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  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 160 journals)
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Advances in Limnology
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1612-166X
Published by Schweizerbart Science Publishers Homepage  [23 journals]
  • Foreword

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      Abstract: ForewordMyers, Jared T.
      Advances in Limnology, (2021), p. 0 - 0
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The role of dipnetting of migratory European whitefish (Coregonus
           lavaretus) in the local culture and traditions of the River Tornionjoki
           Valley

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      Abstract: The role of dipnetting of migratory European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) in the local culture and traditions of the River Tornionjoki ValleyVaaraniemi, Markku; Heikkilä, Jaakko; Jokikokko, Erkki
      Advances in Limnology, (2021), p. 3 - 11Abstract Roasted whitefish on a stick is an excellent symbol of the living culture of fishing in the River Tornionjoki, the border river between Finland and Sweden. The migratory whitefish has historically been an important source of healthy food and income for local communities. The delay in the ascent of whitefish by one month in 30 years has raised concerns about the survival of the living culture of fishing, such as the traditional fishing method of dipnetting in the Kukkola rapids. Local communities have taken several initiatives to find ways to foster a sustainable whitefish stock and the traditional fishing culture of the River Torniojoki Valley. The latest cross-border initiative, a project called “The summer whitefish of the Tornio River Valley,” has widely involved fishermen, scientists and other stakeholders working towards restoration of the migratory summer whitefish stocks and the culture of fishing.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Social media at #Coregonid2017: extending the reach of a small conference
           with Twitter and Periscope

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      Abstract: Social media at #Coregonid2017: extending the reach of a small conference with Twitter and PeriscopeGeorge, Ellen
      Advances in Limnology, (2021), p. 13 - 22Abstract Using social media to enrich the scientific conference experience and communicate findings shared in presentations is becoming more common. Most conference social media efforts focus on text-based Twitter posts (“tweets”) to share information; however, live video streaming platforms offer enormous opportunities for extending the reach of both oral and poster presentations. We organized a social media campaign for the 13th International Symposium on the Biology and Management of Coregonid Fishes in September 2017 in order to increase online participation of both attendees and people following remotely online. The campaign had three main components: 1) foster communication and collaboration between conference attendees through the hashtag #Coregonid2017; 2) allow remote viewers to participate in oral and poster presentations in real time by live streaming talks with Periscope for Twitter; and 3) archiving presentation videos on the Symposium’s YouTube channel. We were able to greatly extend the reach of the conference using social media: although only 150 people attended the conference, a total of 32 unique accounts tweeted using the conference hashtag, live streamed videos received a total of 465 live views and 1099 replay views within four months following the conference, and recorded talks on the conference’s YouTube channel had 742 views. A detailed description of how the campaign was planned and implemented, along with a collection of advice and tips for organizing social media campaigns for conferences, is included to help those interested in spearheading similar campaigns for future conferences.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Towards sustainable commercial vendace fisheries in Finland: lessons
           learned from educating stakeholders for management decision making based
           on imprecise stock monitoring data

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      Abstract: Towards sustainable commercial vendace fisheries in Finland: lessons learned from educating stakeholders for management decision making based on imprecise stock monitoring dataMarjomäki, Timo J.; Valkeajärvi, Pentti; Keskinen, Tapio; Muje, Kari; Urpanen, Olli; Karjalainen, Juha
      Advances in Limnology, (2021), p. 25 - 46Abstract The new Fishing Act in Finland stipulates that fisheries must be managed in an ecologically, economically, and socially sustainable manner based on the best available knowledge. A new regional body representing different stakeholders must prepare a management plan, enforce it, and monitor its impact with data on fisheries. To facilitate these objectives, representatives of different stakeholder groups and other relevant actors were educated for whole-lake-scale vendace (Coregonus albula) stock monitoring and commercial fisheries management planning, and decision-making. The education sessions consisted of lectures on stock monitoring methods and a practical exercise of preparing a monitoring plan and a commercial fishing code. These were then pressure tested and tuned further in management strategy evaluation (MSE); A simulation model was used to create a virtual vendace stock and associated fishing and stock monitoring data that incorporated realistic measurement errors and biases. The participants applied these imprecise data for regulating fishing according to their code. First, this paper provides an example of real vendace monitoring data from Lake Southern Konnevesi. The stock has been monitored with metrics such as yield (kg) and catch (individuals) per unit effort, age distribution, and size-at-age. Later on, density of newly hatched larvae after ice-off and pelagic fish density in autumn (consisting mainly of vendace and smelt) were estimated annually. Despite the considerable imprecision, all abundance indices correlated strongly and indicated the trend in vendace stock abundance. The larval density estimate gave some useful information for back-casting spawning stock abundance and forecasting recruitment. The participants of the exercise felt, based on their experience, that annual data on total commercial yield and fishing effort, YPUE from commercial gear, age-distribution of catch, and size-at-age are minimum annual information required for understanding relative stock fluctuations and for forecasting the potential for sustainable fishing for next season. These were considered cost-effective and heuristically simple to interpret. In certain demanding situations, they found stakeholder-independent information on larval density and vendace density from echo sounding useful, despite their higher cost and more ambiguous interpretation. The exercises generated valuable information on what should be included in a lake-specific commercial vendace fishing code and on an applicable management strategy for a quickly fluctuating vendace resource. The MSE turned out to be useful both in educating the participants about planning and decision-making and testing and fine-tuning the draft of a monitoring plan and fishing code.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Collecting viable deepwater cisco gametes from Lake Michigan for
           propagation – lessons learned

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      Abstract: Collecting viable deepwater cisco gametes from Lake Michigan for propagation – lessons learnedHoley, Mark E.; Hanson, S. Dale; Gordon, Roger R.; Drew, Tim D.; Mackey, 
Gregg E.; Connerton, Michael J.
      Advances in Limnology, (2021), p. 47 - 64Abstract Our objective was to develop protocols for the collection of viable gametes from a deepwater form of cisco (Coregonus hoyi) to support rearing and reintroduction in Lake Ontario where deepwater ciscoes have been extirpated since the early 1980s. We collected gametes of the hoyi form of deepwater cisco in Lake Michigan from 2011–2017. Hoyi spawn over a protracted winter spawning season in offshore waters at depths that can exceed 80 m. We evaluated capture gear, fertilization techniques, and transportation methods to optimize survival to eye-up. Gillnets collected fewer, but larger adults that were in poorer condition, and annual mean survival to eye-up peaked at 40.3%. Bottom trawls caught greater numbers of smaller adults in better condition, resulting in a greater number of viable eggs, and annual mean survival to eye-up ranged from 47.7–80.4%. While gill or trawl netting gear can capture enough fish for brood stock development, only trawl nets are practical to collect enough eggs for rearing experiments and annual stocking for restoration. Pressure effects during net retrieval from 80 m expelled many ripe eggs and sperm, consequently hand stripping of gametes was ineffective. Body cavity incision was necessary to maximize gamete collection. Excised testes were pressed through screening to maximize available sperm and improve fertilization. Overnight shipping to rearing hatcheries in New York and Ontario was necessary to avoid lower survival to eye-up related to multiple shipping days and elevated water temperatures during shipping. Up to two million fertilized eggs were collected in a single spawning season.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Coregonine fisheries in the eastern Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea: history
           and current status

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      Abstract: Coregonine fisheries in the eastern Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea: history and current statusBogdanov, Dmitry V.; Sendek, Dmitry S.; Lajus, Dmitry L.
      Advances in Limnology, (2021), p. 65 - 81Abstract Coregonines in the eastern Gulf of Finland of the Baltic Sea are represented by two species: the common whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus L.) and the vendace (Coregonus albula L.). Early commercial fishing records (15th-16th centuries) suggest whitefish was one of the most important fishes in the region. Harvest information for vendace was limited to recent years, presumably because this species was not as valuable and its catches were unstable. Over an 85-year period of harvest records, the highest whitefish catches were reported in 1937–1939 (annual max. 76 metric tonnes (mt)), 1950–1956 (annual max. 97 mt), 1972 (32 mt) and 1983 (27 mt). In recent years (2011–2016), whitefish catches averaged 10 mt per year. Variability in vendace catches were higher than those of whitefish; from 2006 onwards catches stabilized at a level of approximately 11 mt, while maximum catches were reported in the 1950s (annual max. 1017 mt) and in the early 1970s (annual max. 125 mt). The decline in whitefish catches is due to overfishing and the deterioration of spawning areas, while fluctuations in vendace abundance are likely caused by natural factors such as salinity and temperature. Currently, the total reported catch of vendace accounts for only 1.6% of fish caught in the eastern Gulf of Finland. Most coregonines are caught during the pre-spawning period (September–October), when> 50% of annual whitefish and> 60% of vendace catches are reported. On average, about 70% of the whitefish in the Gulf of Finland were caught by gillnets and 30% were caught by trap nets of varied design (e.g., fyke nets, coastal set nets and weirs). Over 90% of vendace were caught using fyke nets and 10% were caught with small-mesh gillnets. This paper discusses whitefish and vendace conservation as it relates to sustainable fishing practices.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Lake Ontario cisco population dynamics based on long-term surveys

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      Abstract: Lake Ontario cisco population dynamics based on long-term surveysWeidel, Brian C.; Hoyle, James A.; Connerton, Michael J.; Holden, Jeremy P.; Vinson, Mark R.
      Advances in Limnology, (2021), p. 85 - 103Abstract Prior to European settlement, cisco (Coregonus artedi) were likely one of Lake Ontario’s most abundant fishes but currently represent a small portion of the fish community. To understand how the population has changed over the past 70 years we compared trends in annual catch rates from gillnet and bottom trawl surveys and commercial fishery landings. In surveys, cisco were generally rare, and represented 0.2, 0.4, and 0.001% of all fish caught in two gillnet surveys and bottom trawl surveys. Cisco catch rates in gillnets and trawls were positively correlated and correlations increased when gillnet catches two years later were compared to trawls since trawls tended to capture smaller, juvenile-sized cisco relative to gillnets. Survey catch rates suggest recruitment is generally low, but discrete periods of relatively greater recruitment in the 1980s and mid-2010s suggest reproductive conditions for cisco vary temporally. Trawl surveys were the most spatially extensive survey and illustrated catch rates were highest in northeastern Lake Ontario. Greater cisco abundance in this region may be related to more-abundant embayment spawning habitat, greater distance from winter aggregations of nonnative planktivores, or more appropriate environmental conditions during spawing. At the basin scale, Lake Ontario bottom trawl catch per unit effort (CPUE) was positively correlated to Lake Superior trawl CPUE suggesting a regional driver, such as climate, may be similarly impacting both populations. Concurrent patterns across Lake Ontario surveys support the idea that cisco are currently a small portion of the fish community, recruitment remains inconsistent, and habitats in northeastern Lake Ontario appear critical to the remnant populations.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Infection by the cestodes Triaenophorus crassus and Diphyllobothrium spp.
           in a polymorphic whitefish population

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      Abstract: Infection by the cestodes Triaenophorus crassus and Diphyllobothrium spp. in a polymorphic whitefish populationSandlund, Odd Terje; Næsje, Tor F.; Diserud, Ola H.
      Advances in Limnology, (2021), p. 105 - 116Abstract The whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus s.l.) stock in Lake Femunden, Norway, includes three morphs: deepwater spawning (D-), river spawning (R-) and shallow water spawning (S-) whitefish. Infections by Diphyllobothrium spp. and Triaenophorus crassus in the morphs were monitored between 1988–2005. The mean number of T. crassus recorded per infected fish varied between 1.64 and 1.77 in the three morphs, and was not significantly different. In all three morphs T. crassus prevalence increased significantly with age, but at a varying rate. In juvenile fish (age 2–4), mean prevalence was 3.7% in D-whitefish, 10.7% in R-whitefish and 23.7% in S-whitefish. As the rate of increase was lower in R- and S-whitefish than in D-whitefish, prevalence was more similar in older fish. The relative differences in prevalence of T. crassus among the three whitefish morphs appear mainly to be in accordance with the morph differences in habitat use, and associated with the habitat use of the final host of the parasite, the northern pike (Esox lucius). Almost all individuals of D-, R- and S-whitefish were infected by Diphyllobothrium spp., with prevalence higher than 75% from age 2. The mean abundance of Diphyllobothrium spp. increased with age in all three whitefish morphs, but with the most rapid increase in young age groups. The development of infection with age was almost identical in S- and D-whitefish, whereas R-whitefish was at a higher level from an early age. The high prevalence of Diphyllobothrium spp. in all three whitefish morphs probably reflects the distribution of parasite eggs, potentially over all lake habitats by the avian final hosts. The mean abundance of Diphyllobothrium spp. was nearly identical in D- and S-whitefish, but significantly higher in R-whitefish. This is not easily explained by differences in habitat use or diet among the whitefish morphs.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Characteristics of the spawning migration of anadromous broad whitefish
           (Coregonus nasus) in the lower Mackenzie River

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      Abstract: Characteristics of the spawning migration of anadromous broad whitefish (Coregonus nasus) in the lower Mackenzie RiverMartin, Zoya A.; Howland, Kimberly L.; Gillis, Darren; Tallman, Ross F.
      Advances in Limnology, (2021), p. 117 - 132Abstract Anadromous broad whitefish (Coregonus nasus) in the Mackenzie River system undergo extensive upstream migrations in the fall, presumably for spawning. However, quantitative data to support this assumption is rare. Therefore, we investigated fish presence/absence at a site along their spawning route (catch per unit effort; CPUE), fish reproductive status (sexual maturity stage and gonadosomatic index; GSI), relative abundance of males and females (correlations between date, CPUE, and GSI), interactions between fork length, condition factor, GSI, and average fish length by month of broad whitefish entering the Arctic Red River from June through November in 1992 and 1993. CPUE was lowest in July and August, gradually increased through September, and peaked in October each year. Visual inspection of gonads throughout the study also showed a gradual development in sexually maturity of fish, with the abundance of ripe (pre-spawning) fish peaking in October and spent (post-spawning) fish observed in November. GSI of male and female fish gradually increased through the summer, peaked in October, and decreased again in November. In addition to the variation in migration over time (months), we found that there is variation in migration characteristics between the sexes. Based on these results, we conclude sexually mature and running ripe broad whitefish move into the Arctic Red River during a very short time window in the fall.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Compensatory reserve of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in
           Michigan waters of Lake Michigan

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      Abstract: Compensatory reserve of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in Michigan waters of Lake MichiganYoun, So-Jung; Taylor, William W.; Hayes, Daniel B.; Ferreri, C. Paola
      Advances in Limnology, (2021), p. 133 - 145Abstract Every fish population has a compensatory reserve, which reflects the degree of population resilience to perturbations in the environment. This compensation is directly related to the degree of flexibility in vital rates (i.e., survival, growth, and fecundity), which are affected by changing environmental conditions, population density, and genetics. The impacts of changes in growth, maturation, and fecundity of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in Michigan waters of Lake Michigan, from 1986–2016, were explored using Leslie matrices to assess the potential impacts of stressors (e.g., decreased food availability, fishing pressure, interactions with invasive species) on the population’s scope of compensatory reserve. Analyses of the matrices indicated that the projected population growth rates were up to 9% higher during 1986–2007 (relatively low abundance) compared to the baseline time period (2008–2016; relatively high abundance but declining). Therefore, the lake whitefish populations in northern Lake Michigan exhibited some compensatory reserve during the time period studied (1986–1993). The decrease in compensatory reserve of the population over the past 30 years may be due to density-dependent factors and significant alterations in environmental factors, such as a reduction in the availability of their primary food source (Diporeia).
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +000
       
 
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