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  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 161 journals)
Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acque Sotterranee - Italian Journal of Groundwater     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal  
Advances in Limnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Agua y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Águas Subterrâneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
altlastenforum Baden-Württemberg e.V., Schriftenreihe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Water Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Applied Water Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquacultural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Aquaculture and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries     Open Access  
Aquasains     Open Access  
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Aquatic Living Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Aquatic Sciences and Engineering     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Australian Journal of Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bonorowo Wetlands     Open Access  
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Desalination and Water Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Discover Water     Open Access  
e-Jurnal Rekayasa dan Teknologi Budidaya Perairan     Open Access  
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Energy Nexus     Open Access  
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
European journal of water quality - Journal européen d'hydrologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal  
Frontiers in Water     Open Access  
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Grundwasser     Hybrid Journal  
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IDA Journal of Desalination and Water Reuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
International Hydrographic Review     Open Access  
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Nuclear Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Waste Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Water Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Water Resources Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aquaculture and Fish Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrology (New Zealand)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Natural Resources and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of South Carolina Water Resources     Open Access  
Journal of the American Water Resources Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Water and Wastewater / Ab va Fazilab     Open Access  
Journal of Water Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Water Resource Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 65)
Journal of Water Security     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Jurnal Enggano     Open Access  
La Houille Blanche     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology     Hybrid Journal  
Marine Ecology Progress Series MEPS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Natural and Engineering Sciences     Open Access  
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
npj Clean Water     Open Access  
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Opflow     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal  
Ozone Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Paddy and Water Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revue des sciences de l'eau / Journal of Water Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
River Research and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science     Open Access  
Sciences Eaux & Territoires : la Revue du Cemagref     Open Access  
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Soil Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sri Lanka Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sustainable Water Resources Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Tecnología y Ciencias del Agua     Open Access  
Texas Water Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Water Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Water     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Water and Environment Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Water Cycle     Open Access  
Water Environment and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Water Research X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Resources Management     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Water Resources Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 91)
Water SA     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Science : The National Water Research Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Water-Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water21     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Watershed Ecology and the Environment     Open Access  
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wetlands Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
wH2O : The Journal of Gender and Water     Open Access  
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Water     Hybrid Journal  
WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Water Policy     Hybrid Journal  
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies
Number of Followers: 2  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2220-2765
This journal is no longer being updated because:
    The journal ceased publication
  • Life Cycle Assessment of the natural gas supply chain and power generation
           options with CO2 capture and storage: Assessment of Qatar natural gas
           production, LNG transport and power generation in the UK

    • Authors: Anna Korre et al
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      Fossil fuel-based power generation technologies with and without CO2 capture offer a number of alternatives, which involve different fuel production and supply, power generation and capture routes with varied energy consumption rates and subsequent environmental impacts. The holistic perspective offered by Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) can help decision makers to quantify the trade-offs inherent in any change to the fuel supply and power production systems and ensure that a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions does not result in increases in other environmental impacts. Beside energy and non-energy related GHG releases, LCA also tracks various other environmental emissions, such as solid wastes, toxic substances and common air pollutants, as well as the consumption of resources, such as water, minerals and land use. In this respect, the dynamic LCA model developed at Imperial College incorporates fossil fuel production, transportation, power generation, CO2 capture, CO2 conditioning, pipeline transportation and CO2 injection and storage, and quantifies the environmental impacts at the highest level of detail, allowing for the assessment of technical and geographical differences between the alternative technologies considered. The life cycle inventory (LCI) databases that were developed, model the inputs and outputs of the processes at component or unit process level, rather than “gateto- gate” level, and therefore generate reliable LCI data in a consistent and transparent manner, with a clearly arranged and flexible structure for long-term strategic energy system planning and decision-making. The presentation discussed the principles of the LCA models developed and the newly extended models for the natural gas-fired power generation, with alternative CO2 capture systems. Additionally, the natural gas supply chain LCA models, including offshore platform gas production, gas pipeline transportation, gas processing, liquefied natural gas (LNG) processes, LNG shipping and LNG receiving terminal developed are used to estimate the life cycle GHG emissions for an idealised case study of natural gas production in Qatar, LNG transportation to a UK natural gas terminal and use in a power plant. The scenario considers a conventional and three alternative CO2 capture systems, transport and injection of the CO2 offshore in the Irish Sea.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:45 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.11
       
  • Gas turbine related technologies for carbon capture

    • Authors: R. Peter Lindstedt
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      Combustion modes in gas turbines are evolving in order to meet requirements related to lower emissions and greater thermodynamic efficiency. Such demands can be contradictory and the additional complication of fuel flexibility comes to the fore with potential new fuel stream opportunities arising. The latter may include hydrogen and carbon monoxide rich streams as well as blends with significant amounts of carbon dioxide arising from certain types of syngas (e.g. bioderived). The matter is further complicated by the impact of combustion stability related issues that arise in the context of the ubiquitous transition to lean pre-vapourised premixed (LPP) combustion for power generation applications. Post-combustion carbon capture is generally considered the leading candidate in the context of LPP based technologies. Significant capture related issues arise in terms of parasitic losses associated with CO2 separation and transportation technologies (e.g. compression). The former is typically the major contributor and the relatively low concentration of CO2 in flue gases, combined with excess oxygen resulting from LPP based operation, does impact separation technologies. It hence appears natural to consider the operating mode of the gas turbine and the impact of the fuel composition on the flue gas characteristics alongside the development of efficient and novel separation technologies.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:45 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.12
       
  • Carbon capture and storage: An industry viewpoint

    • Authors: Marcus Schwander
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      Economic growth in developing nations--driven not least by fast growing populations--is leading to a surge in demand for energy, with rapid increases in both renewable energy deployment and fossil fuel production. Since 2000, the world has added 0.3 billion tonnes oil equivalent per annum of renewable energy, but nearly eight times this amount from fossil production1. Current trends are that increasing renewable energy system deployment is not backing out other fuels; rather, it is supplementing a constrained fuel pool, allowing for faster economic growth. This approach will not deliver the necessary global greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals by 2050. Thus, there is an enormous challenge for global efforts to halve CO2 emissions by 2050 in order to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Supply from lower-CO2 energy sources, such as renewables and nuclear, will grow and represent more of the energy mix in future, however it is estimated that fossil fuels could still meet at least 65% of world energy demand in 2050. Moreover, even with strong government support, it takes time for newer energy technologies to become affordable and available at scale. Therefore, large scale CO2 mitigation technologies for fossil fuels are necessary, which underpins the importance of carbon capture and storage (CCS); many countries will therefore need to adopt CCS, post-2020, to meet GHG reduction goals consistent with the “2°C target” are to be met. The IEA Energy Technology Pathway has found that CCS could deliver 19% of the total emission reductions required to meet the 2°C target, and would require just 6% of the overall investment needed to achieve a 50% reduction in GHG emissions in 2050. It has been estimated that, without CCS, the overall costs to halve global emissions by 2050 could rise by 70%.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:44 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.10
       
  • Ionic liquids as novel materials for energy efficient CO2 separations

    • Authors: Richard D. Noble et al
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      Large improvements in separations technology will require novel materials with enhanced properties and performance. The fundamental interlinks for success in merging synthesis and process incorporation are the structure, relevant physical/chemical properties, and performance of new materials. Specific materials with these interlinks are room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and their polymers and composites. As a chemical platform, RTILs have an enormous range of structural variation that can provide the ability to “tune” their properties and morphology for a given application. Introduction of chemical specificity into the structure of RTIL-based materials is an additional key component. Membrane separation is the focus as a process for implementation. There have not been new materials successfully developed for this process in thirty years. For CO2 capture, the target improvement in productivity is two orders of magnitude or more compared to commercial materials currently available.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:44 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.15
       
  • Economic and social issues

    • Authors: Iain Macdonald
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:43 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.8
       
  • Carbon capture and storage: The way ahead

    • Authors: Geoffrey C. Maitland
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      The paper gives a general introduction and overview of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) with an emphasis on the capture of CO2 and other greenhouse gases from the waste gas streams of power plants and industrial processes. This stage accounts for about 80% of the overall cost of the CCS process so is the area where efficiency and cost improvements will have the greatest future impact. The major drivers for continuing to use fossil fuels for most of this century are first considered and the need to implement CCS as one of many measures to mitigate carbon emissions. Current targets will require a commercial CCS capacity to remove about 10Gte CO2 pa by 2050. The overall features of CCS processes are described – capture, compression and transport, sub-surface storage – covering the main capture options and the three main types of storage site (deep saline aquifers, depleted oil and gas reservoirs and unmineable coal seams). The current status of large-scale CCS demonstration projects is reviewed. The main classes of carbon capture technologies are then described, both those currently capable of large-scale deployment and those in development for the future. Finally the main challenges facing CCS, to make it a globally-deployed commercially viable technology, are summarised and suggestions made for future developments in the clean recovery and use of fossil fuels which combine CCS with sub-surface processing.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:43 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.9
       
  • Metal-organic frameworks and porous polymer networks for carbon capture

    • Authors: Julian Patrick Sculley et al
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      The ability to rationally design materials for specific applications and synthesize materials to these exact specifications at the molecular level makes it possible to make a huge impact in carbon dioxide capture applications. Recently, advanced porous materials, in particular metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and porous polymer networks (PPNs) have shown tremendous potential for this and related applications because they have high adsorption selectivities and record breaking gas uptake capacities. By appending chemical functional groups to the surface of these materials it is possible to tune gas molecule specific interactions. The results presented herein are a summary of the fundamentals of synthesizing several MOF and PPN series through applying structure property relationships.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:42 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.16
       
  • Alternatives to amine-based capture & new technologies

    • Authors: Farid Benyahia
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:41 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.6
       
  • An overview of carbon capture technology

    • Authors: Bruce R. Palmer
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      Natural gas produced from gas and /or petroleum reservoirs could contain substantial amount of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, known as “acid gas.” The presence of small concentrations of H2S (ppm levels) in natural gas results in a sour gas with a drastically-reduced market price and hampered wide utilization. Additionally, the presence of CO2 in the natural gas could decrease its calorific value and increase its transportation cost. Therefore, natural gas desulfurization, or sweetening processes for treating natural gas, are an integral part of natural gas cleanup. After H2S is captured chemically using a base solvent such as aqueous amines, the concentrated H2S streams are sent to the Claus sulfur plants to produce elemental sulfur or can be used to produce sulfur oxides which are converted ultimately into sulfuric acid or used to produce gypsum (Natural gas.org, 2012).
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:41 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.13
       
  • Alternatives to amine-based capture & new technologies

    • Authors: Farid Benyahia
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:40 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.7
       
  • The Lacq industrial CCS reference project (France)

    • Authors: Jacques Monne
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      Total is committed to reducing the impact of its activities on the environment, especially its greenhouse gas emissions. The group’s priorities are to improve the energy efficiency of its industrial facilities, to invest in the development of complementary energy sources (biomass, solar, clean coal) and to participate in many operational and R&D programs on CO2 capture and geological storage (CCS). Total has been involved in CO2 injection and geological storage for over 15 years, in Canada (Weyburn oil field) for EOR and Norway (Sleipner, Snohvit) in aquifer. In 2006, Total decided to invest €60 million in the Lacq basin for experimenting in a complete industrial chain from CO2 capture to transportation and injection in a depleted gas field.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:40 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.14
       
  • Shipping and CCS: A systems perspective

    • Authors: N. Mac Dowell et al
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      In this contribution, we present an overview of the contribution made by the shipping sector to global CO2 emissions. We review the currently proposed technology options for mitigating these emissions, and propose a new option for the control of greenhouse gas emissions from shipping.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:39 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.19
       
  • CCS from industrial sources

    • Authors: Paul S. Fennell et al
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      The literature concerning the application of CCS to industry is reviewed. Costs are presented for different sectors including “high purity” (processes which inherently produce a high concentration of CO2), cement, iron and steel, refinery and biomass. The application of CCS to industry is a field which has had much less attention than its application to the electricity production sector. Costs range from less than $2011 10/tCO2 up to above $2011 100/tCO2. In the words of a synthesis report from the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) “This area has so far not been the focus of discussions and therefore much attention needs to be paid to the application of CCS to industrial sources if the full potential of CCS is to be unlocked”.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:38 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.17
       
  • Introduction to market challenges in developing second generation carbon
           capture materials

    • Authors: Jason Mathew Ornstein
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      Absent an economic or social cataclysm, there is no plausible way to meet what will be the world’s unavoidable energy demands without utilizing its vast supply of fossil fuels. One important technology being contemplated to mitigate the negative impact of anthropogenic carbon dioxide loading of the atmosphere is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS will play a vital role in least-cost efforts to limit global warming1. To achieve future least-cost solutions, second generation or ‘2.0’ carbon capture materials are being developed with government support to improve efficiencies over the current applied solution that is “a very expensive proposition”2 for the installed energy generation base. One 2.0 material, Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), is “capable of increasing (carbon dioxide) selectivity, improving energy efficiency, and reducing the costs of separation processes”3 in CCS. Such materials can address CCS utilization outcomes in addition to lowering the carbon capture cost. To support further 2.0 carbon capture material development while CCS faces economic challenges, framergyTM is leveraging alternative usages for MOFs and other 2.0 materials developed for carbon capture.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:38 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.18
       
  • Preface and overview

    • Authors: Howard JM Hanley
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:37 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.1
       
  • Industrial requirements

    • Authors: Patrick Linke
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:37 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.3
       
  • Carbon capture: An introduction

    • Authors: Howard JM Hanley
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:36 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.2
       
  • Industrial procedures and problems

    • Authors: Fedaa Ali
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:36 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.5
       
  • Pre- and post-combustion

    • Authors: Fedaa Ali
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:35 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.4
       
  • QAFAC: Carbon dioxide recovery plant

    • Authors: Khalid Mubarak Rashid Al-Hitmi
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      This short report outlines Qatar Fuel Additives Company (QAFAC) plan to reuse the carbon dioxide emitted from their methanol plant. It is estimated that 500 tn/day of CO2 will be recovered from its Methanol Reformer stack which will be injected into the Methanol Synthesis unit to enhance the production capacity. The Recovery Unit will be constructed under license from MHI (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Japan) and will be a specific and novel application of CO2 recovery focused to optimize methanol production. Overall, since operations are designed to produce 982,350 tonnes per annum of methanol and 610,000 tonnes per annum of MTBE, the QAFAC Plant will be one of the world’s largest commercial-scale CO2 capture facilities.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:35 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.22
       
  • Green shipping

    • Authors: Talal Al-Tamimi
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      The state-of-the-art facilities of RasGas and QatarGas process natural gas from Qatar’s North Field, the world’s largest non-associated gas field. At the Ras Laffan site, gas is liquefied to LNG and then loaded to tankers for transportation. But along with the objective of supplying LNG to customers as efficiently as possible, comes the responsibility to be environmentally aware and, in particular, to ensure that any carbon emissions during the loading and transportation are minimised. The presentation outlines RasGas’s approach. The transportation of LNG by the giant tankers designated Q-Flex and Q-Max – vessels with cargo capacities of the order of 215,000m3 and 266,000m3, respectively – is discussed. A key point is that, although these vessels are much larger than the conventional carriers, the fuel consumption is almost the same, with obvious economic and environmental advantages. It is emphasised that carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere from the LNG cargo itself are minimal since the carriers are fitted with on-board facilities to liquefy the boil-off gas and return the LNG to the cargo tanks. A proposal to retro-fit systems so that natural gas can be delivered to the existing diesel main engines is mentioned: LNG from the vessel’s cargo tanks will be vaporized and the gas used as the fuel. The benefits of replacing marine diesel fuel with gas are delineated, not only with respect to carbon emission reduction, but also to ensure that the legal restrictions on the sulphur content of a marine fuel are satisfied. Finally, the Jetty Boil-off Gas Recovery Project (JBOG) is discussed. The project is a major attempt to reduce the BOG generated and flared at the Ras Laffan LNG terminal. It is remarked that greenhouse gas emissions can be substantially reduced and the recovered gas can be used to generate a significant percentage of the power required by the State of Qatar.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:34 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.20
       
  • The carbon conundrum: GCC perspectives

    • Authors: Farid Benyahia
      Abstract: Sustainable Technologies, Systems & Policies, Issue CCS Workshop, May 2012.
      The solution to the carbon conundrum does not seem to be within reach in the short or medium term, despite significant advances and knowledge gains in demonstration scale CCS facilities. This stems from the fact that currently carbon management has no binding policies and legal framework. Without this legislation, it is unlikely that international cooperation in carbon trade and management would flourish. The situation is also exacerbated by doubts about the suitability of sites and global capacity to store captured CO2. Sophisticated cost models have been developed for carbon capture and storage, and these indicate that cost reduction in the complete carbon value chain should be focused on the capture phase as this is the most energy intensive. However, there are uncertainties about properly costing carbon storage as this should involve search for suitable site location costs. The GCC states have characteristics that make them one of the largest consumers of fresh water and energy in the world, and by default emitters of CO2 per capita. There are currently no demonstration or commercial scale CCS facilities in the GCC and in the short term, it is unlikely to be the case given that current carbon capture technologies favor coal rather than natural gas as fuel in power plants. It is also unlikely that underground carbon storage be considered in the short term, given the risk of CO2 plume migration that may displace brine in saline formations into strata containing hydrocarbon resources or potable. It is therefore imperative that substantial research be conducted to identify storage sites, reduce energy consumption in carbon capture and develop alternatives to CCS in the form of carbon conversion into useful products or minerals with low environmental impact. The GCC have tremendous opportunities to lead the world in carbon management given their strong experience in hydrocarbon processing. However, this may only be successful if agreed policies and legal frameworks are in place to facilitate a robust carbon pricing.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 06:59:34 GMT
      DOI: 10.5339/stsp.2012.ccs.21
       
 
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