Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
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Vocations and Learning
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.662
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1874-7868 - ISSN (Online) 1874-785X
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Promoting Workplace Guidance and Workplace–School Collaboration in
           Vocational Training: A Mixed-Methods Pilot Study

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim of this mixed-method pilot study was to expand the understanding of potential methods to support collaboration between vocational schools and workplaces and to enhance workplace guidance processes. Specifically, we evaluated whether a Cultural-historical Activity theory-based intervention program could have beneficial effects on school–workplace collaboration and on the individual-level competencies of the teachers and workplace personnel. Our results indicate that the change workshop provides a potential mechanism for enhancing personal competencies such as self-efficacy and for promoting collaboration between schools and workplaces, especially in terms of defining objectives for workplace learning. Our study also highlighted how the change workshop method has the potential to trigger expansive learning, in which school personnel and workplace trainers, through learning actions, can change and create new ways of working together. This study highlights the importance of providing workplaces and educational institutions with opportunities to share experiences and learn how to promote workplace-situated learning together.
      PubDate: 2022-04-05
       
  • Recording Business Transactions in Textbook and Receipt Form 

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      Abstract: Abstract An important prerequisite for meeting professional demands upon completion of an apprenticeship is for apprentices to possess the ability to transfer the professional knowledge and skills they acquire in vocational education and training (VET) to various professional situations. This paper presents the empirical results on knowledge and skills transfer from an exploratory study in commercial VET. In a computer-based test environment, 470 commercial apprentices performed business transactions with the same content but with two different forms of presentation. The results indicated that the apprentices did not fully transfer their knowledge and skills within the same context. However, interest in finance and accounting, prior school knowledge and learning opportunities were able to explain their performances. The results suggest that further research on transfer processes that reflect different theoretical approaches is needed.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • Career Change of Young Talent and the Influence of Knowledge Transfer on
           Vocational Commitment: a Study of Hospitality Apprentices in Bavaria
           (Germany)

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      Abstract: Abstract Career change of young talent aggravates human resource shortages in various industries and the analysis of vocational commitment during the educational phase becomes paramount. Knowledge transfer modes and dynamics in the education of young professionals can influence their vocation or “calling” in the sector they are specialising for. With the background of the knowledge-based view, the goal of this study is to identify knowledge transfer-related aspects of education that exert a relevant influence on apprentices’ vocational commitment. The findings of the study of 331 hospitality apprentices in Bavaria, Germany, reveal that both academic sources and firm sources in the apprenticeship-based, also called dual, educational system affect the vocational commitment of apprentices. Specifically, the satisfaction with the training in the educational centre, the existence of organisational mentorship, and a personalised training system in the firm significantly affect vocational commitment after the educational stage. Consequently, educators along with mentors and managers in the partner firms can help enhance their students’ vocational commitment and potentially decrease their likelihood of leaving a sector.
      PubDate: 2022-03-30
       
  • Vocational Students’ Perceptions of Self-Regulated Learning in
           Work-Based VET

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      Abstract: Abstract This study’s aim is to examine vocational students’ perceptions of self-regulated learning in work-based settings regarding Finnish vocational education and training (VET). We examined the participants’ self-reported thoughts and experiences of VET learning and vocational development that were reflected against SRL theory. The interview data (N = 33) included apprentices (n = 15) in work-based and students in school-based VET (n = 18) in the fields of social and healthcare, business and administration, and construction. Overall, the results indicated that learning at work promoted vocational students’ cognitive engagement and motivation. The interviews also introduced certain SRL strategies that guided the participants’ efforts to learn. In particular, many of the vocational students had taken the initiative to set goals, done strategic planning, and monitored their own performance jointly with their teachers or co-workers. However, the self-reports also revealed some shortcomings in the students’ SRL behaviour. The importance and availability of social support and positive feedback from VET teachers and workplace trainers/co-workers to vocational students’ learning and self-efficacy were underlined in the self-reports.
      PubDate: 2022-03-26
       
  • From Thriving Developers to Stagnant Self-Doubters: An Identity-Centered
           Approach to Exploring the Relationship Between Digitalization and
           Professional Development

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      Abstract: Abstract This article reports a study illustrating the relationship between digitalization and professional development from an identity-centered perspective. Drawing on a unique data set of 101 empathy-based stories from 81 Finnish government workers, the findings show how workers might experience and respond to work-identity alignments and misalignments in a digitalized working life and how this might influence their professional development. We identify four typifications—the thriving developer, the loyal transformer, the stagnant self-doubter, and the career crafter— and illustrate how digitalization can either support or hinder professional development by inducing work-identity (mis)alignments and how workers may respond to these in different ways by engaging in identity work and job crafting. In particular, our findings emphasize the role professional identity and agency play in professional development and highlight the importance of recognizing how digitalization of work can threaten or support workers’ professional identities to build a supportive working environment where the workers feel like they are valued and able to develop in a meaningful way.
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
       
  • Collaborating Across Occupational Boundaries: Towards a Theoretical Model

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      Abstract: Abstract The digital transformation leads to changing work contexts and new work objects that give rise to the necessity of collaboration across occupational boundaries. Yet there is a lack of theoretical models of cross-occupational collaboration, particularly with regard to individuals’ cross-occupational collaboration competency (COCC). In order to close this research gap, this article presents a theoretical model of COCC and associated indicators which can be subject to education and diagnostics in VET. In accordance with activity theory, cross-occupational collaboration is characterized as an activity system. While an activity is collective in nature, its role-constituting elements (e.g., division of labor) point to role-theoretical approaches. This paper reviews role-theoretical frameworks and applies structural symbolic interactionism as a framework for modeling an individual’s COCC. Using its conceptual apparatus, a hierarchical model of an individual’s capacity for cross-occupational collaboration within an activity system is developed. Its elements are (i) knowledge about one’s own occupational role, (ii) knowledge about the roles of the cooperation partners with other occupations, (iii) latent role distance, (iv) role-taking, and (v) object-oriented role coordination/role-making. This model can also be used as a basis for assessments that may lead to empirical investigations of how to promote individuals’ COCC.
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
       
  • Conditions for Workplace Learning Among Professional ‘Temps’: A
           Qualitative Study of Temporary Agency Nurses in Sweden

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      Abstract: Abstract Adopting a theoretical perspective that acknowledges both formal and informal learning as crucial and emphasises reproductive and developmental learning as complementary, this article analyses and discusses temporary agency nurses’ experiences of working and learning, focusing on conditions for workplace learning. This provides opportunities to address questions about conditions for the integration of work and learning in a work situation characterised by flexibilization and individualisation. More specifically, among individuals moving between different organizational contexts rather than working at ‘a’ (single and stable) workplace provided by the employer. By presenting findings based on a thematic analysis of 21 interviews with individual temporary agency nurses working in Swedish health care, both opportunities and challenges for workplace learning is highlighted. While opportunities for informal learning linked to the movement between various client organizations as well as to nursing as common ground and as valued and recognized competence, is identified, at the same time, challenges connected to both formal and informal learning, are also illuminated. Regarding informal learning, challenges in terms of varied and general support and feedback as well as scarce opportunities and low expectations for the temporary agency nurses’ participation in development work in daily work/at client organizations, is identified. The findings thus also illuminate a risk for temporary agency nurses adjusting to prevailing working conditions rather than engaging in developmental learning. Regarding formal learning, challenges in terms of few opportunities for planned learning activities, is identified. All in all, the findings illuminate conditions for workplace learning for temporary agency nurses as clearly dependent not only on the offers of specific temporary work agencies and client organisations, but also on temporary agency nurses’ interest in and views regarding responsibility for learning, and thus highly varying.
      PubDate: 2022-02-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-022-09283-x
       
  • Transition from School to Work – Explaining Persistence Intention in
           Vocational Education and Training in Switzerland

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      Abstract: Abstract Vocational education and training (VET) programs are typically regarded as the means to enable successful school-to-work transitions. However, high rates of premature contract terminations in VET programs suggest that adolescents face difficulties during this transition. This paper aims to examine the determinants of persistence intention, claiming that persistence intention is a crucial indicator of imminent dropout decisions. The analysis is based on a longitudinal data set of trainees in dual VET programs in Switzerland (n = 1,163) containing two measurement points (before and after the transition from school to VET). Drawing on Social Cognitive Career Theory (Lent & Brown, 2008, 2013), we are interested in the effects of work adjustment indicators, selected characteristics of the vocational choice process, and environmental support before and after the transition on trainees’ persistence intention. We use structural equation modeling to analyze both direct and indirect effects of different predictor variables on persistence intention. The results show significantly positive effects of both occupational self-efficacy and perceived person-vocation fit during the training program on trainees’ persistence intention. Moreover, there are only indirect effects of anticipated person-vocation fit and occupational self-efficacy at the end of compulsory education. Trainees’ relationship with the trainer also has an indirect effect on persistence intention. Social integration in the workplace is both directly and indirectly linked to persistence intention. Overall, the model explains 48% of the variance in persistence intention. Implications for VET programs and future research are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-01-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09282-4
       
  • Correction to: Professional Competence of Vocational Teachers: a
           Conceptual Review

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09281-5
       
  • A Path Towards a Possible Future – Adult Students’ Choice of
           Vocational Education

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      Abstract: Abstract Today’s society is characterized by high unemployment, a prevailing trust in and demands for an academic degree, and an emphasis on the individual’s own responsibility for their educational choices. This study aims to examine adults’ vocational education choices, their intentions in connection with municipal adult education (MAE) studies, and how this relates to identity formation. The study is based on 18 interviews and compares students from two vocational MAE training programmes in assistant nursing and floor laying. The analysis has identified different pathways concerning adult students’ decisions to enrol in municipal adult education and a specific vocational education and training (VET) programme. We see educational choices and paths in terms of underlying causes or as forward-looking rationalities. The results show that the process of identity formation is larger than simply one of vocational becoming within a vocational community of practice, since MAE studies involve a student’s whole being, including both their personal identity trajectories and their vocational identity formation. With this article we hope to provide a foundation for a pedagogical discussion about student intentions, focusing on how different subjectivities affect students with regard to their future vocational becoming.
      PubDate: 2021-10-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09280-6
       
  • The Lived Body and Embodied Instructional Practices in Maritime Basic
           Safety Training

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper explores the role of the lived body in maritime professional training. By focusing on how instructors include students’ subjective experiencing bodies as an educational resource and context for directives and demonstrations, the study aims at informing training of professionals for survival in emergency situations onboard ships. Drawing on a mobile video ethnography and on phenomenological analyses of the presence/absence of the body in experience, the study illustrates how instructors direct students’ attention towards or away from their appearing corporal field depending on the stage of the training. The article documents three instructional practices incorporating students’ lived embodiment during training: coping with distress by foregrounding the lived body, backgrounding the lived body for outer-directed action and imagining others’embodied experiences. The study contributes to our understanding of intercorporeal practices in instructional interaction and guidance in simulation-based vocational training.
      PubDate: 2021-10-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09279-z
       
  • Beyond Psychological Safety – the Role of Direct Supervisor Behavior in
           Fostering Learning from Errors at the Workplace

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      Abstract: Abstract This study explores how direct supervisors can hinder or enhance how professionals learn from their errors. Extant research has often focused on psychological safety as the main condition for this kind of learning to take place. We expand prior research by exploring which behaviors of direct supervisors effectively facilitate learning from errors in concert with psychological safety. We conducted semi-structured interviews among 23 professionals to gain detailed insights into their thoughts, needs, and the difficulties they encounter. Through content analysis, we identified four critical supervisor behaviors that participants viewed as facilitating learning from errors next to fostering a psychologically safe work environment: (1) providing timely feedback, (2) guidance and elaborate feedback, (3) being accessible and personally involved, (4) organizing joint evaluations. Based on our findings, recommendations are formulated for supervisors that aim to facilitate professionals’ learning from errors and their professional development.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09272-6
       
  • Learning or Leaving' Individual and Environmental Factors Related to
           Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention

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      Abstract: Abstract In addition to well-being, workplace learning has gained increasing interest in supporting employee and organizational development and success. Focusing on specific factors affecting workplace learning and well-being, this study examines the links between individual factors (basic psychological need satisfaction) and environmental factors (expansiveness of the workplace as a learning environment), job satisfaction, and turnover intention. Survey data were collected from the employees (N = 153) of two Finnish engineering companies from 2018 to 2019. The data were analyzed with correlation analysis and structural equation modeling (observed and latent variable path analysis). Results show that a more expansive workplace learning environment is associated with higher satisfaction of basic psychological needs. High levels of autonomy and competence need satisfaction, versatile work, promotion of learning, and acknowledgment of skills are positively associated with job satisfaction. Higher levels of autonomy and non-routine work tasks are associated with lower turnover intention. The results indicate that turnover intention is not necessarily associated with only negative conditions or perceptions, as high levels of competence and participation and understanding of the workplace are positively associated with turnover intention. The findings provide information about workplace factors that are relevant to improving employees’ workplace learning and well-being. The results also highlight the ambiguous nature of turnover intention.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09275-3
       
  • Differences in Perception Matter – How Differences in the Perception of
           Training Quality of Trainees and Trainers Affect Drop-Out in VET

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      Abstract: Abstract The dual system of vocational education and training (VET) and its quality have recently been receiving scientific attention, partly due to high drop-out rates and to politically-motivated efforts to increase participation in the system (Le Mouillour, 2018). However, it remains controversial as to how quality within training companies should be measured, and from whose perspective, and how the quality of training affects drop-out. Empirical studies mostly target the quality perceptions of trainees or of trainers in isolation. The extent to which output factors such as drop-out rates are influenced by variations in perceptions of quality between both these parties has to this point not been tested. The object of the present study was to present a novel bilateral approach to assessing training quality. For this reason, the effects on drop-out intention of differences in the perception of in-company training quality (incongruences) between trainees and trainers from the same company were examined. An online survey was conducted involving 311 commercial trainees and training officers from 30 German companies. A framework model of workplace learning (Tynjälä, Vocations and Learning, 6(1), 11–36, 2013) and a short questionnaire “VET-LQI” (Böhn and Deutscher, Zeitschrift für pädagogische Psychologie: ZfPP, 33, 49–70, 2020) served as the theoretical basis and test instrument respectively. Responses from trainees were matched to those of their corresponding trainers, in order to determine possible differences for every item and scale. Following a weighting method regarding the absolute rating level, 15 input- and process-quality factors of divergence, so called “difference accounting multi-perspective scores” were used as independent variables in multiple regression analyses. The results show that differences in perception of quality not only have a significant effect on drop-out intentions, but also explain drop-out intentions more generally, and with a higher predictive power than the conventional method of merely focusing on the quality perceptions of trainees (adjusted R2 = .439 > .333).
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09263-7
       
  • Effects of Experts’ Annotations on Fashion Designers Apprentices’ Gaze
           Patterns and Verbalisations

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      Abstract: Abstract Visual expertise is a fundamental proficiency in many vocations and many questions have risen on the topic, with studies looking at experts and novices differences’ in observation (e.g., radiologists) or at ways to help novices achieve visual expertise (e.g., through annotations). However, most of these studies focus on white-collar professions and overlook vocational ones. For example, observing is uttermost important for fashion designers who spend most of their professional time on visual tasks related to creating patterns and garments or performing alterations. Therefore, this study focuses on trying to convey a professional way to look at images by exposing apprentices to images annotated (e.g., circles) by experts and identifying if their gaze (e.g., fixation durations and gaze coverage) and verbalisations (i.e., images descriptions) are affected. The study was conducted with 38 apprentices that were exposed to sequential sets of images depicting shirts, first non-annotated (pre-test), then annotated for the experimental group and non-annotated for the control group (training 1 and training 2), and finally non-annotated (post-test). Also, in the pre and post-test and in training 2 apprentices had to verbally describe each image. Gaze was recorded with the Tobii X2–60 tracker. Results for fixation durations showed that the experimental group looked longer in the annotated part of the shirt in training 1 and in the shirt’s central part at post-test. However, the experimental group did not cover a significantly larger area of the shirt compared to control and verbalisations show no difference between the groups at post-test.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09270-8
       
  • The Differential Influence of Learner Factors and Learning Context on
           Different Professional Learning Activities

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      Abstract: Abstract Participation in designated learning opportunities and engagement in workplace learning are very different kinds of professional learning activities: Whereas the former takes place in organised, predefined settings with intended learning objectives, the latter mostly arises as a by-product through everyday experiences at work. Yet, empirical and theoretical models often do not sufficiently differentiate between these two kinds of learning activities. The main goal in the present study is to test whether the two discrete learning activities are indeed facilitated in different ways and by different antecedents. The results of a multi-wave diary study with a sample of 229 German employees show that engagement in workplace learning is not influenced by conscious beliefs connected to learning, which play a central role in most theoretical models explaining participation in designated learning opportunities, underlining the need for an autonomous theory of workplace learning. Furthermore, the current study shows the strong direct, indirect, and moderating influence of organisational learning culture on both kinds of professional learning activities. Possible implications for practitioners to put greater emphasis on organisational factors when designing learning opportunities are discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09266-4
       
  • Goal Orientation and Decision-Making in Education

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      Abstract: Abstract In a project about dropout among young adults in general adult education and initial vocational education and training (IVET), it was assumed that the ability to make rational decisions has a positive impact on completing an educational programme. A central part of decision-making is the ability for goal orientation, which we have defined as setting and committing to accurate and proximate goals. Based on interviews with 31 students in general adult education and IVET, three categories of goals were identified; vague goals, accurate distant goals and accurate proximal goals. Likewise, three categories of decision-making processes were identified: ‘intuitive emotional decisions without seeking advice’, ‘intuitive emotional decisions after seeking advice’ and ‘rational decisions after seeking advice’. Our findings show that there is a link between goal orientation and degree of rationality in the student’s decision-making process. Furthermore, our findings suggest that goal orientation can be supported in three ways: by reducing complexity, through feedback and by explaining the relevance of the school subjects for reaching goals. Generally, student’s relation to and support from teachers and guidance counsellors, as well as peers and parents, are crucial to the goal orientation process.
      PubDate: 2021-09-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09278-0
       
  • Learning Professional Knowledge: Bachelor Nursing Students’ Experiences
           in Learning and Knowledge Quality Outcomes in a Competence-Based
           Curriculum

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      Abstract: Abstract Since decades, nursing education struggles with a persistent gap between the theoretical knowledge offered in the study program and its application in professional practice. To bridge this gap competence-based curricula were developed with instructional designs as authentic learning contexts and self-directed learning. In this project we explored final year Bachelor Nursing (BN) students’ experiences in learning in a newly developed curriculum, and their knowledge quality outcomes and the degree of agreement with knowledge requirements. An instrumental multiple case study was conducted with interviews, concept mapping and a domain knowledge list. Results show that a third of the participants had positive learning experiences and got high appraisals for their knowledge quality. Similar to the medium and low scoring participants, they developed instrumental knowledge but integrated other forms of learning into a system of meaning, which is needed to solve non-routine problems in future practice. Medium and low scoring participants did not profit from learning in authentic contexts and self-directed learning. In conclusion, developing sufficient professional knowledge in a constructivist competence-based curriculum is influenced by students’ intrinsic motivation to build a strong knowledge base, by their perception of how to learn and use professional knowledge, and their expectations of the degree of supervision and guidance by the teacher. It is recommended to evaluate the extent to which the intended curriculum is being taught.
      PubDate: 2021-09-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09274-4
       
  • How Professional Education Can Foster Praxis and Critical Praxis: An
           Example of Changing Practice in Healthcare

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      Abstract: Abstract Learning is crucial to how professionals enact practices, and to how practices change. Professionals frequently encounter uncertainty regarding what to do, requiring praxis informed by practical wisdom, which takes into account the virtues of practice. Critical praxis takes this further, questioning current norms to reduce untoward effects. A simulation-based education program for healthcare professionals was selected for study due to strong evidence of sustained improvements in handling a rare and challenging birth emergency (shoulder dystocia). Videos of simulations and debrief discussions were analysed in terms of complexes of sayings, doings and relatings. Practitioners learned to respond in agile, collective ways to specific situations, through praxis. An extension to the theory of practice architectures is offered, based on two new concepts. ‘Connective enactments’ involved narration, questioning, and directing actions. These contributed to ‘collective accomplishments’ of fluid role-switching, responsive sequencing and pacing, and producing calm. These new concepts help to theorise how professional education can contribute to practice change by fostering praxis and critical praxis, addressing the architectures that shape practices.
      PubDate: 2021-09-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09277-1
       
  • Effects of Augmented Feedback with Error Self-estimates on Vocational High
           School Students’ Motor Skill Learning

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      Abstract: Abstract The influence of augmented feedback and self-estimation of errors on the welding skill learning of vocational high school students was the focus of this study. A quasi-experimental research design was utilized by randomly assigning two classes of car repair students to an experimental group and a control group. Each participant had 9 practice trials, took 3 tests (pre, post, and delayed), and received augmented feedback 3 times during the skill acquisition phase. The experimental group was additionally requested to self-estimate their errors by reviewing their work in comparison to a benchmark piece, assessing the differences, and completing a checklist of criteria, while the control group did not undergo this process. The performance of participants improved through the practice period with the experimental group showing significantly greater changes than those in the control condition. For the delayed-test, both groups declined to some extent from the post-test, but the experimental subjects did better comparatively. Augmented feedback with self-estimation of errors appeared beneficial for vocational high school students’ motor skill learning.
      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s12186-021-09273-5
       
 
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