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  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 160 journals)
Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acque Sotterranee - Italian Journal of Groundwater     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Agua y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Águas Subterrâneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Water Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Water Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Aquacultural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Aquaculture and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aquasains     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Living Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Aquatic Sciences and Engineering     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Desalination and Water Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Discover Water     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European journal of water quality - Journal européen d'hydrologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Water     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Grundwasser     Hybrid Journal  
Hydro Nepal : Journal of Water, Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
IDA Journal of Desalination and Water Reuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
International Hydrographic Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Nuclear Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Waste Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Water Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Water Resources Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrology (New Zealand)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of South Carolina Water Resources     Open Access  
Journal of the American Water Resources Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Water and Wastewater / Ab va Fazilab     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Water Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Water Resource Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Jurnal Enggano     Open Access  
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Marine Ecology Progress Series MEPS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Natural and Engineering Sciences     Open Access  
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
npj Clean Water     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Opflow     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ozone Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Paddy and Water Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revue des sciences de l'eau / Journal of Water Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
River Research and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sustainable Water Resources Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Texas Water Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Water Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Water     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Water and Environment Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Water Cycle     Open Access  
Water Environment and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Water Research X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Resources Management     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Water Resources Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Water Science : The National Water Research Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Water-Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water21     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Watershed Ecology and the Environment     Open Access  
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wetlands Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Water Policy     Hybrid Journal  
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

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Journal Cover
Discover Water
Number of Followers: 7  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2730-647X
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Experimental design of polymer synthesis applied to the removal of Cd2+
           ions from water via adsorption

    • Abstract: Abstract Cadmium is a highly toxic metal, and its presence can have adverse effects on both human health and aquatic ecosystems. The efficient removal of cadmium from wastewater is therefore of crucial importance, but traditional methods have proved to be inadequate. Thus, technologies for the treatment of wastewater containing cadmium, including adsorption, have been developed. The aim of this study was the preparation of a polymeric material by the grafting reaction of κ-carrageenan and its use as an adsorbent for cadmium removal. This was performed to study the removal capacity of cadmium ions in synthetic solutions, as well as the effects of pH and ions on adsorption capacity, adsorption kinetics, isotherms, and reusability. Additionally, the disinfectant potential of the solution was evaluated for the inactivation of total coliforms and E. coli in river water. The best adsorption capacity was 75.52 ± 1.325 mg g−1, with the kinetics described by the pseudo-second order model. Maximum adsorption capacity (127.6 ± 1.833 mg g−1) and RL (0.0113) were determined using the Langmuir model, the Freundlich model was the one that best fits the experimental data and indicated cooperative adsorption, and the Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm was used to obtain the adsorption energy and identify that it is physical. The presence of ions K+, Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ in a concentration of 0.5% decreased the adsorption capacity, and that at pH 2.0, the adsorption capacity was drastically reduced. The study indicates that the polymer has potential as an adsorbent for removing cadmium from aqueous solutions and exhibits self-disinfecting properties.
      PubDate: 2024-07-11
       
  • Comparative assessment of the effect of storage vessels, thatched roof and
           industrial activity on harvested rainwater quality in south eastern,
           Nigeria using water quality index

    • Abstract: Abstract Rainwater is usually harvested through catchment systems such as roofs or directly from the sky for storage in different vessels for eventual use due to water scarcity which is as a result of increased in water demand, rapid industrialization, increasing pollution, global warming and climate change. This study was carried out to assess the effects of galvanized iron and PVC tanks, thatched roof and industrial activity on harvested rainwater quality by investigating physico-chemical properties, heavy metals, coliform level and metal composition of the storage vessels. Seven-two harvested rainwater samples were collected from four locations in the urban and rural areas of Delta and Enugu States, Nigeria between the months of April-July, 2018. Rainwater samples stored for 1 month to a year in storage vessels were considered. The results were compared with water quality standards (USEPA, WHO, NAFDAC and NSDWQ) and Water Quality Index ratings. Heavy metals (Pb, Fe, Cr, Zn and Al) were analyzed using Flame-AAS; other parameters were determined using standard methods. The WQI ratings were calculated using the weighted arithmetic method. The results were analysed using descriptive and two-way ANOVA statistical analysis. Results obtained in both areas of the States showed mean values ranging from 5.60 ± 0.28 to 7.60 ± 0.20 for pH, E.coli (0.00 ± 0.00–1.00 ± 0.00 cfu/mL), EC (7.00 ± 1.41–108.70 ± 8.62 µs/cm), colour (0.44 ± 0.01–12.86 ± 0.17 TCU) and heavy metals (mg/L) gave 0.00 ± 0.00–1.52 ± 0.13 for Fe, Pb (0.00 ± 0.00–0.29 ± 0.02), Cr (0.00 ± 0.00–0.30 ± 0.05), Zn (0.00 ± 0.00–0.05 ± 0.02) and Al (0.00 ± 0.00–4.65 ± 2.24). The results of the harvested rainwater samples analyzed showed that, the mean values of all the parameters analyzed were below and within the water quality set standard with the exception of a few in both areas in each of the States and were significantly different at (p < 0.05). The results of WQI ratings showed that, harvested rainwater qualities in both States were rated from excellent to unfit for drinking water quality. Generally, harvested rainwater stored in PVC tanks rated better than rainwater stored in galvanized iron tanks though not free of contamination. The storage duration for harvested rainwater is very important for its water quality, hence, harvested rainwater whether it is stored or not should be subjected to treatment before being use for potable usages.
      PubDate: 2024-07-09
       
  • Development of an IoT-based multi-level system for real-time water quality
           monitoring in industrial wastewater

    • Abstract: Abstract Industrialization and urbanization contribute significantly to environmental pollution, particularly in water bodies. The consequences of this pollution are dire, impacting both the environment and public health. A serious hazard to life on Earth, contaminated water can cause food poisoning, diarrhea, respiratory diseases, and skin ailments, among other health problems. In countries like Bangladesh, where industrial activities, particularly in the garment sector, are prevalent, waste dumping into rivers and canals has reached alarming levels. This has resulted in a drastic decline in water quality, endangering aquatic life and ecosystems. To solve this important issue, we built an innovative real-time water quality monitoring system using the Internet of Things (IoT). Our system operates at three levels, collecting data from different layers of wastewater. Key parameters, including temperature, turbidity, total dissolved solids (TDS), and pH, are continuously monitored to assess water quality. The analysis revealed that wastewater temperature varied between 25 and 37 °C across different sites, with higher temperatures observed in industrial zones, indicating potential thermal pollution. Total dissolved solids (TDS) levels exhibited substantial variations, ranging from 170 to 360 ppm, surpassing standard thresholds and posing a threat to aquatic ecosystems. Turbidity readings ranged from 1.30 to 12.89 NTU, with higher turbidity observed in areas receiving industrial discharge, highlighting the impact of suspended solids on water clarity. pH values exceeded 7.0 across all sites, ranging from 9.5 to 10.32, indicating alkaline wastewater, particularly in regions with dyeing and textile industries. By integrating these specific metrics into our monitoring system, we provide valuable insights into industrial wastewater quality and its environmental implications. These findings underscore the urgent need for real-time monitoring and targeted interventions to address water pollution. Implementing sustainable water management strategies in industrial contexts is critical to protecting public health and preserving ecosystems for future generations.
      PubDate: 2024-07-09
       
  • Multi-level analysis of access to drinking water in rural communes in the
           south of the Kaffrine region, Senegal

    • Abstract: Abstract In Senegal, there are disparities in access to drinking water at several levels. There are major differences between urban and rural areas. In rural areas, poverty, the abundance or scarcity of water infrastructure, and the distance between the place of residence and the place of supply are, to some extent, factors in the disparity in rates of access to drinking water from one village to another and, within the same village, from one household to another. Determining the sources of variance between villages and households regarding access to drinking water is based on the identification of several explanatory variables, both at the aggregate level (village level) and at the individual level (household level). Multilevel analysis has shown that differences in household access to drinking water are due to several factors that can be grouped into two categories: contextual variables that vary from one village to another, and individual characteristics that differ from one household to another. The aim of this article is to analyze the factors that explain the disparity in access to drinking water in rural communes in the south of the Kaffrine region. The usefulness of multilevel analysis lies in its ability to solidify causal inference in the associations between the infrastructural levels of villages, in terms of water facilities, and their impact on the level of access to drinking water of rural households as reported (Bringe and Golaz in Manuel pratique d’analyse multiniveau, Ined Éditions, Aubervilliers, 2017), as reported (Diane et al., in Analyse multiniveau pour expliquer la prévalence d’impacts sanitaires néfastes autorapportés et l’adaptation lorsqu’il fait très chaud et humide en été dans les secteurs les plus défavorisés des neuf villes les plus populeuses du Québec en 2011, 2015).
      PubDate: 2024-07-05
       
  • Statistical investigation of climate and landfill age impacts on
           Kupferberg landfill leachate composition: one-way ANOVA analysis

    • Abstract: Abstract This study investigated seasonal variations in the physico-chemical properties of leachate from the Kupferberg landfill site, examining the influence of landfill age and climatic factors. Data provided by the Windhoek Municipality during the years 2017 to 2022 facilitated the exploration of critical concerns related to groundwater protection and human health. Guided by two research questions and anchored in hypotheses tested at a 95% confidence level, the study employed Statistical Packages for Social Scientists (SPSS) for analysis. Significant temperature variations were observed across years [F (5, 21) = 4.493, p < 0.05], indicating a substantial relationship between landfill age and seasonal variations in leachate physico-chemical properties. Further ANOVA tests revealed temperature trends impacting leachate parameters, such as organic content and pH. While COD displayed a declining trend with landfill age, inorganic components like Cl- and alkalinity exhibited no distinct age-related pattern. Wet seasons demonstrated higher EC and Cl- -mean values than dry seasons, correlating with elevated COD levels. The study underscored the incremental rise in parameter values over time and during the rainy season, attributed to solid waste degradation and rainwater percolation. Notably, climatic conditions significantly influenced seasonal variations in leachate physico-chemical properties (p < 0.05). Based on this outcome, null hypothesis 1 was rejected. The second null hypothesis was also rejected because climatic conditions do influence the seasonal variations in physico-chemical properties. These findings are crucial for emphasizing the need for effective leachate management strategies and providing valuable insights for arid regions. Future research can expand on a national scale, employing one-way ANOVA tests on other landfills in Namibia, and engaging local communities for comprehensive data collection on cross-contamination.
      PubDate: 2024-07-04
       
  • SDG 6 progress analyses in sub-Saharan Africa from 2015–2020: the
           need for urgent action

    • Abstract: Abstract This study used data from various international databases to track the progress of SDG 6 target indicators in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region between 2015 and 2020. Findings showed that although minimal positive progress was realized in the evaluation period, more than half of SSA residents had no access to safe drinking water services, improved sanitation facilities, hygiene services and safe wastewater treatment. The computed SDG 6 profile index conformed with the trend of indicators as progress of the region to the goal’s realization was rated as medium–low. The trend was further compounded by limited data, preferential access to water and sanitation services to the urban rich and poor monitoring of progress. The analysis also noted that despite these challenges the region was putting concerted efforts to promote transboundary cooperation in water management and had 6% of water stressed resources. The study recommended on the need to revamp water data collection and monitoring efforts to enable decision-making and planning on management actions, use of technology to treat and reuse wastewater as well as device new sources of water, enhanced participation of communities in water projects and improved water use efficiency to steer progress towards SDG 6 realization in SSA region.
      PubDate: 2024-06-24
       
  • Functionalized graphitic carbon nitride as adsorbent for the removal of
           arsenic and lead from groundwater

    • Abstract: Abstract Water pollution caused by highly toxic arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) poses a serious threat to water quality. Hence, the development of materials for their effective removal from water continues to attract research attention. The present study reports functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (GCN) as a green and low-cost adsorbent for the removal of As and Pb from polluted water. The adsorbent was prepared through the protonation and hydroxyl and cyano functionalized graphitic carbon nitride to form H/GCN and OH/CN-GCN respectively. Characterization techniques including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy were respectively used to study functional groups, structure, and morphology of the adsorbents. The adsorption study showed that modification of GCN with −OH and CN− ions in OH/CN-GCN, increased the density of negative charges on the functionalized surface, which also enhances the attraction of the positively charged ions. This may be responsible for the improved removal of As and Pb from wastewater compared to H/GCN. Isotherm studies on the adsorption behavior of OH/CN-GCN suggest that Langmuir isotherm model corroborates with the As adsorption. Therefore, indicating that the removal of As via its adsorption onto OH/CN-GCN is a surface phenomenon. However, the adsorption of Pb could be described as mainly a multilayer adsorption process, based on its R2 value. It is proposed that the −OH and CN− groups on the tri-s-triazine units of GCN nanosheets may be responsible for the adsorption process. The prepared materials are promising adsorbents that nay find useful applications in wastewater treatment plants involving advanced oxidation processes.
      PubDate: 2024-06-20
       
  • Assessing factors influencing greywater characteristics around the world:
           a qualitative and quantitative approach with a short-review on greywater
           treatment technologies

    • Abstract: The obsolete efficiencies in conventional centralized wastewater treatment systems call for implementation of source separation and treatment of wastewater. Approximately 60–75% of domestic wastewater is attributed to greywater, which could be reused to combat freshwater crisis. The present study investigates qualitative and quantitative attributes of greywater from different sources in High-Income Countries (HICs) and Low-Income Countries (LICs). The quantity of greywater generation is positively correlated with country’s per capita income, but feebly negatively correlated with temperature. Kitchen source is the highest contributor of total suspended solids (134–1300 mg/l), whereas in case of turbidity, laundry is the major contributor (39–444 NTU). Also, kitchen greywater is characterized by comparatively high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) of 100–1850 mg/l, low pH of 5.6–8, and elevated total nitrogen (TN) of about 1.5–48 mg/l. The high pH (7.3–10) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels (58–2497 mg/l) in laundry greywater are due to usage of sodium hydroxide-based soaps, while usage of wash detergents containing phosphates like sodium tripolyphosphate contribute to high total phosphorus (TP) (0.062–57 mg/l). The qualitative characteristics of greywater in HICs are perceived to be superior compared to LICs. Furthermore, the most widely used physicochemical, biological, and advanced oxidation treatment technologies for greywater are outlined briefly. It can be observed that economical treatment systems like phytoremediation or biological technologies combined with sand filtration systems can be implemented to treat greywater with high organic content in LICs, whereas in HICs where greywater is generated in large quantities, electro-coagulation combined with advanced oxidation technologies can be used to treat its higher COD levels. Graphical
      PubDate: 2024-06-15
       
  • Banana peels as a green bioadsorbent for removing metals ions from
           wastewater

    • Abstract: Abstract Bioadsorption using agricultural waste offers a promising approach for removing toxic metals from wastewater. This study explores the potential of chemically activated banana peels (BPs) as a green and cost-effective bioadsorbent for Cu(II) and Zn(II) removal. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of functional groups like alcohols, phenols, and amino acids on activated BPs, potentially responsible for metal ion binding. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirmed the presence of cavities on the BPs surface and the existence of oxygen and potassium. The adsorption capacity of BPs was investigated under various conditions, including pH, contact time, sorbent dosage, metal concentration, and temperature. This study used Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin, and Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) isotherm models to describe the equilibrium results of Cu (II) and Zn (II) adsorption. The Langmuir isotherm model best described the adsorption process, suggesting monolayer coverage of metal ions on the BPs surface. Maximum adsorption capacities were 3.2 mg g−1 for Cu(II) and 2.8 mg g−1 for Zn(II), demonstrating the effectiveness of BPs in metal removal. Kinetic studies indicated pseudo-first-order (PFO) behavior for Cu(II) and pseudo-second-order (PSO) behavior for Zn(II) adsorption. Thermodynamic analysis revealed a spontaneous and exothermic process (negative Gibbes free energy (ΔG°) and enthalpy (ΔH°) with decreased randomness [negative entropy (ΔS°)] at the biosorption interface. Finally, the BPs sorbent was successfully applied to remove different metal ions from real wastewater samples collected from the El Wadi drain.
      PubDate: 2024-06-12
       
  • Stormwater runoff calculator for evaluation of low impact development
           practices at ground-mounted solar photovoltaic farms

    • Abstract: Abstract Estimating runoff at ground-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) installations is challenging because of the disconnected nature of impervious solar panels and the pervious ground surface underneath and between panel rows. There is a need for improved tools to estimate how low impact development practices at these solar installations affect stormwater runoff. The objective of this study was to develop an innovative spreadsheet-based runoff calculator that rapidly estimates stormwater runoff from ground-mounted solar PV sites. The calculator is built on a 2-D hydrologic model (Hydrus-2D/3D) calibrated and validated using experimental data from five commercial solar farms in Colorado, Georgia, Minnesota, New York, and Oregon. The Hydrus-2D/3D hydrologic model was then used to generate nomographs for stormwater runoff that were incorporated into an easy-to-use Excel-based solar farm runoff calculator. This calculator allows for rapid estimation of NRCS stormwater runoff curve number (CN) values at solar farms by considering several complex factors unique to PV installations including: soil and topographic characteristics, surface cover, disconnected impervious surface factors associated with various solar panel designs, and climatic factors. The solar farm runoff calculator quickly estimates runoff CN for pre- and post-construction scenarios, and can estimate actual depth of runoff based on a user-specified 24-h design storm depth. Factors that have the most significant impact on stormwater runoff include design storm return frequency, soil texture, soil bulk density, and soil depth. Ground surface cover has a moderate impact on stormwater runoff, and factors that have a lesser impact on stormwater runoff include slope and array size, spacing and orientation on the landscape. The runoff calculator allows for accurate estimates of runoff generated by disconnected impervious surfaces and low impact development practices at solar farms as affected by a wide range of site-specific conditions.
      PubDate: 2024-06-11
       
  • Low impact development devices DNA of cities for long term stormwater
           management strategies

    • Abstract: Abstract In 2024 the Low Impact Development Devices (LID) open-source international database ClimateScan consist of over 14.000 climate adaption related projects uploaded in the period of 2014–2024. For cities with over 500 projects, this offers an opportunity to construct a LID-DNA of the city. LID-DNA presents the ‘genetic information of the development and functioning of LID in a city’ and was first used in The Netherlands during ClimateCafés as evaluation for future design and maintenance of stormwater management strategies. The LID-DNA of several cities based on the quantity and categories of LID is visualized. The LID structure of early adaptor Amsterdam with over 500 LID measures implemented in 2000–2024, shows a large variety of over 20 types of individual LID. The relative new adaptor Riga shows a LID-DNA with a focus on bio-filtration with raingardens and swales (based on 40 data points). Stakeholders from different departments concluded that cities benefit from the insights of their urban LID-DNA earlier in the process. An early insight will support a targeted LID strategy choosing a limited cost-efficient group of LID than having a wide range of different LID without evaluation of their efficiency. Departments in the city asked for more detailed insights (earlier in the process) to prevent mal-adaptation and disinvestments and be more efficient with their capacity. The ClimateScan database holds over 300 monitored LID projects with research results in North America and Europe in cities as Vancouver, New Orleans, Amsterdam and Riga. Future work will focus on more detailed LID-DNA visualisation based on not only the amount of LID but on the dimensions such as water storage (m3) and surface (m2). Monitoring of LID will be stimulated to make strategic decisions on measured infiltration rates (m/d) of LID as most important criteria for possible damage by floodings and maintenance (clogging). Raising awareness and capacity building targeted on the high-ranking cost-efficient LID is set up in both cities focused on the design, construction and maintenance of LID.
      PubDate: 2024-06-10
       
  • Geoelectric analysis for groundwater potential assessment and aquifer
           protection in a part of Shango, North-Central Nigeria

    • Abstract: Abstract Groundwater is vital for sustainable development, and this study addresses potable water challenges in Shango, North-Central Nigeria. The main goal is to identify optimal sites for new wells and boreholes, utilizing geological and geo-electrical attributes from existing boreholes and wells. Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) assessed groundwater potential, aquifer protection, and overburden corrosivity. Sixteen VES stations were probed using Schlumberger array with a maximum current electrode spacing (AB/2) of 200 m using a resistivity meter. The data were interpreted using an automatic computer inversion program, IPI2WIN. The VES results revealed five subsurface geo-electric units, with depths to the aquifer ranging from 58 to 68 m, each exhibiting distinct characteristics contributing to the lithological variability of the research area. Hydraulic conductivity ranged from 0.465 to 0.534 m/day, while transmissivity varied from 9.589 m2/day to 26.029 m2/day across different VES points. Regions exhibiting thick layers and low resistivity values indicate high longitudinal conductivity. Furthermore, areas with low protective capacity are susceptible to the risks of pollution and contamination stemming from leaks and waste sites. The study revealed that all VES points are in practically non-corrosive zones, making them suitable for burying underground tanks with extremely low deterioration rates. Based on geoelectrical characteristics, the study area was divided into three groundwater potential zones: low, medium, and high. These findings provide valuable insights into the groundwater potential and protective capacity of the Shango area, while emphasizing on the vulnerability of these regions and highlighting the pressing need for appropriate preventive measures to safeguard against potential environmental hazards.
      PubDate: 2024-06-06
       
  • Hydrochemical evolution of groundwater in a river corridor: the compounded
           impacts of various environmental factors

    • Abstract: Abstract Various environmental factors could induce groundwater hydrochemical evolution, which should be considered when addressing groundwater environmental issues. However, the complex interactions among the environmental controls remain unknown for a groundwater flow system spanning multiple geological units. To fill this gap, we conducted a study on the groundwater hydrochemical evolution in the fluvial corridor of the Fen River, Northern China, utilizing a combination of hydrogeochemical and multiple isotope methods. Results reveal that the groundwater in the corridor has significantly degraded due to high concentrations of \({\text{SO}}_{4}^{2 - }\) , \({\text{NO}}_{3}^{ - }\) , Cl−, or F−. We find an unordered evolution of the hydrochemical composition of groundwater along this corridor. These evolutions are driven by mineral dissolution/precipitation, dedolomitization, and cation exchange processes. Human activities play a significant role, with notable contributions including \({\text{NO}}_{3}^{ - }\) fluxes from agricultural fertilizers, manure, and sewage, as well as \({\text{SO}}_{4}^{2 - }\) fluxes arising from coal mining activities. The combination between karst spring areas and faults/uplifts, between coal-bearing strata and mining activities fosters the mixing of karst water/mine water with shallow groundwater, promoting dramatic hydrochemical evolution of groundwater. The flat terrain and the natural blockage formed by mountains significantly enhance water–rock interactions and groundwater evaporation by slowing groundwater flow. The contribution of evaporation on groundwater salinity ranges from ~ 0.2% to 4.8%, highlighting its importance in the groundwater hydrochemical evolution. This study unravels the multifaceted nature of groundwater hydrochemical evolution. It emphasizes the four types of environmental controls, including hydrogeochemical processes, climate factors, human activities, and variations in geological settings, can be equally important, which is usually ignored. The findings enrich our understanding of groundwater evolution and highlight the challenges encountered in regions composed of diverse geological units.
      PubDate: 2024-06-03
       
  • Assessment of water quality parameters due to longitudinal salinity
           inundation at Indus Delta: a case study of Kharo Chan, District Sujawal

    • Abstract: Abstract Deltas are landforms that are formed at the regions where a river meets an ocean. When the freshwater of a river joins the saline water of an ocean, a transitional state of water is obtained. This zone of transition varies on the quantity of freshwater entering the ocean and the quality of both waters. Indus River is facing severe challenges due to climate change which has resulted in reduced water flow in the river. Consequently, seawater intrusion takes place which causes coastal erosion, stunted mangrove growth, and the narrowing of the river towards the seaside. The groundwater in the deltaic regions is unfit for drinking which forces an increased reliance on surface water. Sindh Province of Pakistan, particularly the coastal regions, suffers from severe water quality problems, affecting approximately 41% of the population. The population of this region is deprived of good-quality water for their daily use. This research aims to evaluate the physiochemical parameters of water in the Indus River to identify the zone of salinity inundation and determine safe zones for accessing surface water in the Indus Delta in the Sujawal district. Water samples were collected from Khobar Creek, ending in the Arabian Sea in the areas of Shah Bandar and Kharo Chan at an approximate interval of 5 km. These samples were analyzed for various physical and chemical properties. Properties were compared spatially to develop a relationship between distance and quality of water. Results indicate that the values of dissolved solids in collected samples are between 21,450 and 900 mg/L, pH was between 6.66 and 7.63, conductivity of the samples varied from 33,000 to 1385 µS/cm, acidity values were between 921.14 and 399.84 mg/L, hardness was in the range of 3654 to 192 mg/L, and the turbidity was in between 21 and57 NTU. It was revealed from the results that seawater is having a severe influence upto 15 km from the mouth of the creek in which not a single parameter except the pH was complying with WHO recommendations. In the interval of 15 to 30 km, some properties of water were complying with WHO recommendations, while some of them were deviating from the limits. It has been concluded that turbidity was improving while going toward the ocean, while Total Dissolved Solids, hardness, and chloride concentrations were increasing as water was getting closer to the sea while pH was found almost unaffected. The findings emphasize the need for addressing environmental degradation, social hardships, and economic challenges caused by these water quality issues. Ultimately, the quality of water is crucial for various activities specifically for drinking purposes, and its suitability for specific purposes is of utmost importance.
      PubDate: 2024-06-03
       
  • Some thoughts on GIS mapping and geovisualization techniques in water
           research and practice

    • PubDate: 2024-05-30
       
  • A novel membrane-less microbial fuel cell reactor using wood as container
           and separator to prevent air–cathode deterioration and biofouling

    • Abstract: Abstract In this study, we introduce a novel application of wood as the construction material for Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) containers, developing what we term the Wooden Membrane-less Microbial Fuel Cell (WML-MFC). This innovative approach leverages the natural properties of wood to enhance the sustainability and cost-effectiveness of MFCs. Employing three different types of wood—pine, oak, and black locust—the WML-MFC design incorporates a carbon felt anode inside the wooden container and a carbon cloth cathode wrapped externally. This configuration not only protects the cathode from biofouling but also utilizes the inherent moisture management capabilities of wood to maintain operational stability. The performance of these wooden MFCs was assessed in terms of electricity generation and water treatment efficacy. Pine and oak containers achieved maximum power densities (MPD) of 35 mW/m^2 and 4 mW/m^2, respectively, with corresponding maximum open-circuit voltages of 551 mV and 269 mV. Black locust showed the least effective bioelectricity generation. COD removal efficiency was observed between 18 and 48% for pine and 3% to 39% for oak over hydraulic retention times of 24–48 h. Notable water loss due to moisture diffusion was recorded at 20%/day in pine and 6%/day in oak. Durability assessments through DMA and SEM analyses confirmed the suitability of wood as a container material, emphasizing the dual environmental and economic benefits of this WML-MFC design.
      PubDate: 2024-05-28
       
  • Geo-spatial analysis of built-environment exposure to flooding: Iowa case
           study

    • Abstract: Abstract Flooding is the most frequent type of natural disaster, inducing devastating damage at large and small spatial scales. Flood exposure analysis is a critical part of flood risk assessment. While most studies analyze the exposure elements separately, it is crucial to perform a multi-parameter exposure analysis and consider different types of flood zones to gain a comprehensive understanding of the impact and make informed mitigation decisions. This research analyzes the population, properties, and road networks potentially exposed to the 100, 200, and 500-year flood events at the county level in the State of Iowa using geospatial analytics. We also propose a flood exposure index at the county level using fuzzy overlay analysis to help find the most impacted county. During flooding, results indicate that the county-level percentage of displaced population, impacted properties, and road length can reach up to 46%, 41%, and 40%, respectively. We found that the most exposed buildings and roads are laid in residential areas. Also, 25% of the counties are designated as very high-exposure areas. This study can help many stakeholders identify vulnerable areas and ensure equitable distribution of investments and resources toward flood mitigation projects.
      PubDate: 2024-05-23
       
  • Heavy metals pollution, distribution and associated human health risks in
           groundwater and surface water: a case of Kampala and Mbarara districts,
           Uganda

    • Abstract: Abstract Groundwater and surface water quality is of great significance for humanity as they serve as the primary drinking water sources globally. Due to population growth and the need to provide people with necessities that depend on water as an essential resource, these bodies of water are becoming more polluted. The present study involved the collection of groundwater and surface water samples from Kampala and Mbarara districts in Uganda during the dry and wet seasons. Also, concentrations of lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and iron (Fe) were analyzed in order to evaluate the toxicity of metals, identify potential sources, and determine the health risk associated with their presence in water. Results showed that metals were observed with higher concentration during the wet season than the dry season. The concentrations of Fe (8.646 ± 0.00 mg/L), Mn (2.691 ± 0.01 mg/L) and Cd (0.090 ± 0.41 mg/L) measured in groundwater were significantly higher than those measured in surface water. However, only Cu was observed with higher concentration (0.322 ± 0.06 mg/L) in surface water during the wet season. Furthermore, the degree of contamination (Cd) and the heavy metal pollution index (HPI) were evaluated for both the wet and dry seasons. Results showed that few samples were found in the category of portable drinking water while majority are within the “poor” and “very poor” classes which require proper treatment before consumption. The oral hazard index (HIoral) results showed that none of the samples are suitable for consumption; therefore, cause potential non-carcinogenic health issues to the consumer (HIoral > 1). Moreover, children are more at risk than adults in the study districts (higher HI values in both seasons). This study recommends frequent monitoring of quality of water and also effluent waste treatment by the major source of pollution.
      PubDate: 2024-05-23
       
  • Optical properties of daily used water in Kathmandu valley

    • Abstract: Abstract This article comprehensively examines the characteristics of water samples sourced from diverse locations in the Kathmandu Valley, encompassing density, transmittance, absorption coefficient, mass attenuation coefficient, and molecular cross-sectional area (MCA), across varying temperatures. Density variations, within a temperature range of 8 °C to 48 °C, are reported, spanning from 1.17725 to 1.0015 g/cm3. Transmittance increases with wavelength and exhibits temperature-related variations due to differing impurities among sources. The relationship between transmittance and temperature lacks a distinct pattern, influenced by unique source impurities and temperature effects. Moreover, the MCA estimates particles to be approximately 10−24cm2. Additionally, the mass attenuation coefficient consistently decreases with wavelength across all samples. These findings provide a comprehensive insight into the intricate interplay between water properties, impurities, temperature, and radiation interactions in various water sources.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22
       
  • Delineation of aquifer storage potential in response to regional
           groundwater development

    • Abstract: Abstract Developing aquifers as part of sustainability efforts toward groundwater development is a tactical approach to meeting water demand and management objectives. Delineation of aquifer storage potential (ASP) and longitudinal conductance ( \({S}_{L}\) ) is a good approach to protect and manage groundwater resources. A Schlumberger configuration was applied to delineate fifteen (15) vertical electrical sounding (VES) stations alongside a 2D electrical resistivity imagery (ERI) profile and regional borehole data to characterize the regional ASP. The results of the study show that the layer resistivity and thickness values of the regional aquifer unit range from 39.9–105 Ωm and 15–44 m, respectively, while the overburden thickness overlays the regional aquifer unit varied between 5–10 m corresponding to the regional borehole data. The weathered/fractured basemen, which constitute the regional aquifer unit were delineated, which consists of shallow, moderate, and deep aquifer zones. The deep aquifer zones fall within the depth of 30–44 m and are considered suitable for groundwater prospective. The weathered layer with appreciably low resistivity values with thick aquifer regolith has also been identified as most suitable for borehole siting. The weathered/fractured encountered within thick aquifer regolith were mapped as the region with a high ASP for groundwater development. In addition, the values of longitudinal conductance, \({S}_{L}\) and transverse resistance, \({R}_{T}\) estimated from aquifer parameters vary between \(0.21-0.85 \,{\Omega }^{-1}\) and \(1695-3124\, {\Omega m}^{2}\) , respectively. The \({S}_{L}\) values show that the study area falls within moderate ( \(0.20-0.69 \,{\Omega }^{-1}\) ) and good ( \(0.7-4.9 \,{\Omega }^{-1}\) ), which invariably determined the regional aquifer protective capacity. Thus, the DC geoelectrical approach has been successfully employed in a lateritic-based environment to delineate aquifer-promising zones for regional groundwater development.
      PubDate: 2024-05-18
       
 
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  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 160 journals)
Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acque Sotterranee - Italian Journal of Groundwater     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Agua y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Águas Subterrâneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Water Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Water Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Aquacultural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Aquaculture and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aquasains     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Living Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Aquatic Sciences and Engineering     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Desalination and Water Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Discover Water     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European journal of water quality - Journal européen d'hydrologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Water     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Grundwasser     Hybrid Journal  
Hydro Nepal : Journal of Water, Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
IDA Journal of Desalination and Water Reuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
International Hydrographic Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Nuclear Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Waste Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Water Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Water Resources Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrology (New Zealand)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of South Carolina Water Resources     Open Access  
Journal of the American Water Resources Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Water and Wastewater / Ab va Fazilab     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Water Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Water Resource Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Jurnal Enggano     Open Access  
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Marine Ecology Progress Series MEPS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Natural and Engineering Sciences     Open Access  
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
npj Clean Water     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Opflow     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ozone Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Paddy and Water Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revue des sciences de l'eau / Journal of Water Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
River Research and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sustainable Water Resources Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Texas Water Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Water Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Water     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Water and Environment Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Water Cycle     Open Access  
Water Environment and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Water Research X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Resources Management     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Water Resources Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Water Science : The National Water Research Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Water-Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water21     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Watershed Ecology and the Environment     Open Access  
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wetlands Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Water Policy     Hybrid Journal  
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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