Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Recherches & √©ducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Similar Journals
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Work and Occupations
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.651
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 62  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0730-8884 - ISSN (Online) 1552-8464
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Time Work in the Office and Shop: Workers’ Strategic Adaptations to
           the 4-Day Week

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      Authors: Phyllis Moen, Youngmin Chu
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      Increasingly popular post-COVID-19 4-day workweek trials challenge deeply embedded 5-day, 40-hour temporal policies and practices, fostering time-work strategies by employees in the face of reduced working hours. This qualitative study in a small business manufacturing customized products finds similar adaptive responses among both office and shop workers. We detect four prevailing time-work strategies: (1) (re) organizing tasks, (2) shifting (work) time, (3) scheduling communication, and a more deliberate form of time shifting, (4) blocking out (work and nonwork) time. These strategies appear to reflect an increasing sense of employee agency. We discuss possible issues around sustainability.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T05:52:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231203317
       
  • Democratizing the Economy or Introducing Economic Risk' Gig Work
           During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Daniel Auguste, Stephen Roll, Mathieu Despard
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      Though the growth of the gig economy has coincided with increased economic precarity in the new economy, we know less about the extent to which gig work (compared with other self-employment arrangements and non-gig work) may fuel economic insecurity among American households. We fill this gap in the literature by drawing on a sample of 4,756 workers from a unique national survey capturing economic hardships among non-standard workers like app- and platform-based gig and other self-employed workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results from generalized boosted regression modeling, utilizing machine learning to account for potential endogeneity, demonstrated that gig workers experienced significantly greater economic hardship than non-gig and other self-employed workers during the pandemic. For example, gig workers were more likely to experience food insecurity, miss bill payments, and suffer income loss compared with non-gig and other self-employed workers during the pandemic. While household liquid assets endowment prior to the pandemic reduced the effect of gig work on experiencing economic hardships, having dependent children in the household increased this effect. Thus, contrary to democratizing entrepreneurship opportunities, these findings suggest that the expansion of the gig economy may exacerbate labor market inequality, where wealth-endowed families are protected against adverse economic consequences of the gig economy. We discuss the implications of these findings for inequality-reducing labor market policies, including policies that account for the interconnectedness of family and the labor market.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-09-20T11:26:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231202032
       
  • Running From the Union Label' Labor and Business Political
           Mobilization in the Golden Age

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      Authors: Marc Dixon
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      This paper assesses labor's political effectiveness in the industrial Midwest at the peak of union strength during the 1950s—a time and place that should have been ripe for labor mobilization. Comparing labor and business mobilization and outcomes across key labor elections, I find that politicians and business groups were often successful in persuading industrial communities to vote against labor's interests while unions struggled to shed outsider and greedy special interest labels. To make sense of labor's mixed performance, I draw on social movement theory and the inter-related nature of union mobilization, countermovement organization, and the framing of labor issues. Labor struggled when facing a well-organized business countermovement, which effectively weaponized the union label against labor. Union success hinged in part on their ability to downplay union identity and to have other more respected community partners do much of the public-facing work, but only when facing a fractured opposition. The findings point to important vulnerabilities unions faced at their peak and suggest a more nuanced view of postwar labor relations. They also extend social movement research on framing by identifying the important role of countermovements and coalitions in shaping what movements can convey and what will resonate.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-09-16T10:12:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231202527
       
  • Introduction: Laboring in the Extractive University

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      Authors: Michael Burawoy, Margaret Eby, Thomas Gepts, Justin Germain, Natalie Pasquinelli, Elizabeth Torres Carpio
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      The twin pressures of dwindling state funding and widening student access has created a crisis of higher education that reverberates into the hidden abode of teaching and learning. In this special issue we reconnect pedagogy to its context of determination (and nondetermination) by bringing theories of the labor process to bear on the dilemmas and challenges faced by teaching assistants (TAs). Our project of auto-ethnography was suspended between two crises—COVID-19 and an unprecedented university-wide strike by graduate students. Elizabeth Torres Carpio advances the idea of the university's “selective recognition” that expands the work of street-level educators -TAs facing increasing numbers of students from economically poor and culturally diverse backgrounds. Natalie Pasquinelli considers the way faculty manage TAs as apprentices through hegemonic “status control.” Justin Germain focuses on the autonomy that allows TAs to turn teaching into “innovation games,” offering the players a sense of accomplishment. Thomas Gepts examines the “arrhythmic” time bind in which graduate students are caught between commitments to future-oriented research and present-oriented teaching. Margaret Eby shows how the “power of silence” allows TAs to conceal their anxiety and defend their autonomy. The university extracts the labor of TAs by giving them “constrained autonomy” to absorb, divert, and conceal the pressures descending from a top-heavy administrative structure. We extend the idea of “constrained autonomy” to other occupations.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-06-15T07:19:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231177882
       
  • Street-Level Educators: The Selective Recognition of Students and
           Invisible TA Labor

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      Authors: Elizabeth Torres Carpio
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on my experience as a teaching assistant (TA), I expand on Michael Lipsky's concept of the street-level bureaucrat by focusing on how an agency's construction of the client shapes the work of the bureaucrat. I call this selective recognition. The university classifies students into three types: the archetypal student for whom the university is designed, the partially recognized student who receives accommodations, and the unrecognized student with responsibilities that make learning difficult. The result is an adaptation of the TA's three dimensions of the labor process: teaching, administration, and care work. The labor contract stipulates the first and a modicum of the second but not the third. Changing student demographics have increased all dimensions of TA labor, especially administrative tasks and the amount of invisible care work performed. The extractive university relies on this invisible and often overextended labor to dampen and conceal the reality of its own failing mission.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-06-15T07:18:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231178231
       
  • Professor-in-Training: Status Control of the Teaching Assistant

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      Authors: Natalie Pasquinelli
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      I examine the role of apprenticeship status in controlling the labor of unionized graduate student teaching assistants (TAs). In her book Coerced, Erin Hatton identifies status as a basis of labor coercion—particularly in nontraditional labor regimes—in which managers control workers’ access to status-based rights, rewards, and punishments. I expand Hatton's concept of status coercion to status control and distinguish between two types: despotic, in which status coercion prevails, and hegemonic, in which status consent prevails. I argue that status control of TAs is hegemonic, relying on their investment in a system of apprenticeship in which course instructors are a source of professional advancement, opportunity, and support outside of the TA job. I draw on autoethnographic fieldwork to analyze one expression of TA control, participatory management. In this model, the faculty instructor invites TAs to collaborate on course design and encourages routine discussion of teaching strategies, in which hidden labor is made regulable through “confession”. Identification with the instructor limits TA autonomy by disrupting alliances between TAs, and between TAs and students. I conclude by sketching variations in TA management and by discussing status control as a broader mechanism of extraction in the contemporary university.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-06-15T07:17:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231178551
       
  • Enchanting Pedagogy: Creating Labor Games in the Extractive University

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      Authors: Justin Germain
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      Through ethnographic fieldwork as a Teaching Assistant (TA) at the University of California, Berkeley, I advance that pedagogical labor can be conceptualized as two labor games. In the didactic game, I utilize hierarchical lecturing to simplify complex concepts in the pursuit of student comprehension of material, while the experiential game centers nonhierarchical dialogue and students’ personal experiences to promote consciousness-raising. TAs’ ability to create and switch between games underpins my broader theorization of labor games as one of two types: institutional games – shared among workers in similar structural circumstances and persistent across worker entry and exit – and innovation games – created by individual workers with relative autonomy amidst an absence of worker co-presence. Just as institutional games provide a template for obscuring and securing the extraction of surplus value under monopoly capitalism, innovation games do the same for the increasingly flexible, autonomous capitalism of the twenty-first century.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-06-15T07:16:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231178324
       
  • The TA Time Bind: The Arrhythmic Dilemmas of Research and Teaching

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      Authors: Thomas Gepts
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      The labor of teaching assistants (TAs), as full-time students and part-time teachers, faces a “time bind.” Although research and teaching together compose graduate school for TAs, through this ethnography of TAing I argue these domains tend toward arrhythmia. Research and teaching engage distinct work rhythms that persistently interrupt one another, rendering individualized, improvisational coordination an organizing principle of TAing. Coordination is complicated by the commitment to research and teaching as meaningful projects. The autonomy to develop a projection of good teaching “responsibilizes” TAs, channeling surplus effort to teaching. I highlight preparatory work like lesson planning as a crucial site through which to understand the competing coordinative and projective pressures of TAing. I close by outlining some implications of arrhythmia for contemporary US higher education and for the sociology of labor.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-06-15T07:02:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231178186
       
  • The Power of Silence: Anxiety and Autonomy in TA Labor

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      Authors: Margaret Eby
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      When I took on increasing responsibilities within my university's pedagogical training programs during the pandemic, I expected an increase in collaboration and pedagogical discussion because of the difficult teaching circumstances. Instead, I came to see a silence that kept teaching assistants (TAs) from talking about their labor process either with their instructors or with fellow TAs. In this paper, I theorize this silence both as a defense against anxiety and as protecting autonomy. I draw on my own experiences as a TA, my work as a pedagogy instructor in my department and for the university, and an ethnography of working TAs to investigate how TAs leverage their silence to strategically manage multiple competing interests. Finally, I suggest that TAs first internalize these dual purposes of silence to make sense of their teaching labor and later carry it with them as they go from trainee to professional academic.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-06-15T07:00:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231178052
       
  • How White Workers Navigate Racial Difference in the Workplace:
           Social-Emotional Processes and the Role of Workplace Racial Composition

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      Authors: Jennifer L. Nelson, Tiffany D. Johnson
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      Research on racialized emotions and racialized organizations has begun to inform how we understand social interactions in the workplace and their implications for racial inequality. However, most research to date focuses on the experiences and coping strategies of racial minority workers, especially when confronted with instances of racial prejudice and discrimination. We extend research on racialized emotions in the workplace by mapping the stages of belonging/unbelonging white workers go through when they encounter instances of racial discomfort or perceived prejudice in the workplace. This is an important contribution to the study of race and work because existing research suggests the deleterious effects for people of color when white people experience negative emotions such as threat, fear, and anxiety in interracial encounters. Drawing on interview data with 56 white teachers in a metropolitan area in the U.S. Southeast, we document a process of racialized belonging. This is a process whereby white workers experienced varying degrees of surprise, confusion, frustration, and fear resulting from interracial—and some intraracial—experiences with coworkers as well as students. We note how the process is informed by racialized imprinting prior to workplace entry and followed by racialized emotions and racialized coping. Racial composition of the workplace also played a role, though the process looked similar across contexts. We argue that by accounting for white workers’ prior life experiences as well as organizations’ involvement in accommodating their emotional expectations, the way white workers behave when race becomes salient to them can be better understood and addressed.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T06:25:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231176833
       
  • Women Managers and the Gender Wage Gap: Workgroup Gender Composition
           Matters

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      Authors: Sylvia Fuller, Young-Mi Kim
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      Women's representation in managerial positions is a common metric for gender equity in organizations. Whether women managers improve gender equity among their subordinates is, however, less clear. Drawing on rich longitudinal personnel data from a large Korean food company, we provide new insight into this question by focusing attention on key micro-contexts for interaction and relational politics within organizations: workgroups. Building on social-psychological theories about in-group preference and value threats, we theorize that workgroup gender composition conditions the relationship between supervisor gender and gender earnings differentials. Results from regression models with workgroup fixed effects confirm this insight. Women supervisors are associated with smaller gender earnings gaps in workgroups when they are male-dominated. This relationship is stronger for less-advantaged workers, with supervisor gender and workgroup gender composition mattering more for “sticky floors” than “glass ceilings.”
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-06-08T06:24:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231178314
       
  • The Life Course of Unemployment: The Timing and Relative Degree of Risk

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      Authors: Sarah Damaske, Adrianne Frech, Hilary Wething
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to identify group-based trajectories of unemployment risk as workers age in the United States. Our novel methodological approach reveals 73% of full-time workers spend much of their 20, 30, and 40 s with a relatively low risk of unemployment. The remaining sizable minority varies in the timing and relative degree of their unemployment risk. Eighteen percent experience early career unemployment risk into their early thirties, well after the transition to adulthood. Chronic unemployment characterizes the labor market experiences of the remaining 9%. When expanding the sample to all workers, we find two key differences: the overall prevalence of unemployment is greater each year for all groups and the distribution of respondents across groups differs, with fewer workers experiencing Lower unemployment and more workers experiencing Early Career or Higher unemployment. Unemployment risk is shaped by experiences of long-term unemployment in young adulthood and early labor market constraints. Moreover, while men and women appear equally at risk of Early career unemployment, men are particularly at risk of Higher unemployment. Black workers were significantly more likely to be at risk of Higher unemployment, but only slightly more likely to be at risk of Early career unemployment. Since Early career unemployment risk gives way to steadier work for most, this suggests that some men and some Black workers face disproportionately high levels of employment precarity. Our findings point to the importance of a life course approach for understanding the relationship between unemployment and labor market precarity.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-06-06T07:37:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231162949
       
  • Book Review: The Opportunity Trap: High-Skilled Workers, Indian Families,
           and the Failures of the Dependent Visa Program by Banerjee, P.

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      Authors: Debaleena Ghosh
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-05-15T05:51:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231176079
       
  • Book Review: Strategizing Against Sweatshops: The Global Economy, Student
           Activism, and Worker Empowerment by M. S. Williams

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      Authors: Jonathan S. Coley
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-05-11T05:31:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231176081
       
  • She Still Works Hard for the Money: Composers, Precarious Work, and the
           Gender Pay Gap

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      Authors: Timothy J. Dowd, Ju Hyun Park
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      Music composers exemplify precarious work: they historically have been freelancers and have relied on multiple jobs to subsidize their creative work. We focus here on the gender pay gap amidst such precariousness—heeding their income earned solely from composition and from the totality of jobs recently held. There is no gender pay gap when it comes to income earned from composition but there is a significant gap for income earned from all jobs, showing that women composers face relative disadvantage in subsidizing their creative work. We also find that men and women composers experience different and racialized returns to their capitals and career positioning when navigating precarious work. These findings have lessons for multiple literatures—including those on the new sociology of work and on creative careers.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-04-03T07:14:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231165079
       
  • Who is Replaced by Robots' Robotization and the Risk of Unemployment for
           Different Types of Workers

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      Authors: Andreas Damelang, Michael Otto
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      We study the effects of robotization on unemployment risk for different types of workers. We examine the extent to which robotization increases inequality at the skill level and at the occupational level using two theoretical frameworks: skill-biased technological change and task-biased technological change. Empirically, we combine worker-level data with information on actual investments in industrial robots. Zooming in on the German manufacturing industry, our multivariate results show that robotization affects different types of workers differently. We do not observe an increase in unemployment risk for low- and medium-skilled, but we find a considerably lower unemployment risk among high-skilled workers. Moreover, the unemployment risk is significantly higher in occupations with highly substitutable tasks, but only in industries that invest largely in robots.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-03-15T08:08:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231162953
       
  • Book Review: Managing Medical Authority by Daniel Menchik

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      Authors: Kelly Underman
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-03-10T06:02:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231162931
       
  • Book Review: Everyday Dirty Work: Invisibility, Communication, and
           Immigrant Labor by Alvarez, W.

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      Authors: Anna Milena Galazka
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T06:32:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884231151627
       
  • The Gender Wage Gap, Between-Firm Inequality, and Devaluation: Testing a
           New Hypothesis in the Service Sector

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      Authors: Carmen Brick, Daniel Schneider, Kristen Harknett
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      Unequal sorting of men and women into higher and lower-wage firms contributes significantly to the gender wage gap according to recent analysis of national labor markets. We confirm the importance of this between-firm gender segregation in wages and examine a second outcome of hours using unique employer–employee data from the service sector. We then examine what explains the relationship between firm gender composition and wages. In contrast to prevailing economic explanations that trace between-firm differences in wages to differences in firm surplus, we find evidence consistent with devaluation and potentially a gender-specific use of “low road” employment strategies.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2023-01-03T11:08:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884221141072
       
 
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