Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Work, Employment & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.615
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 51  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0950-0170 - ISSN (Online) 1469-8722
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Working Lives in India: Current Insights and Future Directions

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      Authors: Anita Hammer, Janroj Yilmaz Keles, Wendy Olsen
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      India presents a rich context for research on work and employment, epitomising the paradox of an ‘emerging economy’ but one where 92.4% of the workforce is informal – insecure, unprotected, poor – and women and disadvantaged groups most vulnerable. It displays a wide range of production relations in its formal/informal economy, embedded in diverse social relations, and the related forms of exploitation and resistance. This WES Themed Collection aims to review existing WES scholarship on India since 2001, identifying both gaps in scholarship and fruitful avenues for future research on India. The purpose is to showcase some of this scholarship while also advancing the internationalisation and expansion of the journal’s presence in countries in the Global South. This effort is timely as decolonisation of scholarship and increased focus on the South is on the intellectual agenda, challenging established structures of power and knowledge in academia.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T10:25:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221083511
       
  • Gender-Specific Duration of Parental Leave and Current Earnings

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      Authors: Benedikt Gerst, Christian Grund
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Although male employees are increasingly making use of parental leave, gender differences in both usage and duration of parental leave are still prevalent. Based on signalling theory and the masculinities concept, the article explores the role of gender in the relationship between the incidence/duration of parental leave and wages/compensation after returning to a job. It is shown that pay gaps associated with parental leave are much more severe for male than they are for female middle managers in the German chemical industry.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T06:42:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221090163
       
  • ‘They Exist but They Don’t Exist’: Personal Assistants Supporting
           Physically Disabled People in the Workplace

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      Authors: Jane Maddison, Jenni Brooks, Katherine Graham, Yvonne Birks
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Employment rates in England for disabled people are persistently lower than for non-disabled people. Support from a Workplace Personal Assistant is one way of narrowing this gap. Personal assistance is an empowerment-driven model in which the disabled person controls their support: who provides it, when, how and where. Previous research has focused on the personal assistant role in the home setting. This article draws on data from 32 qualitative interviews in the first UK study to explore personal assistance in the workplace for people with physical and/or sensory impairments. To maintain their enabling role in this external setting, Workplace Personal Assistants needed to strive for occupational invisibility when among the disabled workers’ colleagues: to ‘exist but not exist’. This article examines the Workplace Personal Assistant role as invisible work, applying Hatton’s conceptual framework. The analysis contributes to understanding of workplace personal assistance and ways in which mechanisms can intersect to produce multiple invisibility.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T06:36:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221075532
       
  • Between Frustration and Invigoration: Women Talking about Digital
           Technology at Work

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      Authors: Sarah Mosseri, Ariadne Vromen, Rae Cooper, Elizabeth Hill
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study addresses the dearth of gender analysis within debates about technological innovation and workplace change. Qualitative analysis of 12 focus groups conducted with women in ‘frontline’ and ‘professional’ roles discussing their use and engagement with digital technologies at work reveals contrasting narratives of ‘digital frustration’ and ‘digital invigoration’. To explain these distinct narratives, we synthesise insights from science and technology studies with findings from scholarship on gendered work and labour market inequality to show that these differences are not driven solely by a technology’s form or the degree of automation it ostensibly represents. Instead, women’s narratives reflect an interplay between technological design, employment context and workers’ own voice and agency. These findings challenge assumptions about the totalising and transformative power of work-related technologies, redirecting attention to how social and political contestations over digital technologies inform worker experiences and shape the future of work.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T08:36:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221091680
       
  • Emotional Pasts in Swedish Rescue Services: Bringing Temporality to the
           Fore in the Field of Emotional Regimes

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      Authors: Clary Krekula, Stefan Karlsson
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article centres on emotions within the Swedish rescue services in terms of the concepts of emotional regime and emotional pasts, partly with a focus on the role of emotional pasts in emotional regimes, partly on how the (re)construction of emotional pasts relates to the organisation of the workplace. The empirical material consists of qualitative interviews with five female and 13 male firefighters in Sweden, aged 28–58. Results show that individual experiences are used as emotional pasts to define work situations in the present and that work teams, through informal conversations and formal debriefing, create stories out of central events, thus constructing shared emotional pasts. All in all, the analysis shows that temporalities and their narrative expressions are a vital part of how emotional regimes are sustained within the rescue services, which has implications for the understanding of the rescue services as an organisation.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T10:33:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221084615
       
  • The Worth of Their Work: The (In)visible Value of Refugee Volunteers in
           the Transnational Humanitarian Aid Sector

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      Authors: Patricia Ward
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Scholarship on invisible work highlights how volunteers’ labour is devalued and obfuscated because it is framed as something ‘noneconomic’. This article shows how volunteers’ labour is invisible and noneconomic when it is reframed as aid. Drawing upon a case of refugee volunteers in Jordan’s humanitarian aid sector highlights how framing work as aid transforms their labour into objects they ‘receive’ and ‘consume’ as benefits because ‘work’ is understood as something they lack or need. Volunteers are therefore both workers and beneficiaries in relation to aid organisations. This ambiguous positioning distinguishes them and what they do in the workplace from ‘work’. This case elaborates understandings of processes that delineate volunteer labour as invisible work in practice, and provides a starting point for further discussion on the relationship between invisible and insecure work. It also expands empirical knowledge on volunteering and invisible work within the Global South.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T10:26:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221082481
       
  • Working from Home and Work–Family Conflict

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      Authors: Inga Laß, Mark Wooden
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Longitudinal evidence on whether, and under what conditions, working from home is good or bad for family life is largely absent. Using 15 waves of data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey, this study investigates the association between working from home and work–family conflict among parents. Fixed-effects structural equation models reveal that more hours worked at home are associated with less work–family conflict. This association, however, is only sizeable (and significant) for those working most of their hours at home. Furthermore, mothers benefit significantly more from home working than fathers. Additionally, mediation analysis suggests the association between working from home and work–family conflict is partly mediated by the level of schedule control, commuting time, and unsocial work hours. Whereas increased schedule control and less commuting among home workers reduce work–family conflict, home working is also associated with more unsocial work hours, which increases work–family conflict.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T10:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221082474
       
  • Working from Home in Urban China during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Assemblages
           of Work-Family Interference

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      Authors: Li Sun, Tao Liu, Weiquan Wang
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      During the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of workers globally have been forced to work from home. Empirical data from Chinese cities in the Hubei province reveal work productivity decreased among many respondents working from home in 2020, primarily due to family interference with work. Such interference stems not only from the domain of daily life but also from other family members’ e-working and e-learning. Conversely, respondents’ work interferes with family; thus, interference operates bi-directionally. This article proposes an analytical framework of work-family interference along three dimensions: work-daily life, work-work, work-study, and each dimension can be understood through four distinct aspects: temporality, physicality, vocality, digitality. Remote workers encounter ‘assemblages of work-family interference’, consisting of a heterogeneous mixture of these dimensions and aspects. Furthermore, some factors (e.g., living patterns, work culture, digital infrastructure) constrain effective work-family boundary management among urban households.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T06:03:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221080870
       
  • Manufacturing Managerial Compliance: How Firms Align Managers with
           Corporate Interest

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      Authors: Devika Narayan
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Although the domain of labour process research is vast, few studies analyse compliance among managers. This article advances a neglected strand of analysis, focusing on how firms shape managerial actions. Organizational goals, such as downsizing, intensification, and reskilling, demand that professional managers cooperate and act in accordance with firm objectives, at times even at personal cost to themselves. To theorize this, I use the case of information technology (IT) firms in India that recently shed a large number of managerial jobs, fostering an environment of insecurity. Those who lost their jobs were positioned between lower-level employees and top management. Drawing on qualitative fieldwork, I contribute a two-part framing that theorizes the dualities of the managerial subject position and how it is instrumentalized. The article foregrounds the intersection of managerial insecurity and managerial hierarchy, emphasizing how firms utilize these to meet organizational goals.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-28T09:49:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221083109
       
  • Influences on Employment Transitions around the Birth of the First Child:
           The Experience of Italian Mothers

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      Authors: Francesca Fiori, Giorgio Di Gessa
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article studies mothers’ employment transitions around childbirth. It argues that leaving employment around childbirth and returning after an interruption might depend on multiple influences: the micro-context of individual and household characteristics, the meso-context of women’s jobs and the macro-context of broader cultural and institutional factors. This conceptual model is tested using data from the Italian Institute of Statistics (ISTAT) ‘Family and Social Subjects (2009)’ survey. The findings confirm that mothers’ transitions out of employment are shaped by micro-characteristics such as education, meso-characteristics such as status and security of prior jobs, and macro geographical and temporal factors. Subsequent returns to employment also reflect micro and macro influences, as mothers born before 1950, with low education, and large families are less likely to return; but they seem less dependent upon prior job characteristics. The research highlights the importance of considering multiple levels of influence to understand the enabling factors of maternal employment.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-28T06:16:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221082479
       
  • Why Female Employees Do Not Earn More under a Female Manager: A
           Mixed-Method Study

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      Authors: Margriet van Hek, Tanja van der Lippe
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Previous studies found contradictory results on whether women benefit in terms of earnings from having a female manager. This mixed-method study draws on survey data from the Netherlands to determine whether female employees have higher wages if they work under a female manager and combines these with data from interviews with Dutch female managers to interpret and contextualize its findings. The survey data show that having a female manager does not affect the wages of female (or male) employees in the Netherlands. The interviews revealed different ways in which managers can improve outcomes for female employees and suggest several reasons as to why some female managers experience a lack of motivation to enhance female employees’ earnings. This detailed focus on mechanisms that underlie female managers position to act as ‘cogs in the machine’ emphasizes the importance of incorporating context and looking at outcomes other than earnings in future research.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T07:57:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221083971
       
  • The Association between Family Care and Paid Work among Women in Germany:
           Does the Household Economic Context Matter'

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      Authors: Ulrike Ehrlich
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Owing to the rapid ageing of societies, studying the labour market consequences of caring for ill, disabled or frail old-age partners, parents and/or other family members (hereafter: ‘family care’) is of urgent concern. Previous research has mainly concentrated on examining the impact of differing family care situations on women’s employment. Building on household decision-making approaches, this study focuses on the moderating role of the household economic situation in the family care–employment relationship among women. Cox shared frailty regression analyses of German Socio-Economic Panel data (SOEP, 2004–2017) indicate that the family care–employment relationship depends not simply on time committed to care but is also stratified by household economic situations: full-time employed, low-intensity caregivers down-scale to part-time hours only in more affluent households; full-time to non-employment transitions are more likely for married, high-intensity caregivers; part-time to non-employment transitions are more likely for high-intensity caregivers contributing marginally to the household income.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T05:04:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211069841
       
  • Gurkha Warriors as Entrepreneurs in Britain: A Social Anchoring Lens on
           Martial Heritage and Migrant Enterprises

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      Authors: Pawan Adhikari, Shovita Dhakal Adhikari, Shoba Arun, Thankom Arun
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Using the social anchoring approach, this article investigates the entrepreneur experience of one of the newest migrant groups in Britain, the Nepali Gurkhas. The findings derived from the semi-structured interviews show how these migrant entrepreneurs employ multiple ‘anchors’ to engage in family-based enterprises and to navigate structural constraints. Their military heritage, which has provided them with psycho-social resources in the form of subjective and mixed anchors, has been central to their exercise of agency and enabling them to gain a foothold in Britain. This has rendered Gurkha entrepreneurs a distinct group within migrant entrepreneurship. The article contributes to the literature on migrant entrepreneurship by delineating how agential capacity, by deploying different anchors, can cause variations in migrant enterprises, which in turn imbue migrant entrepreneurship with distinct characteristics.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T04:51:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221080394
       
  • Restructuring, Redeployment and Job Churning within Internal Labour
           Markets

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      Authors: Robert MacKenzie, Christopher J McLachlan
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the phenomenon of recurrent internal redeployment, through a case study of restructuring at a UK based steel firm. While redeployment reflected one of the key functions of the traditional internal labour market at SteelCo, frequent restructuring events meant some workers experienced redeployment on a recurrent basis. For these workers the experience of repeated redeployment was analogous to churning in and out of jobs on the external labour market. Adapting this term to internal organisational processes, the article presents a new way of analysing recurrent redeployment through the formulation of the concept of Internal Labour Market Churn. This new contribution to internal labour market theory highlights problems with human capital development, career progression and in-work insecurity associated with internal churning, which tarnishes the sense of mutual commitment traditionally associated with and engendered by internal labour markets.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T04:49:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221080389
       
  • Gender in the Flesh: Allostatic Load as the Embodiment of Stressful,
           Gendered Work in Canadian Police Communicators

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      Authors: Arija Birze, Elise Paradis, Cheryl Regehr, Vicki LeBlanc, Gillian Einstein
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Gender and work are important social determinants of health, yet studies of health inequities related to the gendered and emotional intricacies of work are rare. Occupations high in emotional labour – a known job stressor – are associated with ill-health and typically dominated by women. Little is known about the mechanisms linking health with these emotional components of work. Using physiological and questionnaire data from Canadian police communicators, we adopt an embodied approach to understanding the relationship between gender norm conformity, emotional labour, and physiological dysregulation, or allostatic load. For high conformers, emotional labour leaves gendered traces in the flesh via increased allostatic load, suggesting that in this way, gendered structures in the workplace become embodied, influencing health through conformity to gender and emotion norms. Findings also reveal that dichotomous conceptions of gender may mask the impact of gendered structures, obscuring the consequences of gender for work-related stress.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T12:53:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221080388
       
  • Developing or Degrading Young Workers' How Business Strategy and the
           Labour Process Shape Job Quality across Different Industrial Sectors in
           England

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      Authors: Edward Yates
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores variations in job quality for young workers by analysing six employers across three industrial sectors of Greater Manchester, an English city-region. Four aspects of job quality are examined because of their centrality in shaping how youth labour-power is deployed in the labour process: technological utilisation, work-rate, autonomy and discretion, and opportunities for training and career progression. Primary data were collected from 30 semi-structured interviews with business owners, managers, young workers and from workplace observations. Findings reveal job quality is high in advanced manufacturing and creative and digital sectors, but low in business services. Job quality is shaped by the nature of commodity production and accompanying labour process. Development or degradation of young workers in the labour process depends largely on the requirements of the employer, as few countervailing pressures exist. Training provision improves job quality, but demand-side interventions are required to generate sustainable good jobs for young workers.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T06:43:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211070447
       
  • Disabled People Working in the Disability Sector: Occupational Segregation
           or Personal Fulfilment'

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      Authors: Anne Revillard
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Disabled people face many forms of exclusion on the labour market. To what extent is work in the disability sector a manifestation of this exclusion or a solution to it' Defined here as working for a disability organisation or specialising in disability in one’s occupation, work in the disability sector represents an under-documented aspect of the employment experiences of disabled people. This article uses it as a point of departure to theoretically and methodologically operationalise Carol Thomas’s social relational approach of disability to the study of employment. Drawing on biographical interviews conducted in France with people with either mobility or visual impairments, this study shows the ambivalent nature of work in the disability sector, which is diversely experienced as a form of occupational segregation or a means of self-fulfilment.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T08:20:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221080401
       
  • Work in the Gig-Economy: The Role of the State and Non-State Actors Ceding
           and Seizing Regulatory Space

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      Authors: Cristina Inversi, Tony Dundon, Lucy-Ann Buckley
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Using the concept of regulatory space, this article asks how both the state and non-state actors influence employment regulations particular to the gig-economy. To address this question a mixed method approach is used, including interviews with strategically placed informants involved in policy formation at national and international levels, content analysis of legal cases, parliamentary inquiry transcripts and policy reports. The analysis contributes to an understanding of employment regulation by the state in two ways. First, it reports distinct ‘levers’, which lead to a particular state role of ‘ceding and seizing’ regulatory power. Second, it argues that these levers ultimately serve the accumulation interests of capital over the legitimacy of employment rights for labour. The findings have wider societal implications for issues of equity, justice and employment regulation applicable to the gig-economy.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T08:19:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221080387
       
  • Mobility Power, State and the ‘Sponsored Labour Regime’ in
           Saudi Capitalism

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      Authors: Anita Hammer, Ayman Adham
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on the ‘double indeterminacy of labour power’, a key conceptual development in labour process theory, to examine mobility power in Saudi Arabia. State control over the mobility of migrant workers is crucial to the labour process and the wider political-economy of Saudi Arabia. However, little is known about mobility–effort bargaining and the specific forms of mobility power in the Saudi context. This article argues that not only is mobility–effort bargaining at the core of capital–labour relations in Saudi Arabia, but that mobility and effort are variably controlled by different sponsors/agents of control. Importantly, the control exercised by the state, capital and other sponsors over migrants’ mobility is not absolute. Developing mobility power further, the article details the multiplicity of mobilities and labour contracts to delineate a ‘sponsored labour regime’, and highlights the underexplored role of the state, and other agents of control, in conceptualising mobility–effort bargaining.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T06:17:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170221080373
       
  • Union Equality Structures and the Challenge of Democratic Legitimacy: The
           Case of the Fire Brigades Union

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      Authors: Tessa Wright, Sian Moore, Phil Taylor
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines two commonly adopted trade union strategies to increase the representation of under-represented groups – first, reserved seats on union decision-making bodies and second, self-organisation, involving separate structures. It does so through the case of the Fire Brigades Union (FBU), whose equality reforms were considered remarkable within the union movement and fire service due to the union’s small size and highly male-dominated, white membership. However, reserved seats at senior levels were later removed following objection on the grounds of democratic legitimacy. The article examines this decision using original data comparing UK union rules for additional representation. It exposes the tensions for small, male-dominated unions of reconciling Young’s theoretical principles of ‘group-differentiated democracy’ with the realities of perceived democratic legitimacy, and argues that progress on union equality is contingent on both the particular forms of democratic representation and the political and industrial context.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T06:38:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211072796
       
  • Migrants and Undeclared Employment within the European Construction
           Sector: Challenging Dichotomous Approaches to Workers’ Agency

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      Authors: Iraklis Dimitriadis
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing upon qualitative data on Albanians residing in Italy and Greece, this article furnishes new insights into the topic of undeclared migrant construction workers’ agency. It analyses different types of undeclared work through Katz’s theoretical framework that suggests a disaggregated conceptualisation of agency. In so doing, it adds to thinking on the factors shaping fluidity between types of agency and challenges dichotomous views on passive or voluntary participation. The article also highlights that mutual interests between workers and employers enable migrant builders to defy and resist state regulations, despite the impacts of undeclared work on workers and the fact that power dynamics are unequal. Thus, the main contribution the article makes is to suggest a more nuanced understanding of labour agency that may go beyond the conflict between employers and workers. Overall, the article highlights the relevance of this study for different economic sectors, geographical areas and migrant groups.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-23T02:03:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211072777
       
  • The Making of the Academic Precariat: Labour Activism and Collective
           Identity-Formation among Precarious Researchers in Germany

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      Authors: Aslı Vatansever
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the political potency of ‘precarity’ as an organising axiom in contingent workers’ grassroots organisations. It studies a nationwide network of precarious researchers in Germany and deploys Frame Analysis to illuminate how the Network articulates diverse criticisms as parts of a coherent struggle against precarious academic work. Empirically, the article substantiates the postulate of ‘precarity as a mobilising source’ by depicting the construction of precarity on strategic, organisational and individual levels, drawing on protest campaigns, coordinative work and in-depth interviews, respectively. On a theoretical level, it contributes to the literature by proposing a refinement of the concept of ‘master frame’. Arguing that ‘precarity’ creates a broader class actor with branches in different sectors, to which the contingent academics link their struggle by derivatively describing themselves as the ‘academic precariat’, the article proposes the novel category of ‘class-formative frame’ in difference to operational (diagnostic/prognostic) or relational (supportive/oppositional) frames.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-12T04:53:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211069830
       
  • Learning about Pay at Work: A Labour Process Approach to Pay Transparency

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      Authors: Fuk Ying Tse
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Using a labour process approach, this article examines how workers in three factories in China learnt about the workplace-level pay systems governing their employment relationships. By outlining the processes through which workers learnt about pay at work, this article sheds light on how workers, faced with a perplexing variable pay system and managerial control over pay disclosure, can overcome the pathways towards ignorance and ultimately challenge the workplace-level pay communication regime. It is shown that pay transparency, rather than being merely an outcome of managerial practices to improve employee motivation and organisational performance, is an outcome of dynamic and contested social interactions between management and labour.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T06:12:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211070442
       
  • Union Coalitions and Strategic Framing: The Case of the Agricultural
           Advisory Panel for Wales

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      Authors: Leon Gooberman, Marco Hauptmeier
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses the creation of a union coalition that introduced a new employment relations institution: the Agricultural Advisory Panel for Wales. Building on social movement theory, the article argues that the union’s strategic framing within a conducive political opportunity structure enabled the coalition to form and pursue its goals. The union engaged in a specific frame alignment strategy, frame bridging, to explore and mobilize intersections and shared interests between its own frame and those of its coalition partners. Frame bridging prompted actors to reverse their policy preferences and participate in the coalition, which was facilitated by a political opportunity structure formed from the political salience of the agricultural sector and pre-existing social ties in the ‘small state’ political economy of Wales. The article contributes to the literature by developing and extending the frame bridging concept as a process enabling union coalitions.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T06:11:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211069787
       
  • Gendered Housework: Spousal Relative Income, Parenthood and Traditional
           Gender Identity Norms

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      Authors: Joanna Syrda
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Despite women’s increased market employment and earnings, the gender housework gap persists. Drawing on US data from 1999 to 2017 waves of Panel Study of Income Dynamics (6643 dual-earner heterosexual couples, 19,602 couple-year observations) and using couples fixed effects, this study examines the impact of having children on the relationship between partners’ housework time and spousal relative income. While parenthood could theoretically incentivize a more efficient division of labour, I find it has a traditionalizing effect and parents’ housework exhibits significant gender deviance neutralization, while housework division of childless couples is independent of relative income. In fact, these effects are so sizeable, that parents’ gender gap in the division of domestic labour increases in the higher range of women’s relative income. As the gender earnings gap closes and women’s relative income increases, the gender housework gap opens. Additionally, the traditionalizing parenthood effect is identified only among married and not cohabiting parents.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T06:10:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211069780
       
  • Labour Commodification in the Employment Heartland: Union Responses to
           Teachers’ Temporary Work

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      Authors: Susan McGrath-Champ, Scott Fitzgerald, Mihajla Gavin, Meghan Stacey, Rachel Wilson
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses the commodification of professional labour and union responses to these processes within the employment heartland. It explores the category of fixed-contract or ‘temporary’ employment using Australian public school teaching as the empirical lens. Established to address intensifying conditions of labour market insecurity, the union-led creation of the temporary category was intended to partly decommodify labour by providing intermediate security between permanent and ‘casual’ employment. However, using historical case and contemporary survey data, we discern that escalation of temporary teacher numbers and intensifying work-effort demands concurrently increased insecurity within the teacher workforce, constituting recommodification. The article contributes to scant literature on unions and commodification, highlighting that within the current marketised context, labour commodification may occur through contradictory influences at multiple levels, and that union responses to combat this derogation of work must similarly be multi-level and sustained.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T04:45:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211069854
       
  • Conceptualising ‘Meta-Work’ in the Context of Continuous, Global
           Mobility: The Case of Digital Nomadism

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      Authors: Jeremy Aroles, Claudine Bonneau, Shabneez Bhankaraully
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Meta-work – the work that makes work possible – is an important aspect of professional lives. Yet, it is also one that remains understudied, in particular in the context of work activities characterised by continuous and global mobility. Building on a qualitative approach to online content analysis, this article sets out to explore the meta-work underlying digital nomadism, a leisure-driven lifestyle premised on a ‘work from anywhere’ logic. This article explores the four main dimensions of meta-work (resource mobilisation, articulation, transition and migration work) of digital nomads. In doing so, it shows the distinctiveness of the meta-work activities of digital nomads, thus conceptualising meta-work in the context of continuous, global mobility. Importantly, this article also challenges mainstream depictions of digital nomadism as a glamorous lifestyle accessible to anyone with the ‘right mind’ and the willingness to work less, be happier and live in some far-away paradisiac setting.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T04:41:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211069797
       
  • Fragmented Capital and (the Loss of) Control over Posted Workers: A Case
           Study in the Belgian Meat Industry

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      Authors: Anne Theunissen, Patrizia Zanoni, Koen Van Laer
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Based on the case of a Belgian meat processing company that relies on posted workers employed by two subcontractors, this study investigates how posting affects client capital’s ability to control labour. Analysed through a Labour Process Theory lens, the findings reveal that posting fragments capital and substantially reduces the client firm’s control over workers’ effort and mobility power. This is due to the low-cost, temporary nature of posting, the disembeddedness of posted workers and their stronger relations with their employer than with the client firm. Competing to control posted labour, both units of capital enact practices commonly associated with trade unions: client capital advocates for posted workers in its interactions with the subcontractor, and the subcontractor promotes posted workers’ reduction of effort and increased mobility against the interests of client capital. Because of their structural vulnerability, posted workers might leverage conflicts within capital to resist the harshest forms of exploitation.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T04:40:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211059733
       
  • A Bridge over Troubled Borders: Social Class and the Interplay between
           Work and Life

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      Authors: Samantha Evans, Madeleine Wyatt
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on border theory, this article presents a study of the role that social class plays in the interplay between work and non-work life. A survey was used to collect subjective ratings of social class for class origin, home and work domains. Interviews were then conducted with 20 individuals to explore participants’ experiences of social class across their work-life domains. The analysis identified five groups of individuals who experienced different work-life outcomes depending on their self-perceived social class and any experiences of social class travel. The study found that socially mobile interviewees had more complex work-life experiences and found work-life interplay more challenging than those whose social class was congruent across domains, challenging the assumption that social mobility is inherently beneficial. The article proposes that social class acts as a bridge, which either facilitates or impedes the ease with which individuals move between their work-life domains.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T05:29:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211041304
       
  • Father Parental Leave Use in Spain: The Role of the Female Partner Labour
           Situation

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      Authors: Almudena Moreno-Mínguez, Ángel L Martín-Román, Alfonso Moral
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents novel empirical evidence of fathers’ parental leave usage by introducing a family dimension in Spain. To test this hypothesis, a bivariate probit estimation was used to analyse the effect of the mother’s labour force participation on the father’s decision to take parental leave. This procedure allowed us to address the issue of simultaneous factors affecting the decisions of both the man and the woman, which were relevant to interpreting for the phenomenon. The results suggested that successfully using fathers’ paternity leave as a tool to promote gender equality depends on the family household’s characteristics and the woman’s connection to the job market. The bivariate probit estimation revealed that the effect of the woman’s decision on the man’s choice is much stronger than a naive regression would suggest.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T01:15:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211062808
       
  • Embedded Strangers in One’s Own Job' Freelance Interpreters’
           Invisible Work: A Practice Theory Approach

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      Authors: Deborah Giustini
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates invisible work, as voiced by professionals in the interpreting sector in the UK. Informed by a practice theory approach alongside the sociology of invisible work, it re-frames invisibility as enacted according to the elements that organise and motivate work in terms of purposeful, normative and skilful actions. Drawing on a qualitative dataset of 20 observations and 46 interviews with interpreters, the article conceives invisibility as a functional labour logic in which compliance and resistance to being unseen are the twofold cornerstone of professionalism but also of devaluation. As a freelance workforce, interpreters face contradictions between deontological and stakeholders’ expectations of invisibility, and the individual need of displaying an expert role for securing work continuity. This article contributes to social practice and invisible work literature by uncovering the performative interrelation of the work dynamics which demand a negotiation of hidden/visible status.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T01:09:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211059351
       
  • Disability Discrimination: Employer Considerations of Disabled Jobseekers
           in Light of the Ideal Worker

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      Authors: Kaja Larsen Østerud
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Labour market stratification and discrimination of disabled people remains a less researched topic compared to other minorities despite being a notably disadvantaged group. This article explores the employer side of discrimination against disabled jobseekers by using a field experiment conducted in Norway as its point of departure. Through qualitative follow-up interviews, this article investigates employers’ assessments of equally qualified mobility-impaired candidates in a field experiment. The article employs the theoretical perspective of the ideal worker to shed light on how employers evaluate disabled jobseekers against an able-bodied ideal. Although previous literature on disability and the ideal worker has shown the imperative of asserting productivity, the findings in the current article reveal a stronger emphasis on social considerations as grounds for exclusion. The findings show how tacit constructions of the ideal worker not only relate to productivity but also to the creation of the socially integrated workplace.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T01:08:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211041303
       
  • ‘You Can’t Eat Soap’: Reimagining COVID-19, Work, Family and
           Employment from the Global South

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      Authors: Ameeta Jaga, Ariane Ollier-Malaterre
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article problematises the assumptions regarding work, family and employment that underlie the World Health Organization (WHO)’s COVID-19 guidelines. The scientific evidence grounding sanitary and social distancing recommendations is embedded in conceptualisations of work as skilled jobs in the formal economy and of family as urban and nuclear. These are Global North rather than universal paradigms. We build on theories from the South and an intersectional analysis of gender and class inequalities to highlight contextual complexities currently neglected in responses to COVID-19. We argue that building on both science and local knowledge can help democratise workable solutions for a range of different work, family and employment realities in the Global South. Finally, we propose a research agenda calling for strengthened North–South dialogue to provincialise knowledge, account for differences in histories, locality and resource-availability, and foster greater local participation in policy formulation regarding sanitary measures and vaccination campaigns.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T11:53:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211069806
       
  • Employer Participation in Active Labour Market Policies in the United
           Kingdom and Denmark: The Effect of Employer Associations as Social
           Networks and the Mediating Role of Collective Voice

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      Authors: Danat Valizade, Jo Ingold, Mark Stuart
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Active labour market policies (ALMPs) have evolved as pivotal social policy instruments designed to place the unemployed and other disadvantaged groups in sustainable employment. Yet, little is known about what drives employer participation in such initiatives. This article provides a nuanced account of the socio-economic aspects of the demand-side of ALMPs, by investigating employer embeddedness in wider social networks created by employer associations and employee collective voice as enabling mechanisms for employer participation in ALMPs. Drawing on an original survey of employers in the United Kingdom (UK) and Denmark, we found that the extent of employer embeddedness in such social networks is positively associated with employer participation in the UK but not in Denmark, where the effect was indirect and mediated through collective bargaining. The effects of employer network ties and employee collective voice affirm the importance of a more integrated analysis of the interactions between network ties and institutions in ALMP research.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T11:39:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211063094
       
  • Refugee Subentrepreneurship: The Emergence of a Liquid Cage

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      Authors: Deema Refai, Gerard McElwee
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article conceptualises refugees’ endeavours for upward social mobility through subentrepreneurship. Subentrepreneurship refers to various self-employment forms that are undeclared to relevant authorities to escape superimposed historical, temporal, spatial, institutional and social contexts, which constrain actors’ entrepreneurial activities. Using a mixed theoretical underpinning combining Mixed Embeddedness (ME) with Weber’s Iron Cage of Rationality (ICR), we signify liquidity of refugee subentrepreneurship, which is neither linear nor long-term rational. A liquid cage is envisaged to allow more freedom as refugees become embedded within intersections between transformative journeys and Constrained Institutional Contexts (CICs). This new theorising signifies a pronounced emphasis on agency whereby refugees cleverly contemplate implicit skills (i.e. unrecognised or downgraded skills), opportunities and processes to escape CICs. The article adds clarity as to how contexts become part of the production of entrepreneurial actions through two-way interactions that promote liquidity, enabling a strong foundation for future research exploring subentrepreneurship.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T11:35:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211062817
       
  • From Crunch to Grind: Adopting Servitization in Project-Based Creative
           Work

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      Authors: Johanna Weststar, Louis-Étienne Dubois
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      The digital game industry has embraced servitization – a strategic orientation toward customer centricity in production-based firms – to deeply monetize digital games. Though some note the resource-intensive nature of delivering services and suggest inherent risks in its adoption, extant literature is uncritical. This article draws on labour process theory to critique the impact of servitization on workers at the point of production. We conducted in-depth interviews at a large North American game development studio. The results show the human cost of servitization, generally overshadowed by financial considerations. Specifically, we theorize that servitization increases the indeterminacy of labour and this must be compensated for if servitization is to realize its cost-benefit potential. The result is an intensification of labour through additional control imperatives which make workers accountable to consumers through deterministic success metrics, impact the creative process and direct creative outputs in real time.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T11:28:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211061228
       
  • Betwixt and Between: The Invisible Experiences of Volunteers’ Body
           Work

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      Authors: Katharine Venter
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Prevailing dualisms of work as formal, paid employment on the one hand or informal, unpaid domestic labour on the other, means volunteering is often overlooked. Although academic interest in voluntary labour is growing, it remains inadequately theorised in the sociology of work. A more sociological meaningful understanding of volunteering is needed. Through an analysis of voluntary body work labour, this article advances theorisation of volunteering as work in two ways. Firstly, the article invokes a total social organisation of labour approach to overcome the paid/unpaid work dichotomy. Secondly, it grounds this theorisation empirically by drawing on the volunteers’ insights into their delivery of body work labour to shed new light on the complex ways in which volunteers frame labour within wider social relationships.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T11:25:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211061226
       
  • Unpacking Super-Exploitation in the 21st Century: The Struggles of Haitian
           Workers in Brazil

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      Authors: Francis Portes Virginio, Paul Stewart, Brian Garvey
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Emerging patterns of south–south migration and rapid economic growth in developing countries have highlighted the need for new conceptual contributions accounting for the experiences of migrant workers in the Global South. The concept of super-exploitation has been among those contributions with reference to appalling working conditions and the dependence of developing countries on the export of commodities. However, this article argues that the understanding of contemporary forms of super-exploitation experienced by migrant workers remains underdeveloped. Drawing upon 42 semi-structured interviews with Haitian workers in Brazil, this study makes an innovative contribution to the conceptualisation of super-exploitation in the 21st century, particularly from the perspective of social reproduction theory. This article argues that super-exploitation can be defined more accurately as a combination of economic and non-economic forces that entangle productive–reproductive–exploitative relationships, thereby shaping the dependence of workers on wages below the value necessary for their social reproduction.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T04:59:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211060748
       
  • Rethinking Mobilization Theory for Union Revitalization within the SSA
           Theory Framework

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      Authors: Sadık Kılıç
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers to rethink John Kelly’s mobilization theory within the social structure of accumulation (SSA) approach, a long-wave theory version. The SSA theory claims that institutional changes shape long waves with the decisive roles of capital–labour conflict, economic crises and political decisions. The SSA theory also introduces a different long-wave chronology that is more consistent with Kelly’s approach. Such a chronological reorganization allows Kelly’s expectation of union revitalization to be maintained. By drawing an intersection of these two theories, it is conceivable to conceptualize long waves more in line with the character of mobilization theory. Therefore, the article suggests that union revitalization is still possible in the context of these theories.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T05:37:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211062813
       
  • Representing Solo Self-Employed Workers: The Strengthening of Relations
           between Traditional and New Collective Actors in Industrial Relations

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      Authors: Petr Mezihorak, Annalisa Murgia, Paolo Borghi, Mathilde Mondon-Navazo
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      To date, the emergence of representation of hitherto under-represented workers has mainly been analysed in terms of strategic choices of traditional industrial relations actors. This study – focused on solo self-employed workers (SSE) – instead analyses the interactions between unions, employer organisations and new collective actors, namely SSE associations. More specifically, drawing on a comparative ethnography conducted in three European countries, it conceptualises the representation of SSE as a ‘subfield’ of the ‘parent field’ of employee and employer representation and shows how interactions between traditional and new collective actors consolidate the subfield of SSE representation by also shaping the industrial relations’ institutions. This article thus contributes, first, to the debate about the representation of under-represented workers by emphasising the importance of interactions between traditional and new actors in industrial relations, and second, to the theory of fields by conceptualising interactions as a central element of field-level change.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:56:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211061227
       
  • Marketisation and Regulatory Labour in Frontline Disability Work

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      Authors: Georgia van Toorn, Natasha Cortis
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      In many liberal welfare states, market-based reforms aimed at enhancing competition and choice in disability services have necessitated extensive regulatory reforms to ensure quality service provision. This article explores how the changing regulatory environment surrounding an individualised funding scheme is transforming frontline disability work. Drawing on data from a survey of 2341 Australian disability support workers, the article contributes to sociological understandings of market regulation by foregrounding the importance of frontline workers’ labour to the regulation of social service markets. Various regulation-related tasks and duties are identified which, while practically embedded among the client-focused components of care work previously documented, are analytically distinct from them. This category of undertheorised, unrecognised, often unpaid work is referred to as ‘regulatory labour’. The article illuminates the mechanisms through which workers enact and resist regulatory processes and help absorb market risks and failures in ways previously underexplored in theories of marketised social care.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:54:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211058024
       
  • Book Review: Work and Technological Change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Deniz Tuncalp
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T09:41:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211058586
       
  • Structural Change Shapes Career Mobility Opportunities: An Analysis of
           Cohorts, Gender and Parental Class

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      Authors: Dirk Witteveen, Johan Westerman
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.
      Research suggests that structural change drives occupational mobility in high-income countries over time, but two partially competing theories explain how such change occurs. One suggests that younger cohorts replace older ones through higher education, and the second suggests that individuals adapt to structural change by switching from declining to new or growing occupations during their careers. A proposed occupational scheme aligns with the two dimensions of structural change – skill upgrading on the vertical axis of occupational differentiation, increasing demand for data comprehension (i.e. high skill) and primary tasks concerning either people or things on the horizontal axis. Applied to career trajectories in the Swedish labour market, sequence analyses of the scheme suggest stability in attainment of career mobility types over time between consecutive birth cohorts, and considerable evidence for within-career manoeuvring. Analyses address heterogeneity along parental class and gender.
      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T06:03:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211044305
       
  • Book Review: Sanford M Jacoby, Labor in the Age of Finance: Pensions,
           Politics, and Corporations from Deindustrialization to Dodd-Frank and Jo
           Carby-Hall and Lourdes Mella Méndez (eds), Labour Law and the Gig
           Economy: Challenges Posed by the Digitalisation of Labour Processes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Jacobs
      First page: 580
      Abstract: Work, Employment and Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work, Employment and Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T06:06:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09500170211069863
       
 
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