Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
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Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Recherches & √©ducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
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Neurocritical Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.311
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1556-0961 - ISSN (Online) 1541-6933
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Quantitative Pupillometry: Not a Clear Predictor of Delayed Cerebral
           Ischemia After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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      PubDate: 2023-05-24
       
  • Neurological Pupil Index and Delayed Cerebral Ischemia after Subarachnoid
           Hemorrhage: A Retrospective Multicentric Study

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      Abstract: Background Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) occurs in around 30% of patients suffering from nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and is associated with poor neurological outcome. Whether the Neurological Pupil index (NPi) derived from the automated pupillometry could help to diagnose the occurrence of DCI remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of NPi with the occurrence of DCI in patients with SAH. Methods This was a multicenter, retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients with SAH admitted to the intensive care units of five hospitals between January 2018 and December 2020 who underwent daily NPi recordings (every 8 h) during the first 10 days of admission. DCI was diagnosed according to standard definitions (in awake patients) or based on neuroimaging and neuromonitoring (in sedated or unconscious patients). An NPi < 3 was defined as abnormal. The primary outcome of the study was to assess the time course of daily NPi between patients with DCI and patients without DCI. Secondary outcome included the number of patients who had an NPi < 3 before DCI. Results A total of 210 patients were eligible for the final analysis; DCI occurred in 85 (41%) patients. Patients who developed DCI had similar values of mean and worst daily NPi over time when compared with patients without DCI. Patients with DCI had a higher proportion of at least one NPi < 3 at any moment before DCI when compared with others (39/85, 46% vs. 35/125, 38%, p = 0.009). Similarly, the worst NPi before DCI diagnosis was lower in the DCI group when compared with others (3.1 [2.5–3.8] vs. 3.7 [2.7–4.1], p = 0.05). In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, the presence of NPi < 3 was not independently associated with the development of DCI (odds ratio 1.52 [95% confidence interval 0.80–2.88]). Conclusions In this study, NPi measured three times a day and derived from the automated pupillometry had a limited value for the diagnosis of DCI in patients with SAH.
      PubDate: 2023-05-24
       
  • Aquaporin 4 Mediates the Effect of Iron Overload on Hydrocephalus After
           Intraventricular Hemorrhage

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      Abstract: Background Iron overload plays an important role in hydrocephalus development following intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) participates in the balance of cerebrospinal fluid secretion and absorption. The current study investigated the role of AQP4 in the formation of hydrocephalus caused by iron overload after IVH. Methods There were three parts to this study. First, Sprague–Dawley rats received an intraventricular injection of 100 µl autologous blood or saline control. Second, rats had IVH and were treated with deferoxamine (DFX), an iron chelator, or vehicle. Third, rats had IVH and were treated with 2-(nicotinamide)-1,3,4-thiadiazole (TGN-020), a specific AQP4 inhibitor, or vehicle. Rats underwent T2-weighted and T2* gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging to assess lateral ventricular volume and intraventricular iron deposition at 7, 14, and 28 days after intraventricular injection and were then euthanized. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence analyses were conducted on the rat brains to evaluate the expression of AQP4 at different time points. Hematoxylin and eosin–stained brain sections were obtained to assess the ventricular wall damage on day 28. Results Intraventricular injection of autologous blood caused a significant ventricular dilatation, iron deposition, and ventricular wall damage. There was increased AQP4 mRNA and protein expression in the periventricular tissue in IVH rats through day 7 to day 28. The DFX treatment group had a lower lateral ventricular volume and less intraventricular iron deposition and ventricular wall damage than the vehicle-treated group after IVH. The expression of AQP4 protein in periventricular tissue was also inhibited by DFX on days 14 and 28 after IVH. The use of TGN-020 attenuated hydrocephalus development after IVH and inhibited the expression of AQP4 protein in the periventricular tissue between day 14 and day 28 without a significant effect on intraventricular iron deposition or ventricular wall damage. Conclusions AQP4 located in the periventricular area mediated the effect of iron overload on hydrocephalus after IVH.
      PubDate: 2023-05-19
       
  • Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Management Guidelines: Perspectives on Methodology
           and Clinical Guidance

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      PubDate: 2023-05-18
       
  • Guidelines for the Neurocritical Care Management of Aneurysmal
           Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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      Abstract: Background The neurointensive care management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is one of the most critical components contributing to short-term and long-term patient outcomes. Previous recommendations for the medical management of aSAH comprehensively summarized the evidence based on consensus conference held in 2011. In this report, we provide updated recommendations based on appraisal of the literature using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology. Methods The Population/Intervention/Comparator/Outcome (PICO) questions relevant to the medical management of aSAH were prioritized by consensus from the panel members. The panel used a custom-designed survey instrument to prioritize clinically relevant outcomes specific to each PICO question. To be included, the study design qualifying criteria were as follows: prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs), prospective or retrospective observational studies, case–control studies, case series with a sample larger than 20 patients, meta-analyses, restricted to human study participants. Panel members first screened titles and abstracts, and subsequently full text review of selected reports. Data were abstracted in duplicate from reports meeting inclusion criteria. Panelists used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation Risk of Bias tool for assessment of RCTs and the “Risk of Bias In Nonrandomized Studies – of Interventions” tool for assessment of observational studies. The summary of the evidence for each PICO was presented to the full panel, and then the panel voted on the recommendations. Results The initial search retrieved 15,107 unique publications, and 74 were included for data abstraction. Several RCTs were conducted to test pharmacological interventions, and we found that the quality of evidence for nonpharmacological questions was consistently poor. Five PICO questions were supported by strong recommendations, one PICO question was supported by conditional recommendations, and six PICO questions did not have sufficient evidence to provide a recommendation. Conclusions These guidelines provide recommendations for or against interventions proven to be effective, ineffective, or harmful in the medical management of patients with aSAH based on a rigorous review of the available literature. They also serve to highlight gaps in knowledge that should guide future research priorities. Despite improvements in the outcomes of patients with aSAH over time, many important clinical questions remain unanswered.
      PubDate: 2023-05-18
       
  • Perioperative Neuromonitoring in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

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      Abstract: Although neonates and children with congenital heart disease are primarily hospitalized for cardiac and pulmonary diseases, they are also at an increased risk for neurologic injury due to both empiric differences that can exist in their nervous systems and acquired injury from cardiopulmonary pathology and interventions. Although early efforts in care focused on survival after reparative cardiac surgery, as surgical and anesthetic techniques have evolved and survival rates accordingly improved, the focus has now shifted to maximizing outcomes among survivors. Children and neonates with congenital heart disease experience seizures and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes at a higher rate than age-matched counterparts. The aim of neuromonitoring is to help clinicians identify patients at highest risk for these outcomes to implement strategies to mitigate these risks and to also help with neuroprognostication after an injury has occurred. The mainstays of neuromonitoring are (1) electroencephalographic monitoring to evaluate brain activity for abnormal patterns or changes and to identify seizures, (2) neuroimaging to reveal structural changes and evidence of physical injury in and around the brain, and (3) near-infrared spectroscopy to monitor brain tissue oxygenation and detect changes in perfusion. This review will detail the aforementioned techniques and their use in the care of pediatric patients with congenital heart disease.
      PubDate: 2023-05-15
       
  • CSF-Based Volumetric Imaging Biomarkers Highlight Incidence and Risk
           Factors for Cerebral Edema After Ischemic Stroke

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      Abstract: Background Cerebral edema has primarily been studied using midline shift or clinical deterioration as end points, which only captures the severe and delayed manifestations of a process affecting many patients with stroke. Quantitative imaging biomarkers that measure edema severity across the entire spectrum could improve its early detection, as well as identify relevant mediators of this important stroke complication. Methods We applied an automated image analysis pipeline to measure the displacement of cerebrospinal fluid (ΔCSF) and the ratio of lesional versus contralateral hemispheric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume (CSF ratio) in a cohort of 935 patients with hemispheric stroke with follow-up computed tomography scans taken a median of 26 h (interquartile range 24–31) after stroke onset. We determined diagnostic thresholds based on comparison to those without any visible edema. We modeled baseline clinical and radiographic variables against each edema biomarker and assessed how each biomarker was associated with stroke outcome (modified Rankin Scale at 90 days). Results The displacement of CSF and CSF ratio were correlated with midline shift (r = 0.52 and − 0.74, p < 0.0001) but exhibited broader ranges. A ΔCSF of greater than 14% or a CSF ratio below 0.90 identified those with visible edema: more than half of the patients with stroke met these criteria, compared with only 14% who had midline shift at 24 h. Predictors of edema across all biomarkers included a higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, a lower Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score, and lower baseline CSF volume. A history of hypertension and diabetes (but not acute hyperglycemia) predicted greater ΔCSF but not midline shift. Both ΔCSF and a lower CSF ratio were associated with worse outcome, adjusting for age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score (odds ratio 1.7, 95% confidence interval 1.3–2.2 per 21% ΔCSF). Conclusions Cerebral edema can be measured in a majority of patients with stroke on follow-up computed tomography using volumetric biomarkers evaluating CSF shifts, including in many without visible midline shift. Edema formation is influenced by clinical and radiographic stroke severity but also by chronic vascular risk factors and contributes to worse stroke outcomes.
      PubDate: 2023-05-15
       
  • Integrating Palliative Care into the Neurointensive Care Unit

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      PubDate: 2023-05-12
       
  • Palliative Care in Severe Neurotrauma Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

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      Abstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide and many patients with TBI require intensive care unit (ICU) management. When facing a life-threatening illness, such as TBI, a palliative care approach that focuses on noncurative aspects of care should always be considered in the ICU. Research shows that neurosurgical patients in the ICU receive palliative care less frequently than the medical patients in the ICU, which is a missed opportunity for these patients. However, providing appropriate palliative care to neurotrauma patients in an ICU can be difficult, particularly for young adult patients. The patients’ prognoses are often unclear, the likelihood of advance directives is small, and the bereaved families must act as decision-makers. This article highlights the different aspects of the palliative care approach as well as barriers and challenges that accompany the TBI patient population, with a particular focus on young adult patients with TBI and the role of their family members. The article concludes with recommendations for physicians for effective and adequate communication to successfully implement the palliative care approach into standard ICU care and to improve quality of care for patients with TBI and their families.
      PubDate: 2023-05-12
       
  • Are We Ready for Clinical Therapy based on Cerebral Autoregulation' A
           Pro-con Debate

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      Abstract: Cerebral autoregulation (CA) is a physiological mechanism that maintains constant cerebral blood flow regardless of changes in cerebral perfusion pressure and prevents brain damage caused by hypoperfusion or hyperperfusion. In recent decades, researchers have investigated the range of systemic blood pressures and clinical management strategies over which cerebral vasculature modifies intracranial hemodynamics to maintain cerebral perfusion. However, proposed clinical interventions to optimize autoregulation status have not demonstrated clear clinical benefit. As future trials are designed, it is crucial to comprehend the underlying cause of our inability to produce robust clinical evidence supporting the concept of CA-targeted management. This article examines the technological advances in monitoring techniques and the accuracy of continuous assessment of autoregulation techniques used in intraoperative and intensive care settings today. It also examines how increasing knowledge of CA from recent clinical trials contributes to a greater understanding of secondary brain injury in many disease processes, despite the fact that the lack of robust evidence influencing outcomes has prevented the translation of CA-guided algorithms into clinical practice.
      PubDate: 2023-05-10
       
  • Correction: Advanced Neuromonitoring Modalities on the Horizon: Detection
           and Management of Acute Brain Injury in Children

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      PubDate: 2023-05-09
       
  • Noninvasive Neuromonitoring Modalities in Children Part I: Pupillometry,
           Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, and Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography

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      Abstract: Background Noninvasive neuromonitoring in critically ill children includes multiple modalities that all intend to improve our understanding of acute and ongoing brain injury. Methods In this article, we review basic methods and devices, applications in clinical care and research, and explore potential future directions for three noninvasive neuromonitoring modalities in the pediatric intensive care unit: automated pupillometry, near-infrared spectroscopy, and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Results All three technologies are noninvasive, portable, and easily repeatable to allow for serial measurements and trending of data over time. However, a paucity of high-quality data supporting the clinical utility of any of these technologies in critically ill children is currently a major limitation to their widespread application in the pediatric intensive care unit. Conclusions Future prospective multicenter work addressing major knowledge gaps is necessary to advance the field of pediatric noninvasive neuromonitoring.
      PubDate: 2023-05-09
       
  • Hemodynamic Management in the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed Cerebral
           Ischemia After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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      Abstract: One of the most serious complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is delayed cerebral ischemia, the cause of which is multifactorial. Delayed cerebral ischemia considerably worsens neurological outcome and increases the risk of death. The targets of hemodynamic management of SAH have widely changed over the past 30 years. Hypovolemia and hypotension were favored prior to the era of early aneurysmal surgery but were subsequently replaced by the use of hypervolemia and hypertension. More recently, the concept of goal-directed therapy targeting euvolemia, with or without hypertension, is gaining preference. Despite the evolving concepts and the vast literature, fundamental questions related to hemodynamic optimization and its effects on cerebral perfusion and patient outcomes remain unanswered. In this review, we explain the rationale underlying the approaches to hemodynamic management and provide guidance on contemporary strategies related to fluid administration and blood pressure and cardiac output manipulation in the management of SAH.
      PubDate: 2023-05-09
       
  • Ketamine Use in the Intubation of Critically Ill Children with
           Neurological Indications: A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis

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      Abstract: Background Ketamine has traditionally been avoided for tracheal intubations (TIs) in patients with acute neurological conditions. We evaluate its current usage pattern in these patients and any associated adverse events. Methods We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study of critically ill children undergoing TI for neurological indications in 53 international pediatric intensive care units and emergency departments. We screened all intubations from 2014 to 2020 entered into the multicenter National Emergency Airway Registry for Children (NEAR4KIDS) registry database. Patients were included if they were under the age of 18 years and underwent TI for a primary neurological indication. Usage patterns and reported periprocedural composite adverse outcomes (hypoxemia < 80%, hypotension/hypertension, cardiac arrest, and dysrhythmia) were noted. Results Of 21,562 TIs, 2,073 (9.6%) were performed for a primary neurological indication, including 190 for traumatic brain injury/trauma. Patients received ketamine in 495 TIs (23.9%), which increased from 10% in 2014 to 41% in 2020 (p < 0.001). Ketamine use was associated with a coindication of respiratory failure, difficult airway history, and use of vagolytic agents, apneic oxygenation, and video laryngoscopy. Composite adverse outcomes were reported in 289 (13.9%) Tis and were more common in the ketamine group (17.0% vs. 13.0%, p = 0.026). After adjusting for location, patient age and codiagnoses, the presence of respiratory failure and shock, difficult airway history, provider demographics, intubating device, and the use of apneic oxygenation, vagolytic agents, and neuromuscular blockade, ketamine use was not significantly associated with increased composite adverse outcomes (adjusted odds ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval CI 0.99–1.81, p = 0.057). This paucity of association remained even when only neurotrauma intubations were considered (10.6% vs. 7.7%, p = 0.528). Conclusions This retrospective cohort study did not demonstrate an association between procedural ketamine use and increased risk of peri-intubation hypoxemia and hemodynamic instability in patients intubated for neurological indications.
      PubDate: 2023-05-09
       
  • Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation-Related Microangiopathy

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      PubDate: 2023-05-06
       
  • Prevention and Correction of Dysnatremia After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid
           Hemorrhage

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      Abstract: Background Dysnatremia occurs commonly in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). The mechanisms for development of sodium dyshomeostasis are complex, including the cerebral salt-wasting syndrome, the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, diabetes insipidus. Iatrogenic occurrence of altered sodium levels plays a role, as sodium homeostasis is tightly linked to fluid and volume management. Methods Narrative review of the literature. Results Many studies have aimed to identify factors predictive of the development of dysnatremia, but data on associations between dysnatremia and demographic and clinical variables are variable. Furthermore, although a clear relationship between serum sodium serum concentrations and outcomes has not been established—poor outcomes have been associated with both hyponatremia and hypernatremia in the immediate period following aSAH and set the basis for seeking interventions to correct dysnatremia. While sodium supplementation and mineralocorticoids are frequently administered to prevent or counter natriuresis and hyponatremia, evidence to date is insufficient to gauge the effect of such treatment on outcomes. Conclusions In this article, we reviewed available data and provide a practical interpretation of these data as a complement to the newly issued guidelines for management of aSAH. Gaps in knowledge and future directions are discussed.
      PubDate: 2023-05-03
       
  • Correction: Continuous Monitoring of Cerebral Autoregulation in Children
           Supported by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Pilot Study

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      PubDate: 2023-05-02
       
  • Barriers to Surrogate Application of Patient Values in Medical Decisions
           in Acute Stroke: Qualitative Study in a Biethnic Community

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      Abstract: Background The objective of this study was to identify barriers to surrogate decision-maker application of patient values on life-sustaining treatments after stroke in Mexican American (MA) and non-Hispanic White (NHW) patients. Methods We conducted a qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews with stroke patient surrogate decision-makers completed approximately 6 months after hospitalization. Results Forty-two family surrogate decision-makers participated (median age: 54.5 years; female: 83%; patients were MA [60%] and NHW [36%], and 50% were deceased at the time of the interview). We identified three primary barriers to surrogates’ applications of patient values and preferences when making decisions on life-sustaining treatments: (1) a minority of surrogates had no prior discussion of what the patient would want in the event of a serious medical illness, (2) surrogates struggled to apply prior known values and preferences to the actual decisions made, and (3) surrogates felt guilt or burden, often even in the setting of some knowledge of patient values or preferences. The first two barriers were seen to a similar degree in MA and NHW participants, though guilt or burden was reported more commonly among MA (28%) than NHW (13%) participants. Maintaining patient independence (e.g., ability to live at home, avoid a nursing home, make their own decisions) was the most important priority for decision-making for both MA and NHW participants; however, MA participants were more likely to list spending time with family as an important priority (24% vs. 7%). Conclusions Stroke surrogate decision-makers may benefit from (1) continued efforts to make advance care planning more common and more relevant, (2) assistance in how to apply their knowledge of patient values to actual treatment decisions, and (3) psychosocial support to reduce emotional burden. Barriers to surrogate application of patient values were generally similar in MA and NHW participants, though the possibility of greater guilt or burden among MA surrogates warrants further investigation and confirmation.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
       
  • Effects of Tranexamic Acid in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in
           Brazil: A Prospective Observational Study with Propensity Score Analysis

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      Abstract: Background Rebleeding from a ruptured aneurysm increases the risk of unfavorable outcomes after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and is prevented by early aneurysm occlusion. The role of antifibrinolytics before aneurysm obliteration remains controversial. We investigated the effects of tranexamic acid on long-term functional outcomes of patients with aneurysmal SAH (aSAH). Methods This was a single-center, prospective, observational study conducted in a high-volume tertiary hospital in a middle-income country from December 2016 to February 2020. We included all consecutive patients with aSAH who either received or did not receive tranexamic acid (TXA) treatment. Multivariate logistic regression analysis using propensity score was used to evaluate the association of TXA use with long-term functional outcomes, measured by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 6 months. Results A total of 230 patients with aSAH were analyzed. The median (interquartile range) age was 55 (46–63) years, 72% were women, 75% presented with good clinical grade (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grade 1–3), and 83% had a Fisher scale of 3 or 4. Around 80% of patients were admitted up to 72 h from ictus. The aneurysm occlusion method was surgical clipping in 80% of the patients. A total of 129 patients (56%) received TXA. In multivariable logistic regression using inverse probability treatment weighting, the long-term rate of unfavorable outcomes (modified Rankin scale 4–6) was the same in the TXA and non-TXA groups (61 [48%] in TXA group vs. 33 [33%] in non-TXA group; odds ratio [OR] 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67–2.92; p = 0.377). The TXA group had higher in-hospital mortality (33 vs. 11% in non-TXA group; OR 4.13, 95% CI 1.55–12.53, p = 0.007). There were no differences between the groups concerning intensive care unit length of stay (16 ± 11.22 days in TXA group vs. 14 ± 9.24 days in non-TXA group; p = 0.2) or hospital (23 ± 13.35 days in TXA group vs. 22 ± 13.36 days in non-TXA group; p = 0.9). There was no difference in the rates of rebleeding (7.8% in TXA group vs. 8.9% in non-TXA group; p = 0.31) or delayed cerebral ischemia (27% in TXA group vs. 19% in non-TXA group; p = 0.14). For the propensity-matched analysis, 128 individuals were selected (64 in TXA group and 64 in non-TXA group), and the rates of unfavorable outcomes at 6 months were also similar between groups (45% in TXA group and 36% in non-TXA group; OR 1.22, 95% CI 0.51–2.89; p = 0.655). Conclusions Our findings in a cohort with delayed aneurysm treatment reinforce previous data that TXA use before aneurysm occlusion does not improve functional outcomes in aSAH.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
       
  • Correction to: Impact of Arterial Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen Content on
           Cerebral Autoregulation Monitoring Among Children Supported by ECMO

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      PubDate: 2023-04-26
       
 
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