A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 160 journals)
Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acque Sotterranee - Italian Journal of Groundwater     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Agua y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Águas Subterrâneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Water Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Water Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Aquacultural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Aquaculture and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aquasains     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Living Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Aquatic Sciences and Engineering     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Desalination and Water Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Discover Water     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European journal of water quality - Journal européen d'hydrologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Water     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Grundwasser     Hybrid Journal  
Hydro Nepal : Journal of Water, Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
IDA Journal of Desalination and Water Reuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
International Hydrographic Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Nuclear Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Waste Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Water Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Water Resources Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrology (New Zealand)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of South Carolina Water Resources     Open Access  
Journal of the American Water Resources Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Water and Wastewater / Ab va Fazilab     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Water Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Water Resource Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Jurnal Enggano     Open Access  
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Marine Ecology Progress Series MEPS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Natural and Engineering Sciences     Open Access  
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
npj Clean Water     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Opflow     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ozone Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Paddy and Water Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revue des sciences de l'eau / Journal of Water Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
River Research and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sustainable Water Resources Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Texas Water Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Water Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Water     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Water and Environment Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Water Cycle     Open Access  
Water Environment and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Water Research X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Resources Management     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Water Resources Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Water Science : The National Water Research Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Water-Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water21     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Watershed Ecology and the Environment     Open Access  
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wetlands Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Water Policy     Hybrid Journal  
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Annual Review of Marine Science
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1941-1405 - ISSN (Online) 1941-0611
This journal is no longer being updated because:
    the publisher no longer provides RSS feeds
  • Introduction

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • A Life Outside

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: M.A.R. Koehl
      Abstract: How do the morphologies of organisms affect their physical interactions with the environment and other organisms' My research in marine systems couples field studies of the physical habitats, life history strategies, and ecological interactions of organisms with laboratory analyses of their biomechanics. Here, I review how we pursued answers to three questions about marine organisms: (a) how benthic organisms withstand and utilize the water moving around them, (b) how the interaction between swimming and turbulent ambient water flow affects where small organisms go, and (c) how hairy appendages catch food and odors. I also discuss the importance of different types of mentors, the roadblocks for women in science when I started my career, the challenges and delights of interdisciplinary research, and my quest to understand how I see the world as a dyslexic.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • The Physical Oceanography of Ice-Covered Moons

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Krista M. Soderlund; Marc Rovira-Navarro, Michael Le Bars, Britney E. Schmidt Theo Gerkema
      Abstract: In the outer solar system, a growing number of giant planet satellites are now known to be abodes for global oceans hidden below an outer layer of ice. These planetary oceans are a natural laboratory for studying physical oceanographic processes in settings that challenge traditional assumptions made for Earth's oceans. While some driving mechanisms are common to both systems, such as buoyancy-driven flows and tides, others, such as libration, precession, and electromagnetic pumping, are likely more significant for moons in orbit around a host planet. Here, we review these mechanisms and how they may operate across the solar system, including their implications for ice–ocean interactions. Future studies should continue to advance our understanding of each of these processes as well as how they may act together in concert. This interplay also has strong implications for habitability as well as testing oceanic hypotheses with future missions.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Marine Transgression in Modern Times

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christopher J. Hein; Matthew L. Kirwan
      Abstract: Marine transgression associated with rising sea levels causes coastal erosion, landscape transitions, and displacement of human populations globally. This process takes two general forms. Along open-ocean coasts, active transgression occurs when sediment-delivery rates are unable to keep pace with accommodation creation, leading to wave-driven erosion and/or landward translation of coastal landforms. It is highly visible, rapid, and limited to narrow portions of the coast. In contrast, passive transgression is subtler and slower, and impacts broader areas. It occurs along low-energy, inland marine margins; follows existing upland contours; and is characterized predominantly by the landward translation of coastal ecosystems. The nature and relative rates of transgression along these competing margins lead to expansion and/or contraction of the coastal zone and—particularly under the influence of anthropogenic interventions—will dictate future coastal-ecosystem response to sea-level rise, as well as attendant, often inequitable, impacts on human populations.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Hidden Threat: The Influence of Sea-Level Rise on Coastal Groundwater and
           the Convergence of Impacts on Municipal Infrastructure

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shellie Habel; Charles H. Fletcher, Matthew M. Barbee Kyrstin L. Fornace
      Abstract: Sea-level rise (SLR) is influencing coastal groundwater by both elevating the water table and shifting salinity profiles landward, making the subsurface increasingly corrosive. Low-lying coastal municipalities worldwide (potentially 1,546, according to preliminary analysis) are vulnerable to an array of impacts spurred by these phenomena, which can occur decades before SLR-induced surface inundation. Damage is accumulating across a variety of infrastructure networks that extend partially and fully beneath the ground surface. Because the resulting damage is largely concealed and imperceptible, it is largely overlooked as part of infrastructure management and planning. Here, we provide an overview of SLR-influenced coastal groundwater and related processes that have the potential to damage societally critical infrastructure and mobilize urban contamination. In an effort to promote research efforts that can inform effective adaptation and management, we discuss various impacts to critical infrastructure and propose actions based on literature focused specifically on SLR-influenced coastal groundwater.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • The Global Turbidity Current Pump and Its Implications for Organic Carbon
           Cycling

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Peter J. Talling; Sophie Hage, Megan L. Baker, Thomas S. Bianchi, Robert G. Hilton Katherine L. Maier
      Abstract: Submarine turbidity currents form the largest sediment accumulations on Earth, raising the question of their role in global carbon cycles. It was previously inferred that terrestrial organic carbon was primarily incinerated on shelves and that most turbidity current systems are presently inactive. Turbidity currents were thus not considered in global carbon cycles, and the burial efficiency of global terrestrial organic carbon was considered low to moderate (∼10–44%). However, recent work has shown that burial of terrestrial organic carbon by turbidity currents is highly efficient (>60–100%) in a range of settings and that flows occur more frequently than once thought, although they were far more active at sea-level lowstands. This leads to revised global estimates for mass flux (∼62–90 Mt C/year) and burial efficiency (∼31–45%) of terrestrial organic carbon in marine sediments. Greatly increased burial fluxes during sea-level lowstands are also likely underestimated; thus, organic carbon cycling by turbidity currents could play a role in long-term changes in atmospheric CO2 and climate.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Modeling the Vertical Flux of Organic Carbon in the Global Ocean

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Adrian B. Burd
      Abstract: The oceans play a fundamental role in the global carbon cycle, providing a sink for atmospheric carbon. Key to this role is the vertical transport of organic carbon from the surface to the deep ocean. This transport is a product of a diverse range of physical and biogeochemical processes that determine the formation and fate of this material, and in particular how much carbon is sequestered in the deep ocean. Models can be used to both diagnose biogeochemical processes and predict how the various processes will change in the future. Global biogeochemical models use simplified representations of food webs and processes but are converging on values for the export of organic carbon from the surface ocean. Other models concentrate on understanding specific processes and can be used to develop parameterizations for global models. Model development is continuing by adding representations and parameterizations of higher trophic levels and mesopelagic processes, and these are expected to improve model performance.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • The Four-Dimensional Carbon Cycle of the Southern Ocean

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alison R. Gray
      Abstract: The Southern Ocean plays a fundamental role in the global carbon cycle, dominating the oceanic uptake of heat and carbon added by anthropogenic activities and modulating atmospheric carbon concentrations in past, present, and future climates. However, the remote and extreme conditions found there make the Southern Ocean perpetually one of the most difficult places on the planet to observe and to model, resulting in significant and persistent uncertainties in our knowledge of the oceanic carbon cycle there. The flow of carbon in the Southern Ocean is traditionally understood using a zonal mean framework, in which the meridional overturning circulation drives the latitudinal variability observed in both air–sea flux and interior ocean carbon concentration. However, recent advances, based largely on expanded observation and modeling capabilities in the region, reveal the importance of processes acting at smaller scales, including basin-scale zonal asymmetries in mixed-layer depth, mesoscale eddies, and high-frequency atmospheric variability. Assessing the current state of knowledge and remaining gaps emphasizes the need to move beyond the zonal mean picture and embrace a four-dimensional understanding of the carbon cycle in the Southern Ocean.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • The Impact of Fine-Scale Currents on Biogeochemical Cycles in a Changing
           Ocean

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marina Lévy; Damien Couespel, Clément Haëck, M.G. Keerthi, Inès Mangolte Channing J. Prend
      Abstract: Fine-scale currents, O(1–100 km, days–months), are actively involved in the transport and transformation of biogeochemical tracers in the ocean. However, their overall impact on large-scale biogeochemical cycling on the timescale of years remains poorly understood due to the multiscale nature of the problem. Here, we summarize these impacts and critically review current estimates. We examine how eddy fluxes and upscale connections enter into the large-scale balance of biogeochemical tracers. We show that the overall contribution of eddy fluxes to primary production and carbon export may not be as large as it is for oxygen ventilation. We highlight the importance of fine scales to low-frequency natural variability through upscale connections and show that they may also buffer the negative effects of climate change on the functioning of biogeochemical cycles. Significant interdisciplinary efforts are needed to properly account for the cross-scale effects of fine scales on biogeochemical cycles in climate projections.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Climate, Oxygen, and the Future of Marine Biodiversity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Curtis Deutsch; Justin L. Penn Noelle Lucey
      Abstract: The ocean enabled the diversification of life on Earth by adding O2 to the atmosphere, yet marine species remain most subject to O2 limitation. Human industrialization is intensifying the aerobic challenges to marine ecosystems by depleting the ocean's O2 inventory through the global addition of heat and local addition of nutrients. Historical observations reveal an ∼2% decline in upper-ocean O2 and accelerating reports of coastal mass mortality events. The dynamic balance of O2 supply and demand provides a unifying framework for understanding these phenomena across scales from the global ocean to individual organisms. Using this framework, we synthesize recent advances in forecasting O2 loss and its impacts on marine biogeography, biodiversity, and biogeochemistry. We also highlight three outstanding uncertainties: how long-term global climate change intensifies ocean weather events in which simultaneous heat and hypoxia create metabolic storms, how differential species O2 sensitivities alter the structure of ecological communities, and how global O2 loss intersects with coastal eutrophication. Projecting these interacting impacts on future marine ecosystems requires integration of climate dynamics, biogeochemistry, physiology, and ecology, evaluated with an eye on Earth history. Reducing global and local impacts of warming and O2 loss will be essential if humankind is to preserve the health and biodiversity of the future ocean.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Impacts of Climate Change on Marine Foundation Species

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Thomas Wernberg; Mads S. Thomsen, Julia K. Baum, Melanie J. Bishop, John F. Bruno, Melinda A. Coleman, Karen Filbee-Dexter, Karine Gagnon, Qiang He, Daniel Murdiyarso, Kerrylee Rogers, Brian R. Silliman, Dan A. Smale, Samuel Starko Mathew A. Vanderklift
      Abstract: Marine foundation species are the biotic basis for many of the world's coastal ecosystems, providing structural habitat, food, and protection for myriad plants and animals as well as many ecosystem services. However, climate change poses a significant threat to foundation species and the ecosystems they support. We review the impacts of climate change on common marine foundation species, including corals, kelps, seagrasses, salt marsh plants, mangroves, and bivalves. It is evident that marine foundation species have already been severely impacted by several climate change drivers, often through interactive effects with other human stressors, such as pollution, overfishing, and coastal development. Despite considerable variation in geographical, environmental, and ecological contexts, direct and indirect effects of gradual warming and subsequent heatwaves have emerged as the most pervasive drivers of observed impact and potent threat across all marine foundation species, but effects from sea level rise, ocean acidification, and increased storminess are expected to increase. Documented impacts include changes in the genetic structures, physiology, abundance, and distribution of the foundation species themselves and changes to their interactions with other species, with flow-on effects to associated communities, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning. We discuss strategies to support marine foundation species into the Anthropocene, in order to increase their resilience and ensure the persistence of the ecosystem services they provide.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Neutral Theory and Plankton Biodiversity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michael J. Behrenfeld; Kelsey M. Bisson
      Abstract: The biodiversity of the plankton has been interpreted largely through the monocle of competition. The spatial distancing of phytoplankton in nature is so large that cell boundary layers rarely overlap, undermining opportunities for resource-based competitive exclusion. Neutral theory accounts for biodiversity patterns based purely on random birth, death, immigration, and speciation events and has commonly served as a null hypothesis in terrestrial ecology but has received comparatively little attention in aquatic ecology. This review summarizes basic elements of neutral theory and explores its stand-alone utility for understanding phytoplankton diversity. A theoretical framework is described entailing a very nonneutral trophic exclusion principle melded with the concept of ecologically defined neutral niches. This perspective permits all phytoplankton size classes to coexist at any limiting resource level, predicts greater diversity than anticipated from readily identifiable environmental niches but less diversity than expected from pure neutral theory, and functions effectively in populations of distantly spaced individuals.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Using the Fossil Record to Understand Extinction Risk and Inform Marine
           Conservation in a Changing World

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Seth Finnegan; Paul G. Harnik, Rowan Lockwood, Heike K. Lotze, Loren McClenachan Sara S. Kahanamoku
      Abstract: Understanding the long-term effects of ongoing global environmental change on marine ecosystems requires a cross-disciplinary approach. Deep-time and recent fossil records can contribute by identifying traits and environmental conditions associated with elevated extinction risk during analogous events in the geologic past and by providing baseline data that can be used to assess historical change and set management and restoration targets and benchmarks. Here, we review the ecological and environmental information available in the marine fossil record and discuss how these archives can be used to inform current extinction risk assessments as well as marine conservation strategies and decision-making at global to local scales. As we consider future research directions in deep-time and conservationpaleobiology, we emphasize the need for coproduced research that unites researchers, conservation practitioners, and policymakers with the communities for whom the impacts of climate and global change are most imminent.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • The Microbial Ecology of Estuarine Ecosystems

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Byron C. Crump; Jennifer L. Bowen
      Abstract: Human civilization relies on estuaries, and many estuarine ecosystem services are provided by microbial communities. These services include high rates of primary production that nourish harvests of commercially valuable species through fisheries and aquaculture, the transformation of terrestrial and anthropogenic materials to help ensure the water quality necessary to support recreation and tourism, and mutualisms that maintain blue carbon accumulation and storage. Research on the ecology that underlies microbial ecosystem services in estuaries has expanded greatly across a range of estuarine environments, including water, sediment, biofilms, biological reefs, and stands of seagrasses, marshes, and mangroves. Moreover, the application of new molecular tools has improved our understanding of the diversity and genomic functions of estuarine microbes. This review synthesizes recent research on microbial habitats in estuaries and the contributions of microbes to estuarine food webs, elemental cycling, and interactions with plants and animals, and highlights novel insights provided by recent advances in genomics.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Predation in a Microbial World: Mechanisms and Trade-Offs of Flagellate
           Foraging

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Thomas Kiørboe
      Abstract: Heterotrophic nanoflagellates are the main consumers of bacteria and picophytoplankton in the ocean and thus play a key role in ocean biogeochemistry. They are found in all major branches of the eukaryotic tree of life but are united by all being equipped with one or a few flagella that they use to generate a feeding current. These microbial predators are faced with the challenges that viscosity at this small scale impedes predator–prey contact and that their foraging activity disturbs the ambient water and thus attracts their own flow-sensing predators. Here, I describe some of the diverse adaptations of the flagellum to produce sufficient force to overcome viscosity and of the flagellar arrangement to minimize fluid disturbances, and thus of the various solutions to optimize the foraging–predation risk trade-off. I demonstrate how insights into this trade-off can be used to develop robust trait-based models of microbial food webs.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Life in the Midwater: The Ecology of Deep Pelagic Animals

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Steven H.D. Haddock; C. Anela Choy
      Abstract: The water column of the deep ocean is dark, cold, low in food, and under crushing pressures, yet it is full of diverse life. Due to its enormous volume, this mesopelagic zone is home to some of the most abundant animals on the planet. Rather than struggling to survive, they thrive—owing to a broad set of adaptations for feeding, behavior, and physiology. Our understanding of these adaptations is constrained by the tools available for exploring the deep sea, but this tool kit is expanding along with technological advances. Each time we apply a new method to the depths, we gain surprising insights about genetics, ecology, behavior, physiology, diversity, and the dynamics of change. These discoveries show structure within the seemingly uniform habitat, limits to the seemingly inexhaustible resources, and vulnerability in the seemingly impervious environment. To understand midwater ecology, we need to reimagine the rules that govern terrestrial ecosystems. By spending more time at depth—with whatever tools are available—we can fill the knowledge gaps and better link ecology to the environment throughout the water column.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Phaeocystis: A Global Enigma

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Walker O. Smith; Scarlett Trimborn
      Abstract: The genus Phaeocystis is globally distributed, with blooms commonly occurring on continental shelves. This unusual phytoplankter has two major morphologies: solitary cells and cells embedded in a gelatinous matrix. Only colonies form blooms. Their large size (commonly 2 mm but up to 3 cm) and mucilaginous envelope allow the colonies to escape predation, but data are inconsistent as to whether colonies are grazed. Cultured Phaeocystis can also inhibit the growth of co-occurring phytoplankton or the feeding of potential grazers. Colonies and solitary cells use nitrate as a nitrogen source, although solitary cells can also grow on ammonium. Phaeocystis colonies might be a major contributor to carbon flux to depth, but in most cases, colonies are rapidly remineralized in the upper 300 m. The occurrence of large Phaeocystis blooms is often associated with environments with low and highly variable light and high nitrate levels, with Phaeocystis antarctica blooms being linked additionally to high iron availability. Emerging results indicate that different clones of Phaeocystis have substantial genetic plasticity, which may explain its appearance in a variety of environments. Given the evidence of Phaeocystis appearing in new systems, this trend will likely continue in the near future.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • The Evolution, Assembly, and Dynamics of Marine Holobionts

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Raúl A. González-Pech; Vivian Y. Li, Vanessa Garcia, Elizabeth Boville, Marta Mammone, Hiroaki Kitano, Kim B. Ritchie Mónica Medina
      Abstract: The holobiont concept (i.e., multiple living beings in close symbiosis with one another and functioning as a unit) is revolutionizing our understanding of biology, especially in marine systems. The earliest marine holobiont was likely a syntrophic partnership of at least two prokaryotic members. Since then, symbiosis has enabled marine organisms to conquer all ocean habitats through the formation of holobionts with a wide spectrum of complexities. However, most scientific inquiries have focused on isolated organisms and their adaptations to specific environments. In this review, we attempt to illustrate why a holobiont perspective—specifically, the study of how numerous organisms form a discrete ecological unit through symbiosis—will be a more impactful strategy to advance our understanding of the ecology and evolution of marine life. We argue that this approach is instrumental in addressing the threats to marine biodiversity posed by the current global environmental crisis.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Viruses in Marine Invertebrate Holobionts: Complex Interactions Between
           Phages and Bacterial Symbionts

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kun Zhou; Ting Zhang, Xiao-Wei Chen, Ying Xu, Rui Zhang Pei-Yuan Qian
      Abstract: Marine invertebrates are ecologically and economically important and have formed holobionts by evolving symbiotic relationships with cellular and acellular microorganisms that reside in and on their tissues. In recent decades, significant focus on symbiotic cellular microorganisms has led to the discovery of various functions and a considerable expansion of our knowledge of holobiont functions. Despite this progress, our understanding of symbiotic acellular microorganisms remains insufficient, impeding our ability to achieve a comprehensive understanding of marine holobionts. In this review, we highlight the abundant viruses, with a particular emphasis on bacteriophages; provide an overview of their diversity, especially in extensively studied sponges and corals; and examine their potential life cycles. In addition, we discuss potential phage–holobiont interactions of various invertebrates, including participating in initial bacterial colonization, maintaining symbiotic relationships, and causing or exacerbating the diseases of marine invertebrates. Despite the importance of this subject, knowledge of how viruses contribute to marine invertebrate organisms remains limited. Advancements in technology and greater attention to viruses will enhance our understanding of marine invertebrate holobionts.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Microbialite Accretion and Growth: Lessons from Shark Bay and the Bahamas

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: R. Pamela Reid; Erica P. Suosaari, Amanda M. Oehlert, Clément G.L. Pollier Christophe Dupraz
      Abstract: Microbialites provide geological evidence of one of Earth's oldest ecosystems, potentially recording long-standing interactions between coevolving life and the environment. Here, we focus on microbialite accretion and growth and consider how environmental and microbial forces that characterize living ecosystems in Shark Bay and the Bahamas interact to form an initial microbialite architecture, which in turn establishes distinct evolutionary pathways. A conceptual three-dimensional model is developed for microbialite accretion that emphasizes the importance of a dynamic balance between extrinsic and intrinsic factors in determining the initial architecture. We then explore how early taphonomic and diagenetic processes modify the initial architecture, culminating in various styles of preservation in the rock record. The timing of lithification of microbial products is critical in determining growth patterns and preservation potential. Study results have shown that all microbialites are not created equal; the unique evolutionary history of an individual microbialite matters.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Designing More Informative Multiple-Driver Experiments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mridul K. Thomas; Ravi Ranjan
      Abstract: For decades, multiple-driver/stressor research has examined interactions among drivers that will undergo large changes in the future: temperature, pH, nutrients, oxygen, pathogens, and more. However, the most commonly used experimental designs—present-versus-future and ANOVA—fail to contribute to general understanding or predictive power. Linking experimental design to process-based mathematical models would help us predict how ecosystems will behave in novel environmental conditions. We review a range of experimental designs and assess the best experimental path toward a predictive ecology. Full factorial response surface, fractional factorial, quadratic response surface, custom, space-filling, and especially optimal and sequential/adaptive designs can help us achieve more valuable scientific goals. Experiments using these designs are challenging to perform with long-lived organisms or at the community and ecosystem levels. But they remain our most promising path toward linking experiments and theory in multiple-driver research and making accurate, useful predictions.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Welcoming More Participation in Open Data Science for the Oceans

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alexa L. Fredston; Julia S. Stewart Lowndes
      Abstract: Open science is a global movement happening across all research fields. Enabled by technology and the open web, it builds on years of efforts by individuals, grassroots organizations, institutions, and agencies. The goal is to share knowledge and broaden participation in science, from early ideation to making research outputs openly accessible to all (open access). With an emphasis on transparency and collaboration, the open science movement dovetails with efforts to increase diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging in science and society. The US Biden–Harris Administration and many other US government agencies have declared 2023 the Year of Open Science, providing a great opportunity to boost participation in open science for the oceans. For researchers day-to-day, open science is a critical piece of modern analytical workflows with increasing amounts of data. Therefore, we focus this article on open data science—the tooling and people enabling reproducible, transparent, inclusive practices for data-intensive research—and its intersection with the marine sciences. We discuss the state of various dimensions of open science and argue that technical advancements have outpaced our field's culture change to incorporate them. Increasing inclusivity and technical skill building are interlinked and must be prioritized within the marine science community to find collaborative solutions for responding to climate change and other threats to marine biodiversity and society.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Combined Use of Short-Lived Radionuclides (234Th and 210Po) as Tracers of
           Sinking Particles in the Ocean

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Montserrat Roca-Martí; Viena Puigcorbé
      Abstract: Radionuclides can provide key information on the temporal dimension of environmental processes, given their well-known rates of radioactive decay and production. Naturally occurring radionuclides, such as 234Th and 210Po, have been used as powerful particle tracers in the marine environment to study particle cycling and vertical export. Since their application to quantify the magnitude of particulate organic carbon (POC) export in the 1990s, 234Th and, to a lesser extent, 210Po have been widely used to characterize the magnitude of the biological carbon pump (BCP). Combining both radionuclides, with their different half-lives, biogeochemical behaviors, and input sources to the ocean, can help to better constrain POC export and capture BCP dynamics that would be missed by a single tracer. Here, we review the studies that have simultaneously used 234Th and 210Po as tracers of POC export, emphasizing what can be learned from their joint application, and provide recommendations and future directions.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Metal Organic Complexation in Seawater: Historical Background and Future
           Directions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: James W. Moffett; Rene M. Boiteau
      Abstract: The speciation of most biologically active trace metals in seawater is dominated by complexation by organic ligands. This review traces the history of work in this area, from the early observations that showed surprisingly poor recoveries using metal preconcentration protocols to the present day, where advances in mass spectroscopy and stable isotope geochemistry are providing new insights into the structure, origin, fate, and biogeochemical impact of organic ligands. Many long-standing hypotheses about the specific biological origin of ligands such as siderophores in seawater are finally being validated. This work has revealed the complexity of organic complexation, with multiple ligands and, in some cases, timescales of ligand exchange that are much slower than originally thought. The influence of organic complexation on scavenging is now a key parameter in biogeochemical models of biologically essential metals, especially iron. New insights about the sources and sinks of ligands are required to enhance the usefulness of these models.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Introduction

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2023-01-16T00:00:00Z
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.182.206
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 160 journals)
Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acque Sotterranee - Italian Journal of Groundwater     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Agua y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Águas Subterrâneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Water Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Water Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Aquacultural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Aquaculture and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aquasains     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Living Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Aquatic Sciences and Engineering     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Desalination and Water Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Discover Water     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European journal of water quality - Journal européen d'hydrologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Water     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Grundwasser     Hybrid Journal  
Hydro Nepal : Journal of Water, Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
IDA Journal of Desalination and Water Reuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
International Hydrographic Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Nuclear Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Waste Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Water Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Water Resources Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrology (New Zealand)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of South Carolina Water Resources     Open Access  
Journal of the American Water Resources Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Water and Wastewater / Ab va Fazilab     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Water Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Water Resource Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Jurnal Enggano     Open Access  
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Marine Ecology Progress Series MEPS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Natural and Engineering Sciences     Open Access  
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
npj Clean Water     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Opflow     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ozone Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Paddy and Water Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revue des sciences de l'eau / Journal of Water Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
River Research and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sustainable Water Resources Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Texas Water Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Water Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Water     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Water and Environment Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Water Cycle     Open Access  
Water Environment and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Water Research X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Resources Management     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Water Resources Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Water Science : The National Water Research Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Water-Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water21     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Watershed Ecology and the Environment     Open Access  
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wetlands Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Water Policy     Hybrid Journal  
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.182.206
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-