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  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 160 journals)
Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acque Sotterranee - Italian Journal of Groundwater     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Agua y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Águas Subterrâneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Water Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Water Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Aquacultural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Aquaculture and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aquasains     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Living Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Aquatic Sciences and Engineering     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Desalination and Water Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Discover Water     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European journal of water quality - Journal européen d'hydrologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Water     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Grundwasser     Hybrid Journal  
Hydro Nepal : Journal of Water, Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
IDA Journal of Desalination and Water Reuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
International Hydrographic Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Nuclear Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Waste Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Water Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Water Resources Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrology (New Zealand)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of South Carolina Water Resources     Open Access  
Journal of the American Water Resources Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Water and Wastewater / Ab va Fazilab     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Water Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Water Resource Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Jurnal Enggano     Open Access  
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Marine Ecology Progress Series MEPS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Natural and Engineering Sciences     Open Access  
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
npj Clean Water     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Opflow     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ozone Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Paddy and Water Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revue des sciences de l'eau / Journal of Water Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
River Research and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sustainable Water Resources Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Texas Water Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Water Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Water     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Water and Environment Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Water Cycle     Open Access  
Water Environment and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Water Research X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Resources Management     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Water Resources Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Water Science : The National Water Research Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Water-Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water21     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Watershed Ecology and the Environment     Open Access  
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wetlands Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Water Policy     Hybrid Journal  
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

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GeoHazards
Number of Followers: 2  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2624-795X
Published by MDPI Homepage  [258 journals]
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 582-595: Worldwide Research Trends and Networks
           on Flood Early Warning Systems

    • Authors: Oscar Calvo-Solano, Adolfo Quesada-Román
      First page: 582
      Abstract: This review paper examined the global landscape of research on continental flood early warning systems (EWS), shedding light on key trends, geographic disparities, and research priorities. Continental floods stand as one of the most pervasive and devastating disasters worldwide, necessitating proactive measures to mitigate their impact. Drawing upon a comprehensive analysis of the scholarly literature indexed in the Web of Science repository, this study unveiled significant patterns in EWS research. While the emphasis on flooding is evident, a considerable portion of research focuses on precipitation as a variable and modeling approaches. Furthermore, the influence of climate change emerges as a prominent theme, though distinguishing between climate change and variability remains a crucial area for exploration. Geographically, Europe, particularly England and Italy, dominates research efforts in flood related EWS. Conversely, the limited representation of Central America and other regions such as Asia and Oceania, underscores the need for greater attention to regions facing significant flood risks. Importantly, the concept of total link strength emerges as a valuable metric, highlighting collaborative networks established by European countries and the United States. Based on these findings, recommendations are proposed to enhance the inclusivity and effectiveness of flood related EWS research, including a broader consideration of socio-economic factors, fostering collaboration among researchers from diverse regions, and prioritizing initiatives to strengthen research capacities in vulnerable areas. Ultimately, this study provides valuable insights for policymakers, researchers, and practitioners seeking to advance flood risk management strategies on a global scale.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-06-23
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5030030
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 596-620: Analysis of the Impact Area of the 2022
           El Tejado Ravine Mudflow (Quito, Ecuador) from the Sedimentological and
           the Published Multimedia Documents Approach

    • Authors: Liliana Troncoso, Francisco Javier Torrijo, Elias Ibadango, Luis Pilatasig, Olegario Alonso-Pandavenes, Alex Mateus, Stalin Solano, Ruber Cañar, Nicolás Rondal, Francisco Viteri
      First page: 596
      Abstract: Quito (Ecuador) has a history of mudflow events from ravines that pose significant risks to its urban areas. Located close to the Pichincha Volcanic Complex, on 31 January 2022, the northwest and central parts of the city were hit by a mudflow triggered by unusual rainfall in the upper part of the drainage, with 28 fatalities and several properties affected. This research focuses on the affected area from collector overflow to the end, considering sedimentological characteristics and behavior through various urban elements. This study integrates the analysis of videos, images, and sediment deposits to understand the dynamics and impacts of the mudflow using a multidisciplinary approach. The methodology includes verifying multimedia materials using free software alongside the Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) to estimate the kinematic parameters of the mudflow. The affected area, reaching a maximum distance of 3.2 km from the overflow point, was divided into four zones for a detailed analysis, each characterized by its impact level and sediment distribution. Results indicate significant variations in mudflow behavior across different urban areas, influenced by topographical and anthropogenic factors. Multimedia analysis provided insights into the mudflow’s velocity and evolution as it entered urban areas. The study also highlights the role of urban planning and infrastructure in modifying the mudflow’s distribution, particularly in the Northern and Southern Axes of its path, compared with a similar 1975 event, seven times larger than this. It also contributes to understanding urban mudflow events in Quito, offering valuable insights for disaster risk management in similar contexts.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-06-30
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5030031
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 621-633: A Virtual Reality Simulation of a Real
           Landslide for Education and Training: Case of Chiradzulu, Malawi, 2023
           Landslide

    • Authors: Ali Asgary, Ali Hassan, Tricia Corrin
      First page: 621
      Abstract: Virtual reality (VR) is a promising new educational and training tool in the field of disaster and emergency management, especially for hazards that are not frequent or well known to the public and require spatial and situational understanding. The objective of this paper is to describe an educational VR simulation that was developed based on a landslide that really occurred in Southern Malawi during the March 2023 Cyclone Freddy. The cyclone induced several landslides that caused many casualties and significant damage. The VR simulation framework consisted of four critical steps using Unity3D for the creation of the simulation including data preparation, terrain and environmental modeling, landslide simulation development, and virtual reality interactions. The simulation scenarios were diversified to include three distinct landscapes that can help users learn how factors such as terrain can influence landslide impacts. The VR simulation offers users an intimate, firsthand experience of the landslide’s unfolding and allows users the ability to explore various facets of the landslide phenomena. This VR simulation aims to provide an educational tool to facilitate an in-depth understanding of and interaction with a real-word landslide to learn about the impacts of landslides and how different factors can influence these impacts.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-07-03
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5030032
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 634-651: Addressing the Effect of Intra-Seasonal
           Variations in Developing Rainfall Thresholds for Landslides: An Antecedent
           Rainfall-Based Approach

    • Authors: Chakrapani Lekha Vishnu, Thomas Oommen, Snehamoy Chatterjee, Kochappi Sathyan Sajinkumar
      First page: 634
      Abstract: We developed a rainfall threshold model with the objective of limiting the effects of uncertainties typically associated with them, such as a lack of robust landslide database, the selection of the contributing rain gauge, seasonal variations in rainfall patterns, and the effect of extreme rainfall conditions. With the aid of gauge-corrected satellite precipitation data and a landslide database compiled from various sources, separate rainfall thresholds were developed for two waves of the monsoon season in the Western Ghats, India. The daily vs. antecedent rainfall distributions for different scenarios of antecedent rainfall were analyzed for landslide occurrence. The different scenarios considered included 1, 2, 3, 5, 10-, 20-, 30- and 40-day antecedent rainfalls along with the monsoon antecedent defined as the cumulative rainfall from the start of the monsoon to the day prior to landslide occurrence, and the event antecedent defined as the cumulative rainfall from the start of a rainfall event to the day prior to landslide occurrence. A statistically defined critical value was used to define the thresholds for extreme rainfall conditions, while ordinary least squares and quantile regression models were compared to identify the best-fit model for the non-extreme rainfall threshold. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed on all these models and the best model was chosen based on the efficiency values. The daily vs. monsoon antecedent threshold was the best model for the first monsoon wave, and the daily vs. event antecedent model was the best model for the second monsoon wave. A separate rainfall threshold was defined for the entire monsoon without subdivision into separate waves, and corresponding ROC statistics were compared with the former approach to analyze the efficacy of intra-seasonal variations in rainfall threshold development. The results suggest that cumulative rainfall makes a significant contribution towards landslide initiation and that intra-seasonal variations should be necessarily considered in rainfall threshold modeling.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-07-03
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5030033
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 652-682: Alpine Catchments’ Hazard Related
           to Subaerial Sediment Gravity Flows Estimated on Dominant Lithology and
           Outcropping Bedrock Percentage

    • Authors: Davide Tiranti
      First page: 652
      Abstract: Sediment gravity flows (SGFs) cause serious damage in the Alpine regions. In the literature, several methodologies have been elaborated to define the main features of these phenomena, mainly considering the rheological features of the flow processes by laboratory experiments or by flow simulation using 2D or 3D propagation models or considering a single aspect, such as the morphometric parameters of catchments in which SGFs occur. These very targeted approaches are primarily linked to the definition of SGFs’ propagation behavior or to identify the predisposing role played by just one feature of catchments neglecting other complementary aspects regarding phenomena and the environment in which SGFs can occur. Although the research aimed at the quantification of some parameters that drive the behavior of SGFs provides good results in understanding the flow mechanisms, it does not provide an exhaustive understanding of the overall nature of these phenomena, including their trigger conditions and a complete view of predisposing factors that contribute to their generation. This paper presents a research work based on the collection and cross-analysis of lithological, geomechanical, geomorphological and morphometrical characteristics of Alpine catchments compared with sedimentological and morphological features of SGF deposits, also taking in to account the rainfall data correlation with historical SGF events. A multidisciplinary approach was implemented, aiming at quantifying SGF causes and characteristics starting from the catchments’ features where the phenomena originate in a more exhaustive way. The study used 78 well-documented catchments of Susa Valley (Western Italian Alps), having 614 historical flow events reported, that present a great variability in geomorphological and geological features. As the main result, three catchment groups were recognized based on the dominant catchment bedrock’s lithology characteristics that influence the SGFs’ rheology, sedimentological and depositional features, triggering rainfall values, seasonality, occurrence frequency and alluvial fan architecture. The classification method was also compared with the catchments’ morphometry classification, demonstrating that the fundamental role in determining the type of flow process that can most likely occur in a given catchment is played by the bedrock outcropping percentage, regardless of the results provided by the morphometric approach. The analysis of SGF events through the proposed method led to a relative estimate of the hazard degree of these phenomena distinguished by catchment type.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-07-05
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5030034
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 683-699: The Use of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
           (UAV) for First-Failure Landslide Detection

    • Authors: Michele Mercuri, Deborah Biondino, Mariantonietta Ciurleo, Gino Cofone, Massimo Conforti, Giovanni Gullà, Maria Carmela Stellato, Luigi Borrelli
      First page: 683
      Abstract: The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can significantly assist landslide detection and characterization in different geological contexts at a detailed scale. This study investigated the role of UAVs in detecting a first-failure landslide occurring in Calabria, South Italy, and involving weathered granitoid rocks. After the landslide event, which caused the interruption of State Road 107, a UAV flight was carried out to identify landslide boundaries and morphological features in areas where there are problems of safe access. The landslide was classified as flow-type, with a total length of 240 m, a maximum width of 70 m, and a maximum depth of about 6.5 m. The comparison of the DTMs generated from UAV data with previously available LIDAR data indicated significant topographic changes across the landslide area. A minimum negative value of −6.3 m suggested material removal at the landslide source area. An approximate value of −2 m in the transportation area signified bed erosion and displacement of material as the landslide moved downslope. A maximum positive value of 4.2 m was found in the deposition area. The landslide volume was estimated to be about 6000 m3. These findings demonstrated the effectiveness of UAVs for landslide detection, showing their potentiality as valuable tools in planning further studies for a detailed landslide characterization and for defining the most appropriate risk mitigation measures.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-07-12
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5030035
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 700-731: Seismic Performances of Masonry
           Educational Buildings during the 2023 Türkiye (Kahramanmaraş)
           Earthquakes

    • Authors: Ercan Işık, Hüseyin Bilgin, Fatih Avcil, Rabia İzol, Enes Arkan, Aydın Büyüksaraç, Ehsan Harirchian, Marjo Hysenlliu
      First page: 700
      Abstract: Huge losses of life and property occurred as a result of two independent catastrophic earthquakes on 6 February 2023 in the Eastern Anatolian Fault Zone, where no significant earthquake has occurred in approximately 500 years. The earthquakes, whose epicenters were in the Pazarcık and Elbistan districts of Kahramanmaraş province at 9 h intervals, had magnitudes of Mw = 7.7 and Mw = 7.6 and caused different levels of structural damage, especially in masonry-style structures in rural areas. In this study, the damage that occurred in masonry village schools, especially in rural areas, during these two earthquakes was evaluated in terms of the characteristics of the earthquake and within the scope of civil engineering, and the causes of the damage were discussed. The damage levels of the masonry schools examined were classified using the European Macroseismic Scale (EMS-98). Information about the Kahramanmaraş earthquakes was given and structural analyses were carried out for a widely used reference school building. The school building block was analytically modeled, and its seismic load-bearing capacities were predicted through pushover analysis in TREMURI software. The study also includes repair and strengthening recommendations for such structures.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-07-12
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5030036
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 732-754: Research on the Influence of Spatial
           Dimensions on the Stability of Large-Scale Slopes under Heavy Rainfall

    • Authors: Xun Li, Yujing Jiang, Satoshi Sugimoto
      First page: 732
      Abstract: In engineering practice, slope stability is commonly assessed using a two-dimensional (2D) analysis under the assumption of plane strain conditions. However, when dealing with the complex surface geometries of three-dimensional (3D) slopes, especially under short-term heavy rainfall conditions, relying solely on a 2D cross-sectional analysis may not always yield conservative results compared to 3D slope stability assessments. To investigate the applicability of using 2D cross-sections to represent 3D slopes, this study examines the influence of surface geometries on 3D slope stability. By varying the degree and frequency of surface undulations along a certain longitudinal length of the slope, as well as different variations in slope gradient, the impacts of these factors on the safety factor of 3D slopes under rainfall conditions are analyzed. The findings indicate that for 3D slopes with significant surface undulations and high-frequency variations, the safety factor is generally lower compared to that obtained from the 2D cross-sectional analysis. Furthermore, the variation in slope gradient has a more pronounced effect on the safety factor of 3D slopes compared to surface undulations, particularly when the slope gradients are larger than 50°. Therefore, the influence of spatial dimensions on the stability of slopes can be significant when dealing with complex surface geometries of 3D large-scale slopes. It is highly recommended to conduct both 3D and 2D analyses to ensure the accuracy of the slope stability analysis.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-07-18
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5030037
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 310-328: Serious Games for Seismic Risk
           Education: The Case of the ENP-CP Project

    • Authors: Agostino Goretti, Gemma Musacchio
      First page: 310
      Abstract: This paper delves into the potential advantages of integrating gamification into seismic risk management education, with a specific emphasis on the efficacy of serious games in augmenting the learning process. It offers an illustration of gamification within the framework of a seismic risk preparedness project involving multiple countries, languages, and cultures and across the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. The innovation of this approach largely lies in shifting the focus from competition, which is typical in most games, to collaboration. Three digital serious games were implemented to tackle facets of seismic risk management that are particularly favourable for empowering communities at risk. These games were first used in a hybrid event where students from Algeria, Morocco, and Italy engaged in gameplay both in person within their respective classrooms and remotely with classes in each country. The evaluation study showed the positive impact of gamification in captivating young participants and thereby instilling best practices in seismic risk management.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-04-08
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020016
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 329-349: Relative Sea Level and Coastal Vertical
           Movements in Relation to Volcano-Tectonic Processes at Mayotte Island,
           Indian Ocean

    • Authors: Julien Gargani
      First page: 329
      Abstract: During the last 10 kyr, significant subsidence and uplift occurred on Mayotte Island in the Comoros archipelago (Indian Ocean), but the role of volcanic processes in Holocene vertical movements has been neglected in the research so far. Here, we show that an abrupt subsidence of 6–10 m occurred between 9.4 and 10 kyr ago, followed by an uplift of the same amplitude at a rate of 9 mm/yr from 8.1 to 7 kyr ago. A comparison of the relative sea level of Mayotte and a reference sea level curve for the global ocean has been conducted using a modeling approach. This shows that an increasing and decreasing pressure at depth, equivalent to the process caused by a deep magma reservoir (50–70 km), was responsible for ~6–10 m subsidence and 6–10 m uplift, whereas loading by new volcanic edifices caused subsidence during the last few thousand years. Surface movements and deep pressure variations may be caused by pulses from the deep mantle, related to superplume activity, but uncertainties and unknowns about these phenomena are still present and further studies are needed. A better understanding of the volcano-tectonic cycle may improve assessments of volcanic hazards.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-04-12
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020017
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 350-363: Analysis of Uncertainty in Internal
           Erosion Simulations for DLBreach and WinDAM C

    • Authors: Anthony Atkinson, Mitchell Neilsen
      First page: 350
      Abstract: The work detailed here is part of an international initiative on the evaluation of dam safety simulation software for internal erosion performance and best practices. The primary experiments involve simulating uncertainty in the failure events of two dams with two different models: DLBreach and WinDAM C. DLBreach is a physically-based dam/levee breach model developed by Wu. WinDAM C is also a physically based dam breach model capable of analyzing both dam overtopping and internal erosion. The dams selected for the analysis include a 1.3 m high dam tested in the lab and a larger 15.56 m high dam, which suffered a failure in the field. The findings from these experiments are extended with a further analysis on variance, sensitivity, and optimization. Finally, a regression model is trained using the results of these simulators as an inquiry into how well such a system can be captured using machine learning techniques. The results of these experiments, together with the results of the other members of the initiative, improve our understanding of the influences that users bring to using these tools.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-04-16
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020018
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 364-373: Geospatial Analysis and Mapping of
           

    • Authors: Qingmin Meng, Sara A. Smith, John Rodgers
      First page: 364
      Abstract: A landslide is the movement of rocks, debris, and/or soils down a slope, which often includes falls, topples, slides, flows, and spreads. Landslides, a serious natural hazard to human and human activity, often occur in the coastal and mountainous areas in the United States. Although there are some studies that have explored the landslide probability, which is typically directly modeled by inputting potential environmental variables into statistical regression models, this study designed an alternative geospatial analysis and modeling approach. We first conducted statistical diagnostic tests to examine the significance of potential driving factors including landform, land use/land cover, landscape, and climate. In eastern Tennessee, USA, we first applied the t-test and chi-squared test to select the significant factors driving landslides, including slope, clay percentage in the soil, tree canopy density, and distance to roads, having a p-value of less than 0.05. We then incorporated the four identified significant factors as covariates into logistic regression to model the relationship between these factors and landslides. The fitted logistic model, with a high area under the ROC (AUC) score of 0.94, was then applied to predict landslides and make a regional landslide susceptibility map for eastern Tennessee. The landslide’s potential impacts on eastern Tennessee were also discussed, and implications for local governments and communities for current physical infrastructure protection and new infrastructure development were summarized.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-04-17
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020019
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 374-392: Geospatial Insights into Greece’s
           Desertification Vulnerability: A Composite Indicator Approach

    • Authors: Kalogeropoulos, Tsesmelis, Tsatsaris, Zervas, Karavitis, Vasilakou, Pantelis E. Barouchas
      First page: 374
      Abstract: The Environmentally Sensitive Areas Index (ESAI) is a comprehensive tool for assessing the susceptibility of areas to desertification. This index analyzes various parameters that are vital for environmental health. Through this index, factors such as human activities, geology, soil quality, vegetation and climate patterns are scrutinized. The analysis assigns weights to each participating factor. Thus, the index is derived from the aggregation of four categories (vegetation, climate, soil quality and management practices), and each of them is independently assessed to understand ecological health. In this way, the level of vulnerability to desertification is effectively measured. The application of the index in Greece (for a period of 20 years, 1984–2004) showed signs of environmental degradation and identified many areas with a high risk of desertification. Notably, there was a substantial increase in cultivated land within rural areas, contributing to shifts in the environmental landscape. Furthermore, this period is distinguished as the driest in the last century, with a peak between 1988 and 1993. The consequential rise in irrigation demand, driven by the simultaneous growth of crops and the intensification of agricultural practices, underscores the intricate interplay between human activities and environmental vulnerability.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-04-29
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020020
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 393-414: Marine Geohazards of the Bay of Naples
           (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy): A Review Integrating Morpho-Bathymetric
           and Seismo-Stratigraphic Analysis

    • Authors: Gemma Aiello, Mauro Caccavale
      First page: 393
      Abstract: Marine geohazards in the Bay of Naples, an eruptive region during the late Quaternary, have been assessed based on both morpho-bathymetric and seismic data. Previously identified areas of high marine hazard with slide potential (northern Ischia slope, Naples canyons, and Sorrento Peninsula–Capri slope) have been confirmed and integrated through the seismo-stratigraphic analysis of selected seismic sections. We evaluated the occurrence of important fossil submarine landslides in the stratigraphic record. Several kinds of submarine landslides have been individuated through morpho-bathymetric and seismic interpretation, including creeping, debris avalanches, and debris flows, among others, often controlled by volcanic eruptions. Submarine landslides of Naples Bay are primary geohazards in the marine and coastal areas, which has been ascertained with significant volcanic and tsunami hazards involving the gulf. Despite previous studies on these topics, much work is still needed to compile a systematic database of the submarine landslides of the Bay of Naples, representing a future step of this research.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-05-10
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020021
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 415-440: Geoinformatics-Based Mapping of
           Environmental Sensitive Areas for Desertification over Satara and Sangli
           Districts of Maharashtra, India

    • Authors: Chandra Shekhar Dwivedi, Dishant, Bikash Ranjan Parida, Arvind Chandra Pandey, Ravi Kumar, Navneet Kumar
      First page: 415
      Abstract: Desertification processes in arid, semi-arid, and dry sub-humid conditions have been enhanced in recent decades. The geospatial database and associated satellite data can be effectively employed for regional planning to address desertification and land degradation. In this study, the Mediterranean Desertification and Land Use (MEDALUS) model has been used to map environmentally sensitive areas due to desertification in the Satara and Sangli districts of Maharashtra, India. This was achieved by combining Landsat-8 multispectral data, Census data, soil data, and climatic variables like temperature, rainfall, and evapotranspiration. The algorithm of MEDALUS is the geometric mean of four indicators, namely soil quality index (SQI), climate quality index (CQI), vegetation quality index (VQI), and socio-economic quality index (SEQI). The findings indicated that the majority of the study area comes under the potential category of desertification (60.32%) followed by fragile (27.87%) and critical (11.81%). Areas with a high propensity for desertification were found over the low to very low climatic quality and moderate to high soil quality including lower socio-economic quality. The lower socio-economic quality is mainly due to high to very high population density (>100 people/km2), low to moderate illiteracy rate (<16%), and low to moderate work participation rate (<50%) that incentivize unsustainable land use practices. The study provides a valuable tool for understanding and managing natural resources. It offers a detailed analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the study area, taking into account various factors like land use, vegetation cover, slope, and soil erosion potential. The developed comprehensive map of the area helps in identifying the most sensitive regions and developing appropriate conservation strategies. The information obtained from the study can be utilized to develop and implement successful measures to prevent or alleviate desertification, which is crucial for sustaining the health of ecosystems and the welfare of local residents.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-05-17
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020022
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 441-456: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Minor
           Irrigation Tank Rehabilitation Using Run-Off and Storage Capacity: A Case
           Study from Ambuliyar Sub-Basin, Tamil Nadu, India

    • Authors: Nasir Nagoor Pitchai, Somasundharam Magalingam, Sakthi Kiran Duraisamy Rajasekaran, Selvakumar Radhakrishnan
      First page: 441
      Abstract: This research examines the significance of restoring efficient water management systems in India’s semiarid environment, with special emphasis on the role of traditional irrigation structures, such as tanks, in collecting and storing limited water resources. Assessing the benefits of any restoration program, especially when socioeconomic and environmental benefits are involved, is challenging. In the context of tank rehabilitation, a cost-benefit analysis will be conducted regarding economic and ecological returns in the post-desiltation phase. Since the restoration process requires a significant investment, assessing the project’s viability during the planning stage is better. The present study proposes a novel method to indirectly analyse the cost-benefit of the tank restoration process by correlating run-off and storage capacity of tanks before the planning phase. The Ambuliyar sub-basin, which covers an area of 930 square kilometres in Tamil Nadu, India, comprising 181 tanks (water bodies) of varying sizes and shapes, was taken for this study. This study employed the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number (SCS-CN) method, incorporating factors such as soil type, land cover, land use practices, and advanced remote sensing and Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to simulate surface run-off. Run-off volume and tank capacity were compared for all seasons at the micro-watershed level. The results demonstrated that the run-off volume in each micro-watershed significantly exceeded the tank capacity across all seasons. Even during the summer, the run-off volumes in the micro-watershed were considerably higher than the tank capacity. The findings suggest tank restoration can effectively store run-off and significantly fulfil agricultural and other essential needs throughout the year, thereby improving the local rural economy. This study also highlights the need for periodic maintenance and rehabilitation of these tank systems to retain their functionality.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-05-20
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020023
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 457-484: Applying SLAM-Based LiDAR and UAS
           Technologies to Evaluate the Rock Slope Stability of the Grotta Paglicci
           Paleolithic Site (Italy)

    • Authors: Luisa Beltramone, Vivien De Lucia, Andrea Ermini, Matteo Innocenti, Daniele Silvestri, Andrea Rindinella, Annamaria Ronchitelli, Stefano Ricci, Francesco Boschin, Riccardo Salvini
      First page: 457
      Abstract: This study focuses on slope stability and geological hazard analyses at the Italian Paleolithic site of Grotta Paglicci. The site is characterized by a cave that contains rich archaeological and anthropological finds, spanning various Paleolithic periods, and includes faunal remains, lithic artifacts, human burials, ornaments, mobiliary art objects, and unique Paleolithic wall paintings. The study employs a multi-technique approach that includes topographic surveys carried out by the robotic total station and GNSS receivers, photogrammetric acquisitions with an unmanned aerial system, 3D SLAM-based LiDAR mapping, and an engineering geological survey. The collected data allowed for the creation of georeferenced 3D models that were utilized in rock slope stability analysis and modeling. The results of this comprehensive survey highlighted how the bedding and joint discontinuities influence rock stability in both the external and internal areas of the cave. The integrated use of SLAM-based LiDAR and photogrammetry has been proven to be an efficient and essential tool in the evaluation of the structural interactions between the external morphology and the cave, thus allowing the proposal of safety measures that will keep the site accessible for future activities.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-05-25
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020024
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 485-503: Leveraging Sentinel-2 and Geographical
           Information Systems in Mapping Flooded Regions around the Sesia River,
           Piedmont, Italy

    • Authors: George P. Petropoulos, Athina Georgiadi, Kleomenis Kalogeropoulos
      First page: 485
      Abstract: Sentinel-2 data are crucial in mapping flooded areas as they provide high spatial and spectral resolution but under cloud-free weather conditions. In the present study, we aimed to devise a method for mapping a flooded area using multispectral Sentinel-2 data from optical sensors and Geographical Information Systems (GISs). As a case study, we selected a site located in Northern Italy that was heavily affected by flooding events on 3 October 2020, when the Sesia River in the Piedmont region was hit by severe weather disturbance, heavy rainfall, and strong winds. The method developed for mapping the flooded area was a thresholding technique through spectral water indices. More specifically, the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the Modified Normalized Difference Water Index (MNDWI) were chosen as they are among the most widely used methods with applications across various environments, including urban, agricultural, and natural landscapes. The corresponding flooded area product from the Copernicus Emergency Management Service (EMS) was used to evaluate the flooded area predicted by our method. The results showed that both indices captured the flooded area with a satisfactory level of detail. The NDWI demonstrated a slightly higher accuracy, where it also appeared to be more sensitive to the separation of water from soil and areas with vegetation cover. The study findings may be useful in disaster management linked to flooded-area mapping and area rehabilitation mapping following a flood event, and they can also valuably assist decision and policy making towards a more sustainable environment.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-05-28
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020025
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 504-529: Modelling and Validation of the Derna
           Dam Break Event

    • Authors: Alessandro Annunziato, Marzia Santini, Chiara Proietti, Ludovica de Girolamo, Valerio Lorini, Andrea Gerhardinger, Michele Tucci
      First page: 504
      Abstract: The catastrophic failure of two dams in Libya on 10 and 11 September 2023 resulted in the devastating flooding of the city of Derna, which is located downstream of the dams, causing more than 6000 fatalities and displacing thousands of residents. The failure was attributed to heavy rainfall from Storm Daniel, leading to the dams reaching full capacity and subsequently overflowing and failing. This paper presents an analysis of the dam break, including the modelling of flow discharge and the resulting flooding of Derna. For validation purposes, this study compares the modelled quantities with post-event satellite imagery from UNOSAT and Copernicus, local reports, and data collected from social media using AI detection. The findings provide valuable insights into the dynamics of the dam break and its initial parameters, as well as an assessment of the accuracy of the results. The analysis is performed using a rapid estimation technique developed by JRC to provide the international emergency community with a swift overview of the impact and damage assessment of potential or actual dam break events. The use of all available data shows a satisfactory comparison with the calculated quantities. The rapid modelling of dam break events and combined analysis of multiple data types are proven suitable for promptly assessing the expected dynamic of the event, as well as reconstructing the unknown initial conditions before the break. Incorporating sensitivity analyses provides an estimate of the uncertainties associated with the deduced values of the unknown parameters and their relative importance in the analysis.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020026
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 530-546: An Efficient Solution for Probabilistic
           Slope Seismic Stability Analysis Based on Polynomial Chao Kriging
           Metamodel

    • Authors: Tingting Zhang, Daniel Dias
      First page: 530
      Abstract: Slope stability analysis plays a crucial role in geotechnical engineering, particularly in regions susceptible to seismic activity. The inherent non-homogeneity and uncertainty of soil properties pose significant challenges in assessing slope stability under seismic conditions. To address these complexities, a novel and efficient methodology named DUBLA-PDM-PCK is proposed. In this methodology, the effects of soil non-homogeneity and uncertainty, along with the time and spatial variations of seismic loading, are systematically considered. The deterministic framework integrates discretized upper bound limit analysis (DUBLA) to accommodate soil non-homogeneous characteristics, and the pseudo-dynamic method (PDM) to model seismic loading variability. Then, a robust and efficient probabilistic analysis method, PCK-MA, is implemented utilizing adaptive Polynomial Chaos Kriging metamodeling, Monte Carlo Simulation, and Analysis of Covariance to investigate the uncertainty of the parameters. This approach treats nine key parameters, including soil cohesion, friction angle, non-homogeneous coefficients, horizontal and vertical seismic coefficients, period, and amplification factor, as random variables to assess their uncertainty effects on failure probability (stability level) and sensitivity indices. The DUBLA-PDM-PCK methodology offers a streamlined and reliable tool tailored for assessing slope stability in seismic environments, demonstrating notable efficiency in addressing soil variability and seismic loading uncertainties. Its application holds promise for guiding engineering practices and enhancing understanding of slope behavior in regions prone to seismic hazards.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-06-13
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020027
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 547-558: Cliff Retreat Rates Associated with a
           Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Los Alamos, New Mexico,
           USA

    • Authors: Brent Goehring, Elizabeth Miller, Kay Birdsell, Emily S. Schultz-Fellenz, Richard Kelley, Sean French, Philip H. Stauffer
      First page: 547
      Abstract: We present an analysis and interpretation of potential cliff stability at a low-level waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, using cliff morphologic and fracture characteristics coupled with carbon-14 surface exposure dating. Our study is important as it directly bears on the licensing criteria for low-level radioactive waste sites. We find that future characteristic cliff failures will likely not breach disposal pits and shafts over the 1000-year minimum regulatory period. Further, we find, using a multivariate regression model, that slope angle and cliff face aspect are sub-equal in importance to predict regions of high risk of failure when combined with surface exposure ages and assuming that old exposure ages are most indicative of stability (instability) and therefore can aid decision making in final design implementation.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-06-18
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020028
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 559-581: Combined Effect of the Microstructure
           and Mechanical Behavior of Lateritic Soils in the Instability of a Road
           Cut Slope in Rwanda

    • Authors: Roberto Valentino, Mattia Pizzati, Jules Mizero
      First page: 559
      Abstract: A very common hazard in Rwanda is represented by the instability of steep road cut slopes in lateritic soil. In its natural state, this material appears as a fine-grained weak and altered rock, generally in unsaturated conditions. Steep cut slopes made by this material could remain stable for a long time unless weathering weakens its mechanical behavior and heavy rainfall provokes a rapid landslide. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the microstructural, petrophysical, and geotechnical properties of lateritic soil from a road cut slope located in Kabaya (Ngororero District—Rwanda), which was recently subjected to a landslide. The mechanical properties of the material are strictly related to the geological origin and history of the deposits, their formation environment, and weathering processes. These characteristics were revealed by peculiar microstructural features (micro-texture, porosity, and degree of alteration of original mineral paragenesis). The experimental investigations included identification and classification tests, direct shear tests on saturated samples, and swelling tests. This multidisciplinary approach provided insights into the relationship between geotechnical properties and the microstructural, petrophysical, and chemical characteristics of the altered rocks. This study showed how different levels of chemical alteration operated by weathering processes, in conjunction with brittle deformation related to the tectonic history, formed in the same site two shallow rock layers with similar macro-scale features and mechanical behaviors but markedly different microstructural and chemical properties. The innovative aspect of this research suggests an integrated multidisciplinary approach to considering microstructural aspects in addition to mechanical behavior in the slope stability analyses in lateritic soil. In particular, this study demonstrates the importance of such an approach since the failure mechanism is better explained if it is based on microstructural observations instead of considering the soil shear strength parameters only. This research helped to explain the formation of the landslide failure mechanism in a specific road cut slope, which could be assumed as representative of many other similar slopes subjected to landslides in Rwanda.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-06-18
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5020029
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 1-21: Assessment of Soil Loss from Land Cover
           Changes in the Nan River Basin, Thailand

    • Authors: Kwanchai Pakoksung
      First page: 1
      Abstract: This study investigates soil loss erosion dynamics in the Nan River Basin, Thailand, focusing on the impact of land cover changes. Utilizing the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) model, key factors, including rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, topography, and land cover, are analyzed for the years 2001 to 2019. The findings reveal a substantial increase in human-induced soil erosion, emphasizing the pressing need for effective mitigation measures. Severity classification demonstrates shifting patterns, prompting targeted conservation strategies. The examination of land cover changes indicates significant alterations in the satellite image (MODIS), particularly an increase in Deciduous forest (~13.21%), Agriculture (~0.18%), and Paddy (~0.43%), and decrease in Evergreen Forest (~13.73%) and Water (~0.12%) cover types. Deciduous forest and Agriculture, associated with the highest soil loss rates, underscore the environmental consequences of specific land use practices. Notably, the increase in Deciduous forest and Agriculture significantly contributes to changes in soil loss rates, revealing the interconnectedness of land cover changes and soil erosion in ~18.05% and ~8.67%, respectively. This study contributes valuable insights for informed land management decisions and lays a foundation for future research in soil erosion dynamics. Additionally, the percentage increase in Agriculture corresponds to a notable rise in soil loss rates, underscoring the urgency for sustainable land use practices.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-01-04
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010001
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 22-37: Statistics on Typhoon Intensity and Rice
           Damage in Vietnam and the Philippines

    • Authors: Kai Wan Yuen, Adam D. Switzer, Paul P. S. Teng, Janice Ser Huay Lee
      First page: 22
      Abstract: Typhoons are destructive multi-hazard events. To assess the relationship between typhoon intensity and agricultural loss, there is a need for accurate and standardized information on loss and damage, which is currently lacking. To address this, a database for Vietnam and the Philippines was created to provide aggregated information on the magnitude of rice damage and to highlight the rice-growing areas which were prone to being damaged by typhoons. Our study period was from 1970 to 2018, and we focused on Vietnam and the Philippines as these two countries experience frequent and intense typhoons. As different crops respond differently to wind and rain, we limit our research to a single crop. In this study, we focused on rice as it is a major staple food in Southeast Asia, and rice fields were often damaged by typhoons in the two countries. Of the 829 typhoon events recorded, only 15% of the events resulted in rice damage. The average area of rice damaged per typhoon event ranged from 42,407 ha in Vietnam to 83,571 ha in the Philippines. Meanwhile, the average production loss per typhoon event ranged from 190,227 metric tonnes in the Philippines to 539,150 metric tonnes in Vietnam. The monetary value of rice crops lost was only reported in the Philippines, and this amounted to an average of US$ 42 million per typhoon event. There was a weak relationship between landfall wind speed and the three indicators of rice damage, which suggests that rice damage was not primarily due to strong winds. Our results showed that the rice fields in the coastal provinces of Vietnam and the northern parts of the Philippines were more vulnerable to being damaged by typhoons.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-01-11
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010002
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 38-63: The Lac Fallère Area as an Example
           of the Interplay between Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation and
           Glacial Shaping (Aosta Valley, NW Italy)

    • Authors: Stefano Dolce, Maria Gabriella Forno, Marco Gattiglio, Franco Gianotti
      First page: 38
      Abstract: The Lac Fallère area in the upper Clusellaz Valley (tributary of the middle Aosta Valley) is shaped in micaschist and gneiss (Mont Fort Unit, Middle Penninic) and in calcschist and marble (Aouilletta Unit, Combin Zone). Lac Fallère exhibits an elongated shape and is hosted in a WSW–ENE-trending depression, according to the slope direction. This lake also shows a semi-submerged WSW–ENE rocky ridge that longitudinally divides the lake. This evidence, in addition to the extremely fractured rocks, indicates a wide, deep-seated gravitational slope deformation (DSGSD), even if this area is not yet included within the regional landslide inventory of the Aosta Valley Region. The Lac Fallère area also shows reliefs involved in glacial erosion (roches moutonnée), an extensive cover of subglacial sediments, and many moraines essentially referred to as Lateglacial. The DSGSD evolution in a glacial environment produced, as observed in other areas, effects on the facies of Quaternary sediments and the formation of a lot of wide moraines. Glacial slope sectors and lateral moraines displaced by minor scarps and counterscarps, and glaciers using trenches forming several arched moraines, suggest an interplay between glacial and gravitational processes, which share part of their evolution history.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-01-11
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010003
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 64-90: Machine Learning-Based Flood Forecasting
           System for Window Cliffs State Natural Area, Tennessee

    • Authors: George K. Darkwah, Alfred Kalyanapu, Collins Owusu
      First page: 64
      Abstract: The prevalence of unforeseen floods has heightened the need for more accurate flood simulation and forecasting models. Even though forecast stations are expanding across the United States, the coverage is usually limited to major rivers and urban areas. Most rural and sub-urban areas, including recreational areas such as the Window Cliffs State Natural Area, do not have such forecast stations and as such, are prone to the dire effects of unforeseen flooding. In this study, four machine learning model architectures were developed based on the long short-term memory, random forest, and support vector regression techniques to forecast water depths at the Window Cliffs State Natural Area, located within the Cane Creek watershed in Putnam County, Tennessee. Historic upstream and downstream water levels and absolute pressure were used to forecast the future water levels downstream of the Cane Creek watershed. The models were tested with lead times of 3, 4, 5, and 6 h, revealing that the model performances reduced with an increase in lead time. Even though the models yielded low errors of 0.063–0.368 ft MAE, there was an apparent delay in predicting the peak water depths. However, including rainfall data in the forecast showed a promising improvement in the models’ performance. Tests conducted on the Cumberland River in Tennessee showed a promising improvement in model performance when trained with larger data.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-01-25
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010004
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 91-111: ENSO Impacts on Jamaican Rainfall
           Patterns: Insights from CHIRPS High-Resolution Data for Disaster Risk
           Management

    • Authors: Cheila Avalon-Cullen, Rafea Al Suhili, Nathaniel K. Newlands, Christy Caudill, Harvey Hill, Jaqueline Spence-Hemmings, Markus Enenkel
      First page: 91
      Abstract: This study examines the influence of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on Jamaica’s rainfall patterns, leveraging CHIRPS data from 1981 to 2021 in 370 locations. Our analysis reveals a distinct ENSO imprint on rainfall, with La Niña phases showing a consistently higher probability of exceeding various rainfall thresholds compared to El Niño. Notably, La Niña increases the likelihood of heavier rainfall, particularly in the wet seasons, with probabilities of exceeding 200 mm reaching up to 50% during wet season II. Spatially, the probability of total monthly rainfall (TMR) during La Niña is elevated in the northeastern regions, suggesting regional vulnerability to excess rainfall. Additionally, during El Niño, the correlation between TMR and the maximum air temperature (Tmax) is significantly stronger, indicating a positive and more pronounced relationship between higher temperatures and rainfall, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.39 to 0.80. Wind speed and evapotranspiration show a negligible influence on TMR during both ENSO phases, maintaining stable correlation patterns with only slight variations. The results of this study underscore the necessity for differentiated regional strategies in water resource management and disaster preparedness, tailored to the unique climatic characteristics imposed by ENSO variability. These insights contribute to a refined understanding of climate impacts, essential for enhancing resilience and adaptive capacity in Jamaica and other small island developing states.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010005
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 112-141: A Review of the Contribution of
           Satellite Altimetry and Tide Gauge Data to Evaluate Sea Level Trends in
           the Adriatic Sea within a Mediterranean and Global Context

    • Authors: Krešo Pandžić, Tanja Likso, Ranko Biondić, Božidar Biondić
      First page: 112
      Abstract: The relatively new sea level satellite altimetry and secular coastal tide gauge data made the reconstruction of sea levels on regional and global scales possible about one century back. Due to better estimations of the Earth’s crustal, glacial, tectonic, and other possible motion biases in tide gauge data, some additional improvements can be expected in sea level reconstructions, analysis, and predictions. A more detailed review of published sea level-related results was conducted for the Eastern Adriatic coast, including the operation of the tide gauge network and data processing, crustal movement estimations, and the establishment of a new reference height system in Croatia, based on five tide gauge sea level data. It was shown that sea level variation and trend-related indicators are spatially homogeneous, especially on a sub-Adriatic scale. The regional Adriatic Sea mean sea level rise rate of +2.6 mm/year for the satellite altimetry era (1993–2019) is less than the global mean sea level (GMSL) rise rate of +3.3 mm/year for the period of 1993–2022. Several empirical methods for GMSL projections and expected IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) assessments until the end of the 21st century are considered.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-02-04
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010006
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 142-165: Archeoseismic Study of Damage in
           Medieval Monuments around New Delhi, India: An Approach to
           UnderstandingPaleoseismicity in an Intraplate Region

    • Authors: Sambit Prasanajit Naik, Klaus Reicherter, Miklos Kázmér, Jens Skapski, Asmita Mohanty, Young-Seog Kim
      First page: 142
      Abstract: The seismic shaking observed around Delhi and the surrounding region due to near-field and far-field earthquakes is a matter of concern for the seismic safety of the national capital of India, as well as the historical monuments of the region. Historical seismicity indicates that the Delhi region has been affected by several damaging earthquakes originating from the Himalayan region as far-field events, as well as due to near-field earthquakes with epicenters close to Delhi. The historical records, along with recent archeoseismological studies, suggest that Qutab Minar, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, was damaged by the earthquake of 1803 CE. This event represents the only evidence of seismic damage from the region, as there has been no detailed study of other historical monuments in the area or earthquakes that have caused damage. In this context, the earthquake damage to other monuments might have been overlooked to some extent around the Qutab Minar due to the lack of proper earthquake damage surveys and documentation in historical times. The main goal of this study is to identify evidence of earthquake archeological effects around the Qutab Minar and to shed new light on the occurrence and characteristics of ancient earthquakes while providing data to inform seismic risk assessment programs. With this aim, we describe different earthquake-related damage (EAE, earthquake archeological effects) at the Isa Khan Tomb and Humayun’s Tomb, built between 1548 CE and 1570 CE, respectively, as well as the older Tomb of Iltutmish (built in 1235 CE) along with the Qutab Minar, which was built between 1199 CE and 1220 CE. The damage was probably caused by seismic events with intensities between VIII and IX on the European Macroseismic Scale (EMS). Based on the methodology of paleo ShakeMaps, it is most likely that the 1803 CE earthquake was the causative earthquake for the observed deformation in the Isa Khan Tomb, Tomb of Iltutmish, and Humayun’s Tomb. More detailed regional paleoseismological studies are required to identify the responsible fault. In conclusion, the impressive cultural heritage of Delhi city and the intraplate region is constantly under seismic threats from near-field earthquakes and far-field Himalayan earthquakes.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-02-14
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010007
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 166-175: Estimation of Return Levels with Long
           Return Periods for Extreme Sea Levels by the Average Conditional
           Exceedance Rate Method

    • Authors: Jesper Rydén
      First page: 166
      Abstract: Estimation of so-called return levels for environmental extremes is of importance for risk assessment. A particular challenge is to find estimates corresponding to long return periods, as uncertainties in the form of confidence intervals became too wide for practical use when applying conventional methodology where large portions of data are not used. A recently proposed technique, the Average Conditional Exceedance Rate (ACER), makes effective use of all available data. For risk analysis related to nuclear infrastructure, usually located along a coastline, extreme sea levels are of concern. We demonstrate, for measurements of the sea level along the Swedish coast at locations close to nuclear power plants, that the methodology results in considerably shorter confidence intervals compared to conventional approaches.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-02-18
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010008
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 176-191: Examining the Relationship between
           Rainfall, Runoff, and Turbidity during the Rainy Season in Western Japan

    • Authors: Mohamad Basel Al Sawaf, Kiyosi Kawanisi, Masoud Bahreinimotlagh
      First page: 176
      Abstract: Given the changing climate, understanding the recent variability in large-scale rainfall patterns is a crucial task in order to better understand the underlying hydrological processes that occur within a watershed. This study aims to investigate how rainfall events in western Japan have changed due to climate change and how these changes have affected runoff–turbidity dynamics during the rainy season. To address the research objectives, we analyzed two decades of precipitation records in the Gōno River watershed and examined the associated runoff–turbidity dynamics during floods using turbidity–discharge (T-Q) loops, quantified using an enhanced hysteresis index. Our findings revealed a kind of intense rainfall event occurring every 3 to 4 years. Additionally, spatial pentad analysis showed varying intensities of accumulated precipitation, indicating that extreme rainfall is not confined to a specific spatial zone. Regarding turbidity–discharge behavior, we found that clockwise hysteresis patterns were caused by sediment sources from near-channel areas, while anticlockwise patterns were caused by soil erosion from nearby areas. Another notable finding was that turbidity peaks during floods may represent the earlier (or later) arrival of turbid water from distant upstream sources due to intense precipitation. One of the key challenges in quantifying hysteresis patterns is that there is no agreed-upon definition for how to determine the start and end of a flood event. This can lead to bias in the quantification of these patterns.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-02-18
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010009
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 192-208: Seismic Fragility Curves of RC
           Buildings Subjected to Aging

    • Authors: Spyridon Diamantopoulos, Zeinep Achmet, Sotiria Stefanidou, Olga Markogiannaki, Michalis Fragiadakis
      First page: 192
      Abstract: A large number of existing reinforced concrete (RC) buildings have surpassed their anticipated service life and show signs of degradation due to aging; this degradation is a function of the construction practices adopted in the past as well as environmental conditions. This paper discusses seismic fragility and the risk assessment of RC structures, emphasizing the impact of corrosion due to concrete aging and the associated deterioration mechanisms. The literature on this topic is critically reviewed, and a methodology for studying the seismic fragility of deteriorated RC buildings is proposed. As a case study, a four-story RC building designed according to contemporary code provisions is examined. The investigation encompasses the derivation of fragility curves, considering critical parameters such as the corrosion rate, the initiation time, and the cover depth. The proposed approach enables the evaluation and quantification of the impact of corrosion mechanisms on the seismic performance of buildings.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-02-27
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010010
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 209-232: A GIS-Based Approach for Shallow
           Landslides Risk Assessment in the Giampilieri and Briga Catchments Areas
           (Sicily, Italy)

    • Authors: Giulio Vegliante, Valerio Baiocchi, Luca Maria Falconi, Lorenzo Moretti, Maurizio Pollino, Claudio Puglisi, Gaia Righini
      First page: 209
      Abstract: Shallow landslides pose a widely growing hazard and risk, globally and particularly in Mediterranean areas. The implementation of adequate adaptation and mitigation measures necessarily requires the development of practical and affordable methodologies and technologies for assessing the shallow landslides hazard and its territorial impact. The assessment of shallow landslide hazard maps involves two different and sequential steps: the susceptibility and the runout analysis, respectively, aimed at the identification of the initiation and the propagation areas. This paper describes the application in the Giampilieri and Briga Villages area (Sicily, Italy) of a shallow landslide risk process at a basin scale with an innovative approach in the runout assessment segment. The runout analysis was conducted using specific GIS tools employing an empirical–geometric approach at a basin scale. The exposure and vulnerability values of the elements at risk were assigned using a qualitative and semi-quantitative approach, respectively. The results highlight the effectiveness of the procedure in producing consistent runout hazard and risk assessments in the valley areas where the more important and vulnerable exposed elements are located. This study contributes to addressing the public administration demand for valuable and user-friendly tools to manage and drive regional planning.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010011
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 233-254: New Observational Material about
           Seismic and Non-Seismic Tsunamis in Greece and Surrounding Areas from 1900
           to 2023

    • Authors: Ioanna Triantafyllou, Gerassimos A. Papadopoulos
      First page: 233
      Abstract: A new set of observations has been compiled for tsunamis occurring in Greece and in the surrounding areas from 1900 to 2023. A variety of information sources has been collected and examined, including scientific and press reports, books, eyewitness accounts, pictorial and video material, and tide-gauge records. New material was also collected during our field surveys in the islands of Cephalonia, Karpathos, and Kos. Our investigation included 26 distinct events and revealed several tsunamis. The majority of them have remained unknown so far in the tsunami community. Our compilation also included little-known events for which further documentation has been provided. Among others, of particular importance is the collection of new information about the well-known tsunami associated with the 9 February 1948 large earthquake in Karpathos Island as well as the unknown so far series of local but powerful tsunamis generated during the seismic crisis of very strong earthquakes that destroyed the Ionian islands during August 1953. The new observational material collected is significant for the enrichment of existing tsunami catalogs with positive implications for better understanding the tsunami generation mechanisms and the assessment of tsunami hazards and risks.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-03-04
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010012
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 255-270: Rapid Earthquake Damage Assessment
           System in the Black Sea Basin: Selection/Adoption of Ground Motion
           Prediction Equations with Emphasis in the Cross-Border Areas

    • Authors: Nikolaos Theodoulidis, Basil Margaris, Dimitris Sotiriadis, Can Zulfikar, Seyhan Okuyan Akcan, Carmen Ortanza Cioflan, Elena Florinela Manea, Dragos Toma-Danila
      First page: 255
      Abstract: In the present study, an effort to propose and adopt appropriate Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs) for the Rapid Earthquake Damage Assessment System (REDAS) in the Black Sea basin is attempted. Emphasis of GMPE harmonization in the cross-border areas (CBA) is given. For this reason, two distinct sub-areas are investigated, taking into consideration their seismotectonic regime. One sub-area refers to active shallow crustal earthquakes (Greece-Turkey, CBA) and the other to intermediate-depth and shallow crustal earthquakes (Romania-Moldova, Western Black Sea CBA). Testing and ranking of pre-selected GMPEs has been performed using strong motion data of the broader CBA regions of both sub-areas. The final proposed GMPEs to feed the REDA System may assure the effective estimation of ShakeMaps and—in combination with the appropriate vulnerability curves—reliable near-real-time damage assessment in the cross-border earthquake affected areas.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-03-05
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010013
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 271-285: Three-Dimensional Amplitude versus
           Offset Analysis for Gas Hydrate Identification at Woolsey Mound: Gulf of
           Mexico

    • Authors: Saiful Alam, Camelia Knapp, James Knapp
      First page: 271
      Abstract: The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium selected the Mississippi Canyon Lease Block 118 (MC118) as a multi-sensor, multi-discipline seafloor observatory for gas hydrate research with geochemical, geophysical, and biological methods. Woolsey Mound is a one-kilometer diameter hydrate complex where gas hydrates outcrop at the sea floor. The hydrate mound is connected to an underlying salt diapir through a network of shallow crestal faults. This research aims to identify the base of the hydrate stability zone without regionally extensive bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). This study analyzes two collocated 3D seismic datasets collected four years apart. To identify the base of the hydrate stability zone in the absence of BSRs, shallow discontinuous bright spots were targeted. These bright spots may mark the base of the hydrate stability field in the study area. These bright spots are hypothesized to produce an amplitude versus offset (AVO) response due to the trapping of free gas beneath the gas hydrate. AVO analyses were conducted on pre-stacked 3D volume and decreasing amplitude values with an increasing offset, i.e., Class 4 AVO anomalies were observed. A comparison of a time-lapse analysis and the AVO analysis was conducted to investigate the changes in the strength of the AVO curve over time. The changes in the strength are correlated with the decrease in hydrate concentrations over time.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-03-08
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010014
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • GeoHazards, Vol. 5, Pages 286-309: Landslide Risks to Bridges in Valleys
           in North Carolina

    • Authors: Sophia Lin, Shen-En Chen, Wenwu Tang, Vidya Chavan, Navanit Shanmugam, Craig Allan, John Diemer
      First page: 286
      Abstract: This research delves into the intricate dynamics of landslides, emphasizing their consequences on transportation infrastructure, specifically highways and roadway bridges in North Carolina. Based on a prior investigation of bridges in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria, we found that bridges above water and situated in valleys can be exposed to both landslide and flooding risks. These bridges faced heightened vulnerability to combined landslides and flooding events due to their low depth on the water surface and the potential for raised flood heights due to upstream landslides. Leveraging a dataset spanning more than a century and inclusive of landslide and bridge information, we employed logistic regression (LR) and random forest (RF) models to predict landslide susceptibility in North Carolina. The study considered conditioning factors such as elevation, aspect, slope, rainfall, distance to faults, and distance to rivers, yielding LR and RF models with accuracy rates of 76.3% and 82.7%, respectively. To establish that a bridge’s location is at the bottom of a valley, data including landform, slope, and elevation difference near the bridge location were combined to delineate a bridge in a valley. The difference between bridge height and the lowest river elevation is established as an assumed flooding potential (AFP), which is then used to quantify the flooding risk. Compared to traditional flood risk values, the AFP, reported in elevation differences, is more straightforward and helps bridge engineers visualize the flood risk to a bridge. Specifically, a bridge (NCDOT ID: 740002) is found susceptible to both landslide (92%) and flooding (AFT of 6.61 m) risks and has been validated by field investigation, which is currently being retrofitted by North Carolina DOT with slope reinforcements (soil nailing and grouting). This paper is the first report evaluating the multi-hazard issue of bridges in valleys. The resulting high-fidelity risk map for North Carolina can help bridge engineers in proactive maintenance planning. Future endeavors will extend the analysis to incorporate actual flooding risk susceptibility analysis, thus enhancing our understanding of multi-hazard impacts and guiding resilient mitigation strategies for transportation infrastructure.
      Citation: GeoHazards
      PubDate: 2024-03-21
      DOI: 10.3390/geohazards5010015
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2024)
       
 
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  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 160 journals)
Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acque Sotterranee - Italian Journal of Groundwater     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Agua y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Águas Subterrâneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Water Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Water Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Aquacultural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Aquaculture and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aquasains     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Living Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Aquatic Sciences and Engineering     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Desalination and Water Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Discover Water     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European journal of water quality - Journal européen d'hydrologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Water     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Grundwasser     Hybrid Journal  
Hydro Nepal : Journal of Water, Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
IDA Journal of Desalination and Water Reuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
International Hydrographic Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Nuclear Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Waste Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Water Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Water Resources Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrology (New Zealand)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of South Carolina Water Resources     Open Access  
Journal of the American Water Resources Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Water and Wastewater / Ab va Fazilab     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Water Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Water Resource Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Jurnal Enggano     Open Access  
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Marine Ecology Progress Series MEPS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Natural and Engineering Sciences     Open Access  
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
npj Clean Water     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Opflow     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ozone Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Paddy and Water Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revue des sciences de l'eau / Journal of Water Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
River Research and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sustainable Water Resources Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Texas Water Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Water Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Water     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Water and Environment Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Water Cycle     Open Access  
Water Environment and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Water Research X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Resources Management     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Water Resources Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Water Science : The National Water Research Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Water-Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water21     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Watershed Ecology and the Environment     Open Access  
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wetlands Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Water Policy     Hybrid Journal  
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

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