Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Trabajo : Revista de la Asociación Estatal de Centros Universitarios de Relaciones Laborales y Ciencias del Trabajo     Open Access  
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Similar Journals
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Work and Occupations
Number of Followers: 57  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0730-8884 - ISSN (Online) 1552-8464
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  • Über-Alienated: Powerless and Alone in the Gig Economy

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      Authors: Paul Glavin, Alex Bierman, Scott Schieman
      Pages: 399 - 431
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 399-431, November 2021.
      While the gig economy has expanded rapidly in the last decade, few have studied the psychological ramifications of working for an online labor platform. Guided by classical and modern theories of work and alienation, we investigate whether engagement in platform work is associated with an increased sense of powerlessness and isolation. We analyze data from two national surveys of workers from the Canadian Quality of Work and Economic Life Study in September 2019 (N = 2,460) and March 2020 (N = 2,469). Analyses reveal greater levels of powerlessness and loneliness among platform workers—a pattern that is not fully explained by their higher levels of financial strain. Additional analyses of platform activity reveal that rideshare driving is more strongly associated with powerlessness and isolation than engagement in online crowdwork. We interpret our findings in light of platform firms’ use of algorithmic control and distancing strategies that may undermine worker autonomy and social connection.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T01:34:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211024711
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Dilemma Work: Problem-Solving Multiple Work Roles Into One Work Life

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      Authors: Phillipa K. Chong
      Pages: 432 - 469
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 432-469, November 2021.
      Scholars have observed workers combining multiple work roles to earn a living to cope with the vicissitudes of the labor market. In studies of creative labor markets, this trend of workers broadening of their skills is termed “occupational generalism”. Previous scholarship has focused on the structural factors that push and pull workers into generalizing and combining multiple work roles. But we lack an understanding of the subjective experience of work as a generalist. I introduce the concept of dilemma work: a form of problem-solving wherein workers who have generalized their work portfolios, attempt to rationalize their professional practices to overcome conflicts that arise from occupying multiple work roles. Drawing on in-depth interviews with professional writers who also freelance as book reviewers, I find that these generalists use three dilemma work strategies: anchoring another role to guide action in the current one; incorporating multiple roles under a higher role or purpose; and compartmentalizing roles in order to act exclusively within a single identity. I propose the general value of a typology of dilemma work for understanding workers’ experience both within artistic labor markets, and beyond.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-05-26T04:23:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211017623
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Unemployment Experts: Governing the Job Search in the New Economy

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      Authors: Patrick Sheehan
      Pages: 470 - 497
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 470-497, November 2021.
      In recent years, sociologists have examined unemployment and job searching as important arenas in which workers are socialized to accept the terms of an increasingly precarious economy. While noting the importance of expert knowledge in manufacturing the consent of workers, research has largely overlooked the experts themselves that produce such knowledge. Who are these experts and what kinds of advice do they give' Drawing on interviews and ethnographic fieldwork conducted at three job search clubs, the author develops a three-fold typology of “unemployment experts”: Job Coaches present a technical diagnosis that centers mastery of job-hunting techniques; Self-help Gurus present a moral diagnosis focused on the job seeker’s attitude; and Skill-certifiers present a human capital diagnosis revolving around the job seeker’s productive capacities. By offering alternative diagnoses and remedies for unemployment, these experts give job seekers a sense of choice in interpreting their situation and acting in the labor market. However, the multiple discourses ultimately help to secure consent to precarious labor markets by drawing attention to a range of individual deficiencies within workers while obfuscating structural and relational explanations of unemployment. The author also finds that many unemployment experts themselves faced dislocations from professional careers and are making creative claims to expertise. By focusing on experts and their varied messages, this paper reveals how the victims of precarious work inadvertently help to legitimate the new employment regime.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T08:22:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211003652
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Murray, J., & Schwartz, M. (2019). Wrecked: How the American Auto Industry
           Destroyed Its Capacity to Compete.

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      Authors: Marc Dixon
      Pages: 498 - 500
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 498-500, November 2021.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-03-05T03:56:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211000408
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Groeger, C. V. (2021). The Education Trap: Schools and the Remaking of
           Inequality in Boston

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      Authors: Hannah Ingersoll
      Pages: 500 - 502
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 500-502, November 2021.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-03-05T03:56:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211000401
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • McKersie, R. B. (2018). A Field in Flux: Sixty Years of Industrial
           Relations

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      Authors: J. Ryan Lamare
      Pages: 502 - 504
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 502-504, November 2021.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-04-04T05:09:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211008208
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Carré, F., & Tilly, C. (2017). Where Bad Jobs Are Better: Retail Jobs
           Across Countries and Companies

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      Authors: Chris Warhurst 
      Pages: 504 - 506
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 504-506, November 2021.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-05-30T10:32:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211022029
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Chin, M. M. (2020). Stuck: Why Asian Americans Don't Reach the Top of the
           Corporate Ladder

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      Authors: Yvonne Chen
      Pages: 507 - 509
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 507-509, November 2021.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T06:55:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211022414
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Bulut, E. (2020). A Precarious Game: The Illusion of Dream Jobs in the
           Video Game Industry

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      Authors: Mengyang Zhao
      Pages: 509 - 511
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 509-511, November 2021.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-06-25T04:45:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211028892
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Working More, Less or the Same During COVID-19' A Mixed Method,
           Intersectional Analysis of Remote Workers

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      Authors: Wen Fan, Phyllis Moen
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed where paid work is done. Workers able to do so have been required to work remotely. We draw on survey data collected in October 2020 from a nationally representative sample of 3,017 remote workers, as well as qualitative survey data collected from 231 remote workers, to examine perceived changes in work hours from before to during the pandemic. Results indicate women are at greater risk of change (either a major decrease or a major increase)—rather than stability—in work hours. Gender also intersects with caregiving, race/ethnicity, prior remote work experiences, and socioeconomic status to shape changes in hours. Women and men in the sandwich generation, as well as women (but not men) with pre-school children, are the most likely to report a decrease in work hours, whereas women with older children at home or caring for adults (but not both) are the most likely to have an increase in hours. Remote working Black women and women moving into remote work are more likely to experience a major increase in hours worked, even as Hispanic women and Black men are the most likely to report somewhat of a reduction in work hours. Gender also intersects with SES, such that women without a college degree are more likely to have a decrease in work hours, while women with an advanced degree and women managers report a considerable increase in work hours. Qualitative data further illuminate why work hours change or remain stable for remote workers during COVID-19.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T01:03:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211047208
       
  • Book Review

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      Authors: Sneha Annavarapu
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-09-24T11:35:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211039277
       
  • Book Reviews

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      Authors: Gabriella Alberti
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T03:34:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211040784
       
  • Unequal Reach: Cyclical and Amplifying Ties Among Agricultural and
           Oilfield Workers in Texas

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      Authors: Kathleen Griesbach
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      What kinds of ties do agricultural and oil and gas workers form in the field, and how do they use them later on' Why do they use them differently' Scholarship highlights how weak ties can link people to valuable information, while strong ties can be critical for day-to-day survival. Yet many mechanisms affect how workers form and use social networks over time and space. Drawing on 60 interviews and observations with agricultural and oilfield workers in Texas, I examine how both groups form strong ties of fictive kinship when living together in the field far from home—pooling resources, sharing reproductive labor, and using the discourse of family to describe these relationships. Then I examine how they use these ties very differently later in practice. Oilfield workers often use their fictive kin ties to move up and around the industry across space, time, and companies: amplifying ties. In contrast, agricultural workers renew the same strong ties for survival from season to season, maintaining cyclical ties. The comparison highlights how industry mobility ladders, tempos, and geographies affect how workers can use their networks in practice. While both agricultural and oilfield workers become fictive kin in situations of intense proximity, structural differences give their networks unequal reach.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-08-09T04:29:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211034208
       
  • Collins, C. (2019). Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and
           Caregiving

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      Authors: Michelle J. Budig 
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T07:23:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211030970
       
  • Kelly, E. L., & Moen, P. (2020). Overload: How Good Jobs Went Bad and
           What We Can Do About It

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      Authors: Quan Mai
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T06:12:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211031976
       
  • Narrative Continuity/Rupture: Projected Professional Futures amid
           Pervasive Employment Precarity

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      Authors: Elena Ayala-Hurtado
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      As working conditions change worldwide, employment precarity is increasing, including for groups for whom such conditions are unexpected. This study investigates how members of one such group—educationally advantaged young adults—describe their professional futures in a context of unprecedented employment precarity where their expected trajectories are no longer easily achievable. Using 75 interviews with young university graduates in Madrid, Spain, I find that most young graduates drew on a long-standing cultural narrative, which I call the “achievement narrative,” to imagine future stable employment. Simultaneously, most denounced this narrative as fraudulent. To explain this finding, I draw on the concept of hysteresis: the mismatch between beliefs that are dependent on the past conditions that produced them and the available opportunities in the present. I argue that hysteresis can extend into future projections; projected futures can be guided by beliefs based on past conditions more than by lived experiences in the present. Further, I argue that the achievement narrative itself reinforces hysteresis in future projections due to its resonance and institutional support. The paper offers new insights into projected futures and employment precarity by analyzing the future projections of a privileged cohort facing unexpected precarity, further develops the concept of hysteresis, and extends the study of cultural narratives.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T05:03:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211028277
       
  • Blackett, A. (2019). Everyday Transgressions: Domestic Workers’
           Transnational Challenge to International Labor Law

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      Authors: Hina B. Shah
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T07:45:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211029338
       
  • Precarious Employment and Well-Being During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Mini
           Conference and Special Issue

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      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-05-09T04:13:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211016974
       
 
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