A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 160 journals)
Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acque Sotterranee - Italian Journal of Groundwater     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Agua y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Águas Subterrâneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Water Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Water Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Aquacultural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Aquaculture and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aquasains     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Living Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Aquatic Sciences and Engineering     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Desalination and Water Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Discover Water     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European journal of water quality - Journal européen d'hydrologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Water     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Grundwasser     Hybrid Journal  
Hydro Nepal : Journal of Water, Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
IDA Journal of Desalination and Water Reuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
International Hydrographic Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Nuclear Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Waste Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Water Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Water Resources Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrology (New Zealand)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of South Carolina Water Resources     Open Access  
Journal of the American Water Resources Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Water and Wastewater / Ab va Fazilab     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Water Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Water Resource Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Jurnal Enggano     Open Access  
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Marine Ecology Progress Series MEPS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Natural and Engineering Sciences     Open Access  
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
npj Clean Water     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Opflow     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ozone Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Paddy and Water Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revue des sciences de l'eau / Journal of Water Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
River Research and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sustainable Water Resources Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Texas Water Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Water Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Water     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Water and Environment Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Water Cycle     Open Access  
Water Environment and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Water Research X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Resources Management     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Water Resources Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Water Science : The National Water Research Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Water-Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water21     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Watershed Ecology and the Environment     Open Access  
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wetlands Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Water Policy     Hybrid Journal  
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Aquatic Sciences
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.109
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1015-1621 - ISSN (Online) 1420-9055
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Exploring uncharted waters: insights into groundwater zooplankton of the
           Brazilian semiarid region

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The subterranean environments of the Caatinga drylands (Brazilian biome) host a diverse array of aquatic systems and diversity, comprising both lentic and lotic ecosystems. Species diversity in these environmnts has been overlooked and remains poorly understood, especially regarding zooplankton. We studied the species richness and composition of zooplankton living in groundwater of the Caatinga drylands and explored how they vary in relation to habitat type (lentic and lotic) by testing two hypotheses: (1) species richness, gamma diversity, and zooplankton density are higher in lentic environments and (2) zooplankton species composition differs between habitat types. We sampled 12 lentic and lotic groundwater environments quarterly for 2 years, and identified 100 species of zooplankton in groundwater environments, including testate amoebae (50 species), Rotifera (25 species), Copepoda (16 species), and Cladocera (9 species). Rotifer species richness and copepod density differed between lentic and lotic habitats, as did zooplankton composition. Additionally, each habitat was found to harbor distinct indicator species based on their ecology and morphological characteristics. These findings contribute to current understanding of groundwater biodiversity and ecology, providing support for freshwater and speleological management and conservation programs.
      PubDate: 2024-07-11
       
  • Effect of glyphosate on the sporulation of aquatic fungi: an in-vitro
           experience

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Glyphosate, a herbicide widely used in agriculture, has adverse effects on aquatic ecosystems. This study aimed to assess the repercussions of in-vitro exposure to varying concentrations of glyphosate (1500, 3000, and 6000 μg l−1) on  sporulation of fungi that colonize Typha latifolia (L.) leaves. Although the results were not significant, our bioassay revealed a trend of a 50% increase in fungal sporulation at lower glyphosate concentrations compared to the control, with an effect size of approximately 100%. Thirteen aquatic fungi taxa were identified, belonging to the phylum Ascomycota. Amniculicola longissima (Anguillospora longissima) was dominant among fungi associated with decaying leaves, exhibiting a tendency of decreased sporulation rate at higher glyphosate concentrations. Conversely, Brachysporium sp. demonstrated significantly higher spore abundance at the lowest herbicide level. Some fungal taxa, such as Cordana sp., exhibited an inhibition of sporulation rates in the presence of glyphosate. On the other hand, Curvularia sp. and Sporidesmium sp. were only found in treatments with glyphosate concentrations > 3000 ppm. These findings underscore the potential adverse effects of glyphosate on sporulation of some aquatic fungi, pivotal microorganisms that are considered key in the decomposition of organic matter in aquatic ecosystems and consequently in water self-purification processes. Hence, it is plausible that this herbicide alters the dynamics of decomposition, modifying the recycling of organic matter and thereby influencing the trophic networks of aquatic ecosystems. These results represent a preliminary investigation that establishes a baseline to understand the effect of glyphosate on aquatic fungi, a topic that has been poorly studied. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2024-07-10
       
  • A global meta-analysis of the effects of land use on the diversity of
           stream fish and macroinvertebrates

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Different catchment land uses affect stream communities through direct and indirect effects by changes in water flow, sediment input, channel physical structure, and productivity. Previous studies of land use effects show a wide variation in the size and direction of biodiversity responses with positive, negative, or even no effects of the loss of native vegetation in catchments. This variation can result from physiographic characteristics, such as the original type of native vegetation (grassland or forest), dominant land use (agricultural or urban), history of change in land use and land coverage (LULC), and climate, and/or from the specific design of each study, such as the range of the analyzed LULC gradient. We performed a meta-analysis of 62 studies using stream macroinvertebrates and fish to determine which of these factors influence the biodiversity responses to changes in LULC. Contrary to our expectation, most of the physiographic factors considered relevant in the literature did not influence the response of macroinvertebrates and fish to land use. We did find, however, that studies with greater ranges of changes in LULC show stronger and the most negative diversity responses for macroinvertebrates. This suggests that studies covering a small gradient in LULC may be unable to detect potentially minute negative impacts on macroinvertebrate diversity. Our results highlight that the response of stream fish and macroinvertebrate diversity to changes in the landscape is context dependent. We suggest that the local environment of study sites and other context-dependent factors should be further investigated to better understand environmental contingencies in stream biodiversity responses.
      PubDate: 2024-07-09
       
  • Turbidity effects on prey consumption and survival of larval European
           smelt (Osmerus eperlanus)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The anadromous European smelt (Osmerus eperlanus) plays a key role in food webs of many riverine ecosystems in Europe. However, population sizes in several German rivers (e.g. Elbe or Weser rivers) have diminished drastically over the past decade. Turbidity has been considered one of the stressors affecting the successful recruitment of European smelt, as their early life stages may be particularly sensitive to changes in the abiotic environment. In this study, we investigated whether prey consumption and survival of European smelt larvae would be negatively affected by an acute exposure to elevated turbidity. We reared the larvae in the laboratory and exposed them in four separate trials (18 to 26 days post hatch, 9.5 ± 0.8 mm standard length, mean ± SD) to six turbidity levels (0–500 NTU, nephelometric turbidity units). We found that prey uptake increased at low turbidity levels and decreased at high turbidity levels, with an optimum between 100 and 200 NTU. Survival started to decrease at turbidity levels above 300 NTU. In addition, we conducted a systematic literature analysis in which we found that prey consumption of larval and juvenile fishes had been tested across a wide range of turbidity levels, mostly using pelagic (e.g. planktonic) prey items, with more studies focusing on perciform fishes and juvenile rather than larval life stages. Our empirical findings contribute to establishing thresholds for optimal larval European smelt performance under increased turbidity and provide valuable information for developing mechanistic models that assess potential consequences for European smelt recruitment dynamics.
      PubDate: 2024-07-09
       
  • Genetic diversity studies of Baikal endemic sponges at the interspecies
           and population levels using high-resolution microsatellite markers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Lake Baikal, an ancient, massive lake in Siberia that holds 20% of the world’s fresh water reserves, is a unique center of speciation. Changes in the lake’s ecosystem in recent years require comprehensive monitoring activities to track the continuously evolving situation. Sponges are bioindicators of the state of aquatic ecosystems, and in Lake Baikal sponges are represented by both cosmopolitan and endemic species. However, the study of intra- and interspecific relationships between endemic sponges is complicated by the fact that standard molecular genetic markers are not suitable for these purposes. In this regard, the search for suitable high-resolution molecular genetic markers is especially relevant. Here we report on the development of a set of universal microsatellite markers that allows the interspecific relationships between Lake Baikal endemic sponges to be studied. We tested the effectiveness of this set of microsatellite markers on representatives of four endemic sponge species and achieved a reliable separation of representatives of all four genera of the endemic sponge family Lubomirskiidae. This is the first report of a set of highly variable molecular genetic markers that has been developed specifically for the study of interspecific relationships between Lake Baikal sponges. This set also has the potential to be a marker for species identification, which is important for monitoring activities in connection with events of mass death and diseases of sponges in Lake Baikal. The described approach can be used to study endemic sponges from other ancient lakes. It has great potential for use in the development of universal markers for identifying groups of closely related species.
      PubDate: 2024-07-09
       
  • Ontogenetic variation in isotopic niche positions of aquatic consumers in
           boreal lakes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract We used an extensive multispecies dataset to examine how C and N stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) of aquatic consumers varied with body size in populations of northern lakes. Ontogenetic variation in tissue δ13C and δ15N was evident in a diversity of aquatic consumers. Relationships with body size tended to be stronger and more consistently positive for δ15N, and more variable in nature for δ13C. Among-population variation in ontogenetic slopes was greater for δ13C than for δ15N for most biota examined. Relationships between δ13C and δ15N and body size were still significant even after accounting for variation owing to tissue C:N and body condition. Ontogenetic variation was more strongly linked to age than body size in some fishes, particularly for δ15N, but age effects, inferred from growth rate, also accounted for variation in δ13C and δ15N beyond body size effects; δ13C tended to be positively related and δ15N tended to be negatively related to growth rate. There was only limited evidence of concordance in ontogenetic slopes between co-habiting pairs of species, suggesting that the factors driving ontogenetic variation in stable isotope ratios may be largely species- or population-specific. However, ontogenetic slopes of individual taxa were related to various lake habitat features representing climate, ecosystem size, and water clarity. The proportion of isotopic niche space attributable to ontogenetic variation can be substantial and this has implications for applying and interpreting isotopic niche metrics. Our study provides the broadest and most comprehensive analysis of ontogenetic variation in isotopic compositions of freshwater consumers to date and our results underscore the need to account for this variation in the analysis of freshwater food webs.
      PubDate: 2024-07-06
       
  • Contribution and control of microbial necromass carbon in wetland soils

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Microbial necromass carbon (MNC) has been identified as an essential component of a persistent soil carbon pool. However, the contribution of MNC to soil organic carbon (SOC) in wetlands remains unclear. This study aims to explore the contribution of MNC to SOC and the factors controlling its distribution in wetlands. The distribution pattern of MNC in drawdown areas was investigated in the inlet and center of the Dongting Wetland, China. Random forest modeling was performed to determine the relative importance of environmental variables to MNC. A partial least squares path model was performed to further explore the direct and indirect effects of environmental variables on MNC. The analyses showed that the MNC content was 2652.70–3314.64 mg kg−1, accounting for 23.16–31.65% of SOC in wetland soils. Compared to bacterial necromass carbon (BNC), fungal necromass carbon (FNC) contributed more to SOC accumulation (over 70% of total MNC) in wetland soils. MNC content and the contribution of BNC to MNC increased with soil depth. In addition, MNC in wetland soils was directly affected by dissolved total nitrogen (DTN) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC)/SOC (p < 0.001; standardized total effect = 0.81). The pH indirectly affected MNC by regulating carbon and nitrogen content, with a standardized total effect of 0.48. In wetland soils, the lower MNC content and lower contribution to SOC may be supported by the slow accumulation of necromass and potential necromass mining in nutrient-poor conditions. Carbon and nitrogen availability played a crucial role in controlling the MNC turnover process in wetland soils.
      PubDate: 2024-07-06
       
  • Unveiling the spatio-temporal variation of harmful algal bloom (HAB)
           species assemblages and their relationship with environmental factors in a
           tidal creek environment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The present study provides complementary information on the harmful algal bloom (HAB) species present in Manori Creek coastal water and tidal channel. A total of 67 HAB species representing 35 genera and 7 taxonomic class groups were identified. Among them, 27 were potentially toxic, while 45 had the potential to form harmful algal blooms. Notable blooms included Chaetoceros socialis in April (8.9 × 105 cells l−1) and May (3.9 × 105 cells l−1), Nitzschia palea in May (4.37 × 106 cells l−1) and June (1.1 × 105 cells l−1), and Coscinodiscus radiatus in (2.7 × 105 cells l−1) in January. The marine ciliate Mesodinium rubrum exhibited bloom formation in May (1.33 × 105 cells l−1) at all stations in Manori Creek. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the proliferation of HAB species was facilitated by optimal temperature, salinity, and nutrient levels in creek water. Dinoflagellates responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) were rare and found in low abundance. Toxin assessment results, based on the mouse bioassay, revealed that Gafrarium divaricatum samples contained paralytic shellfish toxin (PSP toxin) levels < 0.875 mouse units (MU) per 100 g of clam tissue. The test mice exhibited normal fecal consistency, indicating the absence of high levels of diarrhetic shellfish toxin (DSP toxin). The present study recorded HAB species variability and potential toxin accumulation within G. divaricatum in Manori Creek. The data generated from the creek serve as a pivotal base for the advance monitoring initiatives focused on HAB species and their associated toxins within the creek ecosystem.
      PubDate: 2024-07-06
       
  • Dormant and active ostracod communities in six rice fields of Yunnan,
           China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Ostracods have frequently been reported as part of the active faunas in the wet phase of rice fields, but knowledge on the dormant ostracods during the dry period of the rice cycle has been limited, hindering a comprehensive understanding of their adaptation to the rice field environment. In this study, we record 11 dormant ostracod species by incubating soil samples from six desiccated rice fields in Yunnan Province of southwestern China. The dormant ostracod community was dominated by species of the family Cyprididae, accompanied by members of Candonidae, Ilyocyprididae, and Notodromadidae. Our data provide unequivocal evidence for the presence of dormant ostracods from all the four families of the superfamily Cypridoidea in desiccated rice fields, verifying that these ostracods adapt to the rice fields by desiccation-resistant stage. Considering the usually shallow penetration depth of ostracods, the frequent discoveries of dormant ostracods in 2‒4 cm depth in the soil profile were probably the result of ploughing. Despite overlap in species composition, the dormant ostracod community differs from the active community sampled at the same sites more than four years ago. This suggests temporal changes of faunal composition, although the ecological memory of the dormant community containing multiple generations and the different seasonal windows represented by the two types of communities should also be considered. The emergence of adults within the first two weeks of the incubation experiment suggests the presence of dormant instars in the soil rather than resting eggs alone.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Seasonal dynamics of mangrove outwelling and its impact on estuarine
           productivity: insights from multi-parameter analysis across tidal
           variations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Tropical mangroves are subjected to extreme environmental conditions yet remain highly productive ecosystems. The Mandovi and Zuari estuaries of Goa on the western coast of India are lined by mangroves and are a rich source of fisheries that supports the coastal livelihood. Despite their ecological and economic significance, the nutrient and organic matter dynamics in tropical mangrove ecosystems remain poorly studied. The hydrographic conditions in the mangrove and adjacent estuarine waters are dictated by monsoonal precipitation, freshwater input, tides, and influx of seawater, resulting in subsequent changes in their physicochemical parameters and organic matter concentrations. The impact of these changes on the phytoplankton biomass and primary productivity in estuarine waters was investigated during the pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. Dissolved inorganic nutrients, such as nitrite, nitrate, ammonia, phosphate and silicate, displayed wide seasonal variability and were higher during the low tide than those in high tide. Isotopic and elemental ratios of carbon and nitrogen revealed that primary productivity in the estuaries was enhanced by the outwelling of mangrove-derived organic matter. The highest chlorophyll a and primary productivity were observed during the pre-monsoon season, with Zuari exhibiting higher levels compared with Mandovi. Multivariate statistical analyses confirmed that primary productivity was influenced mainly by temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen and organic matter. Results from our study emphasizes the role of outwelling of organic matter from mangroves and their influence on primary productivity in adjacent estuarine waters.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Monitoring potential impacts of climate change on the biodiversity of
           springs and springbrooks in the Central Alps

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Headwaters in alpine regions and their biodiversity are particularly threatened by climatic changes. Most predictions on their response to climate change are based on modeling approaches. Empirically gained data rarely exist for glacially influenced and groundwater-fed headwaters. In 2019, long-term monitoring was initiated at 15 springs, 8 springbrooks and 2 brooks in the UNESCO Biosphere Reserve Engiadina Val Müstair. The goal was to gain data on hydro-ecological aspects over several decades to understand whether (1) the environmental conditions change over time and (2) how these changes influence the composition of the species assemblages. Water temperature loggers were installed, pH, electrical conductivity, oxygen, nutrients and discharge were measured three times per year, and ecomorphological features were mapped two times per year. The meio- and macrofauna was sampled in 2019, 2020 and 2021 with a semi-quantitative approach. The results of the first 5 years of monitoring show that the physico-chemistry, water temperature and discharge confirm the stable character typical for groundwater-fed systems. Certain seasonal variability is evident, which possibly indicates an influence of permafrost or snow meltwater. The composition of the species assemblages differs significantly between sites but stays relatively constant over time within a site. Elevation and the availability of wood—parameters indicating forestation—significantly influence the species composition. This study provides a solid baseline on the environmental conditions and the fauna in springs and springbrooks in the Central Alps, which is needed for a proper interpretation of changes identified on a long-term basis.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Combining biotelemetry and genetics provides complementary insights
           relevant to the management and conservation of a freshwater predator (Esox
           lucius) living in brackish lagoons

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract To inform the management of wild fish populations, it is equally important to understand both the ecological connectivity of habitat patches, apparent at annual and seasonal scales, and the genetic connectivity, emerging at evolutionary scales across generations. Ecological connectivity indicates the potential for rapid recolonization upon local depletion, while genetic connectivity informs about the conservation needs related to the evolution of subpopulations and ecotypes in metapopulations. We combined acoustic biotelemetry and pooled-genome sequencing to study a northern pike (Esox lucius) population as a model of a freshwater piscivore that inhabits a network of shallow brackish lagoons in the southern Baltic Sea. We found limited ecological connectivity among genetically similar subpopulations of pike, suggesting a metapopulation structure characterized by discrete local subpopulations with infrequent migrations between them. Connectivity of different lagoons increased during spawning, suggesting directed spawning migrations to either freshwater rivers or low salinity patches in connected lake-like bays. Spawning site fidelity to either brackish or freshwater spawning sites was observed, further contributing to the reproductive isolation of certain subpopulations. The genetic population structure aligned with salinity gradients and geographical distance and was significant between pairs of rivers draining into the lagoon network, but it was unrelated to ecological connectivity. The results collectively suggest that local subpopulations may not rapidly replenish upon local depletion and that even weak connectivity among subpopulations was sufficient to maintain genetic homogeneity across lagoons with similar salinity levels. Effective management and conservation of species forming metapopulations, such as the coastal northern pike studied here, necessitate localized approaches that adapt fishing mortality to local abundance and promote access to specific habitats, especially rivers, during spawning to conserve the entire genetic biodiversity and foster resilience of the metapopulation.
      PubDate: 2024-06-25
       
  • Existing dataset suggests lakes in agricultural watersheds are warming
           faster than urban or forested lakes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Lake temperatures are important drivers of ecological and ecosystem processes, including influencing organism physiology and biogeochemical rates. Over the past several decades, lake surface temperatures have warmed due to increases in air temperatures driven by anthropogenic climate change. Similarly, increases in surface temperatures have contributed to stronger water column stratification, which also affects oxygen dynamics, nutrient cycling, and organism habitat availability. To date, we know relatively little about how land use impacts lake temperatures. We hypothesized a greater proportion of urban land use within the watershed may increase warming in lakes and lead to increased strength of stratification through time relative to other land use types, as urban heat islands and warmer runoff would contribute to greater warming. We explored trends in lake surface temperatures and stratification strength using a long-term dataset of widely distributed lakes. Contrary to our expectations, we did not observe greater warming in urban lakes; however, we did see higher rates of warming with greater agricultural land use in the watershed. We did not observe any patterns between land use and stratification strength, but stratification strength increased through the time series across lakes. Our results suggest greater warming is an important consideration for projecting the ecological implications for land use change and agricultural expansion. Our assessment of a multi-continental set of lakes also highlights the need to emphasize long-term data collection in human-impacted systems.
      PubDate: 2024-06-17
       
  • Effects of metals exposure on morphological and histological structure of
           the digestive gland in native and invasive clams in the Paraná de las
           Palmas River (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Corbicula fluminea is an aggressive invasive species that has successfully colonized aquatic habitats worldwide, producing changes in natural environments and impacting endemic populations. As disturbed environments may favor the adaptive success of exotic species over native ones, we studied the fitness response of two freshwater bivalves, invasive C. fluminea and native Diplodon delodontus, to the presence of metals in the Parana de la Palmas River. To assess the health status of both species, we analyzed morphological and histological alterations in the digestive gland and their relation to metal concentrations in this organ and in the water. Water and specimens sampling took place in the first section of the delta of the Parana River in June and September. Most metal concentrations increased in the river, although in the digestive gland only iron in D. delodontus and nickel and zinc in C. fluminea increased seasonally. Digestive gland factor and hepatosomatic index indicated higher values in C. fluminea in both periods. Despite histological analysis showing a decrease in atrophic tubules frequency in both species, which was followed by histomorphometric parameters of the epithelium and lumen of the digestive tubules, C. fluminea exhibited a greater physiological capacity for metal metabolism and recovery. These results suggest that the physiological characteristics of the Asian clam C. fluminea, combined with its reproductive efficiency and broad dispersal capacities, could explain its invasive dispersal competence over the D. delodontus in the disturbed environmental conditions observed in the Parana de las Palmas River.
      PubDate: 2024-06-04
       
  • Assessment of rarity and ecological preferences of the non-marine
           ostracods (Crustacea) in Çanakkale Province (Türkiye)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Rarity as a multidimensional concept has not been discussed for the ostracods along with the effects of physicochemical factors and sedimentation rates of waters on their distribution. We randomly sampled 91 aquatic sites including eight habitat types in the Çanakkale Province to study ostracod species rarity, commonness, and ecological preferences, and to test the relationships between the rarity index (average of geographic range, habitat specificity, and population size indices) and environmental factors. A total of 44 ostracod taxa (25 living) were reported from 75 sites. Among the species, Candonocypris caledonica was recorded for the first time in Türkiye. Sixty percent of 25 living species exhibited cosmopolitan characteristics, making significant contributions to the diversity of ostracods. The well-known cosmopolitan species, Heterocypris salina (rr = 0.268), Cypridopsis vidua (rr = 0.289), Limnocythere inopinata (rr = 0.330), Ilyocypris bradyi (rr = 0.370), and Psychrodromus olivaceus (rr = 0.390), were identified as common species based on the rarity index (rr) values. Of the environmental variables, only sediment grain sizes (×2000, ×500, and ×63 μm) were found to be effective on the distribution of ostracod species. The Shannon index exhibited a positively significant association with ×2000, while the population size index displayed a linear relationship with ×63 μm grain size, indicating a small population size and rarity. Associations among index values, sediment grain size, and water quality variables showed that comprehensive studies on ostracods, analyzing both water and sediment, can provide a clearer and more precise information for evaluating the rarity and ecological preferences of species.
      PubDate: 2024-05-31
       
  • The impact of drought duration on two Potamogeton species with different
           growth forms

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract When facing new climate extremes, aquatic plant communities may experience more frequent or increasing durations of water shortages. Aquatic macrophytes of permanently inundated habitats (true hydrophytes) may lack the physiological or morphological characteristics that protect terrestrial plants from drying out. Aquatic hydrophytes with floating or emergent leaves are expected to be more resilient to droughts than completely submerged plants, as they have morphological characteristics adapted to air-exposed conditions. Therefore, we expected the latter to survive longer periods of air exposure and perform better with increasing drought than a completely submerged growing species. Here, we conducted a microcosm experiment and exposed two Potamogeton species—the completely submerged growing Potamogeton perfoliatus and the areal leaf producing Potamogeton nodosus—to different drought conditions (1, 5, and 15 days). We aimed to detect how two species with different growth strategies cope with and respond to increasing air exposures with waterlogged sediment. Both species showed a resistance to 1–5 days of drought but showed high mortality after 15 days. They displayed significant differences in all measured morphological responses (shoot length, side shoot, and leaf counts), plant chemistry (carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate), and the produced biomass (shoot, root, leaves), and reacted significantly to increasing drought durations. Differences in their resistance were observed based on the mortality rate and morphological responses. To prevent long-term droughts and keep mortality low, we recommend to the water managers to identify areas of risk and increase water levels during dry periods.
      PubDate: 2024-05-31
       
  • Microbial contamination in a large drinking water reservoir in north
           Vietnam

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Surface water is used by 50% of the global population as a source of drinking water. It is therefore important to have an understanding of the quality of surface water used for this purpose, given its potential risk to human health. We studied fecal indicator bacteria [FIB; comprising total coliforms (TC), Escherichia coli (EC) and fecal streptococci] numbers along with 28 other water quality variables in Hoa Binh reservoir, Vietnam during six sampling campaigns undertaken from July 2023 to January 2024. Hoa Binh is a multi-purpose reservoir used for aquaculture, drinking water for local cities and Hanoi, the capital, which is downstream of the reservoir, and irrigation. Of the measured FIB, the mean value of TC exceeded that permitted by the Vietnam technical regulation for surface freshwater, QCVN 08-MT:2023/BTNMT. The mean values of the other variables, except for total nitrogen, were within the limits, although the maximal values of total organic carbon and total phosphorus exceeded them. Different point sources, including those originating from the local human population, tourists, livestock farming and fish cage farming, and diffuse sources from agriculture, comprise the major sources of contamination of the reservoir. Due to the importance of Hoa Binh reservoir for the provision of drinking water for Hanoi, the largest city of Vietnam, our results indicate the need to regularly monitor the quality of the water in the reservoir to provide a scientific basis for the implementation of timely measures to protect it. Our results also contribute to filling the knowledge gap on the microbial quality of water in developing countries.
      PubDate: 2024-05-30
       
  • Phytoplankton composition in Mediterranean confined coastal lagoons:
           testing the use of ecosystem metabolism for the quantification of
           community-related variables

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Estimations of ecosystem metabolism have rarely been used to quantify productivity in structural reductionist approaches for the description of phytoplankton composition. However, estimations of ecosystem metabolism could contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between phytoplankton composition and ecosystem functioning. To examine this, we investigated the community structure of phytoplankton in a set of Mediterranean coastal lagoons (natural and artificial) during a hydrological cycle to identify the most important environmental variables determining phytoplankton species composition. The focus of the study was on the quantification of productivity-related variables using estimations of ecosystem metabolism, such as different proxies for the estimation of the production-to-biomass ratio and of the relative importance of K- and r-strategies, which are commonly used conceptually but not quantified. Our results demonstrated differences in phytoplankton composition between seasons, due to the dominant hydrological pattern of flooding confinement in the salt marsh, and between lagoons that were caused by different levels of nutrient availability. Moreover, there was a notable decrease in the production/biomass ratio and a prevalence of K-strategists with seasonal succession, as predicted by Margalef’s mandala. Thus, the results showed that estimations of ecosystem metabolism are useful for the higher frequency quantification of important ecological variables, and contribute to a better understanding of planktonic assemblages, and physical and chemical changes, in these fluctuating ecosystems.
      PubDate: 2024-05-27
       
  • Plankton assemblages in a tropical West African estuary

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The taxonomic composition, abundance, diversity and spatial distribution of phytoplankton and zooplankton, as well as the prevailing hydrographic conditions, were examined in the Whin Estuary, which is considered one of the most pristine and productive coastal ecosystems of Ghana, which is located on the Gulf of Guinea. Hydrographic and plankton variables were determined along the gradient of the estuary between March and July 2022 across two seasons and tidal periods. A total of 50 genera of phytoplankton and 27 genera of zooplankton were recorded across the two seasons and sampling periods. Diatoms and copepods dominated the plankton communities across the estuary. Plankton genera such as Navicula, Nitzschia, Thalassiosira, Cyclops, Paracalanus and Temora were recorded across all the seasons and tidal periods, despite the varying hydrographic conditions. The environmental variables varied across the seasons, tidal periods and sampling stations in the estuary. For instance, temperature, DO, transparency, and chlorophyll a varied significantly (p < 0.05) across both the seasons and tidal periods. pH values were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the rainy season compared to the dry season. There was a strong salinity gradient across the estuary, with the upper reaches dominated by freshwater organisms, such as cladocerans and cyanobacteria, and the lower reaches by marine organisms, primarily diatoms and copepods. In sum, the results reported here are important as they highlight the distribution of plankton communities in a tropical estuarine ecosystem and can serve as a reference for the management of tropical brackish ecosystems.
      PubDate: 2024-05-19
       
  • Structure of plankton and waterbird communities under water level
           fluctuations: two case studies in shallow lakes of the Patagonian steppe

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The Buenos Aires Lake Plateau, a unique semi-arid environment and priority area for waterbird conservation in Argentina, has recently shown reductions in lake sizes due to scarce rainfall. This study assessed the impact of contrasting hydrological conditions on the abiotic variables of lakes Chapu and Cervecero, as well as on the structure of plankton and how this affected the use of the lakes by waterbirds. We show that hydrological conditions shape the abiotic and biological features of these lakes. In 2015, both lakes were vegetated, but by 2016, their water level had dropped, causing decreased macrophyte coverage. In 2017, the lakes dried up completely, but were refilled the following year. The partial drought of 2015-2016 led to reduced concentrations of nutrients and food that support a high density and richness of birds, which are mostly aquatic and terrestrial feeders. After the extreme drought in 2017 and refilling phase in 2018, there was an improvement in the water quality of lake Chapu, as indicated by its increased clarity compared to that in 2015, while Cervecero remained turbid. Increased homogenization in plankton and waterbird species composition became evident in both lakes. There was a cyanobacteria bloom in Cervecero, while in Chapu Gammaproteobacteria were dominant. Both lakes supported few waterbirds, of which aquatic-terrestrial feeders and terrestrial herbivores were dominant. The abundance of the endemic and endangered hooded grebe (Podiceps gallardoi Rumboll 1974) declined with the cover of macrophytes, which these birds use when establishing their colonies. In sum, this study revealed changes in the conditions of lakes Chapu and Cervecero and their plankton communities in response to hydrological shifts, with implications for waterbird assemblages and, thus, biodiversity conservation.
      PubDate: 2024-05-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s00027-024-01083-w
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.182.206
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 160 journals)
Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acque Sotterranee - Italian Journal of Groundwater     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Agua y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Águas Subterrâneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Water Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Water Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Aquacultural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Aquaculture and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aquasains     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Living Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Aquatic Sciences and Engineering     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Desalination and Water Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Discover Water     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European journal of water quality - Journal européen d'hydrologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Water     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Grundwasser     Hybrid Journal  
Hydro Nepal : Journal of Water, Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
IDA Journal of Desalination and Water Reuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
International Hydrographic Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Nuclear Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Waste Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Water Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Water Resources Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrology (New Zealand)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of South Carolina Water Resources     Open Access  
Journal of the American Water Resources Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Water and Wastewater / Ab va Fazilab     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Water Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Water Resource Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Jurnal Enggano     Open Access  
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Marine Ecology Progress Series MEPS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Natural and Engineering Sciences     Open Access  
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
npj Clean Water     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Opflow     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ozone Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Paddy and Water Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revue des sciences de l'eau / Journal of Water Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
River Research and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sustainable Water Resources Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Texas Water Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Water Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Water     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Water and Environment Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Water Cycle     Open Access  
Water Environment and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Water Research X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Resources Management     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Water Resources Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Water Science : The National Water Research Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Water-Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water21     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Watershed Ecology and the Environment     Open Access  
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wetlands Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Water Policy     Hybrid Journal  
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.182.206
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-