Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Similar Journals
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Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.5
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 22  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 6 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2040-7149 - ISSN (Online) 2040-7157
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Buddhism, gender, and sexualities: queer spiritualities in Thailand

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      Authors: Witchayanee Ocha
      Abstract: The article aims to present a new aspect of “the emergent identities” in Thailand with a correlation between morality and religiosity. The research deals with the perception of 65 Thai male-to-female transgender sex workers who are currently working in sex tourism in Pattaya and Bangkok. This article explores the role religion plays, the linkages between sexualities, and the potential for Thai Theravada Buddhist individuals to understand the way that they cope with life and interpret its meaning among these sexual minorities. Finally, the article shows how Thai marginalized Theravada Buddhists are negotiating their gendered religious spaces in Thailand. The study investigates perceptions of religion and its role in the lives of Thai Buddhist male-to-female transgender sex workers. Almost all the qualitative data was collected sequentially through (1) focus group discussions, (2) small group discussions, and (3) in-depth interviews. All interview sessions took place over six months in 2019. The researcher is a native Thai speaker and conducted the interviews in Thai with selected sex workers over 20 years old who have at least one year of experience engaging in sex work. The research found three principal characteristics of “lived religion” in which emergent identities negotiate sexuality and morality: (1) Buddhist dequeering (the way Buddhism operates conservatively to reinforce heteronormativity), (2) queering Buddhism amidst multiple oppressions (how Buddhism operates to complement queer identity and empowerment), and (3) queering Buddhism as enlightenment (Buddhism with an emphasis on “practice” and “spiritual development”). The paper discusses how institutional Buddhism creates and recreates gendered identities in complex ways. The article shows how Thai marginalized Theravada-Buddhism are negotiating their gendered religious spaces and “buy” the right to sexual and anatomy within their families and society by providing financial support, engaging in religion practices, donating in social charity projects base on their faith and capacity. The paper is supporting human right movements and dignity for sexual minorities gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender questioning, intersex (LGBTQI+) in Thailand. The paper also promotes equality to all human beings and shows a struggle for the basic human rights of sexual minorities in religion. The paper is raising awareness to religion's rights for all to look beyond distinctions of gender and class which may help to shape future history. This article examines how Thai transgender sex workers utilize the non-essentialist philosophy of Theravada Buddhism. The paper finds that respondents are negotiating their religious spaces through the linkages among their gender, body, embodiment, identities, and sexualities. Despite most respondents believe that being born “a kathoey” as a result of bad karma, they use the Buddhist teachings of karma to explain their identities and even to lead a meaningful life to gain more merits for a better rebirth. Thailand still lacks research on queer spiritualities and Buddhism. The article has seen challenges to the human rights of sexual minorities in religion. The solution is to increase awareness of the concepts of sex, gender, and sexualities and broaden the understanding of “endless performativity” and “gender diversification” (Butler, 1990) for gender sensitivity and gender responsiveness in creating “social equality” for all member societies in public campaigns, and media launched by the state and NGOs.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-19
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2020-0025
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • LGBTQ+ in workplace: a systematic review and reconsideration

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      Authors: Sucharita Maji, Nidhi Yadav, Pranjal Gupta
      Abstract: The inclusion of LGBTQ + persons (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and having other sexual orientations and gender identities) is a crucial step in improving gender diversity in the workplace; however, till date, it remains a significant challenge for human resource management professionals. The current study critically examines this issue of an inclusive workplace for LGBTQ + people through a systematic review of the existing research that has empirically studied their experiences at the workplace. It also examines the resistance and challenges organizations face in LGBTQ + diversity training and provides future research avenues. For systematically reviewing the literature, Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) model has been used. A total of 101 empirical studies have been reviewed. The result shows that LGBTQ + people encounter multiple negative workplace experiences, including proximal (hiring discrimination and housing discrimination) and distal workplace discrimination (unsafe work climate, microaggressions and harassment). These aversive experiences lead to work stress while also mandating that people manage their sexual identity and style of dressing. This stress, in turn, impacts their work–family outcomes, job satisfaction and decision-making with regard to their careers. The paper provides a holistic understanding of the aversive workplace experiences encountered by sexual minorities.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-16
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-02-2022-0049
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The making of a discriminatory ism

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      Authors: Ognjen Arandjelović
      Abstract: The millennia long struggles of various oppressed groups have over time illuminated widespread social injustices, organically leading to the recognition of yet further injustices captured by the umbrella of discriminatory isms, such as racism, sexism, classism, ableism, anti-Semitism, ageism, heterosexism and many others. In recent years, the debate has become increasingly fierce, polarized and even physically violent. One of the premises of the present work is that in part, the aforementioned unconstructive behaviors are a result of the different understandings of what constitutes an ism and the lack of a thoughtful consideration of this issue in the mainstream social debate as much as in the academic literature. The author presents evidence for this and critiques the dominant lines of thought in this realm, showing all the dominant lines of thought to fall short of both the fundamental philosophical as well practical desiderata in how isms ought to be understood. The author proposes an alternative which does not suffer from the weakness of the existing one: one based on the denial of equivalence of sentience. The author shows how the adoption of this understanding leads to constructive ways of addressing isms effected injustice.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-09
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2023-0009
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • “When the baby sleeps, I work” – neoliberal motherhood
           in Latin America during the Covid-19 lockdown

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      Authors: Mariana I. Paludi, Isabella Krysa, Marke Kivijärvi
      Abstract: This paper explores working mothers’ coping strategies concerning paid and unpaid work in Chile and Argentina during the Covid-19 pandemic. The paper aimed to understand the influence of cultural norms on motherhood and neoliberal workplace practices on mothers’ sensemaking processes and coping strategies. This study focuses on mothers living in Chile and Argentina where governments established mandatory lockdowns between March and September 2020. Drawing on the notion of neoliberal motherhood, women’s demands were analyzed when paid work and mothering duties collide in time and space. Open-ended interviews were conducted with 17 women in Chile and Argentina. All interviewees had at least 1 child below the age of 6 and were working from home during the lockdown. Neoliberal workplace demands, and disadvantageous government policies greatly heightened the dual burdens of working mothers. Women were expected to fulfill the discourses of the neoliberal worker and the good mother, while also adopting additional strategies in the wake of the lockdown. The data highlights mothers’ strategies to cope with care and work duties by adjusting to new routines involving their partners, relatives and the wider community. The generalizability of the results is limited by the small sample of 17 interviewees, all from middle to middle-upper class. The changing scenario due to Covid-19 makes the collected data not sufficient to grasp the impact of the pandemic, as during the interviews (December 2020 and January 2021) the process was still ongoing. Organizations should assess their role in the management of paid and unpaid work for both genders, as the neoliberal discourse views the worker as masculine, full-time, always available and productive, ignoring women’s additional care duties outside of the workplace. The Covid-19 pandemic provides a unique opportunity to reflect on care work and gender, collective versus individual responses to care and work demands and the idea of organizing.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-04-2022-0081
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Barcelona hotel employees and their conception of fair work. An
           exploratory study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Montserrat Crespi-Vallbona, Ester Noguer-Juncà, Nuria Louzao, Lluís Coromina
      Abstract: Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 5 and 8, respectively, indicate that decent work and gender equality are challenges that business organizations must face in order to achieve the social well-being and sustainable development of communities. Considering these goals, the present article aims to define the concept of fair work and examine the current degree of knowledge among staff in the hotel sector in Barcelona about the indicators of the Fair Labor Responsible Hotels (HJLR) certification. A mixed methodology is used to analyze the primary data. A survey of 248 employees is complemented by nine semi-structured interviews with experts, general managers and heads of department of independently owned hotels and national and international chains. The results show that this certification is necessary for the economic and social sustainability of the hospitality sector and to raise awareness that fair work is an urgent need. However, these currently tend to be little more than artificial actions. The paper aims to emphasize the perspective of real actors in hotel industry about the actors' considerations of fair work to enhance the actors' job involvement and satisfaction.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-08-2022-0232
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The influence of religious beliefs on the expectations of individual
           social class mobility

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      Authors: Xiaodong Chen, Miraj Ahmed Bhuiyan
      Abstract: This paper examines the in-depth relationship between religious beliefs and individual social class mobility expectations in China. The data used in this article are mainly from the China Comprehensive Social Survey in 2010 (CGSS2010). Compared with other years' CGSS data, CGSS2010 includes a module on religious topics, and the questionnaire information related to religion is more comprehensive and suitable for in-depth analysis. The results show that religious beliefs have a significant positive impact on personal social class mobility expectations. Based on the principle of diminishing marginal returns on capital, the positive impact of religious belief on the expectation of individual social class mobility is more significant in groups with nonagricultural household registration, higher education level, older age and better family background conditions. However, with the further improvement of family background conditions, this positive impact begins to weaken. In addition, possible channels of action include prejudice effects, psychological effects, individual capital effects and social capital effects. The results of other effects are positive except for the prejudice effect. Overall, religious beliefs, as one of the important components of contemporary Chinese culture, have a positive significance for the “Chinese Dream”. There is also little literature globally that provides an in-depth analysis of the relationship between religion and economic development. Studies have led to an understanding of the relationship between religious beliefs and individual social class mobility expectations. But it is unclear whether theories developed based on Western spiritual experience will be applicable to China or not. The authors have tested for China.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-05-2022-0122
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Staff perceptions of patient inequalities in a UK secure mental healthcare
           setting

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      Authors: Elizabeth Bayo-Idowu, Sarrah Fatima, Kristina Brenisin, Aile Trumm, Paul Wallang, Kieran Breen
      Abstract: Inequalities can have a cumulative effect that leads to the presentation and subsequent progression of mental health difficulties. The detrimental effects can be compounded in the healthcare environment if staff lack an awareness of patients’' inequalities, and therefore, educating staff is of particular importance. The development of awareness training requires a deep understanding of staff perceptions of patient inequalities in a secure mental health care setting and the impact that this can have on mental illness. The study was carried out using a qualitative design, where staff were asked to complete a 22-question survey from which the output is analysed using thematic analysis. In total, 100 patient-facing staff members working in a secure mental health facility completed the survey. The results highlight that staff employed in a secure mental health care setting have an understanding of patient inequalities and how these can impact on patients in both the short and longer terms. The results highlighted the importance of awareness by staff and how an increase can have a significant benefit on the quality of the care provided within secure mental health facilities. There is an increasing awareness of the impact of inequalities on mental health and how this can influence a patient’s journey. This study involving staff employed in a secure care mental health facility highlights the role of staff awareness of inequalities and also underlines the importance of understanding the key role of staff awareness in mental ill health.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-04-24
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-04-2022-0095
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • “Stop talking about gender:” Toward positive diversity and inclusion
           experience of female IT professionals in Poland

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      Authors: Monika Sońta
      Abstract: The purpose of this research is to explore the experiences regarding diversity and inclusion in the professional context. The stories of female IT professionals included the discussion around enablers and blockers of career and development in IT and talking about worst and best daily experiences at the workplace. This is a qualitative study that presents the findings from four focus groups with 50 participants – selected female IT professionals working in Poland. The IT professionals were taking part in the Women in Tech Summit in Warsaw in 2019. LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY® projective technique has been applied during the group interviews to help the participants express their experiences in a creative way. The findings include conceptualization of the three main sources of inequalities: (1) Imbalance in rewards and recognition and performance visibility (2) Inability to build wider women-oriented strategic alliances and meaningful relationships around D&I and (3) Willingness but no practical mechanisms to contribute to the business value and being a part of meaningful activities and two concepts of how to improve employee experiences, namely: business strategizing based on daily meaningful experience and mentoring others and impacting business reality through creating professional alliances that matter and are recognized as business value generators as the key directions. The research was conducted before the pandemic. The research creates a practical conversational framework for managers giving directions on how to talk about diversity and inclusion in the workplace using a perspective of “daily interactions” and “everyday employee experiences”. The emerged concepts help to direct the corporate discussions around Social Development Goal No. 5 – Gender Equality in a practical business dimension. The originality is brought by (1) LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY® – the method of creative exploration used during the focused groups (2) social significance of gender equality in the technological roles and industries, especially in the context of reskilling approaches (3) Central and Eastern European perspective of the research.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-04-13
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2021-0327
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Social inclusion of disabled performers in the performing arts: a
           case from Türkiye

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      Authors: Ayse Collins, Ian Fillis, Zeynep Goknil Sanal
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding for the social inclusion of disabled performers in a developing country to create awareness and improve policies/practices. The study employed qualitative methodology, and data were collected through semi-structured interviews, site visits/observations and review of secondary data. The data from different respondent groups showed the social inclusion should be reviewed at three levels: the state, society and individual. The review of existing policies revealed the neglect of the state regarding disabled people in general and even more so in performing arts due to the lack of enforcement of national and international agreements. Findings indicate that social inclusion of disabled performers is a minor issue, especially in a developing country where access to basic human rights and needs may be difficult. Amidst such difficulties, performing arts is not seen as a priority compared to other needs of disabled people and performers. Limitations include the limited number of disabled performers who could be identified and were willing to participate in the study. Those working in venues/public offices were also reluctant to participate. The greatest limitation was the broad lack of interest in disabled performers. In Türkiye, studies on disabled people tend to focus on basic needs like health, education and employment. None, to best of researchers' knowledge, explore the social inclusion of disabled performers. This is an original study because it collects and discusses primary data on this topic, revealing the state-level negligence/oversight, the apathy of society and the degree to which an individual with disabilities must struggle to participate in performing arts. Consequently, this study shows the difficulty of developing social inclusion, equality and diversity in an emerging economy for disabled performers to raise awareness and present grounds for further legal enforcement. Moreover, implications allow for a global understanding of social inclusion that moves beyond a biased or privileged understanding/critique of disability centered on the developed world.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-04-11
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-02-2022-0054
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Factors affecting team performance: An empirical study of Indian GenY
           and GenZ cohorts

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      Authors: Pratibha Maan, Dinesh Kumar Srivastava
      Abstract: The study intends to examine the generational differences between GenY and GenZ Indian generational cohorts on the study variables, i.e. core self-evaluations (CSE), team cohesion, organizational culture and team performance. Further, the present research aims to analyze the impact of CSE, team cohesion and organizational culture on team performance as antecedents. The study has adopted a descriptive cross-sectional survey method where the data were collected from Indian working professionals who belonged to GenY and GenZ generational cohorts. Further, a total of 370 responses were received, and thereafter, the data were analyzed by employing significant statistical tests such as exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), structural equation modeling (SEM) and an independent samples t-test. The study results revealed that GenY and GenZ cohorts significantly differ on CSE, team cohesion and organizational culture. However, no significant difference was reported in team performance between these two generational cohorts. Also, the study results disclosed that CSE, team cohesion and organizational culture positively influence team performance by acting as its determinants. The study reports differences between GenY and GenZ that would assist managers in effectively dealing with these generational cohorts and formulating human resource (HR) policies that can accommodate the needs of these two cohorts. Additionally, the study benefits managers by highlighting the importance of core-self evaluations, team cohesion and organizational culture to enhance team performance. Existing research depicts that there lies a paucity of generational studies in the Indian context. The present study attempts to address this lacuna by putting pioneering efforts into this field. The main contribution of the study lies in empirically investigating the Indian generational cohorts (GenY and GenZ) in the organizations. Further, the study has also conceptualized and examined a team performance model by considering factors at three levels (individual, team and organization).
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-04-07
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-05-2022-0114
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The use of self: the conscious or unconscious (sharing or) leaking of
           identity by LGBQ cisgender women youth workers in the North of England

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      Authors: Jean Hatton
      Abstract: This paper discusses how professionally qualified cisgender lesbian, gay, bisexual or queer (LGBQ) women youth workers present their self. The research examined how youth workers consciously or unconsciously shared their sexual identity with young people with whom they worked. Whilst this research focussed on youth workers, issues discussed are relevant for practitioners from a range of professional backgrounds such as therapists, social workers, teachers and health care practitioners. The research focused only on the experiences of cisgender LGBQ women as the experiences of men and trans women are different and so requires separate research. This research taking a qualitative approach, used in-depth interviews to discuss how respondents shared information about their identity. Some of fifteen youth workers interviewed reported not having choices about being out with the young people as their sexuality had been leaked. Others were able to pass and so choose when, or if, to be out with young people. Their different strategies to sharing information regarding their sexuality used by these participants reflected different approaches to being out. Although there is evidence in the literature of how being out or closeted impacts on teachers there is little written about the effect on youth workers or other professionals. The little research that has been undertaken in this area focusses on the impact of identity on the clients rather than on the professionals. This article contributes to filling this gap in the literature.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-04-06
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-03-2022-0066
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • A qualitative study of diversity management practices in Iran's private
           sector organizations

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      Authors: Seyedeh Fatemeh Ghasempour Ganji, Fariborz Rahimnia, Mohammad Reza Ahanchian, Jawad Syed
      Abstract: This paper aims to examine diversity management (DM) practices in leading private-sector organizations in Iran. The study draws on in-depth interviews with 23 human resource management (HRM) executives and supervisors in nine private sector companies in Iran, and presents the analysis conducted using MAXQDA software. The results categorize DM practices into four subsystems of HRM, i.e. recruitment and selection, training, performance management, and reward management. These practices indicate the inclusion of diversity-sensitive criteria and consideration of equal opportunity in the HRM subsystems. The findings advance a contextual understanding of DM in a developing country. Considering DM practices in HRM subsystems may provide an effective way to help managers address workforce diversity in organizations.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-03-23
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2022-0158
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The impact of board-level female directors on firm performance: evidence
           from India

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      Authors: Rupjyoti Saha
      Abstract: This study investigates the impact of female directors on firms' financial performance by scrutinizing the different roles they are empowered to fulfill. This study examines the impact of the roles performed by female directors on firms' financial performance using a panel dataset of the top 100 listed Indian firms over a period of 5 years. The study uses an appropriate panel data model for empirical analysis. For the robustness evaluation, a two-stage least square (2SLS) with the instrumental variable model were used. The findings reveal a significantly positive impact of the total percentage of female directors on firms' financial performance. Further, by disentangling the impact of the total percentage of female directors between independent directors and executive directors, the study shows that independent female directors make a significant positive contribution to their firms' financial performance. By contrast, the performance impact of female executive directors was insignificant. In addition, the findings reveal that firms with a higher proportion of independent female directors outperform firms with a higher percentage of female executive directors. This study is the first of its kind to unravel the performance impact of female directors and distinguish between the roles of independent directors and executive directors in the context of the emerging market of India, after the imposition of a gender quota for corporate boards.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-03-22
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-07-2022-0172
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • An intergroup contact approach for understanding attitudes
           and behaviours towards deaf students among hearing students in Malaysia

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      Authors: Poh Chua Siah, Chee Seng Tan, Wan Ying Lee, Mah Ngee Lee
      Abstract: This study examines the hearing students' attitudes and behaviors towards deaf students in Malaysia using the intergroup contact approach. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 439 hearing students at secondary schools. Hearing students were asked to fill in questionnaires that contained four measurements: contact with deaf people, sources of knowledge about deaf people, attitudes towards deaf people and behaviors toward deaf people. A serial mediation model was proposed to investigate the hypothetical mediating role of knowledge and attitudes toward deaf students in the relationship. The results of this study showed that contact frequency is negatively associated with attitudes towards deaf people. However, such a relationship is suppressed, only when knowledge is included as a mediator. In addition, mediation analysis supports that sources of knowledge and attitudes about deaf people mediate the relationship between contact and behaviors toward deaf people. Moreover, the frequency of contact indirectly contributes to behaviors through knowledge and attitudes. The findings indicate that increasing the contact between hearing and deaf students would improve hearing students' attitudes and behaviors towards deaf students. However, this is only when the contact can improve hearing students' knowledge about deaf people and deafness.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-03-21
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-03-2022-0059
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Sexuality and gender within Afghanistan's population

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      Authors: Elise E. Racine
      Abstract: Limited evidence exists on bacha bazi, Afghanistan's steadily revived practice involving transgenerational same-sex relationships, despite its frequent association with violence towards young males, known as bacha bereesh. This paper aims to fill this critical gap. The author conducted an integrative literature review using qualitative and quantitative secondary data. An ecological framework for violence was applied to the findings. The findings offer a comprehensive overview of bacha bazi in its modern form, including the unique health needs, sexual practices, and gender identities and orientations of bacha bereesh. The author reveals how Afghan masculine identities and male-male sexual activity occur in relation to power structures and notions of honor. Numerous risk factors increasing bacha bereesh vulnerability for violence and socio-legal barriers constraining access to crucial services are also discussed. Afghanistan's shame-based culture limits accurate data collection by obscuring the practice and stigmatizing bacha bereesh who serve in feminized roles. The research highlights the inadequacies of applying Western gender-binary frameworks to bacha bazi. It contributes to our understanding of sexuality, gender, masculinity, and male-directed sexual violence within Afghan culture. These insights will help us better address the health needs of this underserved population. The lack of evidence addressing these topics highlights our paper's originality, while the literature firmly linking violence to poor physical and psychological health outcomes emphasizes the importance of its contribution.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-03-09
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-04-2022-0096
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The impact of digital inequality in achieving sustainable development: a
           systematic literature review

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      Authors: Prabath Perera, Selva Selvanathan, Jayatilleke Bandaralage, Jen-Je Su
      Abstract: Digital inequality is considered one of the leading causes of socioeconomic disparities nowadays and a barrier to sustainable development. However, a dearth of empirical research has examined the impact of digital inequality in attaining sustainable development. This study aims to systematically review the scientific publications on the impact of digital inequality in achieving sustainable development. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA, 2020) guidelines were followed to carry out the systematic literature review (SLR) using Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest and Google Scholar electronic databases. Numerous inclusion/exclusion criteria were employed to obtain the most relevant literature. Finally, 54 articles were included to prepare the final database and qualitative synthesis was performed using 12 variables. While the findings show that there has been a substantial expansion of scientific publications on the focused area in recent years, there is still a lack of empirical and comparative studies; less focus on the offline benefits of online activities were also demonstrated by the results. Moreover, SDGs 04 and 05 were identified as the predominant goals in the literature. Findings further highlighted the importance of an accurate conceptualization of digital inequality. In general, this study investigates the level of impact of digital inequality on the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals. Moreover, it shows the evolution of scientific publications on digital inequality in terms of its contribution when achieving sustainable development.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-08-2022-0224
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Cultivating resilience among Hong Kong's underprivileged ethnic minority
           groups in the face of a pandemic through a social justice lens

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      Authors: Gizem Arat, Suna Eryigit-Madzwamuse, Angie Hart
      Abstract: In this study, the authors investigated ways to cultivate resilience through a social justice lens among ethnic minorities against COVID-19 in Hong Kong. A qualitative (case study) methodology was adopted to interview 15 social service providers from diverse ethnic backgrounds serving disadvantaged ethnic minority groups (South and Southeast Asian groups from low-income households, foreign domestic workers and asylum seekers/refugees). Two major protective factors were identified, contributing to the development of resilience among diverse ethnic groups: (1) individual-based resilience (including being optimistic) and (2) socio-environmental factors (including ongoing support from strong family, peer and religious settings' support, consulates' support, on-going material and nonmaterial donations, support of young volunteers and importance of online connection and communication) using the integration of resilience and social justice frameworks. This study showed that the protective factors were found to dynamically interact with each other and the environment. The present study recommends additional culturally sensitive service and policy implications for preventing the long-term impact of mass crises among Hong Kong's marginalized minorities.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2022-0149
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The United States Air Force pilot diversity dilemma

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      Authors: Brandon Robert Russell
      Abstract: The paper aims to examine literature on the issues of the pilot shortage in the United States Air Force and the demographic diversity dilemma within the United States Air Force pilot community and how it relates to the National Defense Strategy. In addition, there is an examination of current initiatives designed to combat these issues. The paper opted for an exploratory review of 90 sources from 2012 to 2023 to examine the pilot shortage and pilot diversity issues within the United States Air Force. Three theories, the theory of generative interactions, the theory of cognitive diversity and the identity theory, were examined in relation to the barriers to the pilot diversity issue. The paper provides emergent insights from the literature into the growing pilot shortage and diversity disparity found within the United States Air Force pilot community. These issues were associated with many barriers, including geographic disparity, socioeconomic status, culture, education, mentorship and life balance. The current initiatives examined are new and, as such, warrant future research. In particular, what are the long-term projections for the youth flight programs' An examination of the effectiveness of improving the pilot shortage and pilot diversity within the Air Force should be further scrutinized in the coming years as new cadets enter pilot training after accession. This paper highlights a need to further study the effectiveness of youth flight programs and other United States Air Force initiatives in improving pilot numbers and diversity.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-10-2022-0297
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Seeing past different signals in the job interview: information improves
           ratings of candidates on the autism spectrum

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      Authors: Debra R. Comer, Janet A. Lenaghan, Daphna Motro
      Abstract: The authors used signaling theory to explain negative perceptions of individuals on the autism spectrum (IotAS) in the job interview and explored whether parasocial contact could improve perceptions. Participants were randomly assigned across six experimental conditions. Some received information that IotAS' social and communication differences prevent them from attaining jobs they could perform (information), some received this information and watched a video showing IotAS working competently (parasocial contact) and others were exposed to neither information nor video (control). Participants then watched a mock interview of a job candidate presenting as an IotAS or neurotypical and gave their first impressions of him, perceptions of his job suitability and selection decision. Participants had less favorable first impressions of the IotAS-presenting candidate and perceived him as having lower job suitability and were therefore less likely to select him. Parasocial contact had no effect. However, participants who had received information that IotAS' differences keep them from being hired for jobs they could do perceived the IotAS-presenting candidate as more suitable for the job and had greater intentions to interact with and select him. The authors enhance understanding of autism in the workplace by explaining how IotAS' signaling behavior during a job interview impedes their selection. The authors also provide evidence that a brief message that IotAS' social and communication differences keep them from securing jobs they could perform can promote IotAS' selection by focusing decision-makers on their job-relevant qualifications.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2022-0334
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • How to facilitate the educational inclusion of students with autism:
           learning from the experience of teachers in Spain

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      Authors: Yolanda Muñoz-Martínez, Cecilia Simon Rueda, MªLuz M. Fernández-Blázquez
      Abstract: This study analyses the barriers and facilitators for the educational inclusion of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from the perspective of their teachers. A qualitative methodology was applied, specifically a multiple case study from which 24 in-depth interviews were conducted with teachers who had worked previously with students with ASD. The participants were Spanish teachers from different educational stages (from early childhood education to baccalaureate) and with different roles (ordinary classroom teachers and support teachers). The results show that collaboration amongst teachers, their attitudes, the way of understanding the supports, the creation of collaboration between students and the organisation of both the school and the classroom are important for the inclusion of students with ASD. The analyses and discussion of the facilitators for the inclusion of these students are especially relevant, since they provide useful guidance for teachers who want to respond to the right of these students to an inclusive education. The limitations and future research lines of this study are related to the logic of amplitude and depth, respectively. Regarding amplitude, the authors highlighted the importance of gathering the voices of professionals committed to the development of more inclusive practices; however, the authors also identified the need to expand the listening to the voices of teachers who do not have such experience. This raises a possible future research line: to explore how to reach teachers with no experience in inclusive education in order to contribute to the transformation of their practice. There is extensive knowledge within the classrooms, which the authors aimed to demonstrate in this study, with the hope that others can learn from it. The obtained results are useful to every teacher who wishes to create an inclusive school. In agreement with the consideration of inclusive education as a process, this investigation identified strategies and resources that facilitate the learning and participation of students with ASD, as well as barriers that must be tackled to advance in this regard. The authors aimed to contribute to understanding the advances in the development of the right to inclusive education. To this end, the authors gathered the voices of teachers (those from the ordinary classroom and those considered “support teachers”) from regular schools that welcome students with ASD and which had a history of commitment to the development of more inclusive education. There is extensive knowledge within the classrooms, which the authors aimed to demonstrate in this study, with the hope that others can learn from it. The obtained results are useful to every teacher who wishes to create an inclusive school.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-27
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-02-2022-0034
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Gender benders and job contenders: cosmetics in selection contexts for
           women and men

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      Authors: Liana Bernard, Lauren S. Park, Larry R. Martinez, Kay Kulason
      Abstract: The aim of the present study was to contribute to the workplace diversity literature by experimentally manipulating gender expression through the use of makeup among women and men to determine makeup's impact on interpersonal discrimination in a real-world job selection context. In an experimental field study, we applied either real (i.e. tinted) or placebo (i.e. transparent) cosmetic products to women and men confederate applicants. The women and men engaged in job inquiry and pre-interview conversations with store personnel in 136 retail stores across 3 shopping malls that were randomly assigned to one of 4 conditions in a 2 (confederate gender: women versus men) by 2 (cosmetic usage: real versus placebo) experimental design. The confederate applicants were accompanied by confederate observers and recorded interactions were later analyzed by naïve coders. The applicants, observers, and naïve coders rated interpersonal discrimination from store personnel in each interaction. As hypothesized, women who enhanced their femininity through the use of makeup experienced significantly less interpersonal discrimination than women who did not. In contrast, there was no significant difference in interpersonal discrimination for men as a function of visual gender expression. These findings highlight the pervasive gender norm expectations for women at work by examining gender non-conformity of women and men.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-03-2022-0080
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Barriers to gender equality in STEMM: do leaders have the gender
           competence for change'

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      Authors: Denise Cuthbert, Robyn Barnacle, Nicola Henry, Kay Latham, Leul Tadesse Sidelil, Ceridwen Spark
      Abstract: Science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM) workplaces worldwide remain stubbornly resistant to gender equality initiatives. Leaders are vital to driving change, but the extent to which their capabilities lead to change remains unknown. This article examines STEMM leaders' gender competence to achieving transformative changes in gender inequality. This article examines the capability of STEMM leaders to act as change agents through an in-depth, qualitative analysis of perceptions of gender inequality, sexual harassment, sex discrimination and gender bias within their organisations. Findings are analysed using a customised tripartite gender competence schema, comprising commitment, knowledge and method (or know-how). The findings suggest that while STEMM leaders may express a commitment to addressing gender inequality, misapprehensions about the nature and scope of the problem are likely to hamper efforts. Two key misapprehensions standout: a tendency to frame gender inequality in primarily numerical terms; and recourse to blaming external factors beyond STEMM for gender inequality in STEMM. This article makes an original contribution by examining the gender competence of leaders in STEMM organisations, which has not been previously researched. The findings extend understanding of the salience of leaders' capabilities to lead change by identifying key gaps and misapprehensions in STEMM leaders' understanding of the nature and scope of the problem.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-07
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-09-2022-0267
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Examining the impact of reasonable accommodation appraisals on New
           Zealand managers' attitudes toward hiring people with disability

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      Authors: Oliver Nelson D'Souza, Joana R.C. Kuntz
      Abstract: Managers are responsible for implementing reasonable accommodation (RA) for people with disabilities (PwD). Yet, little is known about the extent to which managerial views of RA shape attitudes toward PwD. The study draws on conservation of resources (COR) and job demands and resources (JD-R) theories to examine the relationship between managerial views of RA availability and implementation ease on attitudes towards hiring PwD. In total, 162 full-time managers at a large New Zealand (NZ) healthcare organisation completed an online survey. Moderated multiple regressions were conducted to test the main effects and interactions between perceptions of RA process and attitudes towards hiring PwD. The study results indicate that line managers held positive attitudes towards hiring PwD when they viewed RA implementation as easy, particularity around the provision of flexible work arrangements. This study shows the importance of gaging managers' views of RA processes to understand their attitudes toward PwD and highlights potential linkages between managerial perspectives on RA, PwD experiences in the organisation and the effectiveness of disability support and inclusion initiatives. RA availability from the organisation is insufficient to elicit positive managerial attitudes toward hiring PwD. Policies and procedures that reduce RA implementation complexity are expected to foster positive managerial attitudes toward PwD and improve employment outcomes for this employee group. This study is the first to test how managerial attitudes towards hiring PwD are influenced by views of RA availability from the organisation and of RA implementation ease. It also provides a multidimensional measure that captures managerial views of RA availability from the organisation and RA implementation ease.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-02
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-08-2021-0207
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Experiences of conflict, non-acceptance and discrimination are associated
           with poor mental well-being amongst LGBTQ-identified individuals in
           Singapore

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Gerard W. Toh, Wee Ling Koh, Jack Ho, Jackson Chia, Ad Maulod, Irene Tirtajana, Peter Yang, Mathia Lee
      Abstract: Health disparities affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) populations have been reported in many countries. For Singapore, no large quantitative studies on mental health and well-being in the local LGBTQ community have been published. The authors conducted a community-based survey (National LGBT Census Singapore, 2013; NLCS2013) that covered a comprehensive set of demographic, social and health indicators. Here, the authors investigated mental health status and its correlates in 2,350 LGBTQ individuals within the NLCS2013 sample. The NLCS2013 was an anonymous online survey conducted amongst self-identified LGBTQ adults (aged ≥ 21 years) residing in Singapore. The survey included the World Health Organisation Well-being Index (WHO-5) as a measure of mental well-being, with low WHO 5 scores (
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-10-2021-0270
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • When are trans women treated worse than trans men'

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      Authors: Joel Rudin, Tejinder Billing, Andrea Farro, Yang Yang
      Abstract: This paper aims to test penis panic theory, which predicts that trans women will face more discrimination than trans men in some but not all situations. Respondents were 262 American college students who were all enrolled in the same undergraduate course. They were presented with a case about coworker resistance to transgender employees' use of the workplace restrooms of their choice. Four versions of a case were randomly distributed as follows: trans woman, restroom with one toilet; trans woman, restroom with three toilets; trans man, restroom with one toilet and trans man, restroom with three toilets. The authors observed greater discrimination against trans women compared to trans men when there was one toilet but not when there were three toilets. This supports penis panic theory. The chief limitation was the use of American college students as respondents. The results may not generalize to practicing managers especially in other countries. Future researchers should develop a scale to measure situational discrimination against trans women. This study should be replicated in other contexts to deepen the understanding of discrimination against trans men and trans women with disabilities, as well as discrimination against nonbinary individuals who identify as neither trans men nor trans women. Employers need to search for situations in which trans women face greater discrimination than trans men, because they can be resolved in ways that protect the rights of transgender employees no matter how transphobic their coworkers may be. Also, employers need a nuanced approach to combat discrimination that recognizes the unique perspectives of trans men, trans women and other members of the transgender community. This is the first quantitative study of penis panic theory, and it illuminates the understanding of discrimination against transgender individuals.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-08-2021-0195
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Aesthetic labour and diversity on the shopfloor: the experiences
           of women workers in fashion retail

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      Authors: Lydia Olakumbi Oluyadi, Wenjin Dai
      Abstract: This paper explores the workplace experiences of aesthetic labour among racially diverse frontline women workers in a fashion retail store. This qualitative study is based on an ethnographic study, drawing on findings from participant observation and interviews with frontline workers at a fashion retail store in the UK. This paper explores how the embodiments of aesthetic labour are perpetually produced and commodified through the discipline of management in a fashion retail store. It challenges the notion of phenotypical Whiteness as the beauty standard within fashion retail and demonstrates how embodiments differ according to race. While White women are continuously scrutinised by their appearance, the aesthetic demands for women of colour tend to focus on speech and racialised bodies to provide “authentically” exotic experiences for customers. Additionally, this study highlights how the mobilisation of aesthetic labour can create work humiliation and work alienation. Despite this study being based on an ethnographic study at one British fashion retailer, this paper seeks to give voices to an underrepresented group by exploring the lived experiences of racially diverse women workers. This paper contributes to the intersection between aesthetic labour and race from an embodiment perspective, exploring the workplace experiences of racially diverse women workers in fashion retail and how their various forms of embodiment are racialised and commodified.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-10-2021-0257
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Kindness-informed allyship praxis
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Kristin S. Williams, Heidi Weigand, Sophia Okoroafor, Giuseppe Liuzzo, Erica Ganuelas Weigand
      Abstract: This paper explores intergenerational perceptions of kindness in the context of Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement and the COVID-19 global pandemic. The purpose of this exploratory study is to investigate perceptions of kindness in the context of traumatic events and its potential value in authentic allyship in organizational environments.
      Authors interviewed 65 individuals (31 self-identifying as non-racialized and 34 self-identifying as Black, Indigenous and People of Colour aka BIPOC). Participants included Generation Z (Gen Z; born between 1997–2012/5) and Generation Y (Gen Y; also referred to as Millennials, born between 1981 and 1994/6) across North American, Europe and Africa. Millennials currently represent the largest generation in the workplace and are taking on leadership roles, whereas Gen Z are emerging entrants into the workplace and new organizational actors. The paper offers insights into how to talk about BLM in organizations, how to engage in authentic vs performative allyship and how to support BIPOC in the workplace. The study also reveals the durability of systemic racism in generations that may be otherwise considered more enlightened and progressive. The authors expand on kindness literature and contribute theoretically and methodologically to critical race theory and intertextual analysis in race scholarship. The study contributes to the understanding of how pro-social behaviours like kindness (with intention) can contribute to a more inclusive discourse on racism and authentic allyship.
      Authors reveal the potential for kindness as a pro-social behaviour in organizational environments to inform authentic allyship praxis.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-09
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2021-0145
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The future of work in shaping the employment inclusion of young adults
           with disabilities: a qualitative study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Arif Jetha, Ali Shamaee, Emile Tompa, Peter Smith, Ute Bültmann, Silvia Bonaccio, Lori B. Tucker, Cameron Norman, Cristina G. Banks, Monique A.M. Gignac
      Abstract: The world of work is changing and creating challenges and opportunities for the employment inclusion of young people with disabilities. In this article, the perceptions held by young adults with disabilities regarding participation in the future of work are examined. One-on-one interviews were conducted with Canadian young adults (ages 18–36 years) living with a disability. Participants were asked about their thoughts regarding the impact of the changing nature of work on their labor market involvement and career aspirations. A thematic analysis was performed to identify and examine emergent salient themes. In total, 22 young adults were interviewed; over half held secure employment. Career aspirations and work-related decisions were primarily shaped by a participant's health needs. The future of work was seen as a more proximal determinant to employment. Digital technologies were expected to impact working conditions and create barriers and facilitators to employment. Participants who indicated being securely employed held positive expectations regarding the impact of digital technology on their work. Participants working precariously held negative appraisals regarding the impact of digital technologies on employment opportunities. The role of technological and soft skills was critical to participating in a labor market reliant on advanced technology. Participants reported barriers to developing job skills related to their disability and their work arrangements. This research highlights the importance of considering changes in the future of work, especially the digital transformation of the economy, in the design of initiatives which promote the employment inclusion of young adults with disabilities. Despite the significance of the changing nature of work, supporting health needs and encouraging access to secure work arrangements also remain paramount.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-09
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2022-0154
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 9 (2023)
       
  • I'm only joking!(') the role of disparaging humor in the communicative
           constitution of inclusion/exclusion in organizations

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Daniel Wolfgruber
      Abstract: The purpose of this article is to investigate the communicative constitution of organizational inclusion and/or exclusion through humorous acts at the expense of members of minorities and/or historically disadvantaged groups. Semistructured interviews with 84 employees in Austria and Germany dealing with their experiences regarding diversity and inclusion (D&I) at work were conducted and analyzed in two steps. First, a thematic text analysis was performed to structure the content and identify relevant themes and anecdotes for further analysis. Second, a ventriloquial analysis sought to identify the physically absent yet present voices in these anecdotes. The interviews revealed that jokes and quips mostly target colleagues of observable foreign origin. The analysis further identified three themes that show that disparaging humor can simultaneously reinforce inclusion/exclusion across hierarchies and create boundaries within teams – but in different ways. The findings also indicate that above all prejudices “participate” in such events and that in most cases the collective is invoked to increase the joke's “authority”. This research is the first one that investigates humor in the context of D&I through a communicative constitution of organization (CCO) lens, which facilitates studying the constitutive character of humorous communication in terms of inclusion and exclusion. Moreover, this is one of the first empirical humor studies to draw on established theory-driven concepts of inclusion-exclusion in its analysis.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-08-2022-0223
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 9 (2023)
       
  • Race, ethnicity, and discrimination at work: a new analysis of legal
           protections and gaps in all 193 UN countries

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Jody Heymann, Sheleana Varvaro-Toney, Amy Raub, Firooz Kabir, Aleta Sprague
      Abstract: While only one aspect of fulfilling equal rights, effectively addressing workplace discrimination is integral to creating economies, and countries, that allow for everyone's full and equal participation. Labor, anti-discrimination, and other relevant pieces of legislation were identified through the International Labor Organization's NATLEX database, supplemented with legislation identified through country websites. For each country, two researchers independently coded legislation and answered questions about key policy features. Systematic quality checks and outlier verifications were conducted. More than 1 in 5 countries do not explicitly prohibit racial discrimination in employment. 54 countries fail to prohibit unequal pay based on race. 107 countries prohibit racial and/or ethnic discrimination but do not explicitly require employers to take preventive measures against discrimination. The gaps are even larger with respect to multiple and intersectional discrimination. 112 countries fail to prohibit discrimination based on both migration status and race and/or ethnicity; 103 fail to do so for foreign national origin and race and/or ethnicity. Both recent and decades-old international treaties and agreements require every country globally to uphold equal rights regardless of race. However, specific national legislation that operationalizes these commitments and prohibits discrimination in the workplace is essential to their impact. This research highlights progress and gaps that must be addressed. This is the first study to measure legal protections against employment discrimination based on race and ethnicity in all 193 UN countries. This study also examines protection in all countries from discrimination on the basis of characteristics that have been used in a number of settings as a proxy for racial/ethnic discrimination and exclusion, including SES, migration status, and religion.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2022-0027
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 9 (2023)
       
 
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