Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Work and Occupations
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.651
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 57  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0730-8884 - ISSN (Online) 1552-8464
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Prime Suspect: Mechanisms of Labor Control at Amazon's Warehouses

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      Authors: Steven P. Vallas, Hannah Johnston, Yana Mommadova
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      What mechanisms has Amazon deployed in its effort to control the labor of its warehouse employees' This question holds both practical and theoretical interest, given Amazon's prominent position in the economy and the wider importance of the logistics sector for consumer capitalism. This paper, part of a broader mixed-methods study of Amazon's workplace regime, uses a small national sample of interviews with Amazon warehouse workers (N =  46) to identify the mechanisms of labor control the company invokes. In keeping with accounts propounded by activists and journalists, we find evidence of highly coercive labor controls, chiefly in the form of what we call techno-economic despotism (which applies algorithmic technology to a precariously employed workforce). Yet many workers also experience forms of labor control that rely not on coercion but on the generation of consent. We identify three such mechanisms of hegemonic labor control - normative, relational, and governmental – that Amazon uses to foster workers’ consent. The efficacy of Amazon's workplace regime stems largely from its ability to deploy a multiplicity of labor controls that resonate with different groups holding distinct positions in the labor process. Given shifts in the social and economic conditions that bear on the company's regime, cracks have begun to appear in Amazon's armor, potentially reducing the traction its labor control mechanisms have gained with segments of its employees.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T04:23:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884221106922
       
  • Book Review: Youth, Work and the Post-Fordist Self by David Farrugia

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      Authors: Stephanie Taylor
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T05:52:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884221103462
       
  • The Organization of Networking and Gender Inequality in the New Economy:
           Evidence from the Tech Industry

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      Authors: Ethel L. Mickey
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      In the new economy, with shrinking organizational supports and increased precarity for professional workers, networking has intensified as an entrepreneurial career management strategy. Networking is embedded in the logic of new work organizations, but less attention has been paid to its impact on gender inequality. Through fifty interviews with workers from one tech company and nine months of observations, I ask: (1) In the new economy, with intense networking demands, how does gender structure the networking strategies of workers' And (2) How does the organization of networking contribute to gender inequality' I find that individuals draw on masculinity and femininity as they network in ways that reproduce gender status hierarchies. The structure and culture of networking disproportionately limit the careers of women compared to men by shaping their (1) networking approaches; (2) attitudes about networking; and (3) resources gained from networking. Men network by strategically socializing, confidently building informal relationships with other men through masculine activities and leveraging these relationships for key resources. Women cannot similarly access informal relationships, and so they engage in strategic networking, attending formal networking events that are less effective in providing career resources. Women embodying an elite, white femininity locate personal support in the company-sponsored women's network. However, this group reinforces organizational boundaries by gender and race. This article advances sociological literature on inequality in the new economy, drawing on gender theory to demonstrate how in elite, male-dominated industries like technology, networking contributes to the maintenance of gender inequalities.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T06:47:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884221102134
       
  • Gender and Racial Discrimination in Hiring Before and During the COVID-19
           Pandemic: Evidence from a Field Experiment of Accountants, 2018–2020*

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      Authors: Koji Chavez, Katherine Weisshaar, Tania Cabello-Hutt
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we ask whether macro-level changes during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic relate to changes in the levels of discrimination against women and Black job-seekers at the point of hire. We develop three main hypotheses: that discrimination against women and Black job-seekers increases due to a reduction in labor demand; that discrimination against women decreases due to the reduced supply of women employees and applicants; and that discrimination against Black job-seekers decreases due to increased attention toward racial inequities associated with the Black Lives Matter protests during the summer of 2020. We test these hypotheses using a correspondence audit study collected over two periods, before and during the early COVID-19 pandemic, for one professional occupation: accountants. We find that White women experience a positive change in callbacks during the pandemic, being preferred over White men, and this change is concentrated in geographic areas that experienced relatively larger decreases in women's labor supply. Black women experience discrimination pre-pandemic but receive similar callbacks to White men during the pandemic. In contrast to both White and Black women, discrimination against Black men is persistent before and during the pandemic. Our findings are consistent with the prediction of gender-specific changes in labor supply being associated with gender-specific changes in hiring discrimination during the COVID-19 pandemic. More broadly, our study shows how hiring decision-making is related to macro-level labor market processes.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T08:47:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884221094539
       
  • Job Satisfaction and Women's Timing of Return to Work after Childbirth in
           the UK

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      Authors: Julia M. Gumy, Anke C. Plagnol, Agnieszka Piasna
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines to what extent multiple facets of pre-childbirth job satisfaction affect women's labor market outcomes after first childbirth in the UK. Using the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) we find that higher levels of overall job satisfaction increase the probability of returning to work sooner, and to the same job, during the sample period. Satisfaction with job security, work hours and the work content - but not with pay – are important determinants of mothers’ employment choices. We discuss the role of job satisfaction on women's ability to combine work and family responsibilities, and related aspects of job quality.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T04:46:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884221087988
       
  • Scarred by Your Employer' The Effect of Employers’ Strategies on the
           Career Outcomes of Non-Standard Employment

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      Authors: Lucille Mattijssen, Dimitris Pavlopoulos, Wendy Smits
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we investigate how the strategies employers have for using non-standard employment – screening, workforce adaptability or cost reduction – affect the career outcomes of workers. To investigate this, we use multichannel sequence analysis to produce a typology of employment and income trajectories of workers with non-standard contracts in the Netherlands. The results show that workers starting employment in firms that use non-standard employment as a screening device are most likely to have careers with high levels of employment security. Strong scarring effects on the career are only found for workers who start employment in firms with cost reduction strategies.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T07:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884221076383
       
  • Book Review: Bound by Creativity: How Contemporary Art is Created and
           Judged by H. Wohl

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      Authors: Rachel Skaggs
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T03:10:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884221087463
       
  • LGBTQ@NASA and Beyond: Work Structure and Workplace Inequality among LGBTQ
           STEM Professionals

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      Authors: Erin A. Cech, Tom Waidzunas
      First page: 187
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars are just beginning to understand how organizational processes shape LGBTQ workplace inequality. Using multimethod data from STEM professionals, this article examines how one such factor—the way work tasks are structured within organizations—may impact LGBTQ workers’ experiences of marginalization and devaluation. Through interviews with STEM professionals at two NASA space flight centers with different work structures, we find that LGBTQ professionals at the NASA center where work is organized in dynamic project-based teams experienced less inclusive and respectful interactions with colleagues, in part because they had to rapidly establish credibility and develop new status management strategies each time they were shuffled into new teams. The stability of the traditional unit-based structure at the other NASA center, by contrast, allowed LGBTQ professionals time to navigate status management and build trust. This stability also facilitated LGBTQ community building. Analysis of survey data of over 14,000 US STEM professionals (594 who identify as LGBTQ) corroborates this work structure pattern: LGBTQ professionals across STEM disciplines and employment sectors working in dynamic project-based teams were more likely to report interpersonal marginalization and devaluation than LGBTQ professionals who worked in traditional unit-based structures. These findings highlight work structure as an important mechanism of LGBTQ inequality that demands further investigation.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T06:08:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884221080938
       
  • When Do Work-Family Policies Work' Unpacking the Effects of Stigma and
           Financial Costs for Men and Women

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      Authors: Sarah Thébaud, David S. Pedulla
      First page: 229
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      Work-family policies—such as parental leave and flextime—can help to facilitate gender equality in workplaces and in families. But policy use is typically low, varies significantly from one workplace to another, and is often more prevalent among women than men. Extant research suggests that flexibility stigma—workplace norms that penalize workers for utilizing policies that facilitate non-work demands—as well as the financial costs associated with policy use, contribute to this pattern. However, previous studies have been largely correlational in nature, and have had difficulty assessing how these factors may interact with one another to shape gendered patterns of policy use. In this study, we offer novel causal traction on this set of issues. Using an original, population-based survey experiment, we examine how the salience of flexibility stigma and financial costs affect men's and women's intentions to use work-family policies. We find that these factors exert a large direct effect on men's and women's intentions to use work-family policies. Moreover, the gender gap in parental leave use intentions is large in workplace contexts with high flexibility stigma and high financial costs, but this gap narrows significantly under more favorable conditions. Findings point to the importance of organizational contexts and policy design in shaping work-family policy use and, in turn, gender inequality.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T04:47:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211069914
       
  • Book Review: Labor in the Time of Trump by Kerrissey, Jasmine, Eve
           Weinbaum, Clare Hammonds, Tom Juravich, and Dan Clawson

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      Authors: Rebecca Kolins Givan
      First page: 264
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T02:19:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884221080924
       
  • Precarious Employment and Well-Being During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Mini
           Conference and Special Issue

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      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-05-09T04:13:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211016974
       
  • Working More, Less or the Same During COVID-19' A Mixed Method,
           Intersectional Analysis of Remote Workers

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      Authors: Wen Fan, Phyllis Moen
      First page: 143
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed where paid work is done. Workers able to do so have been required to work remotely. We draw on survey data collected in October 2020 from a nationally representative sample of 3,017 remote workers, as well as qualitative survey data collected from 231 remote workers, to examine perceived changes in work hours from before to during the pandemic. Results indicate women are at greater risk of change (either a major decrease or a major increase)—rather than stability—in work hours. Gender also intersects with caregiving, race/ethnicity, prior remote work experiences, and socioeconomic status to shape changes in hours. Women and men in the sandwich generation, as well as women (but not men) with pre-school children, are the most likely to report a decrease in work hours, whereas women with older children at home or caring for adults (but not both) are the most likely to have an increase in hours. Remote working Black women and women moving into remote work are more likely to experience a major increase in hours worked, even as Hispanic women and Black men are the most likely to report somewhat of a reduction in work hours. Gender also intersects with SES, such that women without a college degree are more likely to have a decrease in work hours, while women with an advanced degree and women managers report a considerable increase in work hours. Qualitative data further illuminate why work hours change or remain stable for remote workers during COVID-19.
      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T01:03:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211047208
       
  • Book Reviews

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      Authors: Gabriella Alberti
      First page: 266
      Abstract: Work and Occupations, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Work and Occupations
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T03:34:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07308884211040784
       
 
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