Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Trabajo : Revista de la Asociación Estatal de Centros Universitarios de Relaciones Laborales y Ciencias del Trabajo     Open Access  
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
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Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0034-3552 - ISSN (Online) 1538-4853
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  • Continuing Education Answer Sheet For Volume 65, No 2

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      Pages: 166 - 166
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Volume 65, Issue 2, Page 166-166, January 2022.

      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-11-29T09:09:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211058792
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Psychometric Validation of the Wisconsin Community Participation Scale in
           a Sample of People with Chronic Health Conditions and Disabilities Living
           in the Community

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      Authors: Kanako Iwanaga, Xiangli Chen, Jia-Rung Wu, Beatrice Lee, Brett Deppert, Timothy N. Tansey, Chetwyn Chan, Jing Tao, Fong Chan
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Increasing community participation can reduce the risk for functional disabilities; participation is influenced by person and environment contextual factors. Development and validation of a brief community participation assessment can advance and support evidence-based assessment in clinical rehabilitation counseling practice. It will be an invaluable rehabilitation and public health surveillance tool that can be used to gauge the health conditions and participation of people with disabilities. The current study evaluated and validated the Wisconsin Community Participation Scale (WCPS) in 982 individuals with chronic health conditions and disabilities. Participants indicated five most meaningful life roles: (a) being able to get around with or without help, (b) live independently with or without help, (c) live a healthy lifestyle, (d) work, and (e) leisure and recreation activities. The WCPS scores were positively associated with physical health, mental health, and life satisfaction and negatively related to functional disability in the theoretically expected directions. The WCPS can help rehabilitation counselors assess their clients’ current level of participation in meaningful life roles that are important to them. Rehabilitation counselors can use the WCPS assessment data to guide treatment planning and empower clients to build confidence and self-efficacy to participate in personally meaningful activities in the community.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-12-31T04:53:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211063873
       
  • Lessons Learned by Rehabilitation Counselors and Physicians in Services to
           COVID-19 Long-Haulers: A Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Jasin Wong, Angelika Kudla, Tri Pham, Nnaemezie Ezeife, Deborah Crown, Pamela Capraro, Robert Trierweiler, Stephanie Tomazin, Allen W. Heinemann
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) may cause long-lasting adverse consequences after acute recovery, including functional limitations and reduced work capacity. Individuals with long-lasting complications of COVID-19 are known as long-haulers. There is a knowledge gap on how COVID-19 complications affect return-to-work (RTW) efforts. We aimed to describe the challenges that long-haulers encounter when RTW from the perspectives of rehabilitation professionals. In this study, four certified rehabilitation counselors and four rehabilitation physicians in outpatient rehabilitation centers participated in focus groups. Participants discussed challenges in working with long-haulers, including personal attributes, post-COVID-19 symptoms and complications, uncertain recovery and unpredictable outcomes, limited health care accessibility and support, and unsupportive work environments. Participants provide individualized services to meet long-haulers’ diverse needs as they do for all persons with disabilities, although they expressed uncertainty due to the variable disease course and risk of infection. Modifying workplace policies, especially gradual RTW, were frequently mentioned accommodations. The findings highlight the RTW issues of long-haulers. We provide recommendations on increasing awareness of the challenges and job accommodations of long-haulers.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-12-15T06:39:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211060014
       
  • Disability Content in the Journal of Counseling and Development and Social
           Work: A Comparative Analysis

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      Authors: Charles Edmund Degeneffe, Heather Doty, Rachel Martinez, Nothizile Ncube, Nathan Nguyen
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to provide an understanding of how disability is addressed in the Journal of Counseling and Development (JCD), the flagship journal of the American Counseling Association. A review of disability content in JCD was compared with a review of disability in Social Work (SW), the flagship journal of the National Association of Social Workers. A series of between and within analyses for JCD and SW addressed the frequency, focus areas, and trends concerning how both journals addressed disability content over their histories. Overall, SW published a higher rate of disability content articles. Mental health was the most common disability domain addressed in both journals; however, JCD has published most of its disability content articles on mental health over the past two decades. The findings of the present study are discussed concerning prior research, historical events, and implications for accreditation.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-12-10T10:34:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211063245
       
  • Vocational Rehabilitation Professionals’ Perceptions of Facilitators and
           Barriers to Return to Work: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

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      Authors: Kjerstin Larsson, Anna Liljestam Hurtigh, Åsa M. V. Andersén, Ingrid Anderzén
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      This is a qualitative descriptive study of professionals’ perceptions of facilitators and barriers for returning to work for women on long-term sick leave due to musculoskeletal pain and/or common mental disorder who participated in a vocational rehabilitation project. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 13 purposefully selected professionals from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency, the Swedish Public Employment Service, the health care services, and the municipal services. The interviews were analyzed with a manifest content analysis. The main facilitators were the close cooperation between the professionals and the individual support that was offered to the project participants. The main barriers were differences among the stakeholders’ missions and goals, limitation in project duration and within the labor market, and the project participants’ personal factors. These results emphasize the importance of cooperation between the professionals from the various stakeholders and focus on the individual’s resources and needs. The study highlights the value of including health care professionals in vocational rehabilitation to benefit from their specific knowledge of the target group and their strengths and needs. Moreover, the study highlights the need to incorporate collaboration with employers and align with the local labor market in the development of vocational rehabilitation interventions.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-12-07T10:47:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211060013
       
  • What Predicts Job Quality of Vocational Rehabilitation Consumers Who Are
           Blind or Have Low Vision'

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      Authors: Michele C. McDonnall, Jennifer L. Cmar, Zhen McKnight
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act emphasizes promoting high-quality, competitive employment for people served by vocational rehabilitation (VR), but few studies have assessed VR consumers’ job quality. The purpose of this study was to investigate job quality and factors that predict the job quality of VR consumers with blindness or low vision (B/LV), taking into consideration their employment status at application. We utilized RSA-911 data of VR consumers with B/LV who were closed in competitive employment during 2015, creating two separate hierarchical linear models to predict job quality for VR consumers (a) who were employed at application and (b) who were not employed at application. We investigated individual-level (consumer personal characteristics and VR services) and state/agency-level predictors. Job quality and some predictors of job quality differed by employment status at application, although the strongest predictors (education level at application, gender, benefit receipt at application, receipt of a bachelor’s or higher degree) were consistent across the models. While several additional individual-level variables were significantly associated with job quality, their effect sizes were very small. With the exception of advancing education to a bachelor’s degree or higher while receiving services, consumer characteristics at application were the primary determinants of their job quality.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-12-02T11:13:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211060012
       
  • Identifying Racial Differences in Vocational Rehabilitation Services

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      Authors: Michelle Yin, Aditi Pathak, Dajun Lin, Nevin Dizdari
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The literature on racial differences in vocational rehabilitation (VR) services has not been updated for over a decade. Using the 2017 individual-level national RSA-911 data, supplemented with the 2017 American Community Survey and publicly available information from Kaiser Family Foundation, we investigate racial differences at each step of the VR process—application, eligibility, service provision, and employment outcomes at closure. At the first step, application, White individuals with disabilities are less likely to apply than their African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Hispanic counterparts, and more likely to apply than their Asian counterparts. For the remaining three steps, the results are inverted: the White subgroup has higher eligibility rates, service rates, and employment rates than the African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Hispanic subgroups, and lower rates than the Asian subgroup. These findings suggest that racial and ethnic differences continue to exist in the VR process despite several legislative acts and policy efforts. Within each racial and ethnic minority group, we also find large variation in application rates and employment rates across states, which indicates a need for developing performance measures and standardized guidelines for state VR agencies to better serve individuals with disabilities from racial and ethnic minorities.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-10-05T10:12:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211048218
       
  • Validation of the Perceived Empathic and Social Self-Efficacy Scale: A
           Brief Report

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      Authors: Kanako Iwanaga, Xiangli Chen, Jill Bezyak, Courtney M. Holmes, Caisey Dotson-Hutto, Denise Hall
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Perceived empathic and social self-efficacy are required to strengthen interpersonal relationships and receive social support, which are crucial for community participation, employment, and job retention of people with disabilities. This study investigated the factor structure and related psychometric properties of an instrument used to measure these two constructs among people with disabilities. Results confirmed the two-factor measurement structure, the Perceived Empathic Self-Efficacy and the Perceived Social Self-Efficacy factors. This scale can be used by rehabilitation professionals to assess vocational rehabilitation (VR) consumers’ perceived levels of empathic and social self-efficacy. It can also be used by researchers as an outcome measure to evaluate the effectiveness of social skills training interventions for VR consumers.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T08:58:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211043260
       
  • Internal Consistency of the Customized Employment Discovery Fidelity
           Scale: A Preliminary Study

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      Authors: Tim Riesen, Stephen Hall, Beth Keeton, Aubrey Snyder
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The discovery fidelity scale (DFS) is a 15-item instrument used to determine fidelity to systems and services level discovery best practices. Fidelity scale development is typically guided by an iterative, three-part process that includes identifying and specifying the fidelity structure and content, measuring and confirming the content, and assessing the internal consistency and reliability of the scale. This study is the initiation of the third step of the fidelity process to determine if items on the DFS accurately and reliably measure the discovery construct (internal consistency). The study also examined outcomes for individuals engaged in the discovery process. The results of the study suggest that both the systems and services components appear to measure their respective constructs and the overall discovery construct appears to have acceptable internal consistency.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-09-03T12:06:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211043259
       
  • Mindfulness- and Acceptance-Based Interventions for Stroke Survivors: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Areum Han
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Mindfulness- and acceptance-based intervention (MABI) is an emerging evidenced-based practice, but no systematic review incorporating meta-analyses for MABIs in stroke survivors has been conducted. The objective of this systematic review was to measure the effectiveness of MABIs on outcomes in people with stroke.Method:Three electronic databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, were searched to identify relevant studies published in peer-reviewed journals. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed. Data were extracted and combined in a meta-analysis with a random-effect model to compute the size of the intervention effect.Results:A total of 11 studies met the eligibility criteria. Meta-analyses found a small-to-moderate effect of MABIs on depressive symptoms (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 0.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.12, 0.66]) and a large effect on mental fatigue (SMD = 1.22, 95% CI = [0.57, 1.87]). No statistically significant effect of MABIs on anxiety, quality of life, and mindfulness was found, but there was a trend in favor of MABIs overall.Conclusions:This meta-analysis found positive effects of MABIs on depressive symptoms and mental fatigue in stroke survivors, but future high-quality studies are needed to guarantee treatment effects of MABIs on varied outcomes in stroke survivors.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-09-03T12:06:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211043257
       
  • Sexual Health Education and Life Satisfaction for People With Congenital
           Neurological Disabilities

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      Authors: Alexandra M. Kriofske Mainella, Susan Miller Smedema
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      People with disabilities are sexual beings, yet there is little research on sexuality in this population. The present study explored the impact of sex education for people with congenital neurological disabilities, largely, spina bifida and cerebral palsy, on sexual self-concept and life satisfaction. This study included 104 adults with spina bifida, cerebral palsy, and other congenital neurological disabilities. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between demographic variables, sexual health education variables, and outcome variables (sexual self-concept and life satisfaction). Serial mediation analysis was conducted to examine the mediating relationship of sexual self-concept variables (sexual anxiety and sexual self-esteem) between social support and life satisfaction. Results indicated that sexual self-concept was significantly predicted by relationship status, disability impact, and satisfaction with sex education. Life satisfaction was significantly predicted by relationship status, social support, disability impact, and sexual self-concept. Sexual anxiety and sexual self-esteem formed a partial serial mediating relationship between social support and life satisfaction. The findings expand upon existing literature on sex education for people with disabilities, reinforcing the notion that satisfactory sex education and strong social support positively impact the life satisfaction of individuals with spina bifida and cerebral palsy. Implications for rehabilitation research and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-07-30T07:12:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211031870
       
  • Psychometric Validation of the PERMA-Profiler as a Well-Being Measure for
           Young Adult Survivors of Pediatric Central Nervous System Tumor

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      Authors: Teresa Ann Grenawalt, Emre Umucu, Antonio Reyes, Andrea Baylin, David R. Strauser, Timothy N. Tansey, Stacia Wagner
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to validate a measure of well-being, the PERMA-Profiler, among a sample of young adult survivors of pediatric central nervous system (CNS) tumor. Measurement structure of the PERMA-Profiler was evaluated using exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis using pretest–posttest data. Reliability and concurrent validity of the PERMA-Profiler were examined. This study included 127 young adult survivors of pediatric CNS tumor between the ages of 18 and 30 (M = 23.83, SD = 3.00) years. The results of factor analyses yielded a single-factor solution for well-being. Significant relationships between well-being and happiness, life satisfaction, perceived stress, and physical health were observed, providing support for the concurrent validity of the PERMA-Profiler. The PERMA-Profiler displayed good internal consistency and test–retest reliability. The PERMA-Profiler can help rehabilitation researchers and counselors better evaluate well-being in young adult survivors of pediatric CNS tumor, which provides opportunity for more targeted psychosocial interventions.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-07-29T05:20:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211025509
       
  • Fifty-Five Books That Shaped Rehabilitation Counseling

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      Authors: David B. Hershenson
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      This article attempts to construct a history of the first half-century of the field of rehabilitation counseling by identifying the seminal books that initiated or documented significant developments in the field. Those books fall into three categories: (a) books on theories and principles of human behavior, vocations, and counseling that underlie rehabilitation counseling practice (9 books); (b) books on disability (9 books); and (c) books on rehabilitation (37 books). By arraying books in each subcategory in chronological order, one can trace the evolution of the field. Unmet and future needs of the literature are suggested.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-07-28T10:15:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211034823
       
  • Psychosocial Adaptation to Chronic Illness and Disability: An Updated and
           Expanded Conceptual Framework

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      Authors: Hanoch Livneh
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The article revisits and updates an earlier model (Livneh, 2001) that examined the building blocks that constitute the dynamics of psychosocial adaptation to chronic illness and disability (CID). In the revised tripartite model, the author reconstructs and refines the earlier model based on recent theoretical formulations, clinical reviews and research findings. In the revised model, the author discusses three overarching components, namely, antecedents (causes of medical conditions, background variables), processes (the dynamically unfolding course of post-CID events), and outcomes (anticipated exit indicators that serve, as snapshot end products, to assess the individual’s experienced and reported quality of life following onset of CID). The article concludes with a brief review of the model’s practical and research implications.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T08:01:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211034819
       
  • Development and Validation of the Ableist Microaggression Impact
           Questionnaire

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      Authors: Deniz Aydemir-Döke, James T. Herbert
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Microaggressions are daily insults to minority individuals such as people with disabilities (PWD) that communicate messages of exclusion, inferiority, and abnormality. In this study, we developed a new scale, the Ableist Microaggressions Impact Questionnaire (AMIQ), which assesses ableist microaggression experiences of PWD. Data from 245 PWD were collected using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) platform. An exploratory factor analysis of the 25-item AMIQ revealed a three-factor structure with internal consistency reliability ranging between .87 and .92. As a more economical and psychometrically sound instrument assessing microaggression impact as it pertains to disability, the AMIQ offers promise for rehabilitation counselor research and practice.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T09:46:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211014259
       
  • An Examination of Barriers and Facilitators of Job Satisfaction and Job
           Tenure Among Persons With Disability in South Korea

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      Authors: SunHee J. Eissenstat, Yunsoo Lee, Sojung Hong
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of the study is to investigate the barriers and facilitators of job tenure among persons with disabilities (PWD), using the theory of work adjustment, which explains that the correspondence between person and environment predicts job satisfaction and consequently job tenure. This study utilized the ninth Panel Survey of Employment for the Disabled (PSED) data set compiled from 1,755 employees with disabilities in South Korea in 2016. The results show that education-level match and aptitude match are associated with job satisfaction, whereas the effect of job–skill match on job satisfaction was not significant. Job discrimination experience and accessible work facilities were significantly related to job satisfaction, which is a significant predictor of job tenure.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-04-19T12:20:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211006767
       
  • Understanding Persons With Disabilities’ Reasons for Not Seeking
           Employment

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      Authors: Denise C. Fyffe, Anthony H. Lequerica, Courtney Ward-Sutton, Natalie F. Williams, Vidya Sundar, John O’Neill
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Unemployment is common for persons with disabilities but little is known about the different reasons why people with disabilities may not be seeking employment. This study identified the reasons that people living with disabilities report for not seeking employment, from the 2015 Kessler Foundation National Employment and Disability Survey (KFNEDS) and variation of reasons by demographic, socioeconomic, and disability characteristics. We conducted a content analysis of responses to an open-ended question on the KFNEDS. The analytic sample (n = 1,254) included adults (ages 18–64) living with disabilities, who self-identified as either unemployed or not seeking employment. Team coding used a hybrid inductive/deductive approach to identify nine meaningful reasons why people with disabilities may not seek employment. Overall, medical conditions, functional limitations, or their disability were more likely to be reported as reasons for not seeking work, rather than situational reasons associated with workplace engagement, such as “lack of job opportunities.” Bivariate comparisons of codes across demographic, socioeconomic, and disability characteristics noted variability in reasons reported by respondents by sex, race/ethnicity, age, household income, and disability. These findings provide an understanding of diverse reasons for not seeking employment, which can inform programs and policies that promote labor force participation of people with disabilities.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T11:35:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211006773
       
  • Testing Kumpfer’s Resilience Model Among Adults With Serious Mental
           Illness

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      Authors: Deyu Pan, Jennifer Sánchez
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Having a serious mental illness (SMI) is often associated with significant adversities, and people respond differently to adversities. The existing research supports that people with SMI can achieve and maintain positive life outcomes despite experiencing adversities. Resilience, the ability to cope with (or bounce back quickly from) crisis, can help buffer the negative effects of various types of adversities, including chronic illness and disability, and facilitate the psychosocial adaptation process to SMI. Kumpfer’s resilience model, a person-process-context framework, has been widely used to conceptualize, and assess for, resilience in various populations, including people with chronic illnesses and disabilities. However, the research in resilience among people with SMI is very limited. The purpose of this study was to empirically assess the utility of Kumpfer’s resilience model and its proposed predictive components for conceptualizing the adaptation process to SMI. One hundred forty-four participants completed a Qualtrics survey containing demographic questions and a series of validated instruments representing the major components of Kumpfer’s resilience model. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to analyze the data, and the final model explained 71% of the variance of the dependent variable—adaptation to disability. Avoidance coping, internalized stigma, and optimism were significant independent predictors of adaptation to disability. This study supports the utilization of Kumpfer’s resilience model to conceptualize the adaptation to disability process among people with SMI. Implications for rehabilitation counseling practices are discussed.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T11:33:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211006770
       
  • Psychometric Validation of Adapted Inventory of Virtues and Strengths

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      Authors: Jeong Han Kim, Jaehoon Lee, Taryn V. Richardson, Dong Hun Lee, Brian T. McMahon, Hyeyoung Kim, Rebecca R. Sametz
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to validate the Adapted Inventory of Virtues and Strengths (AIVS). AIVS is a unique instrument that operationalizes virtues in terms of character traits that are specially designed for psychosocial adaptation and rehabilitation. Data were collected from 464 individuals with disabilities and analyzed via the combination of exploratory (n = 256) and confirmatory analyses (n = 208). Although the results suggest dropping some items, the original five-virtue structure was supported and confirmed via both analyses. The construct validity of AIVS was further analyzed via correlation analyses between AIVS and other measures including Values in Action Inventory of Strengths 72-Item, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Connor-Davison Resilience Scale, and General Self-Efficacy Scale. The results suggest that with continuing research to document reliability and validity, AIVS has potential in the context of rehabilitation research. Further discussion on psychometric information of AIVS and future implications were presented.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-02-22T10:38:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0034355221993553
       
  • On-the-Job Treatment of Employees With Disabilities: A Grounded Theory
           Investigation

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      Authors: Lynn C. Koch, Rachel Glade, Christine M. Manno, Aten Zaandam, Lauren S. Simon, Phillip D. Rumrill, Christopher C. Rosen
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Workplace mistreatment is common for workers with and without disabilities. Overt forms of mistreatment in the workplace (e.g., abuse, bullying, harassment) have been well studied; however, less is known about more subtle forms of workplace mistreatment for employees with disabilities. The purpose of this study was to examine how workers with disabilities are treated on the job, the types of mistreatment present in the workplace, the consequences involved (if any), the courses of action taken (if any), and workers’ satisfaction with the outcomes of actions taken. We used a grounded theory approach to learn from 26 employees with disabilities about their experiences with workplace treatment. Primary themes that emerged from the data were (a) the emotional toll of being mistreated on the job; (b) attempting to “grin and bear it,” as one participant described it, to avoid mistreatment; (c) a desire to feel a sense of belongingness at the workplace; and (d) the intersection of disability characteristics, individual characteristics, and work environment characteristics that influences how people with disabilities are treated on the job. Implications are presented for understanding the role that rehabilitation counselors play in helping workers and employers to respond to mistreatment of employees with disabilities.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-02-17T05:17:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0034355221993571
       
  • Parent Perspectives on Pre-Employment Transition Services for Youth With
           Disabilities

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      Authors: Michele A. Schutz, Jessica M. Awsumb, Erik W. Carter, Elise D. McMillan
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Parents have long been recognized as critical supports and partners to youth with disabilities preparing for the world of work. We collected survey responses from 253 parents of transition-age youth with disabilities regarding their views on practices related to pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS), the overall employment preparation of their children, potential barriers to future employment, and their knowledge of local transition resources. Parents reported that their children would benefit from an array of employment-focused transition practices. However, they were quite mixed in their views of prevailing barriers and current employment preparation. Moreover, a large majority of parents said they were unfamiliar with a range of transition-related resources available in their communities. In some areas, the views of parents differed based on the type of community in which they lived (i.e., rural vs. non-rural) or the nature of their child’s disability (i.e., intellectual and developmental disabilities vs. other disabilities). We offer recommendations for supporting families as they prepare their children with disabilities for life after high school.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-02-16T07:39:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0034355221993542
       
  • Resilient Coping Types in People With Spinal Cord Injury: Latent Class
           Analysis

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      Authors: Chungyi Chiu, Jessica Brooks, Alicia Jones, Kortney Wilcher, Sa Shen, Simon Driver, James Krause
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Resilience is central to living well with a spinal cord injury (SCI). To provide a timely, targeted, and individualized intervention supporting resilience, it is necessary to assess an individual’s resilience level and characteristics of resilience on an ongoing basis. We aimed to validate the different types of resilient coping among people with SCI (PwSCI), using the Connor–Davidson resilience scale, and to identify the relationships between resilience and other psychosocial factors among the types of resilient coping. We recruited 93 PwSCI, who took the self-report measures of resilience, depression, life satisfaction, and spirituality. Using latent class analysis, we found three types: (a) goal-pursuing, bouncing-back, and persevering, named GP; (b) uncertainty about coping with setbacks, named UC; and (c) loss of resilient coping, named LOSS. The multivariate tests indicated that the three types differed on a linear combination of resilience, depression, and life satisfaction, with a large effect size. We discussed the three types of resilient coping and the implications for psychosocial interventions. We also recommended that rehabilitation clinicians examine PwSCI’s resilience levels and types of resilience during initial and follow-up visits. In doing so, PwSCI will have timely, targeted supports for developing and/or re-building their resilience.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-02-03T10:48:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0034355221990736
       
  • Exploration of the Effects of Protective Person–Environment Factors
           Between Functional Impairments and Stress in Individuals With Multiple
           Sclerosis: Mediation and Moderation Analyses

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      Authors: Beatrice Lee, Timothy N. Tansey, Fong Chan, Malachy Bishop, William T. Hoyt, Laura M. Hancock
      First page: 95
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Functional impairments can lead to stress in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). The study examined protective person and environment factors (i.e., positive cognitive stress appraisal, core self-evaluations [CSE], resilience, hope, spirituality, social support, and environmental supports) as both mediators and moderators of this association to guide understanding of the experience of stress in this population. The sample consisted of 373 participants with MS. In simple mediation analyses, positive cognitive stress appraisal, CSE, resilience, hope, social support, and environmental supports served as a partial mediator between functional impairments and stress. In a parallel mediation analysis, significant unique indirect effects were observed for two of the seven hypothesized mediator variables (CSE and environmental supports). Separate moderator tests provided support for the CSE variable as a protective factor. The positive association between functional impairments and stress was weaker for persons reporting high CSE compared with those reporting low CSE. The findings provide implications for rehabilitation counseling practices by promoting CSE and environmental supports in improving rehabilitation and psychosocial outcomes for individuals with MS.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T10:22:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211025534
       
  • Development and Validation of the Satisfaction With Labor Market
           Participation Survey

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      Authors: Brian N. Phillips, Allison R. Fleming, Brad W. McDaniels, Allison Levine
      First page: 108
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Employment is often assumed to be the universally desirable outcome in vocational counseling and research; however, many personal and environmental factors affect individual decisions about the costs and benefits of work and the amount of work that is desired. The objective of this study was to validate an instrument capturing satisfaction with labor market participation regardless of one’s employment status. The Satisfaction with Labor Market Participation Survey (SLMP) was administered at two points in time to adults with disabilities. Analysis included a combination of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. A nine-item, two-factor scale emerged from the exploratory factor analysis and was supported by confirmatory factor analysis. All correlations were in the expected direction and regression analysis with both the SLMP and employment status showed the SLMP significantly predicting satisfaction with life while employment status did not after controlling for the SLMP. Preliminary data support the SLMP as a reliable and valid tool for assessing satisfaction with labor market participation for use with people with disabilities in vocational counseling and employment research.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-05-31T08:19:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211017215
       
  • An Examination of the Relationship of Core Self-Evaluations and Life
           Satisfaction in College Students With Disabilities

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      Authors: Susan Miller Smedema, Deborah Lee, Muna Bhattarai
      First page: 129
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      For many students with disabilities, the transition from high school to a postsecondary educational institution can be challenging as they navigate a new environment with new or different supports. Recent research has demonstrated strong relationships between core self-evaluations (CSE) and a variety of psychosocial and employment outcomes in individuals with disabilities. The purpose of this study is to test a mediation model of the relationship between CSE and life satisfaction in 195 college students with disabilities. Hayes’ (2018) PROCESS macro for SPSS was used to evaluate the model. The results showed that acceptance of disability, social support from significant others, employment-related self-efficacy, and social self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between CSE and life satisfaction. The direct effect of CSE on life satisfaction was still significant after controlling for the effects of all mediators. Overall, CSE affected life satisfaction in college students with disabilities, both directly and indirectly through improved disability acceptance, greater support from significant others, increased employment-related self-efficacy, and improved social self-efficacy. Implications of the results to improve life satisfaction in college students with disabilities are discussed.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-02-15T09:58:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0034355221993569
       
  • A National Study to Assess Validity and Psychometrics of the Short Kessler
           Psychological Distress Scale (K6)

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      Authors: Emre Umucu, Karen Fortuna, Hyejin Jung, Anita Bialunska, Beatrice Lee, Thenral Mangadu, Marianne Storm, Gul Ergun, Donyeill A. Mozer, Jessica Brooks
      First page: 140
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to test the validity and reliability of the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale-6 (K6) with a nationally representative clinical sample with various mental health disorders. The cross-sectional, nationally representative, and publicly available data were extracted from the 2014 Health Center Patient Survey (HCPS), which was sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). After excluding certain participants for the purpose of this study, we had a total of 1,863 participants. The highest and lowest psychological distress weighted scores were reported by individuals with bipolar disorder (M = 17.16) and individuals with schizophrenia (M = 16.09), respectively, although psychological distress interference was highest in individuals with schizophrenia (M = 2.44). Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) results yielded a unidimensional factor solution for K6 scale in all subgroups. The K6 is a brief, reliable, and valid measure of psychological distress in adults with panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-09-03T04:28:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211043261
       
  • Disability Self-Worth and Positive Personal Meaning in Disability:
           Correlates of Hope Among U.S. Residents With Physical Disabilities

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      Authors: Mercedes A. Zapata
      First page: 150
      Abstract: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Research is beginning to indicate that positive disability identity is associated with positive psychosocial outcomes among people with disabilities. Personal disability identity (PDI) refers to self-concept as a person with a disability. Two studies were conducted to examine (a) the psychometric properties of new PDI subscales and (b) the association between the new subscales and hope, a cognitive motivational construct. In Study 1, the author examined the structural validity and internal consistency of recently developed measures of PDI (i.e., disability self-worth and personal meaning in disability) in a sample of 247 adults with physical and sensory disabilities. In Study 2, the author examined the association between the two PDI subscales and hope (i.e., pathways and agency) in a subsample of 147 U.S. residents. In Study 1, internal consistency of all instruments was supported and confirmatory factor analyses supported the structural validity of the PDI subscales in a sample representing a broader disability subgroup than the original measurement development study, which had exclusively examined adults with visual impairment and blindness (Zapata, 2019). In Study 2, findings from hierarchical linear regression indicated that scores on disability self-worth and personal meaning were significantly and positively associated with hope scores (p < .001), after accounting for demographic and disability characteristics. Study 1 found preliminary evidence to support the use of two new PDI subscales (i.e., disability self-worth and personal meaning) in academic research among adult U.S. residents with physical and sensory disabilities. Study 2 introduced disability self-worth and personal meaning as predictors of hope. Given prior research on the relationship between hope and positive adjustment among people with disabilities, these findings contribute to the emerging literature on the predictive role of disability identity in positive life outcomes among adults with disabilities.
      Citation: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-04-24T12:05:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00343552211009569
       
 
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