals work across diverse organizations and sectors in India (e.g. architecture and health care). Data were analyzed using qualitative methods. Interviewees grappled with three dilemmas: professionalism versus authenticity (i.e. bringing only a partial professional self or the whole self to work), withdrawal versus participation (i.e. withdrawal from workplace interactions to conceal their condition or participation such that people could know of it) and personal privacy versus general advocacy (i.e. guarding one's privacy or engaging in advocacy for individuals who experience mental health conditions). Overall, findings suggest that the disclosure dilemma can stem from both one's internalized sense of a devalued self and by perceived contextual cues. Findings imply that perceived contextual conditions that amplify threat of discovery and its anticipated consequences can lead to and reinforce the disclosure dilemma. As individuals internalize others' constructions of themselves, they self-police and do not interrogate assumed normality within their social contexts. Employers can create inclusive environments. Present findings suggest some examples of inclusive practices such as the employment of dedicated resident counselors or counselors shared across organizations, training of stakeholders (including human resource personnel), allowing for selective disclosure (e.g. only to medical personnel) and cultivating informal support networks comprising similar others. Such evidence-based research that can inform practices of inclusion for persons with a disability is especially important, considering that research on mental health conditions is conspicuous by its relative absence in mainstream management journals.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-03-24
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2020-0146
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Understanding LGBT individuals' employment environment in Taiwan: a
           relational framework perspective

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      Authors: Jennet Achyldurdyyeva, Li-Fan Wu, Nurbibi Datova
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the aspects of workplace environment and the experiences of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) employees in an Asian context; a subject that has hitherto been somewhat neglected. It responds to a call for more contextual research in the field of employment diversity in organizational management in general. This is a mixed method study, which utilizes multiple sources of primary and secondary data and consists of in-depth personal interviews, a survey of LGBT employees, published data (including legislation and state policies), reports issued by social and media organizations, documentary evidence from Taiwanese companies and insights drawn from the existing literature. It was found that there is an interplay between the macro, meso and micro levels in the multilevel relational framework applied to diversity of employment in Taiwan. Macrolevel factors, such as supportive legislation, mass media and social tolerance toward LGBT community positively affect mesolevel factors, such as stable and secure social networks among the LGBT community in the form of legal and social organizations (NGOs, social media, bars, restaurants, etc.) as well as many companies inclusion of sexual orientation in their definitions of diversity. However, this is opposed by macrolevel, cultural values related to family structure and intergenerational relationships that inhibit pro-active integration and equality of LGBT individuals at the meso organizational level. Companies headed by older-generation leadership can be slow to advocate, support and promote sexual-orientation diversity in their workplaces. In contrast, microlevel data shows that LGBT employees receive robust psychological support from their peer group, friends and the LGBT community, although gaining acceptance by family and coworkers remains a challenge. Future studies need to focus on the dynamics of the meso- and microlevel factors by investigating how organizational structure, perspectives of leaders and HR managers, diversity management practices and attitudes and behaviors of LGBT employees and other coworkers affect development and integration of sexual-orientation diversity programs within organizations. Managers, policy makers in organization as well as educators benefit from the context-sensitive findings and recommendations offered in this paper. Understanding of LGBT individuals employment environment helps to facilitate or hinder the positive development of equal society and benefit both LGBT employees, their coworkers and managers. Limited research exists on the LGBT employees experiences at work in Asia. This study makes unique contribution to the understanding of sexual orientation category of diversity at work in Taiwan context.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-03-19
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-02-2020-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Building, sustaining and growing: disability inclusion in business

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      Authors: Robert Gould, Courtney Mullin, Sarah Parker Harris, Robin Jones
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the unique and the complementary aspects of disability inclusion and diversity strategies and to offer insight for organizations to integrate disability within diversity frameworks. The research team conducted semi-structured interviews with diversity and inclusion “champions” from large businesses to learn about policies, practices and processes for fostering disability inclusion. The businesses have all received national recognition for supporting employees with disabilities. Interviewees described strategies to build, sustain and grow disability inclusion by framing disability similarly to other diversity categories. The champions suggested practices to improve disability inclusion initiatives within their organizations. There is limited information on what organizations are doing to support disability inclusion in the workplace. This study builds on the existing literature and responds to calls for case information from business personnel to gather data about common and effective practices.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2020-0156
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Retaining and supporting employees with mental illness through inclusive
           organizations: lessons from five Canadian case studies

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      Authors: Rebecca E. Gewurtz, Karen Harlos, Emile Tompa, Margaret Oldfield, Rosemary Lysaght, Sandra Moll, Bonnie Kirsh, Hélène Sultan-Taïeb, Katie Cook, Sergio Rueda
      Abstract: Although awareness is growing of the importance of employee mental health and the value of inclusive work practices, less is known about how to support employees with mental illness (MI). We aimed to explore organizational strategies and work practices that promote retention and support of employees living with MI in relation to past theory-driven research by building and extending current theory. We adopted a qualitative case-study approach focussed on organizations that have taken steps towards promoting workplace inclusion for employees with MI. Five diverse Canadian organizations were recruited based on their efforts to build psychologically safe and healthy workplaces, and actively support employees with MI. Data collection in each organization consisted of onsite observation and interviews with workplace stakeholders, including employees with MI, their co-workers, supervisors/managers and human resource professionals. Thirty interviews were conducted from across the five organizations. Data analysis was informed by interpretive description to identify challenges and opportunities. Two key themes were noted in depictions of supportive workplaces: (1) relationship-focussed workplaces and (2) flexible, inclusive work practices. These practices highlight how organizations support employees with MI. Despite our focus on organizations working towards inclusion, the stigma associated with MI and the rigidity of some workplace processes continue to limit support and retention. Our findings suggest that organizations should focus on communication processes, support mechanisms, how they reinforce flexibility, inclusion and oversight of employees with MI.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-03-12
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2020-0174
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The benefits of inclusion for disability measurement in the workplace

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      Authors: Alecia M. Santuzzi, Jesus Jose Martinez, Robert T. Keating
      Abstract: The formal reporting of disability to an employing organization is inconsistent and likely an underestimate of the true numbers of workers with disabilities and the presence of various types of disabilities. This issue interferes with an organization's count of such workers, as well as efforts to set priorities and develop practices to support workers with disabilities. The authors argue that creating inclusive work environments not only improves worker well-being (as suggested in past research) but also improves their reactions to the process of formal reporting of disability in the workplace. A sample of 160 working adults in the United States who reported disabilities or health conditions that may qualify as disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990, as amended in 2008) completed a survey that measured perceptions of the workplace environment and reactions to a frequently used disability disclosure form. When controlling for age of respondents, anticipated disability stigma and inclusion in the workplace predicted different reactions to a disability disclosure request. Anticipated stigma was associated with more negative emotion, concerns about privacy and others' reactions to their responses on the disclosure form. Inclusion in the workplace was associated with higher ratings for appropriateness of the measure, positive emotion and less negative emotion. Although research has identified associations between workplace inclusion and general worker experiences, such as job satisfaction and intentions to quit, this work uncovers a benefit of inclusion to required measurement processes in organizations. The unique contributions of inclusion and implications for workplace practices are discussed.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-02-25
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2020-0167
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Addressing COVID through PCD: policy coherence for vulnerability in
           development and its relationship to the coronavirus pandemic

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      Authors: Sergio Moldes-Anaya, Harlan Koff, Angelica Da Porto, Tara Lipovina
      Abstract: The purpose of this article is to understand how coronavirus impacts relate to existing vulnerabilities in different world regions. The article utilizes quantitative analysis to examine regional variations in coronavirus risk assessment. It then qualitatively employs a policy coherence for development (PCD) approach to analyze how public policies contribute to or mitigate vulnerability, defined as the product of exposure to external shocks, institutional coping capabilities and risk associated with social divisions in societies. The research presented below shows that significant regional variance exists in terms of coronavirus risk, based on statistical analysis of the INFORM COVID-19 Risk Report prepared by the European Commission. The PCD analysis highlights important relationships between public policy strategies and the construction of both underlying vulnerabilities and coronavirus impacts. The PCD approach presented here focuses on the reconciliation of trade-offs. It shows how policy interactions affect vulnerabilities and suggests that coherent policy strategies aimed at reducing vulnerabilities are necessary in order to adequately respond to the coronavirus pandemic. This analysis frames vulnerability as a socially constructed condition and through implementation of a PCD approach, it indicates how policy strategies contribute to or mitigate vulnerabilities. In doing so, it intends to contribute conceptually to the literature on vulnerability by showing how policy incoherences contribute to the construction of this condition. Empirically, the originality of this article is its statistical analysis of regional variance of coronavirus risk and the qualitative analysis of policy strategies in representative cases and how they have affected vulnerabilities and coronavirus impacts.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-02-01
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-08-2020-0253
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Gender stereotypes: persistence and challenges

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      Authors: Gladys Merma-Molina, María Alejandra Ávalos-Ramos, María Ángeles Martínez Ruiz
      Abstract: The aims of this study are to identify and analyse prevalent gender roles and the persistence of sexist stereotypes among teachers in training in Spain, to determine the reasons for them and suggest solutions for eradicating sexist prejudices. A gender role questionnaire was administered to 1260 workers from 54 different professions who were enrolled on a postgraduate training course to qualify as secondary education teachers. The instrument contained six variables for both quantitative and qualitative analysis: professional work, family (looking after children), feelings and emotions, household chores, body image and free time. Household chores, looking after children and gender roles linked to body image were those most indicated by both men and women. It is concluded that men participate little in bringing up children and household chores and that women continue to shoulder the responsibility. Both are concerned about their body image, but women have little self-acceptance of and satisfaction with their bodies and a stronger sense of being judged by how they look. Gender stereotypes persist, despite extensive legislation in Spain since 2004. The study has limitations deriving from its choice of convenience sampling. Although it includes participants from six Spanish autonomous communities, the number from each region is not very high. Nevertheless, the sample is representative of almost all branches of knowledge (54 professions). Another limitation concerns the images used in the research instrument as a data collection strategy insofar, as they could not be obtained from a data bank specific to the research subject but instead had to be found in databases of general images. It can be inferred that a data collection strategy without any danger of bias would be to encourage each participant to design their own images, reflecting their perceptions and auto-perceptions of gender roles and stereotypes. The fact that there were no pre-existing studies using this type of research instrument in education sciences was a handicap for the investigation. Despite these methodological limitations, the results of the study may serve as a basis for implementing specific future actions originating from any area – but especially from the area of education – aimed at teaching people about equal roles in order to eliminate sexist sterotypes. This research was carried out as part of the Proyecto Diseño y Atención a las Oportunidades de Género en la Educación Superior (Project on Design and Gender Equality of Opportunities in Higher Education) funded by the Vicerrectorado de Cooperación al Desarrollo (Office for University Cooperation for Development) at the University of Alicante (Spain). Spanish legislation has not been able to promote significant changes in the performance of traditional gender roles or to eliminate sexist stereotypes that perpetuate imbalances between men and women. The ideal and prevalent model of a Spanish woman is still that of a “self-sacrificing mother”, responsible for the household chores and childcare. She must combine this first job with a second profession, and, in addition, she must have a “desirable physical image”. The study puts forward various possible solutions for reducing and/or eradicating sexist attitudes with the participation of different social agents and in particular through education. The investigation could be of use when carrying out specific cross-sectional interventions on the subject of gender equality with students on postgraduate teacher training courses, for the purposes of encouraging the elimination of stereotypes and strengthening the capacity for critical judgement, positive self-concept and self-esteem. The study may be useful for carrying out specific and transversal university training interventions in postgraduate teacher training on gender equality aimed at promoting the elimination of stereotypes, the strengthening of critical judgement capacity, positive self-concept and self-esteem.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-01-08
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2018-0229
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Developing and testing a framework for understanding refugees' job search
           processes

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      Authors: Harrison C.D. Boss , Clara S. Lee , Joshua S. Bourdage , Leah K. Hamilton
      Abstract: This article outlines the development of the Refugee Job Search Process Framework (RJSPF), which was created to help identify barriers that refugees face when trying to find employment. The framework incorporates an interdisciplinary, multi-level approach to the job search, delving into research from migration studies and Industrial/Organizational psychology to outline factors that exist on both the side of the refugee applicant and the organization at each stage of the RJSPF. The authors also tested the RJSPF with Syrian refugees and service providers in Canada to examine the validity of each component of the model. The authors used a semi-structured format to interview refugees and service providers on their experiences in either trying to find employment or helping their refugee clients with the job search process. After transcribing the interviews, the data were independently coded, quantified, and analysed using Nvivo software to validate the RJSPF. The majority of the RJSPF either had high or moderate support from the interviews. The authors also identified 6 broader themes using thematic analysis, which include language fluency, credential recognition, Canadian experience “catch 22”, cultural incongruencies, employer exploitation, and mental health for successful employment. The RJSPF is a new integration of disparate theories of job search experiences in a literature that lacks an organizing framework and perspective on the unique challenges refugees face in this area compared to other newcomers. In doing so, the authors use an interdisciplinary, multi-level approach that extends the nomological network of barriers facing refugees, therefore informing future research and practice.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-11-30
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2021-0031
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Untangling the role of CEOs' political ideology in the provision and
           inclusiveness of work–family policies: a multi-level conceptual model

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      Authors: Dorothea Roumpi
      Abstract: Acknowledging the importance of work–family practices that extend beyond what is legally mandated and that cover the needs of a diverse workforce, this paper offers a conceptual model that explores the factors that can influence the provision and inclusiveness of work–family policies in organizations. The conceptual model is based on a thorough literature review of relevant articles in the fields of management and political science. In line with the upper echelons perspective, chief executive officers’ (CEOs') political ideology is a multidimensional concept, comprising two main dimensions (financial and social) that can influence the provision and inclusiveness of work–family practices. Moreover, the proposed conceptual model considers other important factors, such as the centrality of the CEO's political ideology, as potential moderating factors, as well as the conditional role of institutional pressures. Finally, the proposed model takes into account the important role of line managers/supervisors in the implementation of work–family policies and shows the importance of the provision and inclusiveness of work–family practices for critical organizational outcomes (organizational attraction and turnover). The proposed conceptual model offers a more in-depth understanding of the factors that influence the provision and inclusiveness of work–family policies.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-11-26
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-05-2021-0117
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Contributions and challenges of voluntary organizations towards the
           integration of refugees into the job market

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      Authors: Pablo Marlon Medeiros da Silva , Walid Abbas El-Aouar , Thaís Teles Firmino , Juliana Carvalho de Sousa , Wesley Vieira da Silva
      Abstract: This study aims to understand the contributions and challenges of voluntary organizations towards the integration of refugees into the job market. Descriptive research with a qualitative approach based on interpretivism was used, applied to mediators of social entities in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The findings of this study support the importance of voluntary organizations in the employment of refugees, based on background that will contribute directly to the training of displaced persons in the Brazilian labor market. Meanwhile, difficulties such as post-employment refugee monitoring, legislative obstacles to the verification of skills, structural and human capital limitations of mediators, the national economic crisis and the lack of government support are identified as the main challenges for long-term assistance to refugees. The results of the study can foster greater participation of public policymakers and society in supporting the third sector, aiming at a greater reach in the provision of services of mediators for the effective integration of refugees in Brazil. This study contributes to the literature on the integration of refugees into the labor market by demonstrating the importance of voluntary organizations in this process. It also demonstrates how the main challenges of the third sector in the Brazilian context impact its support in facilitating and maintaining the employment of displaced persons.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-11-26
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-07-2020-0203
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The impact of gender inequality in education and employment on economic
           performance in Turkey: evidence from a cointegration approach

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      Authors: Ömer Esen , Gamze Yıldız Seren
      Abstract: This study aims to empirically examine the impact of gender-based inequalities in both education and employment on economic performance using the dataset of Turkey for the period 1975–2018. This study employs Johansen cointegration tests to analyze the existence of a long-term relation among variables. Furthermore, dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS) and fully modified ordinary least squares (FMOLS) estimation methods are performed to determine the long-run coefficients. The findings from the Johansen cointegration analysis confirm that there is a long-term cointegration relation between variables. Moreover, DOLS and FMOLS results reveal that improvements in gender equality in both education and employment have a strong and significant impact on real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita in the long term. The authors expect that this study will make remarkable contributions to the future academic studies and policy implementation, as it examines the relation among the variables by including the school life expectancy from primary to tertiary based on the gender parity index (GPI), the gross enrollment ratio from primary to tertiary based on GPI and the ratio of female to male labor force participation (FMLFP) rate.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-11-18
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-04-2021-0099
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Relating supervisor interpersonal emotion management- and task-oriented
           leadership to adaptive performance: a moderated-mediation model
           incorporating trust and gender

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      Authors: Gary A. Adams , Jennica R. Webster
      Abstract: The authors incorporated leadership and gender theories with research on trust to propose a model relating interpersonal emotion management (IEM, a type of relational leadership) and task-oriented (T-O) leadership to follower adaptive performance. The authors also examine the indirect effect of IEM and T-O on adaptive performance via trust and the possible moderating role of gender on these relationships. The authors tested this model using a sample of 314 workers who rated their direct leaders (supervisors). Overall, results supported the model for IEM as it was directly and indirectly related (via trust) to adaptive job performance (even after controlling for transformational leadership) and these relationships were more positive for women leaders. T-O leadership was related to adaptive job performance as expected but was unrelated to trust or, via trust, to adaptive performance. Findings also suggest that women direct leaders may garner more trust and adaptive performance from followers by engaging in higher levels of IEM, while also not experiencing backlash for engaging in the more agentic T-O behaviors during a crisis. Despite an emphasis on women's relational leadership during a crisis, the authors findings show organizations are best served by ambidextrous leaders who can manage the emotions and tasks of their followers and that both women and men can engage in these leadership styles without penalty. Much research regarding women's leadership advantage during a crisis is based on political leaders or has been conducted in lab settings. Further, it has focused on attitudes toward the women leaders rather than their performance. Research has also not considered both IEM along with the possible backlash women may experience for engaging in T-O leadership.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-11-18
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-07-2021-0174
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Selling science: optimizing the research funding evaluation and decision
           process

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Claartje J. Vinkenburg , Carolin Ossenkop , Helene Schiffbaenker
      Abstract: In this contribution to EDI's professional insights, the authors develop practical and evidence-based recommendations that are developed for bias mitigation, discretion elimination and process optimization in panel evaluations and decisions in research funding. An analysis is made of how the expectation of “selling science” adds layers of complexity to the evaluation and decision process. The insights are relevant for optimization of similar processes, including publication, recruitment and selection, tenure and promotion. The recommendations are informed by experiences and evidence from commissioned projects with European research funding organizations. The authors distinguish between three aspects of the evaluation process: written applications, enacted performance and group dynamics. Vignettes are provided to set the stage for the analysis of how bias and (lack of) fit to an ideal image makes it easier for some than for others to be funded. In research funding decisions, (over)selling science is expected but creates shifting standards for evaluation, resulting in a narrow band of acceptable behavior for applicants. In the authors' recommendations, research funding organizations, evaluators and panel chairs will find practical ideas and levers for process optimization, standardization and customization, in terms of awareness, accountability, biased language, criteria, structure and time. Showing how “selling science” in research funding adds to the cumulative disadvantage of bias, the authors offer design specifications for interventions to mitigate the negative effects of bias on evaluations and decisions, improve selection habits, eliminate discretion and create a more inclusive process.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-10-27
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2021-0028
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Definitions of work-life balance in childfree dual-career couples: an
           inductive typology

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      Authors: Galina Boiarintseva , Souha R. Ezzedeen , Christa Wilkin
      Abstract: Work-life balance experiences of dual-career professional couples with children have received considerable attention, but there remains a paucity of research on the definitions of work-life balance among dual-career professional couples without children. This qualitative investigation sheds light on childfree couples' lives outside of work and their concomitant understanding of work-life balance. The study draws on interviews with 21 dual-career professional couples in Canada and the US, exploring their non-work lives and how they conceive of work-life balance. Thematic analyses demonstrate that this group, while free of child rearing responsibilities, still deals with myriad non-work obligations. These couples also defy uniform characterization. The inductive investigation uncovered four couple categories based on the individual members' career and care orientations. These included careerist, conventional, non-conventional and egalitarian couples. Definitions of work-life balance varied across couple type according to the value they placed on flexibility, autonomy and control, and their particular level of satisfaction with their work and non-work domains. This study contributes to research at the intersection of work-life balance and various demographic groups by exploring the work-life balance of professional dual-career couples without children. Using an interpretive ontology, the study advances a typology of childfree dual-career professional couples. The findings challenge the rhetoric that these couples are primarily work-oriented but otherwise carefree. Thus, this study demonstrates ways that childfree couples are different as well as similar to those with children.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-10-07
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2020-0368
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Social and economic empowerment of women through financial inclusion:
           empirical evidence from India

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      Authors: Mukesh Pal , Hemant Gupta , Yogesh C. Joshi
      Abstract: Women empowerment becomes an important policy discussion in development economics and modernization theory. The empowerment of women can lead to an increase in the quality viz-a-viz the capacity of human resources accessible for economic development. The purpose of this study is to evidence the impact of social and economic dimensions on women empowerment through financial inclusion in rural India. To reveal the research objective, the study has utilized a primary survey of women respondents from the Gujarat state of India by a simple random sampling method and applied a logistic regression approach to identify the relationship between the need of a bank account (determinant of financial inclusion) as a dependent variable and social and economic dimensions of women empowerment such as earning status, participation in financial decision-making, recipient of social welfare schemes and perception towards the safety of saving as independent variables. The results of this study show that earning status, participation in financial decision-making at household level and recipient of social welfare schemes by women have a significant impact on women empowerment through financial inclusion; however, safety of their savings is observed as an insignificant variable, yet the odd value is very high (2.437) in the present study. The present study is the first of its kind to examine the social and economic status of women and its impact on their requirement of a formal bank account for the overall empowerment of women in rural India.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-10-05
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-04-2021-0113
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • From bystander to ally among faculty colleagues: construction and
           validation of the bystander intervention behavior scale

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      Authors: Jennifer Griffith , Mary Fran T. Malone , Christine M. Shea
      Abstract: Bystander intervention mitigates the negative impact of bias incidents in the workplace. However, intervention tends to be viewed as binary: intervention occurred or it did not. Consequently, research has focused on conditions under which witnesses of bias incidents choose to intervene, and less is known about how witnesses may intervene. This paper elucidates the intervention behavior choices available to witnesses of bias incidents and develops a bystander intervention behavior (BIB) scale. To develop the scale, the authors used the three-phased act frequency methodology. In phase I, the authors surveyed faculty who had both witnessed a bias incident and seen someone intervene to address it. The authors asked these faculties to list the observed bystander intervention behaviors they had personally observed. In Phase II, different survey respondents and subject matter experts assessed the prototypicality of each of the behaviors in relation to the concept of bystander intervention. In phase III, the authors tested the validity and reliability of the resulting 18-item scale and assessed the ability of bystander intervention behavior to mitigate the negative impact of bias incidents on the academic workplace. The BIB scale consists of two theoretically derived, empirically validated and reliable dimensions; it can be used as a summary score to evaluate the extent to which colleagues intervene indirectly and directly when a bias incident occurs in the academic workplace. This scale is valuable in advancing efforts to mitigate the negative effect of bias in the workplace and training colleagues to intervene in various ways when bias occurs.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-09-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-02-2021-0050
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Migrant workers in precarious employment

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      Authors: Hui Zhang , Luciara Nardon , Greg J. Sears
      Abstract: Various forms of precarious employment create barriers to the integration and inclusion of migrant workers in receiving countries. The purpose of this paper is to review extant research in employment relations and management to identify key factors that contribute to migrant workers' precarious employment and highlight potential avenues for future research. The authors conducted a narrative literature review drawing on 38 academic journal articles published between 2005 and 2020. The authors’ review suggests that macro- and meso-level factors contribute to the precarious employment conditions of migrant workers. However, there is a limited articulation of successful practices and potential solutions to reduce migrant work precarity and exclusion. The literature on migrant workers' precarious employment experience is primarily focused on low-skilled sector (e.g. agriculture, hospitality, domestic care) jobs. In addition, few studies have explored the role of worker characteristics, such as gender, class, ethnicity, race and migration status, in shaping the experience of migrant workers in precarious employment. The results of this research highlight the importance of engaging multilevel actors in addressing migrant employment precarity, including policymakers, employers and employment agencies. This research contributes to a growing conversation of migrant employment precarity by highlighting the heterogeneity of migrant groups and calling for the use of intersectional lenses to understand migrant workers' experiences of precarious employment.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-09-17
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2021-0018
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Is childcare cost a barrier to women managers' retention and progress at
           large firms'

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      Authors: Amod Choudhary
      Abstract: The impact of childcare cost and childcare responsibilities has generally negatively impacted women in workforce. There has been lack of research on the impact of childcare on women managers in larger US public firms. The purpose of this paper is to determine how childcare costs impact the number of women managers in S&P 500 firms. The paper employs Driscoll–Kraay panel regression model using childcare data for ten years and the percent of women managers at S&P 500 firms. The results show that increase in childcare cost leads to decrease in percent of women in management positions when the child is an infant. Interestingly, but plausibly the results also show that for preschool-age children as the cost of childcare increases, there is an increase in percent of women in management. Furthermore, childcare costs are still an impediment to careers of women managers, specifically when the child is an infant. The effect is much less when the child grows from an infant to preschool age. One limitation of this research paper is that the childcare cost data is not directly from the S&P 500 firms. The percent of women management data used is limited to the largest S&P 500 firms. Also, there is no agreement as to definition of a manager at these firms. Moreover, not only childcare cost, but the quality and availability of childcare are factors that also play a role in decision to work and/or use of childcare. This paper adds to the existing literature by providing evidence that childcare cost impedes women managers' career growth. This finding is more worrisome given that Covid-19 has had a very disproportionate impact on women with child(dren) in the workforce.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2020-0371
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Social inclusion of migrant workers in a pandemic: employing consumer
           vulnerability lens to internal Indian migrant experience

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      Authors: Archana Preeti Voola , Subhasis Ray , Ranjit Voola
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to expand the theoretical understanding of social inclusion of vulnerable populations. Employing cross disciplinary literature from marketing and social policy, this paper examines the factors shaping internal migrant workers experience of inclusion and vulnerability in the context of COVID-19 pandemic. The authors conducted a review of social inclusion and consumer vulnerability literature to develop a new and innovative conceptual framework which operationalises social inclusion. This framework was then examined using an illustrative case study of internal migrant worker crisis in India. Data for the case were collected from various national and international media, government and non-government reports published in English on the pandemic related migrant crisis in India. Access and control over food was fraught with barriers for migrant workers. As the lockdown progressed, access to and control over work opportunities was precarious. Furthermore, the resource-control constraints faced by migrant workers in terms of food, work and transport had a direct impact on their experience of social inclusion. Lastly, the stranded migrant workers found themselves unable to fully participate in economic activities. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first paper that integrates consumer vulnerability concept, originating in marketing scholarship into the social inclusion framework. This allowed for anchoring the “aspirational goals” of social inclusion into the concrete context of consumers and marketplaces.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-09-06
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-09-2020-0254
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The positive experiences associated with coming out at work

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      Authors: Nicholas P. Salter , Thomas Sasso
      Abstract: Much research has focused on the negative aspects of disclosing sexual orientation and/or gender identity in the workplace but less has explicitly examined the positive aspects. This lack of research is problematic as this can oversimplify the work lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ) people. The current study examines positive intrapersonal, interpersonal and work opportunity experiences associated with coming out in the workplace as LGBTQ. The current study surveyed 135 working adults who identified as LGBTQ and used a mixed qualitative and quantitative design to examine the relationship between disclosure and various positive workplace experiences. Results suggest that sexual orientation disclosure at work was related to participants perceiving multiple positive interpersonal as well as work opportunity experiences. Furthermore, results suggest gender identity disclosure was similar to, but not the same as, sexual orientation disclosure in terms of perception of positive experiences. Previous research on disclosure at work has taken a somewhat narrow and typically quantitative approach. The current study provides more nuance to the phenomenon by broadly examining multiple positive experiences associated with disclosure and studying them qualitatively in order to best understand participants' experiences in their own voices.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-09-03
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-11-2020-0322
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Board gender diversity and firms' social engagement in the Gulf
           Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

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      Authors: Mohammad Jizi , Rabih Nehme , Cynthia Melhem
      Abstract: The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries form a unique socioeconomic environment that makes the conclusions of the prior literature not likely to be applicable. GCC countries have huge oil reserves, yet they are aiming at reducing oil dependency through enhancing transparency, increasing foreign direct investments and reforming their governance structure. Their firms are mainly family owned and have low female representation in leadership positions. The study seeks to fill a literature gap by providing a business case supporting the call for gender diverse boards for better governance. The study examines a sample of GCC-listed firms for the years 2009–2018. Three measures are used to proxy for firm social engagement, namely, CSR strategy score, environmental, social and governance (ESG) disclosure score and social pillar score. To ensure whether the presence of women on board or the number of women on board is influential on social engagements, the authors use the existence of women on board and the percentage of women on board variables. Data are collected using Thomson Reuters, and generalized least squares (GLS) panel data regression is used to estimate relationships. The authors find that female representation on GCC corporate boards is increasing, yet in a slow path. The reported results support the role of women on boards in prompting firms' social agenda and enhancing the level of sustainability reporting. The results also show that female board representation supports the implementation of climate change policy, business ethics policy and health and safety policy. The paper evidence the add value of women participation on GCC corporate boards in enhancing boards' functionality and governance. The empirical findings encourage firms and policymakers in the GCC countries to increase the share of females on corporate boards to improve firms' citizenship and facilitate attracting foreign investors.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-31
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-02-2021-0041
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Immigrant health care workers from developing countries in the US:
           antecedents, consequences and institutional responses

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      Authors: Franklin Oikelome , Joshua Broward , Dai Hongwu
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to present a conceptual model on foreign-born health care workers from developing countries working in the US. The model covers their motivations for migration, the consequences in terms of the inequality and exclusion they may experience and the role of institutional responses at micro-, macro- and meso-level of intervention. The paper is based on: (1) in-depth review of key literature studies on the foundation theories of international migration including sociology, economics, anthropology, psychology and human resource management, (2) analysis of theoretical approaches to medical migration across disciplines, (3) analysis of the international and national documentary sources of micro-, macro- and meso-level policies on migration and (4) analysis of evidence on best practices, solutions and aspirational changes across different levels of institutions. (1) Migration of international medical graduates (IMGs) from developing countries to the US can be explained from a micro-, macro- and meso-level of analysis. (2) IMGs who identify as racial/ethnic minorities may experience unfair discrimination differently than their US-born counterparts. (3) Although political/legislative remedies have had some successes, proactive initiatives will be needed alongside enforcement strategies to achieve equity and inclusion. (4) While diversity management initiatives abound in organizations, those designed for the benefit of IMGs from developing countries are rare. (5) Professional identity groups and some nonprofits may challenge structural inequities, but these have not yet achieved economies of scale. Although it is well-documented in the US health care literature how ethnic/racial minorities are unfairly disadvantaged in work and career, the studies are rarely disaggregated according to sub-groups (e.g. non-White IMGs and US-born MGs). The implication is that Black IMG immigrants have been overlooked by the predominant narratives of native-born, Black experiences. In placing the realities of native-born Blacks on the entire Black population in America, data have ignored and undermined the diverse histories, identities and experiences of this heterogeneous group. An awareness of the challenges IMGs from developing countries face have implications for managerial decisions regarding recruitment and selection. Besides their medical qualifications, IMGs from developing countries offer employers additional qualities that are critical to success in health care delivery. Considering organizations traditionally favor White immigrants from Northern and Southern Europe, IMGs from developed countries migrate to the US under relatively easier circumstances. It is important to balance the scale in the decision-making process by including an evaluation of migration antecedents in comprehensive selection criteria. The unfair discrimination faced by IMGs who identify as racial/ethnic minority are multilayered and will affect them in ways that are different compared to their US-born counterparts. In effect, researchers need to make this distinction in research on racial discrimination. Since IMGs are not all uniformly impacted by unfair discrimination, organization-wide audits should be in tune with issues that are of concerns to IMGs who identify as racial/ethnic minorities. Likewise, diversity management strategies should be more inclusive and should not ignore the intersectionality of race/ethnicity, nationality, country of qualification and gender. Immigrant health care workers from developing countries are integral to the health care industry in the United States. They make up a significant proportion of all workers in the health care industry in the US. Although the literature is replete with studies on immigrant health care workers as a whole, research has rarely focused on immigrant health care workers from developing countries. The paper makes a valuable contribution in drawing attention to this underappreciated group, given their critical role in the ongoing pandemic and the need for the US health industry to retain their services to remain viable in the future.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-04-2021-0093
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Labour market inclusion of Afghan refugees in Pakistan through Bourdieu's
           theory of capital

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      Authors: Faiza Ali , Sophie Hennekam , Jawad Syed , Adnan Ahmed , Rabbia Mubashar
      Abstract: This article examines the labour market inclusion of documented and undocumented Afghan refugees in Pakistan using and extending Bourdieu's theory of capital. The authors draw on 22 semi-structured in-depth interviews with both documented and undocumented Afghan refugees in Pakistan. The findings show the low capital endowments of refugees. Their economic capital is shaped by low levels of financial resources, and emotional capital is shaped by their psychological distress and traumata and identity capital takes the form of negative perceptions about them. Their low capital endowments are further reduced through different forms of symbolic violence, such as ambiguous and short-term government policies, bribery and abuse by the police as well as unfair treatment by employers. However, refugees do mobilise their capital endowments to enhance their labour market position. The authors identified resilience as emotional capital, their strategic development of who they are as identity capital as well as social and cultural capital in the form of ethnic and linguistic similarities with locals in finding ways to improve their inclusion in the labour market. The authors provide insights in the dynamics that lead to and sustain the exclusion and inequalities faced by Afghan refugees in Pakistan.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-24
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2020-0353
      Issue No: Vol. 40 , No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Lived experiences of inequalities in the USA: a sense-making perspective

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      Authors: Shaista E. Khilji
      Abstract: Inequality is an important organizational phenomenon. Scholars have argued that inequalities persistently dwell in the flow of our lives and have a lingering impact. Yet, despite such compelling evidence, research has overlooked how individuals make sense of the inequalities they face inside and outside the organizations. The purpose of this paper was to address these gaps and capture its complexity on individual lived experiences with inequalities. The present study used Seidman's adapted 2-interview strategy to collect the data. The first interview placed the participant's life history at the center, allowing the participant to share their childhood and adulthood experiences with inequalities inside and outside the organizations. The second interview focused on the concrete details of the participant's present lived experience and their reflections on the meaning of their experiences. In total, the present study relied on 26 interviews with 13 participants. Lived experiences provided an extended-time view and allowed the researcher to explore how study participants perceived, coped and were shaped by inequalities throughout their lives. In addition, the sense-making perspective offered a new lens to study inequalities. Findings underscore the racial, class and gendered dynamics within organizations supporting their intersectional impact and acknowledge the pre-existing societal norms that condition individual actions and choices. The study presents an “engaged” view of inequality to highlight it as a cumulative and complex experience. The findings help us recognize that participants are immersed in their specific contexts to act, negotiate, empower and make decisions under real-life pressures. Overall, the study pushes the boundaries of inequality research beyond its current episodic treatment.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-03
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2020-0373
      Issue No: Vol. 40 , No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Learning language and gaining employment: problems for refugee migrants in
           Australia

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      Authors: Yi-Jung Teresa Hsieh
      Abstract: Muslim refugee migrants are a growing ethno-religious disadvantaged minority group in several Western societies, and host-country language proficiency and employment are essential factors in reducing this disadvantage. This paper thus explores the efficacy of English training programs in facilitating the settlement and employment of a group of male Muslim refugees in Australia. This study is qualitative in nature, with data collected using semi-structured, in-depth interviews with the eight participants in the study. Analysis was conducted using Bourdieu's concepts of field, capital and habitus. English training programs offered to Australian Muslim men are problematic in their aim of linking them to employment. Areas of concern are identified in respect to the training hours offered, their learning environment, their content and pedagogy, their lack of focus on employment and their failure to recognise the existing work skills of the migrants. The study is conducted with a small sample of male Muslim migrants: while the findings may be similar for other refugee groups, further research is necessary to confirm this. There is a need to restructure the current English training programs offered to refugee migrants in Australia, Muslim or otherwise. This study identifies several areas where such restructuring might occur, both at the policy and pedagogical levels. Few studies focus on Australian male Muslim migrants. This study enhances understanding of this under-researched group and their struggles to learn English, find employment and rise above their disadvantaged societal position.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-07-29
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2020-0358
      Issue No: Vol. 40 , No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Equality, Diversity and Inclusion

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

       
 
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