Subjects -> GARDENING AND HORTICULTURE (Total: 37 journals)
Showing 1 - 20 of 20 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Scientiarum Polonorum Hortorum Cultus     Open Access  
Advances in Horticultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annales Horticulturae     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Agricultural and Horticultural Research     Open Access  
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Dekoratyviųjų ir sodo augalų sortimento, technologijų ir aplinkos optimizavimas     Partially Free  
Folia Horticulturae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Horticulturae     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Horticultural Plant Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Horticulture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Indian Horticulture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Horticultural Research     Open Access  
Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Horticultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Landscape Architecture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Vegetable Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Landscape History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Landscape Online     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Landscape Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Media, Culture & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Mind Culture and Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Molecular Horticulture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parallax     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Polish Journal of Landscape Studies     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie horticultura     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Hortícolas     Open Access  
Science as Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Scientia Horticulturae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sibbaldia: the International Journal of Botanic Garden Horticulture     Open Access  
Studies in Australian Garden History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: An International Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.441
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2211-3452 - ISSN (Online) 2211-3460
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Correction to: Effect of light intensity and air velocity on the thermal
           exchange of indoor-cultured lettuce

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      PubDate: 2022-05-09
       
  • Essential oil from Chrysanthemum boreale flowers modulates SNARE
           protein-linked mast cell response and skin barrier proteins and
           ameliorates atopic dermatitis-like lesions in mice

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      Abstract: Chrysanthemum boreale (CB) has diverse properties including anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, and many attempts have been made to overcome it. However, the effects of CB flower essential oil (CBFEO) on AD has not been determined. This study investigated the potential effect of CBFEO on AD-related pathological events using in vitro and in vivo tests and predicted its related mechanism. CBFEO effects were tested using tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-treated human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) and IgE-sensitized RBL-2H3 mast cells in vitro and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced AD-like mice in vivo. Proteins were analyzed by immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, or immunohistochemistry. β-Hexosaminidase and histamine levels were measured by ELISA. Skin lesions were assessed using SCORAD scores. CBFEO reduced histamine and β-hexosaminidase released from mast cells. It also attenuated SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor activating protein receptor) protein VAMP8 expression and binding of VAMP8 to SNAP23 and syntaxin 4 to SNAP23 in mast cells. In addition, CBFEO inhibited the down-regulation of skin barrier-related proteins (filaggrin and loricrin) by TNF-α in keratinocytes. Application of CBFEO to AD-like skin lesions in DNCB mouse model of AD reduced the severity of dermatitis lesions and the expression levels of filaggrin and loricrin in lesioned skin tissues. These findings suggest that CBFEO inhibits AD-like skin lesions in mice probably by interfering with the SNARE protein-associated mast cell degranulation and by enhancing the expression of skin barrier-related proteins. Therefore, CBFEO may be a potential functional material for AD treatment. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • In vitro selection and identification of a cold-tolerant variant in
           pineapple (Ananas comosus)

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      Abstract: Abstract Cold stress is an important factor limiting the growth and distribution of pineapple. Breeding cold-resistant germplasm is an effective way to cope with this problem. In vitro selection for the somaclonal variation using different selection agents has been used for crop improvement in stress tolerance. In this study, the pineapple cold-tolerant variant was developed through in vitro cold selection of somaclonal variations. Low temperature was used as the selected agent, and the extreme lethal condition for the in vitro pineapple cultures was determined to be 0 °C for 72 h. The morphology changes of the in vitro cultures during the cold selection were observed and analyzed. The cold-tolerant variant line was finally obtained through three consecutive selections with cold shock treatments, based on the established high-efficiency culture system for pineapple embryogenic calli. The genetic variations at the molecular level in the cold-tolerant variant were verified by ISSR analysis. The significantly improved cold tolerance in our selected variant was mainly reflected by the higher survival rate, increased proline content, and elevated SOD activity under cold stress compared to these qualities in the control plants. This study demonstrated the feasibility of in vitro selection for cold tolerance in pineapple. The cold-tolerant variant could be valuable for future pineapple breeding programs and for cold tolerance research.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • Cytomolecular analysis of repetitive DNA provides insight into the
           chromosome structure of Sisymbrium irio

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      Abstract: Abstract Sisymbrium irio (2n = 2x = 14) is a wild plant with traits that can offer economic and ecological benefits, yet it has received scant attention compared to its closely related species. There is no substantial genomic information generated from this species, thus highlighting the need for molecular cytogenetic analyses. The information provided from karyotypic investigation is essential for developing cytogenetic maps. In the present study, asymmetry/symmetry indexes classified S. irio as having a moderately symmetric karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) techniques were implemented as important cytogenetic tools for the direct detection of chromosomal targets and the study of the evolutionary relationship of crops. Repetitive DNA sequences such as ribosomal DNA (rDNA), C0t DNA, telomeric repeats, satellite repeats, and genomic DNA sequences were used as markers for the cytomolecular characterization of S. irio. The linked arrangement of 5 and 18 S rDNA units was found to be located at the terminal regions of the two chromosomes. Arabidopsis-type telomere repeats were detected in the terminal regions. Interestingly, labeled self-gDNA and C0t DNA hybridized in the pericentromeric and rDNA regions signifying the preferential distribution of the major repeats. Comparative GISH assays revealed the degree of genomic relationships among S. irio, Raphanus sativus, and Brassica diploids. The cytogenetic maps generated in this study are essential for understanding the genomic organization of S. irio and could be utilized for future validation of its genome assembly.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • Effects of red/blue versus white LED light of different intensities on the
           growth and organic carbon and autotoxin secretion of hydroponic lettuce

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      Abstract: Abstract Light is a crucial signal for plant growth, development, and secondary metabolism. Exploring the effects of light on autotoxin secretion in lettuce can be helpful for improving the utilization efficiency of the nutrient solution in plant factories. The effects of white light (WL) and the combination of red (R) and blue (B) light (RB, 4R:1B) at different intensities (150, 200, and 250 μmol m−2 s−1) on the growth and root exudates of hydroponic lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were studied in a closed plant factory. The lettuce biomass and photosynthetic rate increased with the increasing light intensity, and the photosynthetic rate was significantly lower under WL than under RB at both 200 and 250 μmol m−2 s−1. Lettuce under WL had the longest root length and highest root surface area at 200 μmol m−2 s−1, while the root length, root surface area, and root volume under RB were the highest at 250 μmol m−2 s−1. Total organic carbon (TOC) content of root exudates in the nutrient solution based on shoot or root dry weight decreased with the increasing light intensity. With the increase in light intensity, the secretion of four autotoxins (benzoic acid, ferulic acid, gallic acid, and tannic acid) based on shoot dry weight and root dry weight decreased under WL. Compared with RB, WL significantly reduced the secretion of autotoxins at 250 μmol m−2 s−1. In conclusion, 250 μmol m−2 s−1 white light should be used for high lettuce yield, and it could also decrease the autotoxins in the nutrient solution and the occurrence of autotoxicity.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • Postharvest chitosan application maintains the quality of spinach through
           suppression of bacterial growth and elicitation

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      Abstract: Abstract Consumption of leafy vegetables is highly recommended for meeting dietary requirements for antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. However, the short shelf life of leaves often compromises the nutritional contents and causes economic loss for farmers and sellers. Chitosan, a natural polymer obtained from seafood waste, has been proposed to improve plant qualities in the postharvest condition. In this study, the quality of spinach leaves following chitosan treatments was analyzed to test the capacity of chitosan to improve postharvest management of spinach. Specifically, harvested spinach leaves were dipped in distilled water, 1% (v/v) acetic acid, and 0.1 and 0.5% (w/v) chitosan. The leaves were then examined for morphological, physiological, and molecular parameters following each treatment on days 0 and 3 after incubation at room temperature with a 12/12-h photoperiod. Our results suggested that the application of 0.1% (w/v) chitosan solution to postharvest spinach delayed the decaying process, possibly due to the suppression of bacterial growth. The elicitation mechanism by chitosan involved proline accumulation, retaining chlorophyll, increasing expression of antioxidant genes (Cu/Zn-SOD and CAT), and decreasing ROS (O2− and H2O2) content. In conclusion, our results support the suggested role of chitosan treatment in maintaining quality of postharvest spinach by regulating the elicitation processes and limiting bacterial growth.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • Deriving stable tropical gynoecious inbred lines of slicing cucumber from
           American pickling cucumber using MABB

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      Abstract: Abstract This study was conducted to develop inbred backcross lines (IBLs) in Indian slicing cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) with the gynoecious trait. The F2 mapping population was developed using the Indian monoecious cultivar of light-green-fruited Pusa Uday as the recurrent parent and the American gynoecious pickling line G421 as a donor. Two markers, SSR13251 and SSR15516, were found to be closely linked to the F locus at 1.5 and 4.5 cM, respectively, by marker analysis of F2 individuals. The amplified product of 430 bp generated using a SCAR marker (CsACS1G) in gynoecious (MMFF) and sub-gynoecious (MMFf) plants of the F2 population confirmed the dominance of F alleles. The IBLs were developed by backcrossing Pusa Uday with BC1 and BC2 progenies followed by foreground and background selection of plants displaying the gynoecious habit in the background of Indian slicing cucumber. These IBLs could be utilized for the development of hybrids with higher yield, earliness, and quality.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • Delayed 1-Methylcyclopropene application improves ripening recovery in
           banana fruit after cold storage

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      Abstract: Abstract This study investigated the potential of delaying 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) application as a postharvest strategy to enhance ripening recovery of banana fruit. The experiment comprised the following treatments: control (no 1-MCP), 400 nL L−1 1-MCP at 1 and 15 d, and 50 µL L−1 ethephon + 400 nL L−1 at 1 and 15 d, arranged in a completely randomized design. Fruit were stored at 14 °C for 30 d and thereafter allowed to ripen at 23 °C for 9 d. After 9 d shelf life, 1-MCP/15 d treated fruit had significantly lower firmness (54.24 N) compared to fruit treated with 1-MCP/1 d (69.45 N). Peel degreening was significantly higher in the 1-MCP/1 d treatment, with hue values of 92.06 compared to 86.62 for 1-MCP/15 d. The 1-MCP/1 d treatment significantly maintained higher total chlorophyll (307.7 µg/g) and carotenoids (145 µg/g) in peel compared to 1-MCP/15 d treatment. Sucrose accumulation significantly increased in 1-MCP/15 d treated fruit (5.26 mg/mL) compared to that treated with 1-MCP/1 d (1.74 mg/mL). A similar trend was observed for glucose (0.81 mg/mL) and fructose (0.83 mg/mL). The 1-MCP/1 d treated fruit had no detectable glucose and fructose during shelf life. Our results demonstrated that application of 1-MCP at 15 d cold storage is a promising postharvest strategy to extend fruit shelf life by enhancing ripening recovery after cold storage.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • Growth characteristics and bioactive compounds of dropwort subjected to
           high CO2 concentrations and water deficit

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      Abstract: Abstract Here, we determined the effects of mild water deficit (WD) and high CO2 concentration (HC) on the growth and bioactive compounds of dropwort and proposed culture conditions for producing high-quality plants. Plantlets with two to three offshoots were transplanted to a controlled environment room with artificial light and cultivated for 6 weeks. To investigate the effects of HC, plantlets were grown under relatively low CO2 concentration (LC; 600 μmol mol−1 CO2) or HC (1000 μmol mol−1 CO2) conditions for 6 weeks (HC6) or grown under standard conditions for 3 weeks and transferred to HC conditions for the remaining 3 weeks (HC3). To investigate the effects of WD, control plantlets were subirrigated by keeping the pots in a tray of nutrient solution, whereas WD-treated plants were allowed to absorb water through wicks extending from the pot bottoms to a nutrient solution below. Leaf water potential of WD-treated plantlets was significantly lower than that of controls. Both WD and HC significantly decreased leaf area but did not significantly affect shoot fresh and dry weights. The photosynthetic rates of HC6- and HC3-treated plantlets were 53% and 64% greater, respectively, than that of LC; the stomatal conductance and transpiration rate exhibited opposite trends. WD significantly decreased net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance. The total nonstructural carbohydrate content of HC6- and HC3-treated plantlets was 8% and 14% greater, respectively, than that of LC. Total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of WD plantlets were 17% and 23% greater, respectively, than those of controls. In controls, total phenolic content of HC6- and HC3-treated plantlets was increased significantly (by 24% and 34%, respectively) than that of LC plantlets. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity of WD-treated plantlets was 14% higher than that of controls; in the controls, PAL activity of HC-treated plantlets increased significantly (by 19%) compared to that of LC plantlets. However, HC did not affect PAL activity under WD. Cyanidin content was increased by both WD and HC treatments. These results indicate that reddish small dropwort (WD treated plantlets) is more useful than greenish dropwort as a functional food and can be easily produced through HC when grown in a closed environment (e.g., a greenhouse or plant factory). Finally, the cultural practice of HC can improve the industrial value of small dropwort grown for food processing.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • Flowering responses of Eremogone juncea (M. Bieb.) fenzl to photoperiod,
           chilling treatment, and cold storage

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      Abstract: Abstract This study was conducted to examine the flowering responses of Eremogone juncea to photoperiod (Experiment 1) and chilling treatment (Experiment 2). In addition, plants were subjected to cold storage following chilling treatment to extend the flowering season (Experiment 3). In Experiment 1, naturally chilled E. juncea plants were subjected to five different photoperiod conditions (9/15, 12/12, 14/10, 16/8, and 24/0 h). There were no differences in percent flowering among photoperiod treatment groups. Furthermore, these plants showed no significant differences among groups in the number of days to the first open flower. In Experiment 2, the plants were exposed to natural chilling for 0, 4, 8, or 12 weeks or artificial chilling at 5 °C for 0, 4, or 8 weeks. Percent flowering was less than 30% in the no-chilling treatment but increased with increasing chilling duration in both the natural and artificial chilling treatments. Days to the first open flower declined as the chilling duration increased. To quantify the chilling requirement, chill units (CUs) were calculated using a modified chilling hours model (MCHM) and a modified Utah model (MUM). To exceed 80% flowering, at least 1,854 CUs in MCHM or 1,889 CUs in MUM were required. In Experiment 3, naturally chilled E. juncea plants were stored for 0, 4, 8, or 12 weeks at 0 °C. Percent flowering significantly decreased under all cold storage treatments. However, cold storage treatment did not affect the number of days to visible bud or days to the first open flower. These results indicate that, although percent flowering was reduced by cold storage, the flowering season could be extended by storage treatment. In conclusion, E. juncea can be classified as a day-neutral plant with a chilling requirement for flowering. Moreover, artificial chilling treatment and cold storage can be used to advance or postpone the flowering season for year-round cultivation.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • Polyploidization reduces the probability of selecting progenies with high
           root pithiness and yield potential in radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

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      Abstract: Abstract Polyploidization affects various plant organs and is widely used in plant breeding programs. This study was conducted to develop a simple and efficient method to generate tetraploid F2 populations and to investigate the polyploidy effect on the root quality and yield in radish (Raphanus sativus L.) by comparing diploid and tetraploid F2 populations. Seeds of a F1 cultivar were immersed in colchicine solution of 0.05, 0.10, 0.50, 1.00 and 2.00% to select the most efficient concentration. Treatment durations were tested for the concentration by immersing seeds for 1, 3, 6 and 12 hours. The ploidy level of colchicine-treated plants was determined using stomata size, flow cytometry and chromosome counts. The diploid and induced tetraploid F1 plants were self-fertilized to produce F2 seeds and both diploid and tetraploid F2 populations were grown in field condition. Immersing radish seeds in 1.00% colchicine solution for an hour was the most efficient in producing tetraploid plants. The leaf weight and number, and root weight and width, on average, were significantly lower in tetraploid than diploid F2 population. However, root pithiness was significantly lower in tetraploid than diploid F2 population and most of tetraploid plants had the lowest pithiness scale with some outliers. These results suggest that tetraploid populations from colchicine-treated F1 cultivars can be useful materials for radish breeding programs by significantly reducing the chances for selecting lines with high root pithiness.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • Chlorogenic acid accumulation and related gene expression in peach fruit

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      Abstract: Abstract To reveal the molecular mechanism in the accumulation of chlorogenic acids (CGAs) in peach (Prunus persica) fruit during growth and development, CGA contents in the flesh of the three peach cultivars ‘Ruiguang 18’, ‘Heiyoutao’, and ‘Beijingyixianhong’ were determined. The expression levels of CGA metabolism-related genes were analyzed based on transcriptome data (RNA-seq). These candidate genes were then screened and real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to verify their expression. The results showed that the content of total CGAs, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid and 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, in the flesh of ‘Ruiguang 18’ exhibited a decreasing trend during fruit development, and there was a great drop at maturity stage (P < 0.05). The three contents in ‘Heiyoutao’ increased first at stage S2 (P < 0.05) and then decreased significantly (P < 0.05). In ‘Beijingyixianhong’, they stayed stable in the early stages, then total CGAs and 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid decreased significantly at the maturity stage (P < 0.05). RNA-seq transcriptome data analysis and qRT-PCR expression analysis showed that the accumulation of CGAs in fruit flesh was mainly affected by the expression of Prupe.3G100800 (PpHCT) and Prupe.3G107300 (Pp4CL), and their expression levels were highly consistent with total CGA content. Thus, we concluded that Prupe.3G100800 (PpHCT) and Prupe.3G107300 (Pp4CL) are the key genes for CGAs synthesis in peach flesh.
      PubDate: 2022-03-07
       
  • Grafting-induced transcriptome changes and long-distance mRNA movement in
           the potato/Datura stramonium heterograft system

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      Abstract: Abstract Grafting potato into Solanaceae plants has been used as an efficient method to solve such problems as a short flowering period, low fruit setting rate, and sterility in potato crossbreeding. However, the molecular mechanisms governing grafting-induced phenotypic variations have not been elucidated. In this study, one potato cultivar and wild Datura stramonium served as scion (StS) and rootstock (DsR), respectively. Phenotypic analysis showed that the fertility of StS was visibly improved in comparison with self-grafted potato (St). Comparative transcriptome profiling revealed that 1490 differentially expressed genes were identified in StS compared with St, and some of these genes appear to be involved in pathways related to genome damage and genotoxic stress response. We reported the comprehensive identification of mRNA movement between DsR and StS, indicating that 111 transcripts of DsR were delivered to StS. Conversely, the 1968 mRNAs were transported from StS to DsR. Based on GO analysis, some of these mobile transcripts had a biological role in regulating pollen tube development and fruit morphogenesis. This work provides abundant transcriptome profile data for potato scions and reveals that three key transcripts moving from rootstock to scion may be responsible for improving the fertility of potatoes.
      PubDate: 2022-03-03
       
  • Increasing the functional quality of Crocus sativus L. by-product (tepals)
           by controlling spectral composition

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      Abstract: Abstract Crocus sativus L. is a crop grown for spice production, and large amounts of residues from the flowers are produced during the process. The underutilized by-product from saffron spice production, the C. sativus tepals, was investigated as a promising raw material of natural bioactive compounds using light spectrum manipulation in controlled environments. The plants were grown under either light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or natural light (NL, greenhouse). LED experiments were performed in controlled-environment chambers (120 µmol m–2 s–1of photosynthetically active radiation, 18 °C, 16-h photoperiod). The LED treatments used were as follows: (i) red ʎ = 660 nm (62%) and blue ʎ = 450 nm (38%) (RB); and (ii) red ʎ = 660 nm (50%), green ʎ = 500–600 nm (12%), and blue ʎ = 4 50 nm (38%) (RGB). Flower growth parameters, total phenols, total flavonoids, flavonols, flavonol glycosides, and antioxidant properties were measured in harvested tepals. Floral by-products from plants grown under the two LED treatments accumulated higher amounts of antioxidant compounds compared to those of plants grown under NL. The total flavonoids content was significantly enhanced in the RGB LED treatment, while the corolla fresh weight significantly declined in the same treatments. The higher content of bioactive secondary metabolites in plants grown under both RB and RGB light environments resulted in increased antioxidant capacity measured by DPPH free-radical scavenging capacity and the ferric reducing antioxidant power method. These results indicate that manipulation of LED spectra could boost secondary metabolites and antioxidant capacity to obtain phytochemically enriched floral by-products with superior functional quality.
      PubDate: 2022-02-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s13580-021-00407-1
       
  • Tackling multiple bacterial diseases of Solanaceae with a handful of
           immune receptors

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      Abstract: Abstract Every year, despite the use of chemicals, significant crop loss is caused by pathogenic microbes. Plant innate resistance to pathogens depends on two sets of genetically encoded immune receptors that sense invaders and trigger signaling cascades leading to reinforcement of physical barriers and production of various antimicrobial compounds. In the past 30 years, the molecular cloning and characterization of plant immune receptors have deepened our understanding of the plant immune system and more importantly, have provided means to improve crop protection against devastating pathogens. Here, we review the molecular characterization of selected immune receptors that can detect multiple species of bacterial pathogens through an expanded recognition range, or through the detection of conserved pathogen activities or host targets. These recent structural and molecular insights about the activation of immune receptors provide the necessary framework to design their concomitant deployment in crops, in order to lower selective pressure on pathogen populations and prevent evasion from recognition. Hence, these few immune receptors emerge as high potential genetic resources to provide durable and environmentally safe protection against important bacterial diseases of solanaceous crops.
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s13580-021-00415-1
       
  • Exogenous supplementation with sodium nitroprusside, a nitric oxide donor,
           mitigates the effects of salinity in Abelmoschus esculentus L. seedlings

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      Abstract: Abstract We investigated the protective role of the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in ameliorating the detrimental effects of salinity in in vitro-grown okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.). Okra seedlings were subjected to salinity treatments at three different NaCl concentrations (100, 150, and 200 mM), which caused a significant reduction in germination rate, shoot and root lengths, and shoot fresh weight (FW) and dry weight (DW). Further, salinity exposure had detrimental effects on the total chlorophyll content, proline content, electrolyte leakage (EL), relative water content (RWC), malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation, and nitrate reductase activity in the seedlings. However, supplementation with SNP significantly improved the plant growth parameters including shoot and root lengths, shoot FW and DW, chlorophyll content, and proline accumulation. Among the tested concentrations, SNP at 100 and 150 µM significantly reduced the H2O2 content, MDA accumulation, and EL, and increased the RWC under salinity stress. SNP supplementation also resulted in increased activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase. Our results revealed the positive effects of SNP in alleviating salt stress through enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes and osmotic adjustment, which can be explored and applied for better growth and yield performance, especially in regions with high salinity.
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s13580-021-00406-2
       
  • Assessment of genetic diversity of mandarin cultivars grown in major
           citrus regions of world using morphological and microsatellite markers

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      Abstract: Abstract Genetic diversity analysis of 46 commercially prominent mandarins grown in different countries was carried out based on molecular and fruit traits. Out of 110 SSR markers, 64 polymorphic markers amplified a total of 155 alleles. Twenty SSR primers revealed 20 unique alleles which generated DNA fingerprints in 17 genotypes. The Polymorphism information content values ranged from 0.13 (CIBE 5156) to 0.73 (CCSM 40), with an average value of 0.45 across all genotypes. The diversity analysis illustrating the genetic relationships classified the genotypes into four major clusters. The ‘Nagpur’ and ‘Mudkhed’ mandarins in cluster I were closely related as these showed the highest genetic similarity having a similarity coefficient of 0.99. In fruit traits, higher heritability (h2) was observed in fruit weight while the higher genotypic coefficient of variation (GCV) was estimated for a number of seeds demonstrating the magnitude of genetic variability in a population.
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s13580-021-00404-4
       
  • Application of galactinol to tomato enhances tolerance to cold and heat
           stresses

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      Abstract: Abstract Galactinol, a galactosyl donor, is the key substrate in raffinose family oligosaccharide (RFO) biosynthesis pathways. Many studies proved that galactinol also regulates some defense-related genes to be transcribed as a sugar signal under biotic and abiotic stresses. There are four galactinol synthase (SlGolS) genes in tomato. In this study, SlGolS1, SlGolS2, and SlGolS4 responded to cold stress, especially SlGolS1 stems treated for 12 h and SlGolS4 stems treated for 24 h. Under heat stress, the expression levels of SlGolS1, SlGolS2, and SlGolS3, especially SlGolS1 and SlGolS2, increased in leaves, roots, and stems. When expressed in E. coli cells, SlGolS2 and SlGolS4 enhanced cold tolerance, whereas SlGolS1 and SlGolS3 improved heat tolerance. These results suggested that SlGolS family members played different roles in tolerance to cold and heat stresses. In addition, the application of galactinol or galactinol + α-galactosidase inhibitor (DGJ) improved the cold and heat tolerances of tomato plants, whereas the single application of DGJ had no effect. Interestingly, the applications of DGJ, galactinol, and galactinol + DGJ also affected the expression levels of SlRS, SlSTS, and SlAGAL under cold and heat stresses. These findings indicated that galactinol was involved in the biosynthesis pathways of RFOs as a galactosyl donor and regulated the expression levels of RFO biosynthesis and breakdown-related genes as a sugar signal under cold and heat stresses.
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s13580-021-00402-6
       
  • The combined response of elevated CO2 and temperature on Valeriana
           jatamansi Jones with worm manuring in the western Himalaya: Integrating
           growth, biomass, and quality

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      Abstract: The impact of elevated CO2 (eCO2) and elevated temperature (eT) on growth, phenology, yield, and quality has been widely investigated in field crops, but limited work has been done so far on the combined effect of eCO2 and eT on medicinal plants. Hence, a 2-year experiment was conducted at CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Palampur, India, to study plant growth, biomass, and essential oil composition of mushkbala (Valeriana jatamansi Jones) in response to elevated CO2, temperature, and their combination with the regulation of fertilization. The growth and yield of V. jatamansi were significantly affected by environmental conditions and fertilization. Root length and root volume were 16.85 and 48.99% higher in the combined eCO2 and eT conditions compared to the ambient conditions. Combined eCO2 and eT showed more positive effect on the stem, root and aboveground biomass as compared to leaf, and flower biomass, over the years. Fertilization improved the growth and biomass of plants compared to unfertilized pots. FACE + FATI positively affected V. jatamansi’s major essential oil compound patchouli alcohol, while fertilization showed a negative effect. Our results highlight the need for long-term studies on medicinal and aromatic plants due to changes in the growth and efficiency of crop. Graphic abstract
      PubDate: 2022-02-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s13580-021-00386-3
       
  • Correction to: A native Trichoderma harzianum strain Th62 displays
           antagonistic activities against phytopathogenic fungi and promotes the
           growth of Celosia cristata

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-02-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s13580-021-00409-z
       
 
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