Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.916
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 25  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1754-9426 - ISSN (Online) 1754-9434
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • Job analysis and job classification for addressing pay inequality in
           organizations: Adjusting our methods within a shifting legal landscape

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Strah; Nicole, Rupp, Deborah E., Morris, Scott B.
      Pages: 1 - 45
      Abstract: Pay inequality remains a pervasive problem within the workforce. However, it can be challenging for even well-meaning and responsible organizations to effectively assess which jobs should be considered equivalent and paid the same based on both legal criteria (which have shifted over time and differ across specific statutes and jurisdictions) and scientific evidence (which continues to amass). This paper intends to initiate a solution-focused discussion on how organizations can proactively categorize jobs so that pay decisions that are made about men and women are both legally defensible and fair. We propose that integrating the job analysis/job classification literature and the pay discrimination literature (e.g., legal opinions given by courts) will inform this discussion. We first review federal and state legislation and court opinions that have set legal standards for identifying pay discrimination. We then review the relevance of job analysis/job classification for systematically defining and categorizing jobs, highlighting the legal issues that should be but (to the best of our knowledge) have not been considered when undertaking such processes. Our intention is for this article to spark dialogue among researchers and practitioners regarding the identification of methods with which organizations can strive to meet equal pay standards and goals, applying both legal and scientific perspectives.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.94
       
  • IOP volume 15 issue 1 Cover and Front matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2022.29
       
  • IOP volume 15 issue 1 Cover and Back matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2022.30
       
  • In analyses of the gender pay gap, job analysis, and O*NET don’t get a
           lot of respect, but they should

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      Authors: Conte; Jeffrey M., Robison, Jessica L., Tricarico, Andrew J.
      Pages: 46 - 50
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.134
       
  • What makes jobs too dissimilar to compare in a pay equity analysis'

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      Authors: Aamodt; Michael G., Haimann, Cliff
      Pages: 51 - 54
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.141
       
  • Metrics for assessing similarity of jobs

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      Authors: Hough; Leaetta M., Russell, Teresa L.
      Pages: 55 - 60
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.129
       
  • If sex discrimination in pay is still a societal problem, job evaluation
           is the answer

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      Authors: Barrett; Gerald V.
      Pages: 61 - 64
      Abstract: Strah et al. (2021) claimed “pay inequality between men and women remains a salient societal issue” (p. 1). We agree that it is a societal issue, but we believe this issue has already been solved by existing job evaluation procedures. Job evaluation procedures have shown to be reliable and valid methods for assessing whether an organization can meet equal pay standards. The authors presented no scientific evidence that this was inaccurate. In fact, nearly 50 years ago there was considerable evidence that equal pay standards, both scientific and legal, were met by job evaluation.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.136
       
  • Practicality of job analysis in today’s world of work

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      Authors: Keeler; Justin B., Brock Baskin, Meagan E., Lambert, Abbie, Clinton, M. Suzanne, Barger Johnson, Jennifer
      Pages: 65 - 69
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.128
       
  • Adding competency models to the pay equity toolbox

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      Authors: Popp; Eric, Allen, Kristin S., Gutierrez, Sara
      Pages: 70 - 72
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.127
       
  • Minding employee pay equality policy perceptions

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      Authors: Laguerre; Rick A.
      Pages: 73 - 75
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.139
       
  • Side effects associated with organizational interventions: A perspective

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      Authors: Watts; Logan L., Gray, Bradley E., Medeiros, Kelsey E.
      Pages: 76 - 94
      Abstract: Drawing on examples from published research, the authors offer a perspective on the side effects that are associated with organizational interventions. This perspective is framed in the context of the many hard-won positive influences that industrial and organizational (I-O) psychologists have had on individuals, groups, organizations, and social institutions over the last century. With a few exceptions, we argue that side effects tend to receive less attention from I-O psychology researchers and practitioners than they deserve. A systematic approach to studying, monitoring, and advertising side effects is needed to better understand their causes, consequences, and the contexts in which they are most likely to emerge. The purpose of this piece is to stimulate conversations within the field about the phenomenon of side effects as well as what might be done to improve our science and practice in this domain.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.93
       
  • Open systems, closed interventions' A way forward requires systems
           thinking

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      Authors: Brown; Shanique G., Fowlin, Julaine M.
      Pages: 95 - 98
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.138
       
  • The power of process theories to better understand and detect consequences
           of organizational interventions

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      Authors: Braun; Michael T., Kuljanin, Goran, Grand, James A., Kozlowski, Steve W. J., Chao, Georgia T.
      Pages: 99 - 104
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.125
       
  • A multilevel approach for advancing organizational interventions

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      Authors: LeNoble; Chelsea A., Hudson, Matthew F.
      Pages: 105 - 109
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.131
       
  • Organization-based participatory research: A framework to guide
           intervention research in I-O psychology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Williams; Myia S., Patel, Vidhi H., Sachdev, Aditi R.
      Pages: 110 - 112
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.137
       
  • Decolonizing intervention assessment: Qualitative and interdisciplinary
           approaches to understanding “side effects”

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      Authors: Beckel; Julia L. O., Gardner, Danielle M., Prasad, Joshua J.
      Pages: 113 - 116
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.132
       
  • Avoiding harm, benefits of interpersonal listening, and social equilibrium
           adjustment: An applied psychology approach to side effects of
           organizational interventions

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      Authors: Itzchakov; Guy, Keeler, Justin B., Sowden, Walter J., Slipetz, Walter, Faught, Kent S.
      Pages: 117 - 121
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.130
       
  • Understanding intervention effects using a desirability and foreseeability
           typology

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      Authors: Carpini; Joseph A, Soo, Christine
      Pages: 122 - 125
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.133
       
  • The brighter side effects: Identification and attainment

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      Authors: Khoobchandani; Nishka, Sharma, Shania, Davis, Alicia S., Feitosa, Jennifer
      Pages: 126 - 129
      Abstract: Organizations that are becoming more diverse and relying on teams to achieve performance outcomes often employ organizational interventions to deliver these outcomes. Although some negative or null side effects have been demonstrated related to these interventions, we argue that many positive side effects are often not captured or are disregarded and warrant further attention. Using examples from the training literature, we provide evidence for positive side effects of organizational interventions. We also identify lapses in the field’s approach to the measurement of the effects of organizational interventions and how this prevents our attempts to improve these interventions to create better and more holistic outcomes for employees and organizations. We suggest opportunities to improve interventions that can be applied in our diverse workplaces.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.140
       
  • Perfect is the enemy of good enough: Putting the side effects of
           intelligence testing in perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Oh; In-Sue
      Pages: 130 - 134
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.126
       
  • Educating future researchers with an eye toward intellectual humility

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Manix; Kelly G.
      Pages: 135 - 136
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.135
       
  • Investigating the promise and pitfalls of pulse surveys

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      Authors: Brown; Matt I.
      Pages: 137 - 149
      Abstract: Despite the growing popularity and marketing of pulse surveys, there is little research concerning this practice. To this end, this practice forum reports the results of a four-wave pulse survey that was conducted in a health care organization. Pulse surveys provided reliable estimates of overall engagement, but scores remained stable across 8 months. Practically no differences in group scores or trends could be found despite high participation (≍ 50%). Item responses displayed little differences between groups, ICC(1) ranging from .03 to .18, and poor discriminant validity. Based on these results, pulse surveys may be adequate for estimating overall employee sentiment but not useful for detecting change over time or differences between groups. These limitations should be considered when designing or implementing pulse surveys.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/iop.2021.124
       
 
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