Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Palliative & Supportive Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.611
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1478-9515 - ISSN (Online) 1478-9523
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • PAX volume 20 issue 2 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2022-05-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951522000529
       
  • Twenty years of Palliative and Supportive Care

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      Authors: Breitbart; William
      Pages: 151 - 152
      PubDate: 2022-05-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951522000372
       
  • Correlations among spiritual care competence, spiritual care perceptions
           and spiritual health of Chinese nurses: A cross-sectional correlational
           study

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      Authors: Wang; Zhangyi, Zhao, Haomei, Zhang, Siai, Wang, Yue, Zhang, Yajun, Wang, Zhao, Li, Xuechun, Xiao, Luwei, Zhu, Yue, Han, Guanghong, Yan, Yishan, Wang, Jing, Zhang, Yujing, Pang, Xiaoli
      Pages: 243 - 254
      Abstract: BackgroundThe significance of spiritual care competence among nurses has been emphasized across countries and cultures in many studies. However, there were few studies on correlations among spiritual care competence, spiritual care perceptions, and spiritual health of nurses in China.ObjectiveTo investigate spiritual care competence, spiritual care perceptions, and spiritual health, and examine the correlations among spiritual care competence, spiritual care perceptions and spiritual health, and the mediating role of spiritual health between other two variables of Chinese nurses.MethodsA cross-sectional and correlational design was implemented, and the STROBE Checklist was used to report the study. A convenience sample of 2,181 nurses were selected from 17 hospitals in 3 provinces, China. Participants provided data on sociodemographic by completing the Chinese Version of the Spiritual Care Competence Scale, the Chinese Version of the Spiritual Care-Giving Scale, and the Spiritual Health Scale Short Form. Descriptive statistics, univariate, multiple linear regression, and Pearson correlation analysis were used to analyze data.ResultsThe total scores of spiritual care competence, spiritual care perceptions, and spiritual health were 58.25 ± 16.21, 144.49 ± 16.87, and 84.88 ± 10.57, respectively, which both were moderate. Spiritual care competence was positively correlated with spiritual care perceptions (r = 0.653, p < 0.01) and spiritual health (r = 0.587, p < 0.01). And spiritual health played a mediating role between the other two variables (accounting for 35.6%).Significance of resultsThe spiritual care competence, spiritual care perceptions, and spiritual health of Chinese nurses need to be improved. It is recommended that nursing managers should pay attention to spiritual care education of nurses, and improve spiritual care perceptions and spiritual health in multiple ways, so as to improve their spiritual care competence and to maximize the satisfy spiritual care needs of patients in China.
      PubDate: 2022-01-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521001966
       
  • Fighting racism in research – CORRIGENDUM

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      Authors: Goldzweig; Gil, Applebaum, Allison, Borasio, Gian Domenico, Cho, Juhee, Chochinov, Harvey Max, Ishida, Mayumi, Loscalzo, Matthew, Breitbart, William
      Pages: 303 - 303
      PubDate: 2022-03-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951522000190
       
  • A decision tree prediction model for a short-term outcome of delirium in
           patients with advanced cancer receiving pharmacological interventions: A
           secondary analysis of a multicenter and prospective observational study
           (Phase-R)

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      Authors: Kurisu; Ken, Inada, Shuji, Maeda, Isseki, Ogawa, Asao, Iwase, Satoru, Akechi, Tatsuo, Morita, Tatsuya, Oyamada, Shunsuke, Yamaguchi, Takuhiro, Imai, Kengo, Nakahara, Rika, Kaneishi, Keisuke, Nakajima, Nobuhisa, Sumitani, Masahiko, Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro
      Pages: 153 - 158
      Abstract: ObjectiveThere is no widely used prognostic model for delirium in patients with advanced cancer. The present study aimed to develop a decision tree prediction model for a short-term outcome.MethodThis is a secondary analysis of a multicenter and prospective observational study conducted at 9 psycho-oncology consultation services and 14 inpatient palliative care units in Japan. We used records of patients with advanced cancer receiving pharmacological interventions with a baseline Delirium Rating Scale Revised-98 (DRS-R98) severity score of ≥10. A DRS-R98 severity score of
      PubDate: 2021-09-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521001565
       
  • Predictors and moderators of outcomes in mindfulness-based cognitive
           therapy intervention for early breast cancer patients

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      Authors: Tamura; Noriko, Park, Sunre, Sato, Yasunori, Sato, Yasuko, Takita, Yuka, Ninomiya, Akira, Sado, Mitsuhiro, Mimura, Masaru, Fujisawa, Daisuke
      Pages: 159 - 166
      Abstract: ObjectivesTo deliver mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) efficiently, the present study aimed (1) to identify predictors and moderators of patients who benefit from MBCT for psychological distress and (2) to explore the initial treatment reaction to identify the optimal number of sessions that produce a significant clinical effect.MethodsThis is the secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of MBCT for breast cancer patients (N = 74). We classified the participants into remitters vs. non-remitters, and responder vs. non-responders, according to the total score of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at the end of the intervention. We conducted multivariate analyses to explore for predictors of response and remission. We adopted generalized estimating equations to explore the optimal number of sessions.ResultsSociodemographic and clinical backgrounds did not have significant influence on the treatment outcomes of the MBCT. Better program adherence, which was represented as the participants’ better attendance to the MBCT program, was a significant predictor of both remission and response [odds ratio (OR) = 1.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25–2.89, p = 0.003, and OR = 1.72, 95% CI 1.12–2.65, p = 0.013, respectively]. It was not until seventh session that the remission rate exceeded 50% and the response rate showed significance.Significance of resultsSociodemographic and clinical characteristics did not significantly influence the treatment outcomes, while homework minutes and class attendance had significant effects on treatment outcomes. This implies that MBCT is recommended to any cancer patient, if he/she is motivated to the program, regardless of their sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Patients are encouraged to attend a standard MBCT program (eight sessions) and do the assigned homework as intensely as possible. Further studies with larger sample and objective measurements are desired.
      PubDate: 2021-06-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S147895152100078X
       
  • Development and preliminary evaluation of EMPOWER for surrogate
           decision-makers of critically ill patients

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      Authors: Lichtenthal; Wendy G., Viola, Martin, Rogers, Madeline, Roberts, Kailey E., Lief, Lindsay, Cox, Christopher E., Brewin, Chris R., Xu, Jiehui Cici, Maciejewski, Paul K., Pan, Cynthia X., Coats, Taylor, Ouyang, Daniel J., Rabin, Shayna, Vaughan, Susan C., Breitbart, William, Marenberg, Marjorie E., Prigerson, Holly G.
      Pages: 167 - 177
      Abstract: ObjectiveThe objectives of this study were to develop and refine EMPOWER (Enhancing and Mobilizing the POtential for Wellness and Resilience), a brief manualized cognitive-behavioral, acceptance-based intervention for surrogate decision-makers of critically ill patients and to evaluate its preliminary feasibility, acceptability, and promise in improving surrogates’ mental health and patient outcomes.MethodPart 1 involved obtaining qualitative stakeholder feedback from 5 bereaved surrogates and 10 critical care and mental health clinicians. Stakeholders were provided with the manual and prompted for feedback on its content, format, and language. Feedback was organized and incorporated into the manual, which was then re-circulated until consensus. In Part 2, surrogates of critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) reporting moderate anxiety or close attachment were enrolled in an open trial of EMPOWER. Surrogates completed six, 15–20 min modules, totaling 1.5–2 h. Surrogates were administered measures of peritraumatic distress, experiential avoidance, prolonged grief, distress tolerance, anxiety, and depression at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and at 1-month and 3-month follow-up assessments.ResultsPart 1 resulted in changes to the EMPOWER manual, including reducing jargon, improving navigability, making EMPOWER applicable for a range of illness scenarios, rearranging the modules, and adding further instructions and psychoeducation. Part 2 findings suggested that EMPOWER is feasible, with 100% of participants completing all modules. The acceptability of EMPOWER appeared strong, with high ratings of effectiveness and helpfulness (M = 8/10). Results showed immediate post-intervention improvements in anxiety (d = −0.41), peritraumatic distress (d = −0.24), and experiential avoidance (d = −0.23). At the 3-month follow-up assessments, surrogates exhibited improvements in prolonged grief symptoms (d = −0.94), depression (d = −0.23), anxiety (d = −0.29), and experiential avoidance (d = −0.30).Significance of resultsPreliminary data suggest that EMPOWER is feasible, acceptable, and associated with notable improvements in psychological symptoms among surrogates. Future research should examine EMPOWER with a larger sample in a randomized controlled trial.
      PubDate: 2021-07-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000626
       
  • Description of a training protocol to improve research reproducibility for
           dignity therapy: an interview-based intervention

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      Authors: Schoppee; Tasha M., Scarton, Lisa, Bluck, Susan, Yao, Yingwei, Keenan, Gail, Handzo, George, Chochinov, Harvey M., Fitchett, George, Emanuel, Linda L., Wilkie, Diana J.
      Pages: 178 - 188
      Abstract: BackgroundDignity Therapy (DT) has been implemented over the past 20 years, but a detailed training protocol is not available to facilitate consistency of its implementation. Consistent training positively impacts intervention reproducibility.ObjectiveThe objective of this article is to describe a detailed method for DT therapist training.MethodChochinov's DT training seminars included preparatory reading of the DT textbook, in-person training, and practice interview sessions. Building on this training plan, we added feedback on practice and actual interview sessions, a tracking form to guide the process, a written training manual with an annotated model DT transcript, and quarterly support sessions. Using this training method, 18 DT therapists were trained across 6 sites.ResultsThe DT experts’ verbal and written feedback on the practice and actual sessions encouraged the trainees to provide additional attention to eight components: (1) initial framing (i.e., clarifying and organizing of the patient's own goals for creating the legacy document), (2) verifying the patient's understanding of DT, (3) gathering the patient's biographical information, (4) using probing questions, (5) exploring the patient's story thread, (6) refocusing toward the legacy document creation, (7) inviting the patient's expression of meaningful messages, and (8) general DT processes. Evident from the ongoing individual trainee mentoring was achievement and maintenance of adherence to the DT protocol.DiscussionThe DT training protocol is a process to enable consistency in the training process, across waves of trainees, toward the goal of maintaining DT implementation consistency. This training protocol will enable future DT researchers and clinicians to consistently train therapists across various disciplines and locales. Furthermore, we anticipate that this training protocol could be generalizable as a roadmap for implementers of other life review and palliative care interview-based interventions.
      PubDate: 2021-05-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000614
       
  • A Portuguese trial using dignity therapy for adults who have a
           life-threatening disease: Qualitative analysis of generativity documents

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      Authors: Julião; Miguel, Sobral, Maria Ana, Johnston, Bridget, Lemos, Ana Raquel, Almeida, Sara, Antunes, Bárbara, Dönmez, Çiğdem Fulya, Chochinov, Harvey Max
      Pages: 189 - 195
      Abstract: ObjectivesDignity therapy (DT) is a brief, individualized intervention, which provides terminally ill patients with an opportunity to convey memories, essential disclosures, and prepare a final generativity document. DT addresses psychosocial and existential issues, enhancing a sense of meaning and purpose. Several studies have considered the legacy topics most frequently discussed by patients near the end of life. To date, no Portuguese study has done that analysis.MethodWe conducted a qualitative analysis of 17 generativity documents derived from a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Inductive content analysis was used to identify emerging themes.ResultsFrom the 39 RCT participants receiving DT, 17 gave consent for their generativity document to undergo qualitative analysis. Nine patients were female; mean age of 65 years, with a range from 46 to 79 years. Seven themes emerged: “Significant people and things”; “Remarkable moments”; “Acknowledgments”; “Reflection on the course of life”; “Personal values”; “Messages left to others”; and “Requests and last wishes”.Significance of resultsGenerativity document analysis provides useful information for patients nearing death, including their remarkable life moments and memories, core values, concerns, and wishes for their loved ones. Being conscious of these dominant themes may allow health providers to support humanized and personalized care to vulnerable patients and their families, enhancing how professionals perceive and respond to personhood within the clinical setting.
      PubDate: 2021-06-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000754
       
  • Dignity-conserving palliative care in a diverse population: A qualitative
           study of physicians’ perspective

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      Authors: de Boer; A.F., de Voogd, X., Meershoek, A., Suurmond, J.L.
      Pages: 196 - 202
      Abstract: BackgroundPreserving personal dignity is an important aim of palliative care. Little is known about how physicians perceive and preserve dignity of patients from non-western migration backgrounds. Insight in this is important given the increased demand for culturally sensitive palliative care.AimTo gain insight in how Dutch physicians perceive and preserve dignity in the last phase of life for patients from non-western migration backgrounds.DesignQualitative thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews.ParticipantsFifteen physicians experienced in palliative care.ResultsPhysicians experienced dilemmas in preserving dignity of non-western patients in three situations: (a) relief of suffering in the terminal phase, (b) termination of interventions and treatment, and (c) disclosure of diagnosis. Physicians wanted to grant the needs of patients in the last phase of their lives, which was central to physicians’ view on dignity, but dilemmas arose when this conflicted with physicians’ other personal and professional values. To make the dilemmas manageable, physicians assessed whether needs of patients were authentic, but due to linguistic, cultural, and communication barriers, this was difficult with non-western patients. To find a way out of the dilemmas, physicians had three strategies: accept and go along with patient's wishes, convince or overrule the patient or family, or seek solutions that were acceptable for all.ConclusionsPhysicians encounter dilemmas providing palliative care for people from non-western backgrounds. Future physicians can be trained in connective strategies and seeking middle grounds to optimally preserve patients’ dignity while being in concordance with their personal and professional values.
      PubDate: 2021-05-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S147895152100050X
       
  • Quality of life among relatives of patients with amyotrophic lateral
           sclerosis: A prospective and longitudinal study

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      Authors: Larsson; Birgitta Jakobsson, Ozanne, Anneli, Nordin, Karin, Nygren, Ingela
      Pages: 203 - 211
      Abstract: ObjectiveRelatives are often central in caring for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), involving considerable physical, emotional, and social challenges. The aim of this study was to describe individual quality of life (iQoL) among relatives of patients with ALS, from diagnosis through disease progression.MethodA total of 31 relatives were included. Data collection was performed at five time points: 1–3 months after their relatives had been diagnosed with ALS and every 6 months for 2 years. Quality of life was determined using the Schedule of Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life — Direct Weighting (SEIQoL-DW), emotional distress with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the illness severity of the patients was determined with the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALS FRS-R).ResultsThe SEIQoL-DW involves participants nominating the important life areas. The most nominated areas were family, friends, health, and leisure. Although most relatives had overall good and stable iQoL, several had scores indicating poor iQoL on some occasions during the disease trajectory. The relatives’ iQoL correlated with emotional well-being and the patient's physical function at different time points.Significant of resultSocial relations, emotional well-being, and rapid decline in the patient's physical function influence the relatives’ iQoL. Measuring both emotional well-being and iQoL, with a focus on the relatives’ own descriptions of perceived iQoL and those factors contributing to their iQoL during the disease trajectory may improve the possibility of identifying and supporting those relatives with poor iQoL.
      PubDate: 2021-06-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000778
       
  • The challenges of ethical deliberation in palliative care settings: A
           descriptive study

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      Authors: Dumont; Serge, Turcotte, Véronique, Aubin, Michèle, Casimiro, Lynn, Lavoie, Mireille, Picard, Louise
      Pages: 212 - 220
      Abstract: ObjectiveInadequate deliberation processes about ethical problems occurring in palliative care settings may negatively impact both patients and healthcare professionals. Better knowledge of the palliative care professionals’ practices regarding such processes could help identify specific education needs to improve the quality of palliative care in the context of complex ethical situations. Therefore, this descriptive study aimed to (1) examine ethical deliberation processes in interprofessional teams in five palliative care settings; (2) identify organizational factors that constrain such processes; and (3) based on this knowledge, identify priority education needs for future and current palliative care professionals.MethodThe study involved three data collection activities: (1) direct observation of simulated interprofessional ethical deliberations in various palliative care settings; (2) individual semi-structured interviews; and (3) deliberative dialogues.ResultsThirty-six healthcare professionals took part in the simulated ethical deliberations and in the deliberative dialogue activities, and 13 were met in an individual interview. The study results revealed suboptimal interprofessional collaboration and ethical deliberation competencies, particularly regarding awareness of the ethical issue under consideration, clarification of conflicting values, reasonable decision making, and implementation planning. Participants also reported facing serious organizational constraints that challenged ethical deliberation processes.Significance of resultsThis study confirmed the need for professional education in interprofessional collaboration and ethical deliberation so that palliative care professionals can adequately face current and future ethical challenges. It also enabled the identification of educational priorities in this regard. Future research should focus on identifying promising educational activities, assessing their effectiveness, and measuring their impact on patient and family experience and the quality of palliative care.
      PubDate: 2021-08-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000729
       
  • “The surprise questions” using variable time frames in hospitalized
           patients with advanced cancer

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      Authors: Kim; Sun Hyun, Suh, Sang-Yeon, Yoon, Seok Joon, Park, Jeanno, Kim, Yu Jung, Kang, Beodeul, Park, Youngmin, Kwon, Jung Hye, Park, Kwonoh, Kim, Jung-Young, Choi, Hana, Ahn, Hong-Yup, Hamano, Jun, Hui, David
      Pages: 221 - 225
      Abstract: ObjectiveSeveral studies supported the usefulness of “the surprise question” in terms of 1-year mortality of patients. “The surprise question” requires a “Yes” or “No” answer to the question “Would I be surprised if this patient died in [specific time frame].” However, the 1-year time frame is often too long for advanced cancer patients seen by palliative care personnel. “The surprise question” with shorter time frames is needed for decision making. We examined the accuracy of “the surprise question” for 7-day, 21-day, and 42-day survival in hospitalized patients admitted to palliative care units (PCUs).MethodThis was a prospective multicenter cohort study of 130 adult patients with advanced cancer admitted to 7 hospital-based PCUs in South Korea. The accuracy of “the surprise question” was compared with that of the temporal question for clinician's prediction of survival.ResultsWe analyzed 130 inpatients who died in PCUs during the study period. The median survival was 21.0 days. The sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy for the 7-day “the surprise question” were 46.7, 88.7, and 83.9%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy for the 7-day temporal question were 6.7, 98.3, and 87.7%, respectively. The c-indices of the 7-day “the surprise question” and 7-day temporal question were 0.662 (95% CI: 0.539–0.785) and 0.521 (95% CI: 0.464–0.579), respectively. The c-indices of the 42-day “the surprise question” and 42-day temporal question were 0.554 (95% CI: 0.509–0.599) and 0.616 (95% CI: 0.569–0.663), respectively.Significance of resultsSurprisingly, “the surprise questions” and temporal questions had similar accuracies. The high specificities for the 7-day “the surprise question” and 7- and 21-day temporal question suggest they may be useful to rule in death if positive.
      PubDate: 2021-06-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000766
       
  • What should be measured to assess the quality of community-based
           palliative care' Results from a collaborative expert workshop

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      Authors: Williams; Nicole, Boumans, Nicole, Luymes, Nicole, White, Nancy E., Lemonde, Manon, Guthrie, Dawn M.
      Pages: 226 - 232
      Abstract: ObjectivesThe need for palliative care (PC) will continue to increase in Canada with population aging. Many older adults prefer to “age in place” and receive care in their own homes. Currently, there is a lack of standardized quality indicators (QIs) for PC delivered in the community in Canada.MethodsA one-day workshop collected expert opinions on what should be measured to capture quality PC. Three brainstorming sessions were focused on addressing the following questions: (1) what is important to measure to support quality PC, regardless of setting' (2) Of the identified measures, are any of special importance to care provided in the home' (3) What are the challenges, barriers, and opportunities for creating these measures' The National Consensus Project (NCP) for Quality Palliative Care framework was used as a guide to group together important comments into key themes.ResultsThe experts identified four themes that are important for measuring quality, regardless of care setting, including access to care in the community by a multidisciplinary team, care for the individual with PC needs, support for the informal caregiver (e.g., family, friends), and symptom management for individuals with PC needs. Two additional themes were of special importance to measuring quality PC in the home, including spiritual care for individuals with PC needs and home as the preferred place of death. The challenges, barriers, and potential opportunities to these quality issues were also discussed.Significance of resultsPC experts, through this collaborative process, made a substantial contribution to the creation of a standardized set of QIs for community-based PC. Having a standardized set of QIs will enable health care professionals and decision makers to target areas for improvement, implement interventions to improve the quality of care, and ultimately, optimize the health and well-being of individuals with a serious illness.
      PubDate: 2021-06-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000791
       
  • End-of-life decision making in critical illness: Perspectives of Asian
           parents

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      Authors: Fu; Kristy Xinghan, Chiong, Yee Keow, Ngiam, Nicola
      Pages: 233 - 242
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo explore parents’ perspectives regarding end-of-life (EOL) decisions, factors and possible barriers that influence the EOL decision making process, and to understand parental preferences for communication about EOL care in an Asian population.MethodA prospective questionnaire cohort study conducted in a university-based tertiary care hospital. 30 parents of children who had been admitted to general pediatric wards for acute ailments and/or were being followed up in general pediatric outpatient clinics after inpatient admissions or emergency department visits completed 30 interviewer-administered questionnaires. With the first 10 completed questionnaires, we sought feedback on the design of the four case vignettes and related questions. Responses to specific questions related to each case vignette were rated on a Likert scale.ResultsThe majority of parents were able to comprehend and identify with the issues in the case vignettes, which allowed them to respond appropriately. Parents tended to avoid active withdrawal or withholding of life-sustaining treatment. The top three priorities for parents making EOL decisions for their children were: the chance of improvement, the presence of pain or discomfort, and information provided by healthcare staff. Parents reported that they would prefer to know immediately if their child is at risk of dying; they also preferred to get as much information as possible from the healthcare team and thought that meeting with the healthcare team before making EOL decisions was pivotal.Significance of resultsParents place highest priorities on their child's likelihood of improvement, perception of their child's pain, and information provided by healthcare professionals in making EOL decisions.
      PubDate: 2021-05-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000493
       
  • The validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Family
           Inventory of Needs

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      Authors: Sağlam; Zeynep, Koç, Zeliha
      Pages: 255 - 263
      Abstract: ObjectiveThe aim of this methodological study was to test the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Family Inventory of Needs.MethodsThe universe of the study consisted of 300 family members of inpatients hospitalized in the palliative care units of four hospitals in northern Turkey between April 12, 2019 and December 30, 2019. The translation process was performed in multiple stages using the forward–backward translation model. The reliability of the Family Inventory of Needs was evaluated using the Cronbach α reliability coefficient and item-total score correlations. Exploratory factor analyses were applied to examine the factor structure of the scale and its construct validity. To test the time invariance of the scale, the relationships between the scores obtained from the first and second applications were examined using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC).ResultsThe Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin value of the Family Inventory of Needs was found to be 0.893. The items of the Family Inventory of Needs were found to explain 45.23% of the total variance in scores. The Turkish form of the scale consisted of the importance and fulfillment subdimensions, and had 19 items. The ICCs of the test–retest scores of the importance and fulfillment subdimensions of the Family Inventory of Needs were found to be, respectively, ICC = 1.000 and ICC = 0.730 with a positive, linear, and highly significant relationship between the scores. The item-total score correlation coefficients of the scale were found to vary between 0.920 and 0.908 in the importance subdimension, and between 0.930 and 0.922 in the fulfillment subdimension.Significance of resultsThe Turkish version of the Family Inventory of Needs was found to be a valid and reliable measurement tool that can be safely used with the family members of Turkish inpatients.
      PubDate: 2021-06-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000833
       
  • Spiritual care needs and their associated influencing factors among
           elderly patients with moderate-to-severe chronic heart failure in China: A
           cross-sectional study

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      Authors: Wang; ZhangYi, Wang, Zhao, Wang, Yue, Xiao, LuWei, Zhao, HaoMei, Li, XueChun, Zhang, SiAi, Pang, XiaoLi
      Pages: 264 - 274
      Abstract: BackgroundThe significance of spiritual care needs among chronic diseases patients has been emphasized across countries and cultures in many studies. However, there were few studies on spiritual care needs among elderly patients with moderate-to-severe chronic heart failure (CHF) in China.ObjectiveTo investigate spiritual care needs and associated influencing factors among elderly patients with moderate-to-severe CHF, and to examine the relationships among spiritual care needs, self-perceived burden, symptom management self-efficacy, and perceived social support.MethodsA cross-sectional design was implemented, and the STROBE Checklist was used to report the study. A convenience sample of 474 elderly patients with moderate-to-severe CHF were selected from seven hospitals in Tianjin, China. The sociodemographic characteristics questionnaire, the Spiritual Needs Questionnaire Scale, the Self-Perceived Burden Scale, the Self-efficacy for Symptom Management Scale, and the Perceived Social Support Scale were used. Descriptive statistics, univariate, multiple linear regression, and Pearson's correlation analysis were used to analyze data.ResultsThe total score of spiritual care needs among 474 elderly patients with moderate-to-severe CHF was 37.95 ± 14.71, which was moderate. Religious belief, educational background, self-perceived burden, symptom management self-efficacy, and perceived social support were the main factors affecting spiritual care needs, and spiritual care needs were negatively correlated with self-perceived burden (r = −0.637, p < 0.01) and positively correlated with symptom management self-efficacy (r = 0.802, p < 0.01) and social support (r = 0.717, p < 0.01).Significance of resultsThe spiritual care needs of elderly patients with moderate-to-severe CHF were moderate, which were influenced by five factors. It is suggested that clinical nurses, families, and society should take targeted spiritual care measures to improve patients’ symptom management self-efficacy and perceived social support from many aspects, and reduce self-perceived burden to meet their spiritual care needs and improve the quality and satisfaction of spiritual care in nursing practice.
      PubDate: 2021-08-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521001279
       
  • Preferences of quality delivery of palliative care among cancer patients
           in low- and middle-income countries: A review

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      Authors: Yemoh; Vicky, Olayemi, Lawal Olatunde, Abraham, Jyothi Alex
      Pages: 275 - 282
      Abstract: BackgroundAll forms of cancer pose a tremendous and increasing problem globally. The prevalence of cancer across the globe is anticipated to double over the next two decades. About 50% of most cancer cases are expected to occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where there is a greater disproportionate level in mortality. Access to effective and timely care for cancer patients remains a challenge, especially in LMICs due to late disease diagnosis and detection, coupled with the limited availability of appropriate therapeutic options and delay in proper interventions.MethodologyThis study explored several mixed-method researches and randomized trials that addressed the preferences of quality delivery of palliative care among cancer patients in LMICs. A designated set of keywords such as Palliative Care; Preferences; Cancer patients; Psycho-social Support; End-of-life Care; Low and Middle-Income Countries were inserted on electronic databases to retrieve articles. The databases include PubMed, Scinapse, Medline, The Google Scholar, Academic search premier, SAGE, and EBSCO host.ResultsFindings from this review discussed the socioeconomic and behavioral factors, which address the quality delivery of palliative care among cancer patients. These factors if measured with acceptance level in cancer patients could help to address areas that need improvement from the stage of disease diagnosis to the end-of-life.Significance of the resultsValuable collaborations among international and local health institutions are needed to build and implement a systematic framework for palliative care in LMICs. Policies and programs that are country and culturally specific, encompassing both theoretical and practical models of care in the milieu of existing quandaries should be developed.
      PubDate: 2021-05-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000456
       
  • Cultural implications for disclosure of diagnosis and prognosis toward
           terminally ill cancer patients in China: A literature review

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      Authors: Stocklassa; Stephanie, Zhang, Silja, Mason, Stephen, Elsner, Frank
      Pages: 283 - 289
      Abstract: ObjectiveHealth professionals in China tend to avoid open communication with terminally ill cancer patients concerning their diagnosis and prognosis. This review aims to explore Chinese cultural beliefs and attitudes concerning disclosure and death among health professionals and cancer patients in China and to investigate preferences of terminally ill cancer patients for a “good death.”MethodA narrative literature review was conducted in May 2020 on MEDLINE, EMBASE, and WEB OF SCIENCE to include all studies with clear study design which presented its own study data or referred to data within underlying studies, published between January 2000 and May 2020, having cancer patients and/or healthcare professionals as participants, conducted in Mainland China, Hong Kong, or Taiwan and containing relevant data concerning “medical disclosure” or “good death.” Quality assessment of publications was conducted using the NIH and CASP checklists.ResultsPrimary database search revealed a total of 108 papers of which 9 were ultimately included. The additional hand search led to the inclusion of eight further papers. In total, there were 11 quantitative studies, 4 qualitative studies and 2 literature reviews included in this review. Our findings indicated that most terminally ill cancer patients in China want to know the truth about their diagnosis and prognosis and preferred to be informed by their doctors. Terminally ill cancer patients valued a good relationship with family and medical staff as well as being respected as an individual and wanted to be able to prepare for death.Significance of resultsTerminally ill cancer patients in China often have a substantial need for information about their condition while their preferences are widely consistent with those in Western societies. Training for health professionals needs to focus on communication skills in order to overcome barriers in patient interaction.
      PubDate: 2021-05-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000535
       
  • “When the first session may be the last!”: A case report of the
           implementation of “rapid tele-psychotherapy” with single-session music
           therapy in the COVID-19 outbreak

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      Authors: Situmorang; Dominikus David Biondi
      Pages: 290 - 295
      Abstract: ObjectiveConventional psychotherapy with a lengthy and regular number of meetings is no longer relevant in the case of COVID-19, when persons with psychiatric problems, especially COVID-19 patients/clients, really require immediate psychological assistance. It is recognized as a “rapid test” in the field of body health to rapidly decide whether or not a person is affected by COVID-19. So, we should now be able to use the term “rapid tele-psychotherapy” with Single-Session Music Therapy (SSMT) in the field of mental health to characterize the mechanism of assistance provided to persons who seek therapeutic assistance virtually during this COVID-19 outbreak, so that they will easily and reliably be freed from troubling psychiatric issues.MethodThe author reports the case of a 33-year-old widow with asymptomatic COVID-19 who was admitted to her own home.ResultsThe author describes the effectiveness of the implementation of rapid tele-psychotherapy with SSMT in reducing the scale of anxiety, panic, fear, depression, acute stress, insomnia, and delusions of death.Significance of resultsThis case can provide new inputs or ideas for counselors/psychologists/psychiatrists/therapists who work in hospitals/institutions to provide rapid tele-psychotherapy with SSMT as therapeutic assistance for individuals who need psychotherapy in this COVID-19 outbreak, especially for COVID-19 patients/clients. Besides that, this concept is not only suitable for rapidly screening individuals that may face psychological problems and helping them better seek therapeutic assistance, but can also be used as an adjuvant therapy for psychiatric patients.
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521001425
       
  • “No one looks for me”: Spiritual care and meaning-centered
           psychotherapy (MCP)

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      Authors: Rothstein; Harry D.
      Pages: 296 - 297
      PubDate: 2021-05-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S147895152100047X
       
  • Q & A @ End-of-life

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      Authors: Xiang; David H.
      Pages: 298 - 298
      PubDate: 2021-09-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521001528
       
  • The dismissal of grief

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      Authors: Rousseau; Paul
      Pages: 299 - 299
      PubDate: 2021-06-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000687
       
  • Interpreting end-of-life experiences of the person with motor neurone
           disease

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      Authors: Harris; Denise Andrea
      Pages: 300 - 301
      PubDate: 2021-06-25
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521000699
       
  • Interpreting end-of-life experiences of the person with motor neurone
           disease – ERRATUM

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      Authors: Harris; Denise Andrea
      Pages: 302 - 302
      PubDate: 2021-07-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S1478951521001267
       
 
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