Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Similar Journals
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Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.5
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 20  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 3 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2040-7149 - ISSN (Online) 2040-7157
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Invited to the party but not allowed to dance' Examining strategic
           decision-making inclusion of top female executives

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      Authors: Ann Mooney
      Abstract: The gender diversity of top management teams (TMTs) is slowly increasing. Research shows that top executives influence firms through their role in strategic decision-making but that executives are not equally engaged in it. The purpose of this paper is to understand whether gender affects the likelihood of inclusion in strategic decision-making. Drawing on surveys completed by chief executive officers (CEOs) and using expectation states and gender roles theories, the author examines the relationship between gender and inclusion in strategic decision-making for 266 top executives of global public firms. After controlling for a myriad of factors, results indicate that female executives are less likely than male executives to be included in strategic decision-making. Firm tenure moderates this effect such that it leads to a greater likelihood of inclusion for female executives but not male executives. This study provides a unique consideration of strategic decision-making in TMTs. The findings suggest that diversity and inclusion do not always go hand in hand and that female executives may need to prove themselves more than male executives to be given an equal voice in the strategic direction of the firm.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-10
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-07-2021-0184
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A systematic review of job-related diversity and future research
           directions

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      Authors: Shatrughan Yadav , Usha Lenka
      Abstract: Job-related diversity is significantly different from demographic diversity, referring to diverse skills, knowledge, and perspectives. Despite the significant relevance of diversity literature, researchers have paid relatively less attention to job-related diversity dimensions like functional, educational, and tenure diversity. This study aims to analyze the scattered job-related diversity literature and identify mediating, moderating, and outcome variables, including dominant theories, methodological practices, and statistical techniques that affect performance outcomes. This paper consolidates the job-related diversity literature and conducts a systematic review to fill the research gap. This study undertook a systematic review of 101 articles on job-related diversity published between 1991 and 2020 in academic management journals. This study has synthesized several theoretical frameworks and proposed an integrative framework of job-related diversity for future research and theory development. Conclusively, this study has highlighted the gaps, advanced the knowledge in job-related diversity, and suggested future research avenues and implications. This study is the first systematic review of job-related diversity, which acknowledges the importance of job-related diversity literature. Job-related diversity has received significant attention in the crisis-like situation during COVID-19 to develop innovative ideas and decision-making from different perspectives.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-09
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2021-0324
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • To disclose or not disclose a workplace disability to coworkers:
           attributions and invisible health conditions in the workplace

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      Authors: Eric Patton
      Abstract: The decision to disclose an illness is a difficult choice for many individuals. Despite national laws such Americans with Disabilities Act that protect workers with disabilities from discrimination in the workplace, the stigmas around certain illnesses, fears of being judged by others using different standards, and concerns about a lack of support regardless of legal requirements are all reasons why someone may hesitate to disclose a health condition in the workplace. Using experimentally manipulated vignettes and a combination of theories on attribution and incivility, this study explores the dangers of not disclosing a disability/condition that can lead to behaviors that will engender judgments by coworkers. The results of the study make clear that there are social benefits to disclosing a health condition rather than concealing. The findings clearly demonstrate that attributing an individual's negative behavior to their disposition will lead to more judgments of responsibility, and less sympathy and more anger compared to behaviors that can be explained by any health reason. Furthermore, more punishment, feelings of revenge and social distancing await individuals whose negative behavior cannot be explained by health issues. This study combines issues of health, attributions, incivility in an experimental studies that illuminates issues surround disclosing a workplace disability that go beyond the typical focus of legal questions.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-09-2021-0228
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Divorce status in the Pakistani workplace: women's narratives on stigma,
           outcomes and coping strategies

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      Authors: Abubakr Saeed , Sundas Kehkishan , Muhammad Sameer
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the processes associated with divorced female employees' experiences at workplaces in the context of a developing country, Pakistan. Specifically, this study analyzes divorced women's narratives to better understand the nature of discrimination, its outcomes and their coping strategies within the workplace environment. A qualitative methodology consisting of 25 semistructured interviews with women employees having divorce status was adopted. Findings demonstrate that divorced women experience a considerable amount of discrimination at their workplace from colleagues (victimized through gossiping). Moreover, they are also offered less training opportunities. This discrimination not only increases turnover intentions and stress but also decreases cognitive performance and disturbs work–life balance. The major coping strategies identified in the research include avoiding the situation and/or concealing their identity. First, this study undertakes an in-depth examination of experiences and consequences of stigma amongst female individuals with divorced identity from an understudied, yet highly relevant, context of Pakistan. In so doing, the authors respond to the call for more research that examines the role of context in shaping the psychological process. Second, contextualizing the concepts of discrimination and inclusion in the workplace setting, this work gives voice to females with divorce identity. Lastly, by examining the interaction between visible and invisible identities, the authors provide further evidence that individuals with multiple subordinate identities are more prone to greater stigma and other negative consequences.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-05-2021-0129
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Coping with sexual harassment in the Egyptian context: a study on female
           academics

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      Authors: Mohamed Mousa , Hala Abdelmoneim Abdallah Abdelgaffar
      Abstract: To understand the position of female academics in public universities in Egypt, the authors of this paper aim to answer the question of what comes between victims breaking their silence about workplace sexual harassment (WSH). A qualitative research method is employed, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 female academics from four public universities selected from among 26 public institutions of higher education in Egypt. Thematic analysis was used to extract main ideas from the transcripts. At the macro level in Egypt, stipulating an anti-harassment law and harsher penalties were found to be a motivator for female academics to speak up against WSH. At the meso organizational level, establishing anti-harassment units in universities is perceived as an effective mechanism for empowering female academics to respond to, expose and seek punitive action against WSH perpetrators. What was found to be a real challenge to reporting perpetrators is the assumption of some female academics that they will never be heard because of socio-cultural norms that hold university professors as honourable and impeccable. Another challenge is that female academics are poorly represented at both professorial levels and in senior administrative positions in Egyptian academic contexts. Sadly, challenges faced by women in academic contexts, such as WSH, are not being prioritized on the agenda of their universities. Although organizational behaviours and country-specific culture challenge female academics' proactive stance against WSH, new anti-harassment laws and university policies are changing this scenario. This paper contributes by filling a gap in human resource (HR) management, higher education and public administration in which empirical studies of WSH in academic contexts have been limited so far.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-20
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-10-2021-0281
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Inside the black box: How can gender diversity make a difference in the
           boardroom'

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      Authors: Hanen Khemakhem , Manel Maalej , Richard Fontaine
      Abstract: Prior research shows that a board of directors' gender diversity positively influences organizations. However, little is known about how and why gender diversity influences the board of directors' functioning and decisions. The objective of this paper is to investigate the differences between women and men when fulfilling their role as directors. This research uses a qualitative approach based on 29 in-depth semi-structured interviews with female and male board members. The authors’ findings reveal that women are as involved as men in the board tasks and responsibilities. Also, women have the same understanding as men of their role and of the skills needed to be board members. However, women fulfil their role differently than men. Women come to board meetings more prepared, take more notes and do more follow-up, and they also dare to ask tough questions to top management. Women directors bring a different point of view — representing different interests — to board discussions, have a different communication style, are not a part of the boys' club and have a social upbringing that might explain gender differences in the boardroom. This study could help boards and policymakers introduce diversity measures and provide ways to better integrate women into top decision-making groups such as board of directors. This study's findings can help organizations include females in key decision-making groups such as board of directors. This study reveals that in the same social setting, with the same role and expectations, and the same understanding of their role, both genders continue to perform differently. Based on direct evidence from board members, this study highlights how and why women do their role in the boardroom differently.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-14
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-07-2021-0178
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Reflections on the evolution of a long-term study of airline cultures: an
           interview with Albert J. Mills and Jean Helms Mills

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      Authors: Vanessa Sandra Bernauer
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to provide insights on Albert J. Mills' and Jean Helms Mills' lifelong methodological journey in the airline culture. The interview offers a retrospective and reflective insight of their research into organizational culture and the airline industry, reasons for this research, their methodological journey, challenges they faced and ways forward. This article is based on an interview with Albert J. Mills and Jean Helms Mills, which was virtually conducted for a professional development workshop (PDW) at the 2020 Academy of Management Meeting. Albert J. Mills and Jean Helms Mills provide insights and reflections on their lifelong methodological journey, focusing organizational culture, discriminatory practices, and the impact of this on what constitutes men and women's work. This paper draws from Albert J. Mills' and Jean Helms Mills' lifelong experience in studying gender, intersectionality and historiography in airline cultures. Scholars will be encouraged by their insights on how to start a long-term study, potential challenges, impacts of current trends and how to deal with them.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-09-2021-0237
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Witnessing interparental violence and leader role occupancy: the roles of
           insecure attachment and gender

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      Authors: Anika Cloutier , Julian Barling
      Abstract: Given the role leaders play in organizational effectiveness, there is growing interest in understanding the antecedents of leader emergence. The authors consider parental influence by examining how witnessing interparental violence during adolescence indirectly affects adult leader role occupancy. Drawing on the work–home resources (W-HR) model, the authors hypothesize that witnessing interparental violence serves as a distal, chronic contextual demand that hinders leader role occupancy through its effects on constructive personal resources, operationalized as insecure attachment. Based on role congruity theory, the authors also predict that the relationship between attachment style and leader role occupancy will differ for women and men. To test the hypotheses, the authors used data from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R) (n = 1,665 full-time employees). After controlling for age, education, childhood socioeconomic status and experienced violence, results showed that the negative indirect effects of witnessing interparental violence on leader role occupancy through avoidant attachment was significant for females only, while the negative effects of anxious attachment hindered leader role occupancy across sexes. Results identify novel distal (interparental violence) and proximal (attachment style) barriers to leader role occupancy, showing empirical support for the life-span approach to leadership and the persistent effects of home demands on work.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-07
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-10-2021-0279
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Earnings of persons with disabilities: Who earns more (less) from
           entrepreneurial pursuit'

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      Authors: Yang Yang , Mukta Kulkarni , David Baldridge , Alison M. Konrad
      Abstract: Persons with disabilities (PWD) are among the largest and most diverse minority groups and among the most disadvantaged in terms of employment. Entrepreneurial pursuit is often advocated as a path toward employment, inclusion, and equality, yet few studies have investigated earning variation among PWD. The authors draw on social cognitive career theory (SCCT), and the disability employment and entrepreneurship literature to develop hypotheses about who among PWD are likely to earn more (less) from entrepreneurial pursuits. The authors then conduct analyses on the nationally representative sample of the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) by including all PWD engaged in entrepreneurial pursuit, and matching each to an organizationally employed counterpart of the same gender and race and of similar age and disability severity (n ≈ 810). Entrepreneurial pursuit has a stronger negative association with the earnings of PWD who experience earlier disability onset ages, those who report more unmet accommodation needs, and those who are female. First, this study applies SCCT to help bridge the literature on organizational employment barriers for PWD and entrepreneurs with disabilities. Second, we call into question the logic of neoliberalism about entrepreneurship by showing that barriers to organizational employment impact entrepreneurial pursuit decisions and thereby earnings. Third, we extend the understanding of entrepreneurial earnings among PWD by examining understudied disability attributes and demographic attributes. Lastly, this study is among the first to use a matched sample to empirically test the impact of entrepreneurial pursuit on the earnings of PWD.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-03-22
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-09-2021-0239
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Employment inequality in India during the pandemic

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      Authors: Diti Goswami , Sandeep Kumar Kujur
      Abstract: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-induced response policies initiated by the Indian states disproportionately impact the employment of different groups in terms of gender, caste and religion. This study analyses the impact of the COVID-19-induced labor policies on employment inequality across different groups in India. The authors identify different exogenous COVID-19-induced labor policies initiated by the Indian states, and synthesize them into direct and indirect labor policies. The authors employ a panel model to examine the impact of COVID-19-induced labor policies on employment inequality. The authors find that the direct and indirect labor policies induce a decline in the employment rate, and create employment inequality among gendered and religious sub-groups. Females and Muslims have not significantly benefited from the COVID-19-induced labor policies. However, disadvantaged caste groups have benefited from direct and indirect labor policies. The time period during which this research was conducted was quite brief, and the qualitative impact of labor policies on employment inequality has not been accounted for. This study unravels the distributive impact of the COVID-19-induced direct and indirect labor policies on the well-being of vulnerable laborers. The study provides novel empirical evidence of the beneficial role of a proactive government. This study’s findings suggest the need for specific distributive labor policies to address employment inequality among gender and religious groups in India. The study employs new data sources and synthesizes the COVID-19-induced labor policies into direct and indirect labor policies. In addition, the study contributes to understanding the impact of COVID-19 induced direct and indirect labor policies on employment inequality across gender, caste and religious sub-groups in India.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2021-0146
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Decision-making in the recruitment of women on corporate boards: does
           gender matter'

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      Authors: Sneh Bhardwaj
      Abstract: The author provides an insider view of women directors' selections on corporate boards from the empirical setting of India and find if the recruitment practices in this space discriminate against women. The study collected data from a diverse cohort of 27 directors through semi-structured interviews. The data were analysed by applying an interpretative inductive approach and using the software NVivo's 12-plus version. The author’s findings show that board recruiters present different selection criteria and processes to women candidates depending upon heterogeneity among candidates' professional standing. Recruiters view women directors as a diverse cohort and value resourceful and experienced women when making recruitment decisions; these women directors are also found influencing directors' selection processes. The results question the underlying assumptions of prejudice against women as posited by the feminist and social identity theorists without accounting for the heterogeneity among women and situations. By proposing the female-gender stereotyping deactivation theory in top leadership matters, such as board selections, the author argues that stereotyping becomes irrelevant in the strategic decisions of board selections. This new theorisation about women's access to leadership roles will help the cause of women empowerment both at a cognitive and practical level. Future researchers can test the gender deactivation theory among women leaders in diverse cultural contexts by looking at the intra-cohort differences among women leaders.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-08-2021-0188
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Teacher-perpetrated sexual harassment and student performance: roles of
           emotional exhaustion and neuroticism

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      Authors: Atif Bilal , Syed Harris Laeeque , Muhammad Ali Saeed , Mohsin Mumtaz
      Abstract: This study examines the effects of teacher-perpetrated sexual harassment on graduate students' academic and extracurricular performance using conservation of resources theory as a framework. Further, it looks into the moderating role of trait neuroticism on the indirect relationship between sexual harassment and student performance via emotional exhaustion. Longitudinal data were collected in three waves from 218 Pakistani students over a period of three months during the fall 2019 semester. PROCESS Macro (v. 4) model 7 was used on SPSS (v. 21) to analyze the data for testing the moderated-mediation hypotheses. The results show that as a source of toxic stress, teacher-perpetrated sexual harassment is negatively related to both academic performance and extracurricular performance, and that emotional exhaustion is a mediator in this inverse relationship. In addition, trait neuroticism strengthens the negative effect of teacher-to-student sexual harassment on student performance through emotional exhaustion. This study addresses an unexplored moderated-mediation mechanism, and thus makes valuable contributions to education management research and practice. More specifically, it contributes by examining emotional exhaustion as a mediating variable in the relationship of teacher-perpetrated sexual harassment and student performance and, perhaps for the first time, establishes the moderating role of neuroticism in increasing the strength of the aforementioned relationship.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-06-2021-0155
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Rohingyas and Sri Lankan Tamil refugees in Tamil Nadu: a replicable model
           of semi-permanent resettlement in low-resource settings

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      Authors: R.K. Radhakrishnan , Emma Emily de Wit , Vandana Gopikumar , Joske G.F. Bunders
      Abstract: After being forced to flee their respective home countries, Sri Lankan Tamils and Rohingya refugees resettled in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. This study attempts to explore the extent to which the state has provided means for integration in the absence of refugee protection laws and citizenship. A qualitative research approach was used, including in-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs) with participants from both refugee groups between 2019 and early 2020. A representative sample of male and female Sri Lankan Tamils, living in or outside government camps, in urban and rural areas, was included (total number = 75). Similarly, a representative sample of the Rohingya refugee community was included for this study (n = 44). Despite constraints imposed by inadequate infrastructure, the study finds that Sri Lankan Tamils and Rohingyas both show to be progressively integrated in local society and have been capable of fulfilling some important basic livelihood needs, especially with regards to education. Some areas for improvement are identified as well, most urgently in terms of health and accommodation. Other states in India, as well as in similar low-income countries (LICs), could learn from the current case study with regards to administering workable policies for small groups of refugees. With minimal state facilitation and within the context of limited legal backing, refugee groups have somewhat managed to re-built their lives. This study identifies the threshold of requirements that make this achievement possible and suggests what more could be done to further advance the current state.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-01-31
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-07-2021-0180
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Employer approaches to recognizing and managing intermittent work capacity

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      Authors: Rosemary Lysaght , Terry Krupa , Allan W. Gregory
      Abstract: This study explored how intermittent work capacity (IWC) presents in workplaces in order to advance conceptual understanding of this phenomenon and establish a set of initial principles to assist in its management. The study followed a grounded theory approach in a multi-stage data collection process. In total, 25 employers representing diverse employment sectors were recruited with a goal of exploring their experiences with IWC. The first phase of the study comprised individual interviews with all employers. A subset of these employers later participated in two focus groups organized by company size. Finally, in-depth case studies were conducted with two information rich organizations to understand their approaches to managing IWC. Analysis methods consistent with grounded theory were used. Although employers have a variety of positive motivations for supporting employees with IWC, they are challenged by the uncertainty arising from the unpredictable work patterns associated with IWC. Five distinct expressions of uncertainty were identified. Negotiation of this uncertainty involves attention to a range of factors, including intrapersonal factors, workplace relations and morale, specific job demands, communication processes, and structural and organizational factors. The findings of this study advance understanding of the expression of IWC, and factors that influence its impact. This paper presents a series of workplace strategies that both enable the well-being and capabilities of employees who experience IWC, and ensure productive and diverse workplaces. The findings of this study advance understanding of the expression of IWC, and factors that influence its impact. This paper presents a series of workplace strategies that both enable the well-being and capabilities of employees who experience IWC, and ensure productive and diverse workplaces.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-01-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-02-2021-0046
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The effect of cultural intelligence of top management on pro-diversity
           work climate and work attitudes of Myanmar migrant workers in Thailand

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      Authors: Peerayuth Charoensukmongkol , Tipnuch Phungsoonthorn
      Abstract: This research examines the effect of cultural intelligence (CQ) of top management on pro-diversity climates and perceived discrimination of the Myanmar migrant workers in Thailand. This research also analyzes the effect of perceived discrimination on job satisfaction and turnover intention of the Myanmar migrant workers. The data were collected from 650 Myanmar migrant workers who are employed at two factories in Thailand. Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used as the data analysis method. The results significantly support the positive effect of perceived management CQ on pro-diversity climates. Pro-diversity climates are also negatively and significantly associated with perceived discrimination. Moreover, the effect of perceived management CQ on perceived discrimination is fully mediated by pro-diversity climate. This research clarifies that simply ensuring top management possess CQ may not be a sufficient condition for the company to successfully tackle discrimination in the workplace. Rather, it is crucial for the top management to create an organizational climate that is supportive of the racial diversity of foreign migrant employees.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-01-20
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-11-2020-0339
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Comparing cultural diversity perspectives among public service employees
           in the Netherlands in 2008 and 2018

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      Authors: Joep Hofhuis
      Abstract: The Netherlands' national government (Rijksoverheid) is an example of a large public organization that strives to recruit and retain employees from different cultural groups, and aims to reap the benefits of workplace diversity. Research has shown that a major predictor of the effectiveness of diversity policy and interventions is the diversity perspective of employees, i.e. which outcomes they associate with cultural diversity in their work environment. The present study compares public servants' diversity perspectives in two similar independent samples, from 2008 (n = 1,617) and 2018 (n = 2,024), using the Benefits and Threats of Diversity Scale (BTDS; Hofhuis et al., 2015). Results show that in 2018, employees of the Netherlands' national government perceived more benefits of diversity for gaining insight about and access to different groups within society. Additionally, contributions of cultural diversity to creativity and innovation within teams are reported significantly more often in 2018 than in 2008. The findings may be of interest to diversity scholars, since data on changes in cultural diversity perspectives across time are rare, and the paper provides a unique comparison of measurements at two time points, one decade apart, within the same organization.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-01-17
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2021-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Social innovation in managing diversity: COVID-19 as a catalyst for change

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      Authors: Deni̇z Palalar Alkan , Mustafa Ozbilgin , Rifat Kamasak
      Abstract: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic had an adverse impact on workforce diversity internationally. While in the Global North, many countries have sophisticated laws and organizational mechanisms and discourses to deal with such adverse impacts on workforce diversity, such structures of diversity management are either ceremonial or poorly developed in the Global South. The global pandemic disproportionately impacted Global North and Global South increases the existing gap due to vaccine rollout inequality and divergence in recoveries. The authors explore social innovation as a possible option for responding to the challenges induced by the COVID-19 pandemic. The study draws on interviews in 26 distinctive organizations operating in various industries in Turkey. The authors have adopted a qualitative design to explore how social innovation helps to respond to diversity concerns during the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors demonstrate that social innovation presents a viable option for a country with a poorly regulated context of diversity management. Social innovation could help overcome the challenge of the absence of supportive legislation, discourses and practices of diversity in poorly regulated contexts. The field study revealed several distinct forms of social innovation for diversity management, which emerged as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors demonstrate that in the absence of supportive diversity management structures and frameworks, social innovation in diversity management at the organizational level could provide a viable response to the emergent needs in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-01-10
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-07-2021-0171
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Let us move beyond word battles and separatism: strategies and concerns
           regarding universal design in Sweden

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Emil Erdtman , Kirsten Rassmus-Gröhn , Per-Olof Hedvall
      Abstract: Universal design (UD) is defined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) and adopted in Sweden as a guiding principle for the design of new products, facilities, services, etc. This study aims to contribute to knowledge about UD in practice – how it is conceived, experienced and discussed in Sweden, especially regarding education, working life and housing. A group interview and a workshop (immersion into personas and scenarios) with 14 practitioners of inclusion and accessibility from academia, civil society, business and the public sector were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. The participating practitioners related UD to a cluster of terms for inclusion and wanted to communicate the reason for UD rather than battling about words. Flexibility was considered openness to the diversity of human conditions and situations combined with individualization capacity including assistance. Short-term demands for access and compliance to minimum standards must be balanced with long-term learning processes. Evaluation, relation-building and dialogs must update and contextualize UD, for example, in relation to categorization. This study yields an in-depth picture of how the practice of UD is conceived, experienced and discussed among Swedish practitioners of inclusion and accessibility. It elucidates dissonances between experiences and ideals, standardized and flexible design, and the interests of users and institutions. It enhances knowledge of the dilemmas in inclusive and diversity-based practices, as well as the implementation and promotion of UD.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-03-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-04-2021-0108
      Issue No: Vol. 41 , No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Gender stereotypes: persistence and challenges

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      Authors: Gladys Merma-Molina, María Alejandra Ávalos-Ramos, María Ángeles Martínez Ruiz
      Abstract: The aims of this study are to identify and analyse prevalent gender roles and the persistence of sexist stereotypes among teachers in training in Spain, to determine the reasons for them and suggest solutions for eradicating sexist prejudices. A gender role questionnaire was administered to 1260 workers from 54 different professions who were enrolled on a postgraduate training course to qualify as secondary education teachers. The instrument contained six variables for both quantitative and qualitative analysis: professional work, family (looking after children), feelings and emotions, household chores, body image and free time. Household chores, looking after children and gender roles linked to body image were those most indicated by both men and women. It is concluded that men participate little in bringing up children and household chores and that women continue to shoulder the responsibility. Both are concerned about their body image, but women have little self-acceptance of and satisfaction with their bodies and a stronger sense of being judged by how they look. Gender stereotypes persist, despite extensive legislation in Spain since 2004. The study has limitations deriving from its choice of convenience sampling. Although it includes participants from six Spanish autonomous communities, the number from each region is not very high. Nevertheless, the sample is representative of almost all branches of knowledge (54 professions). Another limitation concerns the images used in the research instrument as a data collection strategy insofar, as they could not be obtained from a data bank specific to the research subject but instead had to be found in databases of general images. It can be inferred that a data collection strategy without any danger of bias would be to encourage each participant to design their own images, reflecting their perceptions and auto-perceptions of gender roles and stereotypes. The fact that there were no pre-existing studies using this type of research instrument in education sciences was a handicap for the investigation. Despite these methodological limitations, the results of the study may serve as a basis for implementing specific future actions originating from any area – but especially from the area of education – aimed at teaching people about equal roles in order to eliminate sexist sterotypes. This research was carried out as part of the Proyecto Diseño y Atención a las Oportunidades de Género en la Educación Superior (Project on Design and Gender Equality of Opportunities in Higher Education) funded by the Vicerrectorado de Cooperación al Desarrollo (Office for University Cooperation for Development) at the University of Alicante (Spain). Spanish legislation has not been able to promote significant changes in the performance of traditional gender roles or to eliminate sexist stereotypes that perpetuate imbalances between men and women. The ideal and prevalent model of a Spanish woman is still that of a “self-sacrificing mother”, responsible for the household chores and childcare. She must combine this first job with a second profession, and, in addition, she must have a “desirable physical image”. The study puts forward various possible solutions for reducing and/or eradicating sexist attitudes with the participation of different social agents and in particular through education. The investigation could be of use when carrying out specific cross-sectional interventions on the subject of gender equality with students on postgraduate teacher training courses, for the purposes of encouraging the elimination of stereotypes and strengthening the capacity for critical judgement, positive self-concept and self-esteem. The study may be useful for carrying out specific and transversal university training interventions in postgraduate teacher training on gender equality aimed at promoting the elimination of stereotypes, the strengthening of critical judgement capacity, positive self-concept and self-esteem.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-01-08
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-12-2018-0229
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Participation of Indigenous employees in the Quebec's forestry sector:
           opportunities and barriers

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      Authors: Jean-Michel Beaudoin , Marie-Eve Dufour , Eve Desroches-Maheux , Luc Lebel
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to better understand the factors influencing the attraction of Indigenous workers to the Quebec forestry sector. Using a collaborative approach, 64 semi-structured interviews were conducted between 2016 and 2018 with workers and stakeholders from three Indigenous communities in Quebec, Canada. The results highlight the motivations for choosing a job in the forestry sector, including family and friends, attachment to the territory, financial necessity, the search for a challenge and a sense of pride. They also show some of the obstacles to holding a job in forestry, namely work–life conflict, transportation, job insecurity, education and personal problems. Indigenous people have a lower employment rate than non-Indigenous people, which can be explained by a number of factors that hinder their integration into the labour market. They nevertheless represent an interesting labour pool for companies working in the natural resources sector. This study sheds light on the opportunities and barriers to attract this workforce. The study is one of the few to use theoretical frameworks focused on motivation and a qualitative approach to data collection in order to examine to examine the attraction of Indigenous workers to the forestry sector in Quebec (Canada) from a worker's perspective.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-12-24
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2021-0021
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Work experiences of qualified immigrants: a review of theoretical progress
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Ali Dehghanpour Farashah , Tomas Blomquist
      Abstract: Qualified immigrants (QIs) and their work experiences have been studied using a wide variety of theoretical approaches with divergent characteristics. This paper reviews theoretical progress and proposes directions for future research and practice. Using relevant keywords, articles indexed by Web of Science in management, business, industrial relations and applied psychology were systematically searched for and analysed. In total, 60 theoretical articles published during 2008–2018 were included. The theoretical progress and future theoretical and practical challenges were organised based on the notions of equality, diversity and inclusion. Eight theoretical approaches utilised to study QIs' work experiences were recognised: (1) human capital theory, (2) career capital theory, (3) theory of practice, (4) intersectionality, (5) social identity theory, (6) sensemaking, (7) cultural identity transition and (8) the career-centred approach. The contributions and limitations of each theoretical lens were then scrutinised. Overall, research on QIs still lacks a comprehensive theoretical framework. As a step towards that, the paper proposes considering the role of organisations and labour market intermediaries, strategic view over the immigrant workforce, agency–institution play, identity–capital play and host–immigrant play. The focus is on theory development and empirical papers with no clear theoretical foundation are excluded. This review is the first attempt to summarise and direct the divergent research on the topic. The main contribution is setting an agenda for future research, particularly by proposing the elements of a comprehensive theoretical framework for studying QIs in the workplace.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-23
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2019-0046
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Queer India “on paper” – decriminalization, recognition and
           visibility of sexual diversity

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      Authors: Michiel Baas
      Abstract: Taking as a point of departure the edited collection Yaraana (1999), ostensibly the first mainstream publication on gay writing from India, the purpose of this article is to trace the way Indian authors have dealt with the growing visibility of nonnormative sexualities. It suggests that from the start this debate has centered on a dyad between local and culturally specific sexual identities vs its globalized opposite, which is held to threaten regionally specific expressions. The continuing struggle for recognition and equality is revealing for a growing divide between those whose sexuality can rely on growing representation in Indian popular media, and those who feel increasingly marginalized. This article revisits important texts that were published and publicly accessible in India from 1999 onwards. All the text considered and discussed were accessible outside academic networks and thus, available in mainstream bookstores, produced by Indian authors or long-term residents and available in English. Considering the vast language diversity of India as well as the complexity of gaining access to locally published materials, the analysis does not include texts that are only available in a vernacular language. Besides this, the article benefits from the direct input of key activists and scholars from India working on this topic. Even if homosexuality has now been decriminalized in India, what emerges from the writing is a concern that globally hegemonic expressions of alternate sexualities might impact, homogenize and eventually eradicate locally specific expressions. Considering socioeconomic equality in India, this raises serious questions about those whose precarious positions may see them further marginalized because of this. While there have been various overviews and analyses of the fight for decriminalization of homosexuality in India, so far there has not been an analysis how this benefited from a growing awareness and discussion in popularly accessible texts. This analysis also raises concerns that the fight for decriminalization might have negative consequences for those in marginalized positions.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-04-29
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-02-2020-0051
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Understanding LGBT individuals' employment environment in Taiwan: a
           relational framework perspective

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      Authors: Jennet Achyldurdyyeva , Li-Fan Wu , Nurbibi Datova
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the aspects of workplace environment and the experiences of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) employees in an Asian context; a subject that has hitherto been somewhat neglected. It responds to a call for more contextual research in the field of employment diversity in organizational management in general. This is a mixed method study, which utilizes multiple sources of primary and secondary data and consists of in-depth personal interviews, a survey of LGBT employees, published data (including legislation and state policies), reports issued by social and media organizations, documentary evidence from Taiwanese companies and insights drawn from the existing literature. It was found that there is an interplay between the macro, meso and micro levels in the multilevel relational framework applied to diversity of employment in Taiwan. Macrolevel factors, such as supportive legislation, mass media and social tolerance toward LGBT community positively affect mesolevel factors, such as stable and secure social networks among the LGBT community in the form of legal and social organizations (NGOs, social media, bars, restaurants, etc.) as well as many companies inclusion of sexual orientation in their definitions of diversity. However, this is opposed by macrolevel, cultural values related to family structure and intergenerational relationships that inhibit pro-active integration and equality of LGBT individuals at the meso organizational level. Companies headed by older-generation leadership can be slow to advocate, support and promote sexual-orientation diversity in their workplaces. In contrast, microlevel data shows that LGBT employees receive robust psychological support from their peer group, friends and the LGBT community, although gaining acceptance by family and coworkers remains a challenge. Future studies need to focus on the dynamics of the meso- and microlevel factors by investigating how organizational structure, perspectives of leaders and HR managers, diversity management practices and attitudes and behaviors of LGBT employees and other coworkers affect development and integration of sexual-orientation diversity programs within organizations. Managers, policy makers in organization as well as educators benefit from the context-sensitive findings and recommendations offered in this paper. Understanding of LGBT individuals employment environment helps to facilitate or hinder the positive development of equal society and benefit both LGBT employees, their coworkers and managers. Limited research exists on the LGBT employees experiences at work in Asia. This study makes unique contribution to the understanding of sexual orientation category of diversity at work in Taiwan context.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-03-19
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-02-2020-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Selling science: optimizing the research funding evaluation and decision
           process

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Claartje J. Vinkenburg , Carolin Ossenkop , Helene Schiffbaenker
      Abstract: In this contribution to EDI's professional insights, the authors develop practical and evidence-based recommendations that are developed for bias mitigation, discretion elimination and process optimization in panel evaluations and decisions in research funding. An analysis is made of how the expectation of “selling science” adds layers of complexity to the evaluation and decision process. The insights are relevant for optimization of similar processes, including publication, recruitment and selection, tenure and promotion. The recommendations are informed by experiences and evidence from commissioned projects with European research funding organizations. The authors distinguish between three aspects of the evaluation process: written applications, enacted performance and group dynamics. Vignettes are provided to set the stage for the analysis of how bias and (lack of) fit to an ideal image makes it easier for some than for others to be funded. In research funding decisions, (over)selling science is expected but creates shifting standards for evaluation, resulting in a narrow band of acceptable behavior for applicants. In the authors' recommendations, research funding organizations, evaluators and panel chairs will find practical ideas and levers for process optimization, standardization and customization, in terms of awareness, accountability, biased language, criteria, structure and time. Showing how “selling science” in research funding adds to the cumulative disadvantage of bias, the authors offer design specifications for interventions to mitigate the negative effects of bias on evaluations and decisions, improve selection habits, eliminate discretion and create a more inclusive process.
      Citation: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-10-27
      DOI: 10.1108/EDI-01-2021-0028
      Issue No: Vol. 41 , No. 9 (2021)
       
  • Equality, Diversity and Inclusion

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