Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
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International Journal for Quality in Health Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.348
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 40  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1353-4505 - ISSN (Online) 1464-3677
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Prioritization score on the inter-hospital transfer time management and
           severe COVID-19 patients

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      Authors: Mungmunpuntipantip R; Wiwanitkit V.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac027
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Global and regional burden and quality of care of non-rheumatic valvular
           heart diseases: a systematic analysis of Global Burden of Disease
           1990–2017

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      Authors: Nejad M; Ahmadi N, Mohammadi E, et al.
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundWith an increase in the incidence and prevalence of non-rheumatic valvular heart diseases (NRVHDs), having a proper understanding of the disease current status in terms of quality of care and healthcare access can considerably affect further planning for the healthcare system.ObjectiveIn this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the quality and equity of care concerning NRVHDs in terms of gender and sociodemographic index (SDI) using a newly proposed index.MethodsWe obtained the primary measures (e.g. incidence) from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) data about NRVHD from 1990 to 2017 to calculate the subsequent secondary indices (e.g. mortality-to-incidence ratio) with close association to quality of care. Then, using principal component analysis (PCA), quality of care index (QCI) was calculated as a novel index from the secondary indices, rescaled to 0–100. QCI was calculated for all age groups and both genders, globally, regionally and nationally between 1990 and 2017.ResultsGlobally, the QCI for NRVHDs in 2017 was 87.3, and it appears that gender inequity was unremarkable (gender disparity ratio = 1.00, female QCI: 90.2, male QCI: 89.7) in 2017 similar to the past three decades. Among WHO world regions, the Western Pacific Region and Eastern Mediterranean Region showed the highest (90.1) and lowest (74.0) QCI scores. Regarding SDI, the high-middle-SDI quintile with a QCI of 89.4 and the low-SDI quintile with a QCI of 77.8 were the two extremes of healthcare quality in 2017.ConclusionAlthough global status regarding the NRVHD’s quality of care is acceptable, higher attention is required for lower SDI countries.
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac026
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • A simulation study on the association of HRO communication patterns and
           surgical team performance

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      Authors: Baty A; Matis T, Griswold J.
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundThe hallmarks of high-reliability organizations (HROs) have been broadly embraced by health-care organizations as a path to achieve greater reliability in patient care. A simulation study was conducted to investigate the hypothesis that surgical teams whose intraoperative communication displayed the HRO hallmarks had a greater capacity to detect and resolve surgical complications in less time.MethodsThe study consisted of presenting four simulations to five surgical teams using a within-subject experimental design. In each simulation, the patient would manifest a complication in which the detection and/or resolution was either obscure or obvious. Communication patterns related to the frequency and sustained duration of HRO content were extracted from coded transcripts using recurrence quantification analysis (RQA), which were paired with the teams’ elapsed time to detect or resolve a surgical complication. Spearman’s rank-order statistics was then used to test for a monotonically decreasing association between these variables.ResultsData consisting of the RQA metrics and elapsed times are reported for each surgical team in each simulation in addition to statistical tests for association between these variables and inter-rater reliability statistics of the coded communication.ConclusionsThe study suggests that surgical teams whose communication espouses the HRO hallmarks of commitment to resilience and deference to expertise in both frequency and duration are able to resolve surgical complications with an obscure corrective action in less time. The study did not provide confirming evidence that these are associated with their ability to resolve a complication with an obvious corrective action in less time or that patterns of sensitivity to operations are associated with their ability to detect an obscure surgical complication in less time.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac028
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Rebooting effective clinical supervision practices to support healthcare
           workers through and following the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Martin P; Kumar S, Tian E, et al.
      Abstract: AbstractThe importance of clinical supervision, a professional support and clinical governance mechanism, to patients, healthcare workers and organizations has been well documented. Clinical supervision has been shown to support healthcare workers during challenging times, by reducing burnout, enhancing mental health and wellbeing at work, and improving job satisfaction. However, clinical supervision participation and effectiveness are pre-requisites for realising these benefits. During times of stress and increased workloads (e.g. during the Coronavirus pandemic), healthcare workers tend to prioritise clinical duties and responsibilities over clinical supervision. Effective supervision practices can be restored, and healthcare workers can be better supported in their roles during and in the post-pandemic period only if healthcare workers, policy makers, healthcare organizations, clinical supervision trainers and researchers join forces. This paper sheds light on this important topic and offers a number of practical recommendations to reboot effective clinical supervision practices at the point of care.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac030
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Systemic resilience and COVID-19: lessons from Taiwan

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      Authors: Wang V.
      Abstract: AbstractIn May 2021, Taiwan experienced its first COVID-19 surge. Up until then, this geopolitically vulnerable nation had contained the pandemic well. The situation seemed dire at the peak of the surge, however, within two months, the crisis had been resolved. Aside from technical measures such as border control and mandated social distancing, other underlying systemic factors- including an accreditation-strengthened and digitalized healthcare system, government resourcefulness, and continuously adaptive strategies- were crucial to Taiwan’s success, and have demonstrated the importance of systemic resilience in terms of navigating the pandemic.
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac029
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • How safe is virtual healthcare'

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      Authors: Harrison R; Manias E.
      Abstract: virtual models of caredigital healthpatient safetyequityhealthcare quality
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac021
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Job burnout facing Chinese general practitioners in the context of
           COVID-19

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      Authors: Xiao Y; Chen J.
      Abstract: COVID-19general practitionerjob burnoutprimary health care
      PubDate: Tue, 29 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac023
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Depression screening will be included in Chinese students’ health
           check-ups

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      Authors: Xiao Y; Du N.
      Abstract: COVID-19depressionmental healthstudents
      PubDate: Tue, 29 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac024
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Cluster randomized controlled trial: A matter of independence

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      Authors: Netuveli G.
      PubDate: Tue, 29 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac022
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Accreditation and clinical outcomes: shorter length of stay after
           first-time hospital accreditation in the Faroe Islands

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      Authors: Bergholt M; Von Plessen C, Johnsen S, et al.
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundThe aim of accreditation is to improve quality of care and patient safety. However, studies on the effectiveness of accreditation on clinical outcomes are limited and inconsistent. Comparative studies have contrasted accredited with non-accredited hospitals or hospitals without a benchmark, but assessments of clinical outcomes of patients treated at hospitals undergoing accreditation are sparse. The Faroe Islands hospitals were accredited for the first time in 2017, making them an ideal place to study the impact of accreditation.ObjectiveWe aimed to investigate the association between first-time hospital accreditation and length of stay (LOS), acute readmission (AR) and 30-day mortality in the unique situation of the Faroe Islands.MethodsWe conducted a before and after study based on medical record reviews in relation to first-time accreditation. All three Faroese hospitals were voluntarily accredited using a modified second version of the Danish Healthcare Quality Programme encompassing 76 standards. We included inpatients 18 years or older treated at a Faroese hospital with one of six clinical conditions (stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA), bleeding gastic ulcer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), childbirth, heart failure and hip fracture) in 2012–2013 designated ‘before accreditation‘or 2017–2018‘ after accreditation’. The main outcome measures were LOS, all-cause AR and all-cause 30-day mortality. We computed adjusted cause-specific hazard rate (HR) ratios using Cox Proportional Hazard regression with before accreditation as reference. The analyses were controlled for age, sex, cohabitant status, in-hospital rehabilitation, type of admission, diagnosis and cluster effect at patient and hospital levels.ResultsThe mean LOS was 13.4 days [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 10.8, 15.9] before accreditation and 7.5 days (95% CI: 6.10, 8.89) after accreditation. LOS of patients hospitalized after accreditation was significantly shorter [overall, adjusted HR = 1.23 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.46)]. By medical condition, only women in childbirth had a significantly shorter LOS [adjusted HR = 1.30 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.62)]. In total, 12.3% of inpatients before and 9.5% after accreditation were readmitted acutely within 30 days of discharge, and 30-day mortality was 3.3% among inpatients before and 2.8% after accreditation, respectively. No associations were found overall or by medical condition for AR [overall, adjusted HR = 1.34 (95% CI: 0.82, 2.18)] or 30-day mortality [overall, adjusted HR = 1.33 (95% CI: 0.55, 3.21)]) after adjustment for potential confounding factors.ConclusionFirst-time hospital accreditation in the Faroe Islands was associated with a significant reduction in LOS, especially of women in childbirth. Notably, shorter LOS was not followed by increased AR. There was no evidence that first-time accreditation lowered the risk of AR or 30-day mortality.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac015
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Recognizing and responding to clinical deterioration in adult patients in
           

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      Authors: Berry D; Street M, Hall K, et al.
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundPatient isolation is widely used as a strategy for prevention and control of infection but may have unintended consequences for patients. Early recognition and response to acute deterioration is an essential component of safe, quality patient care and has not been explored for patients in isolation.ObjectiveThe primary aims of this study were to (i) describe the timing, frequency and nature of clinical deterioration during hospital admission for patients with isolation precautions for infection control and (ii) compare the characteristics of patients who did and did not deteriorate during their initial period of isolation precautions for infection control.MethodsThis retrospective cohort study was conducted across three sites of a large Australian health service. The study sample were adult patients (≥18 years) admitted into isolation precautions within 24 h of admission from 1 July 2019 to 31 December 2019.ResultsThere were 634 patients who fulfilled the study inclusion criteria. One in eight patients experienced at least one episode of clinical deterioration during their time in isolation with most episodes of deterioration occurring within the first 2 days of admission. Timely Medical Emergency Team calls occurred in almost half the episodes of deterioration; however, the same proportion (47.2%) of deterioration episodes resulted in no Medical Emergency Team activation (afferent limb failure). In the 24 h preceding each episode of clinical deterioration (n = 180), 81.6% (n = 147) of episodes were preceded by vital signs fulfilling pre-Medical Emergency Team criteria. Patients who deteriorated during isolation for infection control were older (median age 74.0 vs 71.0 years, P = 0.042); more likely to live in a residential care facility (21.0% vs 7.2%, P = 0.006); had a longer initial period of isolation (4.0 vs 2.9 days, P = < 000.1) and hospital length-of-stay (median 4.9 vs 3.2 days, P = < 0.001) and were more likely to die in hospital (12.3% vs 4.3%, P < 0.001).ConclusionPatients in isolation precautions experienced high Medical Emergency Team afferent limb failure and most fulfilled pre-Medical Emergency Team criteria in the 24 h preceding episodes of deterioration. Timely recognition and response to clinical deterioration continue to be essential in providing safe, quality patient care regardless of the hospital-care environment.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac020
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • A qualitative study exploring patient shadowing as a method to improve
           patient-centred care: 10 principles for a new gold standard

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      Authors: Goodrich J; Ridge D, Cartwright T.
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundIn recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on patient experience as a dimension of quality in healthcare and subsequently a drive to understand care from the patient’s perspective. Patient shadowing is an approach that has been used in service improvement projects, but its potential as a quality improvement (QI) method has not been studied in practical and replicable detail.ObjectiveThis new research aimed to produce clear guidance on patient shadowing for future Quality Improvement projects.MethodsQualitative interviews were conducted with 20 clinical and non-clinical participants of a national QI programme in UK, which focused on improving the experience of patients at the end of life. All participants had shadowed patients. Data were analysed using a thematic analysis.ResultsThere were two broad themes: (i) The process of shadowing: how participants went about shadowing, adopting different approaches and making judgements about the care they observed and any challenges they had encountered. (ii) The impact of shadowing: on the engagement and motivation of those who shadowed and in terms of service changes to benefit patients and their families.ConclusionThe findings led to a new set of ‘gold standard’ principles to benefit both staff and patients where shadowing is used as a QI method. These, together with new guidance, will ensure that shadowing is conducted as a team exercise, that all those involved are more robustly prepared and supported and that its purpose as a method to improve patient experience will be better understood.
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac018
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Development of a professional competency framework for Australian
           sonographers—perspectives for developing competencies using a Delphi
           methodology

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      Authors: Childs J; Thoirs K, Quinton A, et al.
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundProfessional competencies are important for enhancing alignment between the needs of education, industry and health consumers, whilst describing public expectations around health professionals. The development of competency standards for the sonography profession defines the behaviours, skills and knowledge sonographers should demonstrate for each learning and experience level.ObjectiveThe objective of this project was to develop a set of professional competency standards for the sonography profession which described in depth the behaviours, skills and knowledge sonographers should demonstrate across multiple learning and experience levels.MethodsRepresentatives of three Australian ultrasound professional associations and seven tertiary institutions involved in entry-level sonographer education in Australia formed a research team (RT). The RT recruited an expert panel that responded to six survey rounds. Using a Delphi methodology, the results and free-text comments from each previous round were fed back to participants in the subsequent survey rounds to achieve a consensus.ResultsThe project developed a professional competency framework for sonographers, which included four major domains: detailed competency standards, sonographer knowledge, sonographer attitudes and a holistic competency matrix [https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.17148035.v2.]ConclusionThe Delphi methodology is an effective way to develop professional competency standards. This paper describes the methods and challenges in developing such standards for sonographers which could be translated to other health professionals.
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac017
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Rates of underreported needlestick and sharps injuries among healthcare
           workers in Turkey: in the light of Infection Control Committee data

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      Authors: Korkmaz N; Şentürk G, Tekin A, et al.
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveDoctors and nurses are frequently exposed to needlestick and sharps injuries (NSIs) because of their work. It is estimated that NSIs are more common than the rates reported to Infection Control Committee. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and reporting rates of NSIs in our hospital.MethodsAfter their consent forms were obtained for the questionnaire, 670 doctors and nurses were interviewed face-to-face by the Infection Control Committee nurse. The questionnaire consisted of 22 questions, and the answers were recorded. The questions were on demographic data and injuries. The data of NSIs, whose active surveillance was made in our hospital since 2005 and in the last 1 year, were also analyzed retrospectively.ResultsA total of 119 (17%) people out of 670 people who participated in the study had at least one NSI; 43 (36%) people of the 119 people were doctors and 76 (63.9%) people were nurses. The most common injuries among doctors were found in assistant doctors (60%). No statistically significant differences were detected between the doctors and nurses in terms of injury status (P = 0.398). The most common injuries were found in surgical clinics, and a significant difference was detected here when compared to other clinics. The data that 20 (17%) people of the 118 people who were injured by the NSIs reported the injury were obtained from the Infection Control Committee database.ConclusionIt is seen that injuries are high in surgical clinics and assistant doctors who have high work stress and workload. There were more injuries with sharp objects than the expected rates in our hospital although the reports were made very rarely. First of all, we should determine strategies, especially education, to reduce injuries, and then remove the obstacles to unreported injuries. The methods of clinics with a high rates of reporting needlestick and sharps injuries to the infection control committee should be examined and tried to be applied in our own clinics.
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac012
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The future of quality and accreditation surveys: Digital transformation
           and artificial intelligence

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      Authors: Cayirtepe Z; Senel F.
      Abstract: AbstractAccreditation is documented and reported by the external evaluation organization that the health facility provides services at certain standards. While on-site survey practices are being carried out by external evaluation organizations, there has been a trend toward new survey approaches using digital technologies as a result of the research carried out to ensure efficiency in surveys as well as improved effectiveness. With the emergence of the Covid-19 epidemic, external evaluation organization in all sectors has been forced to work remotely and adopt digital technology. Shared remote survey experience results reported its benefits as also some problems. The increase in the adaptation of digital technologies in quality and accreditation surveys showed that the use of technology in the survey structure will develop further in the future. Can artificial intelligence technologies be the next digital technology that will be adapted to surveys' In addition to the benefits of using artificial intelligence technologies, there are potential problems to consider and some requirements for using them. external evaluation organizations must be prepared to develop their organizational capacity to ensure that quality and accreditation surveys are responsive to changing industry needs and must make the necessary investments to make the data, which is the most important source of digital technologies, accessible and usable.Graphical Abstract
      PubDate: Tue, 07 Apr 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzac025
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 2 (2020)
       
 
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