A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 160 journals)
Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acque Sotterranee - Italian Journal of Groundwater     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Agua y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Águas Subterrâneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Water Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Water Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Aquacultural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Aquaculture and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aquasains     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Living Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Aquatic Sciences and Engineering     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Desalination and Water Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Discover Water     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European journal of water quality - Journal européen d'hydrologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Water     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Grundwasser     Hybrid Journal  
Hydro Nepal : Journal of Water, Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
IDA Journal of Desalination and Water Reuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
International Hydrographic Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Nuclear Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Waste Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Water Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Water Resources Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrology (New Zealand)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of South Carolina Water Resources     Open Access  
Journal of the American Water Resources Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Water and Wastewater / Ab va Fazilab     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Water Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Water Resource Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Jurnal Enggano     Open Access  
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Marine Ecology Progress Series MEPS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Natural and Engineering Sciences     Open Access  
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
npj Clean Water     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Opflow     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ozone Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Paddy and Water Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revue des sciences de l'eau / Journal of Water Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
River Research and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sustainable Water Resources Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Texas Water Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Water Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Water     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Water and Environment Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Water Cycle     Open Access  
Water Environment and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Water Research X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Resources Management     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Water Resources Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Water Science : The National Water Research Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Water-Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water21     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Watershed Ecology and the Environment     Open Access  
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wetlands Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Water Policy     Hybrid Journal  
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Aquatic Geochemistry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.591
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-1421 - ISSN (Online) 1380-6165
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Geochemical Behaviour and Influencing Factors of Salt-Forming Elements in
           Lithium-Rich Salt Lake Region: A Case Study from the Nalenggele River
           Basin, Qaidam Basin

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract To deepen the comprehension of the geochemical behaviour of salt-forming elements (K, Li, B, Ca, Mg, Sr) and distribution patterns in the primary lithium-rich salt lake region of Qaidam Basin, 31 river and lake surface sediments from various hydrogeological settings spanning high mountain to terminal salt lake regions were gathered from the Nalenggele River, the primary feeder river of the lithium-rich salt lakes. Through sequential extraction procedure, we identified notable variances in the chemical speciation of elements across various hydrological environments. Excluding elements bound to the residual fraction, all other chemical speciation content of salt-forming elements show distinct regional variations, suggesting a predominant influence of evaporation and hydrodynamic and the inherent chemical properties of elements are also very important in determining their chemical speciation distribution characteristics. Meanwhile, we have found that in addition to being absorbed and fixed by secondary clay minerals, Li bound to Fe–Mn oxides may also play a crucial role in Li isotope fractionation from the river to the terminal salt lake brine and the precipitation of evaporation salt minerals could influence the B isotope fractionation to a certain extent. Furthermore, The Li and B lost to sediments during the migration process have potential utility and there is scope for enhanced exploitation in the future. Therefore, the results obtained from the sequential extraction procedure of sediments evidently serve as a valuable method for understanding the geochemical behaviour of salt-forming elements in the epigenetic environment.
      PubDate: 2024-06-27
       
  • Mechanisms Underlying the Bromine Anomaly in the Brine of the Jingbian Gas
           Field, Ordos Basin, Northwestern China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Bromine (Br) is a vital chemical raw material primarily obtained from marine brine. The bromine/chlorine (Br/Cl) ratio serves as a crucial indicator for predicting marine potash mineralization in evaporites. As salinity increases, bromine gradually accumulates through evaporation in residual brine. During the process of brine evaporation to the potassium salt stage, the bromine content in the brine can exceed 1000 ppm. The marine brine sourced from the weathering crust reservoir at the top of the Ordovician Majiagou Formation in the Jingbian gas field, Ordos Basin, in northwestern China, displays an exceptionally high bromine content (averaging 1590 ppm), surpassing levels found in contemporary seawater. Based on analysis of major compositions, only brine evaporates to the gypsum stage. Despite extensive exploration in the region, large-scale potassium salt deposits have not been identified. This heightened concentration of bromine in low salinity brine suggests supplementation from additional organic bromine sources. The strata adjacent to the high-bromine oil field water in the Jingbian gas field, Ordos Basin, consist of the Ordovician marine evaporite strata of the Majiagou Formation and the overlying Carboniferous and Permian marine and continental deposits rich in fossil algae. Interactions between hydrocarbons and oilfield water contribute to the notable bromine anomaly observed in the Jingbian gas field in the Ordos Basin. Elevated bromine levels have also been noted in brine from various oil fields worldwide. Through an analysis of the major compositions of brines and bromine, this study will elucidate the reasons behind the presence of high bromine brines.
      PubDate: 2024-05-26
       
  • Modeling Impacts of Fe Activity and H2 Partial Pressure on Hydrogen
           Storage in Shallow Subsurface Reservoirs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Advancing underground hydrogen storage (UHS) is essential for a sustainable, emission-free future, with its success highly contingent on the unique properties of each subsurface reservoir. To ensure optimal storage, detailed site assessments are required. One of the critical gaps in knowledge necessary for ensuring safe storage is geochemical redox reactions, especially those involving iron. These redox reactions are crucial as they influence hydrogen retention or loss in the subsurface environments. In this study, we have theoretically addressed hydrogen consumption via abiotic reduction of a Fe3+ oxide under different Fe2+ activities. Simulations indicate that in scenarios, where the initial hydrogen partial pressure is extremely low (around 10−5 bars), decreasing the activity of Fe2+ by a factor of 10 can lead to a marked decrease in the initial hydrogen pressure by a maximum factor of 1000 within a few years. Variations in Fe2+ activity can significantly influence abiotic hydrogen consumption only under very low hydrogen partial pressures. This is primarily due to enhanced dissolution of Fe3+ oxides. In comparison, in conditions where hydrogen partial pressure is higher (> 10−2 bars), reduction of Fe3+ oxide can yield magnetite, resulting in a muted loss of hydrogen over time. The transition in the reduction behavior of Fe3+ oxide from a ‘dissolution-driven’ process to ‘magnetite crystallization,’ which also determines the fate of stored hydrogen, depends on initial hydrogen partial pressure. Our results demonstrate that low quantities of hydrogen can be maintained within typical storage cycles spanning less than a year, depending upon aqueous Fe content.
      PubDate: 2024-05-23
       
  • MTMF Method for Hydromagnesite Determination Based on Landsat8 and ZY1-02D
           Data: A Case Study of the Jiezechaka Salt Lake in Tibet

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Hydromagnesite (HM for short) is a natural carbonate mineral that is widely distributed. It is a high-quality mineral raw material for preparing flame retardants, magnesium oxides, heavy/light basic magnesium carbonates, magnesium hydroxides, and other Mg products. The evaluation of HM resources is of great significance to the development and utilization of salt lake resources. Using remote sensing technology to observe HM resources in salt lake can overcome the shortcomings of traditional prospecting methods such as discontinuous spatial data, time and effort. In addition, spectral analysis is the basis of hyperspectral remote sensing, and more detailed analysis of the spectral characteristics of HM is still lacking; therefore, we measured the reflection spectral curve of HM samples in the area of Jiezechaka by ASD FieldSpec4 short-wave infrared spectrometer and determined the mineral composition and content of HM samples by X-ray diffraction. The analysis indicated three and seven absorption valleys with high and low absorption intensities, respectively, in the reflectance spectral curves of the HM samples in the Jiezechaka area. Then, on this basis, the Landsat8 OLI multispectral data and ZY1-02D AHSI hyperspectral data were used as the basic data of remote sensing inversion. As the ZY1-02D AHSI data have 166 bands, which is much more than Landsat8 OLI data, it has a stronger ability to characterize the spectral characteristics of HM and can better meet the requirements of remote sensing inversion. The end member spectra were selected based on PPI and SMACC methods, respectively. The HM information around Jiezechaka Salt Lake in Tibet was extracted by the mixture tuned matched filtering method, and the regional distribution map of HM was made. A confusion matrix operation was used to compare the determination results of the two types of data. Among them, based on Landsat8 data, PPI method was used to obtain end members, and the overall accuracy of HM extraction results was > 69%, and the kappa coefficient was 0.688. Based on Landsat8 data, SMACC method was used to obtain end members, and the overall accuracy of HM extraction results was > 67%, and the kappa coefficient was 0.667. Based on ZY1-02D AHSI data, PPI method was used to obtain end members, and the overall accuracy of HM extraction results was > 76%, and the kappa coefficient was 0.743. Based on ZY1-02D AHSI data, SMACC method was used to obtain end members, and the overall accuracy of HM extraction results was > 73%, and the kappa coefficient was 0.728. It shows that the end members selected by PPI method can better express HM information in the image. Finally, through the overlay analysis of the four results, we concluded that HM outcrops in the Jiezechaka area are mainly distributed in the northwestern and southeastern regions of the lake. This study provides a rapid assessment technique for measuring HM information from salt lakes.
      PubDate: 2024-05-15
       
  • Solute Sources and Mechanism of Boron Enrichment in the Tataleng River on
           the Northern Margin of the Qaidam Basin

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The Tataleng River (TTR), as an important tributary of the Da Qaidam Salt Lake (DQSL) and Xiao Qaidam Salt Lake (XQSL) in the Qaidam Basin (QB), has an exceptionally high B content. However, the solute sources and the provenance of B in the TTR are still unclear, which significantly hinders a deeper understanding of the source–sink processes of the boron deposits in the QB. In this study, water samples were collected from tributaries, mainstreams, mud volcanoes, hot springs, and rainwater in the TTR area. Through hydrochemical analysis, forward modeling, and B isotope geochemistry methods, combined with the previous research results, some findings were obtained. The hydrochemical type of TTR is Ca–Mg–Cl, and the major mechanism of controlling chemical composition is rock weathering. The solute sources in the TTR are mainly from dissolution of evaporites (75.9%), atmospheric precipitation (20.8%), and a minor contribution from carbonates (3.1%) and silicates weathering (0.6%). The higher B content (0.89–4.30 mg/L, mean = 2.13 mg/L) and lower δ11B value (0.79‰–4.71‰, mean = 4.17‰) of the TTR indicate that the B sources are mainly from mixture of mud volcanic waters (56.19–199.98 mg/L, mean = 113.51 mg/L, − 1.26‰–2.22‰, mean = 0.85‰) in the upper reaches, and the deep groundwater near the Indosinian granite in the lower reaches. The significant difference in boron resources between the two lakes may be due to the enrichment of B in the late Pleistocene in the DQSL, which received exceptionally rich soluble B carried by the ancient TTR during an active tectonic period, while the weakening of tectonic activity and the diversion of the ancient TTR resulted in the supply of B with significantly reduced content to the XQSL. These results are helpful for a deeper understanding of the ore-forming mechanisms of the boron deposits in salt lake.
      PubDate: 2024-04-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-024-09427-6
       
  • Origin and Evolution of Deep K-Rich Confined Brine in Mahai Basin,
           Qinghai–Tibet Plateau

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Mahai Basin (MH), located in the northern Qaidam Basin (QB), possesses abundant K-rich brine resources. The investigation on the origin of deep K-rich confined brine and the variations in K–Mg elements corresponding to the evolution in MH shed light on the significance of assessment and utilization of brine deposits. This study presents multiple isotopes (δ18O–δD, 87Sr/86Sr) and hydrochemical characteristics for various waters (including river water, surface brine, intercrystalline brine, confined brine and anticlinal brine) in the MH. Our findings corroborate that: (1) confined brine exhibits relatively high K+ (average value of 6.88 g/L) and low Ca2+–Sr2+ concentrations, compared to anticlinal brine, and its chemical composition resembles the evolution of Yuqia River in Ca–SO4–HCO3 diagram, suggesting that contemporary river water is the primary source of confined brine. (2) The δ18O–δD values of confined brine in MH ranged from − 17.80 to − 27.40‰ and 1.50 to 2.40‰, respectively, and fall on the right field of the local evaporation line, indicating successive evaporation and concentration processes. (3) The 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.71142–0.71145) of confined brine fall between river water (0.71150–0.71183) and anticlinal brine (0.71135), combining with river water and confined brine which exhibit low Sr content, and further confirming the origin of confined brine is a mixture by river and anticlinal brine and much river recharge budget. (4) Considering the evolution of sedimentary facies (Dezongmahai Lake area as an example) and the gradual increase in K and Mg contents in MH, the enrichment of K and Mg exhibits a certain correlation with the evolution of MH. Notably, the brine in the northeast of the basin displays the highest levels of K and Mg, indicating that this region serves as the ultimate depositional center.
      PubDate: 2024-04-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-024-09424-9
       
  • Characteristics and Origin of Brine Aquifers Porosity in Quaternary Salt
           Lake: A Case Study in Mahai Salt Lake, Qaidam Basin

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Brine groundwater in Quaternary salt lakes is widely exploited to extract potassium, lithium, and boron; the complex hydrogeological parameters of brine aquifers could cause significant difficulties in brine resource assessment and exploitation. However, the origin and porosity of brine aquifers remain unclear. This study presents an approach that utilizes geochemical indicator analysis with paleogeographic reconstruction to better assess porosity in salt lake aquifers. We identified 15 representative boreholes in Mahai Salt Lake, and the lithology, porosity, and chloride contents of their respective sediments, the pore porosity of each borehole in the study area ranges from 38.17 to 0.51%, the average chloride content of each borehole ranges from 26.63 to 38.74%, found that the vertical porosity fluctuations of halite deposits were significantly larger than those of detrital deposits, the sediments in the boreholes consisted predominantly of halite-containing debris or fine-debris-containing halite, reflecting the paleoenvironmental signatures of the salt lake. According to lithology and sedimentary environment, four brine aquifers were classified and the chloride and porosity distribution characteristics in the I–IV brine aquifers were further illustrated. Based on information of paleolake evolution in Qaidam Basin, we established a conceptual model to identify the impact factors for the porosity distribution pattern in the I–IV brine aquifers.
      PubDate: 2024-04-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-024-09426-7
       
  • Unraveling the Role of Capillarity in Arsenic Mobility: Insights from a
           Sedimentary–Karstic Aquifer in Semiarid Soil

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Arsenic (As) contamination in soil and groundwater poses significant environmental and human health concerns. While chemical mechanisms like solubility equilibria, oxidation–reduction, and ionic exchange reactions have been studied to understand As retention in soil, the influence of capillarity on As transport remains poorly understood, particularly in semiarid soils with broader capillary fringes. This research aims to shed light on the capillary contribution to As attenuation and mobilization in the groundwater, focusing on degraded soil in the northeast of San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Groundwater surveys revealed a remarkable depletion of As concentrations from 91.50 to 11.27 mg L−1, indicating potential As sorption by the underlying shallow aquifer. We examined soil samples collected from the topsoil to the saturated zone using advanced analytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and wet chemical analyses. Our findings unveiled the presence of three distinct zones in the soil column: (1) the A horizon with heavy metals, (2) dispersed calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals and stratified gypsum, and (3) a higher concentration of arsenic in the capillary fringe. Notably, the capillary fringe exhibited a significant accumulation of As, constituting 40% (169.22 mg kg−1) of the total arsenic proportion accumulated (359.27 mg kg−1). The arsenic behavior in the capillary fringe solid phase correlated with total iron behavior, but they were distributed among different mineral fractions. The labile fraction, rich in arsenic, contrasted with the more recalcitrant fractions, which exhibited higher iron content. Further, thermodynamic stability assessments using the geochemical code PHREEQC revealed the critical role of Ca5H2(AsO4)4:9H2O in controlling HAsO42− and the formation of HAsO4:2H2O and CaHAsO4:H2O. During experimentation, we observed arsenate dissolution, indicating the potential mobilization of As in aqueous species. This mobilization was found to vary depending on redox conditions and may become labile during flooding events or water table variations, especially when As concentrations are low compared to metal cations, as demonstrated in our experiments. Our research underscores the significance of developing accurate geochemical conceptual models that incorporate capillarity to predict As leaching and remobilization accurately. This study presents novel insights into the understanding of As transport mechanisms and suggests the necessity of considering capillarity in geochemical models. By comprehending the capillary contribution to As attenuation, we can develop effective strategies to mitigate As contamination in semiarid soils and safeguard groundwater quality, thereby addressing crucial environmental and public health concerns.
      PubDate: 2024-04-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-024-09422-x
       
  • Source and Formation of Boron Deposits in Mahai Basin on the Northern
           Qinghai-Tibet Plateau: Clues from Hydrochemistry and Boron Isotopes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract There are typical salt lake-type borate deposits in the northern Qaidam Basin, which are mainly distributed in Da Qaidam Lake (DQL), Xiao Qaidam Lake, and Mahai Basin (MHB). DQL has deposited famous solid borates and enriched a large number of brine boron deposits. It is the earliest industrial production base in China. Nanbaxian (NBX) to the west of DQL is a unique area where solid borates are deposited in MHB. Although there are three salt lakes in the MHB, borate deposits were only deposited in the salt pits of NBX, and the formation process of these borate deposits remains to be clarified. In this study, the major elements, boron contents, and d11B values in the water and sediments of NBX were investigated in conjunction with the B-Na-Mg equivalence diagrams and relevant data from other salt lakes to elucidate the source of boron in MHB and the depositional conditions of borate minerals in NBX. The results are as follows: (1) The source of boron in NBX differs from that in three salt lakes in MHB. The source in NBX is mainly constrained by the weathering and fluid-rock (Boron-bearing ultra-high pressure metamorphic belt) interaction, while that in Dezongmahai and Niulangzhinv–Balunmahai lakes are primarily controlled by river water and anticlinal brine, respectively. (2) The high boron content (0.28 to 41.38 mg/L) and low d11B values (- 34.71‰ to - 6.14‰) of the water-soluble phase of sediments in NBX are consistent with geochemical characteristics (d11B: - 23.67‰ to - 3.0‰) of borates in DQL, demonstrating that the re-dissolution of borate deposits in NBX. (3) Deposition of borate minerals in the MHB requires ionic equivalents of Mg, Na, and B to 0.02 to 0.4, 0.25 to 0.75, and 0.2 to 0.7, respectively. Additionally, the brine hydrochemistry in which the borate are deposited must be of the carbonate or sulfate type, and the brine water should be greater than 8 in pH and 400 mg/L in boron content. This study provides a theoretical basis for exploring and exploiting salt lake-type borate deposits.
      PubDate: 2024-04-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-024-09425-8
       
  • Direct Salinity Effect on Absorbance and Fluorescence of Chernozem
           Water-Extractable Organic Matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Soil-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) has a significant impact on aquatic ecosystems. Identifying the fluorescence signatures of DOM from different soils in river and sea waters can provide valuable insights into its migration patterns. This makes crucial assessing the contributions of pH, salinity, and other milieu parameters to the variability of DOM optical properties. Present study investigates the changes in DOM of Chernozems under varying salinity using UV–visible absorbance spectroscopy and 3D-fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEMs-PARAFAC). Water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) extracted from soils of two field experiments of contrasting land use: long-term bare fallow (LTBF) and annually mown steppe (Steppe), was used as a proxy for DOM. Diluted extracts were incubated with varying NaCl concentrations in the dark and then examined. Steppe WEOM exhibited fair constancy of optical parameters under increasing salinity, while significant changes of the optical indices and of PARAFAC components’s loadings were observed for LTBF WEOM. The remarkable stability of the Steppe WEOM can be attributed to its chemical diversity. Two distinct and sufficiently stable humic-like PARAFAC components have the potential to serve as markers of Chernozem DOM. The findings clearly demonstrate that salinity itself slightly reduces absorption and fluorescence and changes some optical indices of WEOM of Chernozems.
      PubDate: 2024-02-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-024-09423-w
       
  • Solid-liquid Equilibria (SLE) of the System Containing the Sulfates of
           Lithium and Potassium at 303.2 and 318.2 K

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The solid-liquid phase equilibria of aqueous system containing the sulfates of lithium and potassium (Li2SO4 + K2SO4 + H2O) at T = 303.2 and 318.2 K were done by isothermal dissolution method. The phase equilibria data (solubility, density, and refractive index) of the system were determined experimentally. The corresponding solid-liquid phase diagram, density/refractive index versus composition diagrams, were plotted. There are two ternary invariant points and three crystallization regions corresponding to Li2SO4·H2O, LiKSO4, and K2SO4 in the phase diagram of system Li2SO4 + K2SO4 + H2O at 303.2 and 318.2 K. A comparision of system Li2SO4 + K2SO4 + H2O at different temperature (T = 288.2, 303.2, 318.2 and 348.2 K) shown that the double salt LiKSO4 was formed in the above mentioned temperatures, and the crystallization region of the LiKSO4 increases gradually with the increase of temperature.
      PubDate: 2024-02-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-023-09420-5
       
  • Short-Term Spatiotemporal Variability in Seawater Carbonate Chemistry at
           Two Contrasting Reef Locations in Bocas del Toro, Panama

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract There is growing concern about the effects of ocean acidification (OA) on coral reefs, with many studies indicating decreasing calcium carbonate production and reef growth. However, to accurately predict how coral reefs will respond to OA, it is necessary to characterize natural carbonate chemistry conditions, including the spatiotemporal mean and variability and the physical and biogeochemical drivers across different environments. In this study, spatial and temporal physiochemical variability was characterized at two contrasting reef locations in Bocas del Toro, Panama, that differed in their benthic community composition, reef morphology, and exposure to open ocean conditions, using a combination of approaches including autonomous sensors and spatial surveys during November 2015. Mean and diurnal temporal variability in both physical and chemical seawater parameters were similar between sites and sampling depths, but with occasional differences in extreme values. The magnitude of spatial variability was different between the two sites, which reflected the cumulative effect from terrestrial runoff and benthic metabolism. Based on graphical vector analysis of TA–DIC data, reef metabolism was dominated by organic over inorganic carbon cycling at both sites, with net heterotrophy and net calcium carbonate dissolution dominating the majority of observations. The results also highlight the potentially strong influence of terrestrial freshwater runoff on surface seawater conditions, and the challenges associated with evaluating and characterizing this influence on benthic habitats. The Bocas del Toro reef is a unique system that deserves attention to better understand the mechanisms that allow corals and coral reefs to persist under increasingly challenging environmental conditions.
      PubDate: 2024-02-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-024-09421-y
       
  • Elemental Variations and Mechanisms of Brines in the Context of
           Large-Scale Exploitation: A Case Study of Xitaijnar Salt Lake, Qaidam
           Basin

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract There is limited research on the variations in brine element changes and the factors that influence them during large-scale exploitation. The Xitaijnar Salt Lake in the Qaidam Basin is a large brine lithium deposit. In this study, we investigated the variations in chemical composition and the factors that influence intercrystalline brine at different time periods. Hydrochemistry, mineralogy, and hydrogeochemical simulation methods were employed to understand the brine evolution. Our results indicate that after nearly 20 years of exploitation, the intercrystalline brine still belongs to the magnesium sulfate subtype, with only slight variations in salinity. The concentrations of Na, K, and SO4 showed a slight increase, while the content of Mg and Cl decreased slightly. The concentrations of B and Li exhibited minor fluctuations. The provenance, water level, and hydraulic connection had minimal influence on the chemical composition of the intercrystalline brine. By contrast, the dynamic dissolution and precipitation of sulfate minerals and halite, as well as drastic changes in hydrological conditions (such as floods), were identified as the main factors affecting the chemical composition of brine. With the large-scale extraction of intercrystalline brine, the content of elements in the salt lake showed a decreasing trend. This can be attributed to the fact that intercrystalline brine is formed through long-term evaporation and concentration. Therefore, during the exploitation process, it is crucial to monitor the hydrochemical variations of intercrystalline brine and understand the controlling factors. The results of this study may prove useful for the sustainable development and utilization of salt lake resources worldwide.
      PubDate: 2023-12-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-023-09419-y
       
  • A Study on Ikaite Growth in the Presence of Phosphate

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Phosphate is a common component in natural growth solutions of ikaite. Although phosphate often occurs as a minor constituent, its presence may promote the formation of ikaite as it significantly inhibits the precipitation of calcite. The interactions of phosphate with ikaite and the role of a potential uptake of phosphate by ikaite, however, are poorly understood. In this study, the influence of phosphate on ikaite growth at 1 °C was investigated. Ikaite- and calcite-seeded growth experiments were conducted in cryo-mixed-flow reactors at saturation ratios 1.5 ≤ Ωikaite ≤ 2.9 (Ω = ionic activity product/solubility product). From these growth experiments, the rate constant k = 0.10 ± 0.03 µmol/m2/s and the reaction order n = 0.8 ± 0.3 were derived for ikaite. The reaction order implies a transport- or adsorption-controlled growth mechanism which supports a low energy pathway of ikaite growth via an attachment of hydrous CaCO30 complexes without any extensive dehydration of aqueous species as, for instance, required for calcite growth. A potential depletion of aqueous phosphate due to an uptake by ikaite growth was not detectable. Furthermore, growth retardation by phosphate, as known for calcite growth, was not evident. Thus, a significant incorporation of phosphate into growing ikaite could be precluded for the conditions applied in this study. The observed lack of incorporation of phosphate agrees with the previously suggested growth mechanism via the attachment of hydrous CaCO30 complexes which likely does not facilitate substantial substitution of carbonate by phosphate ions.
      PubDate: 2023-11-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-023-09418-z
       
  • Effect of Ionic Strength on H2O and Si-Species Stability Field Geometry in
           pH-Eh Space

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Speciation diagrams in pH-Eh space at some pressure, temperature, and composition are highly useful in indicating the thermodynamic behavior expected in a system. While these diagrams are found frequently throughout geochemical literature, they often overlook the geometric behavior of stability fields and fail to address the specific impacts of ionic strength and fluid composition. Modeling results from the Salton Sea and Krafla geothermal sites suggest a positive correlation between ionic strength and the H2O(l) stability field area or reactivity domain. In addition, the Si-bearing species (selected due to the propensity of adverse scale occurrence) within the Salton Sea brine are shifted farther apart than the centroids of the same Si species in the comparatively dilute Krafla. These modeling observations imply that geothermal brines at equilibrium accommodate a larger H2O reactive field in pH-Eh space, allowing for the possibility that water–rock interactions could occur at pH-Eh conditions that would conventionally be unexpected if ionic strength is not considered.
      PubDate: 2023-11-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-023-09417-0
       
  • Spatial Variation and Influencing Factors of Optical Characteristic of
           Water Extractable Organic Matter in Soils of Urban Grassland Across
           Climatic Zones in China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the most active organic component in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, 165 soil samples which were dominated by moss were collected from grasslands with similar vegetation in urban residential areas from 55 cities across different climatic zones of China. The water extractable organic matter (WEOM) of samples was analyzed. The results showed that WEOM content ranged from 23.5 to 517.6 mg kg−1 in the soil samples. Four fluorescent components including two tryptophan-like components (C1 and C4) and two humic-like components (C2 and C3) were identified by excitation–emission matrices combined with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC). Proportions of humic-like components (C2 + C3) were 54–66%, which is 1.2–2.0 times of the tryptophan-like component proportion (C1 + C4) for all samples. The proportions of C2 and C3 were highest in the tropical monsoon climate (TroM) zone compared to that in the other climatic zones. Structural equation model and decomposition of variation showed that soil nutrient content was the main contributing factor of soil WEOM. Content Total nitrogen content and mean annual temperature (MAT) were the main factors influencing soil HIX but they had the opposite effects. Our results suggested that increasing soil nutrient content contributed the increase in soil WEOM content, but increasing MAT reduced the humification degree of WEOM.
      PubDate: 2023-09-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-023-09416-1
       
  • Occurrence, Chemical, and Pb-isotopic Composition of Uraninite: A
           Verification of the Effective Source of Uranium in a Granite Aquifer of
           the Daejeon Area, South Korea

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Daejeon is well-known in South Korea for having the highest concentrations of uranium in the Jurassic granite aquifer. This study reports the texture and chemistry of uraninite and discusses the potential of uraninite as an effective source mineral of U in granite aquifers based on uraninite dissolution and U-migration. Its texture and mineral chemistry were examined using FE-SEM and EPMA, respectively, to investigate the occurrence of uraninite. The Pb isotope ratios of the minerals in granite were tested to verify their potential as geochemical tracers for elemental migration. The Pb isotope ratios were obtained using a SHRIMP IIe/MC ion microprobe. Uraninite occurred with muscovite and pyrite as large grains of up to 500 μm in length in the altered granite. Coffinite, a secondary U-mineral, occurs in the cracks within uraninite. The uraninite U content ranged from 79.12 to 89.05 wt. % and uraninites have major impurities of Th, and Pb ranged from 1.82 to 3.49 and 2.13 to 2.42 wt. %, respectively. The breakdown of uraninite may result in the redistribution of U and Pb and facilitate U-migration during surface weathering. The Eh–pH conditions of groundwater are suitable for the dissolution of uraninite, and the uranyl carbonate complex ion (UO2(CO3)22−) is the dominant U-species in the study area. The Pb isotope ratios indicated that uraninite contained radiogenic Pb, feldspar contained common Pb, and pyrite contained a mixture of both components. These Pb isotopic signatures indicate that the radiogenic Pb in uraninite has migrated from uraninite to pyrite. Considering the relatively high mobility of U compared to Pb, the migration of radiogenic Pb from uraninite to pyrite suggests that U can also migrate from uraninite to its surroundings when a reaction with groundwater occurs. Based on hydrological conditions and the Pb isotope signature, uraninite is considered a substantial and compelling host mineral for interpreting a source of uranium in the granite aquifer of the study area.
      PubDate: 2023-06-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-023-09415-2
       
  • Temporal and Seasonal Variations of Silicate Svratka River and Sediment
           Characterization, Czech Republic: Geochemical and Stable Isotopic Approach
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This study investigated weathering and hydrobiogeochemical processes in a silicate dominated watershed (Svratka river) in the Czech Republic in comparison with nearby carbonate dominated catchments. Elemental and isotopic analysis of river waters, particulates and sediments provided a more holistic view of weathering contributions, anthropogenic contamination, biological activity and evasion or sinks of CO2 to the atmosphere. In water samples, we determined total alkalinity after Gran 1974, and cations and anions were determined with inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectrometer and ion chromatograph. δ13CDIC in water samples was determined with isotope ratio mass spectrometer. pCO2 and saturation indexes of calcite and dolomite were calculated with PHREEQC speciation program. Evasion fluxes were calculated after Broecker, 1974. Isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen in particulate matter and sediments were determined with isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Mineral composition of sediments was determined with XRD method and elements with XRF method. Further enrichment factors of elements were calculated. The Svratka river, which is the major tributary of the Dyje river, is dominated by Ca2+ > Na+ > Mg2+ > K+ and HCO3− (as total alkalinity). Partial pressure (pCO2) concentrations range from close to 0–572-fold of atmospheric pressure. Isotopic composition of carbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) value ranged from − 13.3 to − 8.0‰ reflecting degradation of organic matter and exchange with the atmosphere. Bicarbonate weathering intensity for the Svratka river at its mouth is 11.8 mol/(l⋅km2⋅s), more on par with silicate terrains and lower than nearby carbonate watersheds. Isotopic composition of carbon (δ13C) and isotopic composition of nitrogen (δ15N) values of river sediment reflect soil and temperate plant (C3 plant) values, while higher δ15N values could be attributed to application of organic fertilizers in lower reaches. The river sediments, which came from weathering of crystalline rocks, are dominated by silt size, geochemically less mature quartz, feldspar and muscovite particles. All the stream sediments examined revealed slightly increased amounts of Zn, Cu and Pb. However, using Al as the normalization element to calculate enrichment factors, Zn, Cu and Pb are only elevated downstream, related to industrial contamination. This study is important for local and global level since it deals with contribution of weathering rates and contribution of CO2 to the atmosphere in silicate watershed.
      PubDate: 2023-05-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-023-09414-3
       
  • Geochemistry of Limestone from the Douala Sub-basin, Cameroon:
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The geochemistry of limestone from Nkapa and Logbajeck formations, Douala sub-basin, has been studied using major, trace elements and stable isotopes in order to decipher paleo-redox condition, depositional and post-depositional imprints and paleotemperature. Collectively, U/Th Ni/Co, V (V + N), V/Cr and Ce/Ce* ratios clearly indicate an oxic depositional condition for the samples. The ratios of Mn/Sr suggest less significant diagenetic alteration on limestone composition. The carbon isotopic signals δ13C ranged from − 0.26 to 0.86‰ PDB while oxygen isotope δ18O is from − 2.24 to − 7.94‰.‰ PDB. The isotopic composition of δ13C (− 1.9 to 0.79‰) shows a discrepancy from modern carbonate sediments. The poor correlation and scattered distribution of δ13C versus δ18O plot in calcareous sediments reflect different degrees of burial diagenesis and/or the potential impact of meteoric water. The average estimated temperature of formation for the limestone is 44.08 °C revealing a warm period during its deposition. The paleosalinity values (Z) for the studied area vary from 111.45 to 127.11‰ indicating a marine to fresh water depositional environment. The δ13O versus δ18O bivariate diagram indicates that the limestone is predominantly marine limestone, freshwater limestone, late cement and Pleistocene limestone.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-023-09413-4
       
  • Predicting Coral Reef Carbonate Chemistry Through Statistical Modeling:
           Constraining Nearshore Residence Time Around Guam

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract To accurately predict the impacts of ocean acidification on shallow-water ecosystems, we must account for the biogeochemical impact of local benthic communities, as well as the connectivity between offshore and onshore water masses. Estimation of residence time can help quantify this connectivity and determine the degree to which the benthos can influence the chemistry of the overlying water column. We present estimates of nearshore residence time for Guam and utilize these estimates to model the effects of benthic ecosystem metabolism on the coral reef carbonate system. Control volume and particle tracking approaches were used to estimate nearshore residence time. These estimates were paired with observed patterns in the reef carbonate system around Guam using water samples collected by NOAA’s National Coral Reef Monitoring Program. Model performance results suggest that when considering the effects of benthic metabolism on the carbonate system, it is paramount to represent the contact time of the water volume with the benthos. Even coarse estimates of residence time significantly increase model skill. We observed the highest predictive skill in models including control volume derived estimates of residence time, but only when those estimates were included as an interaction with benthic composition. This work shows that not only is residence time critically important to better predict biogeochemical variability in coral reef environments, but that even coarse hydrodynamic models can provide useful residence time estimates at management relevant, whole-ecosystem scales.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10498-023-09411-6
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.182.206
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> WATER RESOURCES (Total: 160 journals)
Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acque Sotterranee - Italian Journal of Groundwater     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
African Journal of Aquatic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Agua y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Águas Subterrâneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Water Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Water Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Aquacultural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Aquaculture and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aquasains     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Living Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Aquatic Sciences and Engineering     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Desalination and Water Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Discover Water     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European journal of water quality - Journal européen d'hydrologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Water     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Grundwasser     Hybrid Journal  
Hydro Nepal : Journal of Water, Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
IDA Journal of Desalination and Water Reuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Inland Waters     Hybrid Journal  
International Hydrographic Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Nuclear Desalination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Waste Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Water Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Water Resources Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Water Resource & Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans     Partially Free   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Hydro-environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Hydrology (New Zealand)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of South Carolina Water Resources     Open Access  
Journal of the American Water Resources Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Water and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Water and Wastewater / Ab va Fazilab     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Water Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Water Resource and Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Water Resource Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Jurnal Enggano     Open Access  
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Marine Ecology Progress Series MEPS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Natural and Engineering Sciences     Open Access  
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
npj Clean Water     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Opflow     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Osterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ozone Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Paddy and Water Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revue des sciences de l'eau / Journal of Water Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
River Research and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sustainable Water Resources Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Texas Water Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Water Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Water     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Water and Environment Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Water Cycle     Open Access  
Water Environment and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Water Research X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Resources Management     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Water Resources Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 101)
Water Science : The National Water Research Center Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Water-Energy Nexus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water21     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Watershed Ecology and the Environment     Open Access  
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wetlands Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Water Policy     Hybrid Journal  
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.182.206
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-