Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access  
Annals of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access  
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access  
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access  
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
La Calera     Open Access  
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Selbyana     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.133
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0015-752X - ISSN (Online) 1464-3626
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Nonresponse bias in change estimation: a national forest inventory example

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Westfall J; Wilson B.
      Pages: 301 - 311
      Abstract: Nonresponse in national forest inventories primarily occurs in forested areas due to accessibility issues or where hazardous conditions exist. As with all surveys, nonresponse has the potential to impart empirical bias into sample-based estimates and care should be taken to minimize any effects. A less-studied aspect is the effects of nonresponse when estimating change between two points in time. In this study, potential bias in change estimates was evaluated using imputed values for nonresponse inventory plots to compare differences between response and nonresponse means. Analysis of forest area and tree biomass density attributes revealed that systematic differences in probabilities of nonresponse that occur due to ownership type and forest/nonforest status produce overall estimates of change that are too small. The empirical bias appears to worsen as nonresponse rates increase. Underestimation of change inhibits detection of statistically significant shifts in forest resource attributes and concurrently thwarts effective management and policy responses. Thus, further study to ameliorate this issue is warranted, including improved strategies for defining populations and strata to better conform to nonresponse assumptions and/or alternative estimation methods that account for differential nonresponse probabilities due to ownership or forest/nonforest status.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpab056
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Applying multidate Sentinel-2 data for forest-type classification in
           complex broadleaf forest stands

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shirazinejad G; Javad Valadan Zoej M, Latifi H.
      Pages: 363 - 379
      Abstract: Biodiversity assessment and forest management require accurate tree species maps, which can be provided by remote sensing. Whereas the application of high-spatial resolution remote sensing data is constrained by high costs, Sentinel-2 (S2) satellites provide free imagery with appropriate spatial, spectral and temporal resolutions for mapping of various forest traits across larger spatial scales. Here we assessed the potential of multidate S2 as well as a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in classifying tree species across a highly structured and heterogeneous broadleaf forest ecosystem in the Hyrcanian zone of northern Iran. We applied multidate S2 and DEM data as input to a variable selection using random forests algorithm for feature reduction. Ten forest types were classified using random forest algorithm and to evaluate the results we computed area-adjusted confusion matrices. Classifications based on single-date S2 data reached overall accuracies of 67–74 per cent, whereas results for multidate S2 images increased the accuracy by ~28 per cent. Joint use of DEM data along with multidate S2 images showed improvement of overall accuracy by ~3 per cent. In addition, we studied the effect of topographic correction of S2 data on classification performance. The results imply that applying topographically corrected imagery had no significant effect on the classification accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high potential of freely available multisource remotely sensed data for broadleaf tree species classification across complex broad-leaved forest landscapes.
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpac001
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Development of activity recognition models for mechanical fuel treatments
           using consumer-grade GNSS-RF devices and lidar

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Becker R; Keefe R.
      Pages: 437 - 449
      Abstract: Mobile technologies are rapidly advancing the field of forest operations and providing opportunities to quantify management tasks in new ways through increased digitalization. For instance, devices equipped with global navigation satellite system and radio frequency transmission (GNSS-RF) enable real-time data collection and sharing of positional data in remote, off-the-grid environments where cellular and internet availability are otherwise inaccessible. In this study, consumer-grade GNSS-RF data were evaluated to determine their effectiveness in developing activity recognition models for excavator-based mastication operations. The ability to automate the classification of cycle elements for operations is valuable for quickly and efficiently quantifying production rates for research and industry applications. The GNSS-RF-based activity recognition model developed successfully classified productive elements versus delay with over 95 per cent accuracy. Individual cycle elements were classified with an overall model accuracy of 73.6 per cent, with individual element classification accuracy ranging from 51.3 per cent for walk/reposition to 95.6 per cent for mastication elements. Reineke’s stand density index, basal area (m2 ha−1) of treated areas and the duration of cycle elements impacted the classification accuracy of the activity recognition model. Impacts of forest stand characteristics on the production rate of mastication treatments were also assessed. Production rates (ha·hr−1) for mastication treatments were affected by the basal area of treated areas. However, the degree to which this would impact operations in practice is minimal. Determining the proper application and capabilities of mobile technologies and remote sensing for quantifying forest operations is valuable in continuing the innovation and advancement of forest digitalization.
      PubDate: Thu, 03 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpab058
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Corrigendum to: Continuous cover forestry in Europe: usage and the
           knowledge gaps and challenges to wider adoption

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mason W; Diaci J, Carvalho J, et al.
      Pages: 450 - 450
      Abstract: Due to email miscommunication, the authors were unable to obtain data from Serbia directly but were able to obtain data for Serbia from another source which is referenced in the manuscript. Footnote 4 to Table 1, and the first sentence under the heading “Main knowledge gaps and obstacles limiting the uptake of CCF” have been revised to account for the miscommunication in order not to imply any lack of interest in the topic in Serbia.
      PubDate: Sat, 26 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpac008
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Reflectance spectroscopy to characterize the response of Corymbia
           calophylla to Phytophthora root rot and waterlogging stress

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Croeser L; Admiraal R, Barber P, et al.
      Pages: 312 - 330
      Abstract: The health of Corymbia calophylla (marri), a keystone tree species in the native forests of southwest Western Australia, has been in decline for the past few decades. Phytophthora root disease and waterlogging have often been cited as contributing to this decline. Traditional methods (i.e., field surveys and sampling) of mapping Phytophthora root infection in the field are time-consuming and expensive; thus, the potential of reflectance spectroscopy to characterize marri response to Phytophthora and waterlogging stress was investigated. Twelve-month old marri plants were infected with either P. cinnamomi or P. multivora in two glasshouse trials and waterlogged for 24 h each fortnight. Spectral measurements with a portable high-resolution spectroradiometer were taken weekly. Plant biophysical measurements were taken at harvest time. Normalized difference spectral index (NDSI) was calculated for every combination of reflectance values between 400 and 2500 nm for all time points, correlated with the treatment effects and displayed as heat maps. Narrowband vegetation indices (VIs), utilizing different wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, were also calculated from the spectral data. The Phytophthora treatments did not cause significant differences with the biophysical measurements in both trials. In the second trial, the waterlogging treatment significantly lowered plant top dry weight (P = 0.016) and diameter (P = 0.044). Reflectance values plotted against wavelength displayed differences between treatments as well as a seasonal trend. The NDSI heat maps indicated that the Phytophthora and waterlogging treatment effects were strongest correlated with bandwidths in the visible and near-infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum (538–558 nm and 701–709 nm). Six of the VIs (normalized difference nitrogen index 2, anthocyanin reflectance index 1, photochemical reflectance index, Carter index 1, Vogelman index 3 and water band index) were able to track the biochemical changes in the leaves over the 10 weeks, confirming the seasonal trend. The interaction effect between P. cinnamomi, waterlogging and elapsed time in the first trial was significant for water band index (P = 0.010). This study demonstrates that reflectance spectroscopy holds promise for characterizing marri response but more work needs to be done to identify the optimum wavelengths for identifying Phytophthora and waterlogging stress with marri.
      PubDate: Sat, 30 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpab045
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • A remote sensing-guided forest inventory concept using multispectral 3D
           and height information from ZiYuan-3 satellite data

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wallner A; Friedrich S, Geier E, et al.
      Pages: 331 - 346
      Abstract: Increased frequencies of storms and droughts due to climate change are changing central European forests more rapidly than in previous decades. To monitor these changes, multispectral 3D remote sensing (RS) data can provide relevant information for forest management and inventory. In this case study, data of the multispectral 3D-capable satellite system ZiYuan-3 (ZY-3) were used in a RS-guided forest inventory concept to reduce the field sample size compared to the standard grid inventory. We first pre-stratified the forest area via the ZY-3 dataset into coniferous, broadleaved and mixed forest types using object-based image analysis. Each forest type was then split into three height strata using the ZY-3 stereo module-derived digital canopy height model (CHM). Due to limited sample sizes, we reduced the nine to six strata. Then, for each of the six strata, we randomly selected representative segments for inventory plot placement. We then conducted field inventories in these plots. The collected field data were used to calculate forest attributes, such as tree species composition, timber volume and canopy height at plot level (terrestrially measured tree height and height information from ZY-3 CHM). Subsequently, we compared the resulting forest attributes from the RS-guided inventory with the reference data from a grid inventory based only on field plots. The difference in mean timber volumes to the reference was +30.21 m3ha−1 (8.99 per cent) for the RS-guided inventory with terrestrial height and −11.32 m3ha−1 (−3.37 per cent) with height information from ZY-3 data. The relative efficiency (RE) indicator was used to compare the different sampling schemes. The RE as compared to a random reduction of the sample size was 1.22 for the RS-guided inventory with terrestrial height measurements and 1.85 with height information from ZY-3 data. The results show that the presented workflow based on 3D ZY-3 data is suitable to support forest inventories by reducing the sample size and hence potentially increase the inventory frequency.
      PubDate: Fri, 31 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpab055
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Developing a forest inventory approach using airborne single photon lidar
           data: from ground plot selection to forest attribute prediction

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Queinnec M; Coops N, White J, et al.
      Pages: 347 - 362
      Abstract: An increasing number of jurisdictions are integrating airborne laser scanning (ALS) into forest inventory programs to produce spatially explicit and accurate inventories of forest resources. However, wall-to-wall ALS coverage relative to the total area of managed forest remains limited in large forest nations such as Canada, wherein logistics, cost and acquisition capacity can be limiting factors. Technologies such as single photon light detection and ranging (SPL) have emerged commercially, which have the capacity to provide efficient ALS acquisitions over large areas and with a greater point density than conventional linear-mode ALS. However, the large-scale operational application of SPL in a forest inventory still needs to be effectively demonstrated. In this study, we used wall-to-wall SPL data (collected with a Leica SPL100) across a 630 000 ha boreal forest in Ontario, Canada to develop a forest inventory. Specifically, we used a structurally guided sampling approach enabled via a principal component analysis of the SPL100 data to establish a network of 250 ground plots. Random forest models were then used to produce area-based estimates of forest attributes of interest. Results demonstrated that the sampling approach enabled the optimization and enhancement of the existing plot network by extending the range of sampled structural types and reducing the number of plots in oversampled forest types. Moreover, Lorey’s height, basal area, quadratic mean diameter at breast height, stem density, gross and merchantable volume and above-ground biomass were estimated with a relative root mean square error of 8.5, 19.76, 13.97, 30.82, 21.53, 23.79 and 22.87 per cent, respectively, and relative bias <1 per cent. Model accuracies achieved using the SPL100 were comparable with those obtained using linear-mode ALS in a previous forest inventory. This study demonstrates the utility of the SPL100 for the complete development of a forest inventory over large forest areas, from ground plot establishment through to the production of forest attribute estimates.
      PubDate: Wed, 08 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpab051
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Modelling above-ground biomass of Pinus radiata trees with explicit
           multivariate uncertainty

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sandoval S; Montes C, Olmedo G, et al.
      Pages: 380 - 390
      Abstract: The biomass content and carbon captured by forest plantations is of interest, for example in the context of climate change and carbon budgets.The main objective of our study was to develop functions to estimate the total biomass and its components (stem, branches, bark and leaves) of Pinus radiata D. Don trees in Chile. The methodology proposed for the model fitting uses the maximum likelihood method in a multivariate equation system fitting simultaneously. The fit strategy incorporates additivity restrictions in the estimation functions and in the variance functions to incorporate the heteroskedasticity of biomass, and three structures of the variance–covariance matrix were evaluated to assess the dependence of the different components of tree biomass. Non-linear biomass functions that used the variable $D^2H$ performed best according to several indicators of goodness-of-fit (log-likelihood, Akaike Information Criterion and Bayesian Information Criterion) and estimation precision (root mean square error (RMSE), Bias and EI). The simple structure of both biomass and variance estimation functions was $\beta _1 (D^2H)^{\beta _2}$, and in the modelling system for total tree biomass RMSE between 54.1-54.4 kg (28-36%) were obtained. The three variance–covariance matrix structures evaluated did not generate clear differences in relation to the RMSE, bias and Error Index indicators. The structure of the variance–covariance matrix that incorporated explicitly in the system equations allowed modelling of the relationship between biomass components.
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpab048
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Diameter, height and volume increment single tree models for improved
           Sitka spruce in Great Britain

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Manso R; Davidson R, McLean J.
      Pages: 391 - 404
      Abstract: The British forestry sector lacks reliable dynamic growth models for stands of improved Sitka spruce, the most important commercial forest type in Great Britain. The aim of this study is to fill this gap by trialling a new modelling framework and to lay the foundations of a future dynamic growth simulator for that forest type. First, we present single tree diameter and height increment models that are climate sensitive and include explicit competition effects. The predictions from the increment models are pooled to project diameter and height at a given age. These projections are then used as inputs to an integrated taper model from which stochastic tree volume predictions are obtained. Retrospective data from over 1400 trees collected in two extensive genetic trials in Scotland and Wales were used for the purposes of this study. Diameter increment and height increment predictions were highly accurate and diameter and height projections proved consistent. The predicted volume at the time of harvesting also exhibited a high degree of accuracy, which shows the robustness of our approach. Further data will be needed in the future to recalibrate the present models and extend their range of validity to the whole of Great Britain.
      PubDate: Sat, 13 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpab049
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Volume functions for Shorea robusta Gaertn. in Nepal

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Baral S; Neumann M, Basnyat B, et al.
      Pages: 405 - 415
      Abstract: In Nepal, there is currently no volume function for economically valuable tree species like Shorea robusta Gaertn. prepared based on destructive sampling for stem and branches. Existing functions rely on solely diameter and height, despite research indicating the importance of crown dimensions for stem taper. The objective of this study was to collate harmonized data from destructive sampled S. robusta trees from far-west to east Nepal, spanning about 500 km and to prepare new stem and branch volume functions. For every tree (n = 219) diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree height (H) was measured. Thereof 188 trees had measurements of crown length (CL). For a subsample (n = 100) volume of branches (>10 cm diameter) were measured too. We fitted functions for stem and branch volume using regression mixed models with DBH, slenderness and crown ratio as covariates/predictors. We hypothesized that crown ratio is needed for accurate stem and branch volume predictions. Our results indicate that DBH and slenderness were the most important variables for predicting stem volume (marginal coefficient of determination R2 0.948), whereas the inclusion of crown ratio did not increase the explained variance. Crown ratio significantly increased explained variance in branch volume functions, suggesting that crown dimensions are needed to obtain accurate branch volume predictions (marginal R2 0.766). Estimating volume with only DBH, e.g. if more detailed H and CL measurements are missing, resulted in more precise estimates for stem (marginal R2 0.908) and fair estimates for branch volume (marginal R2 0.554). Our mixed model approach revealed that there were only small differences in volume from the different sampling sites and a similar accuracy can be assumed when applying the presented functions in other part of the country. Additionally, we demonstrated that log-transformation and currently used volume functions lead to biased volume estimates, in particular for large-sized trees. This study helps to provide reliable growing stock estimates of S. robusta (and in combination with density the carbon content) and considers the effects of wider spacing and longer crowns on stem taper and allocation patterns.
      PubDate: Sat, 13 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpab050
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Effect of additive, dominant and epistatic variances on breeding and
           deployment strategy in Norway spruce

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nguyen H; Chen Z, Fries A, et al.
      Pages: 416 - 427
      Abstract: Genetic variances are important parameters and have a great impact on the determination of optimal breeding strategies of tree species. A large clonal testing program was conducted to estimate additive, dominant and epistatic variances for the development of breeding and deployment strategies in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). The analysis results of genetic variation for growth and wood properties in two clonal trials in central Sweden indicated that the important sources of total genetic variation were both additive and non-additive genetic variances. Additive genetic variation accounted for the majority of total genetic variation for diameter at breast height (DBH) and wood quality traits, whereas non-additive genetic variation was significant only for tree height at an early age. Predicted genetic gain was the highest for clonal deployment based on best tested (replicated) clones (4.7–65.3 per cent), followed by clonal deployment of the best individual trees from a full-sib family trial (3.5–57.7 per cent), and the deployment of seedlings generated by open-pollination (1.9–48.3 per cent).
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpab052
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Effects of temperature, moisture content and storage on dormancy release
           and germination of European hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) seeds

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Suszka J; Bujarska-Borkowska B, Tylkowski T, et al.
      Pages: 428 - 436
      Abstract: Mature seeds of European hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) are characterized by deep physical and morphological dormancy. Although a procedure for their stratification is well developed, secondary dormancy prevents many healthy seeds from germinating, and this affects the productivity of the specie’s nursery material. The objective of this work was to determine optimal conditions for germination of European hornbeam seeds, and how to avoid the induction of their secondary dormancy. We also aimed at establishing methods for controlling the seed germination prior to sowing. Harvested nuts were stratified in a substrate at 20°/3°C for 4 + 16–18 weeks. Following stratification, the seeds were dried up to 25, 20, 15 and 10 per cent moisture content or frozen in the substrate at −3°C for 8, 16 or 32 weeks. The seeds dried up to 10 and 15 per cent moisture content were also stored at −3°C for 8, 16 and 32 weeks. After stratification, drying, storing and freezing, the seeds were germinated at the laboratory at 20°C and 3/20°C (16 + 8 h). However, reliable germination results were only achieved when the seeds not germinating at the above listed temperatures were additionally germinated at 3°C. Poor germination at 20° and 3/20°C was due to the induction of secondary dormancy. Stratified seeds of European hornbeam were found sensitive to dehydration. Their viability decreased considerably, particularly after drying up to 10 per cent moisture content, and in the seeds dried to 15 per cent the viability further decreased during storage. The seeds that were not dried but frozen at −3°C after stratification retained their germination ability for at least 16 weeks. Our results shows dual effects of temperature on germination control of hornbeam seeds. In laboratory practice applying temperature cycles of 3°/20°C at 16/8 h intervals is recommended to avoid the induction of secondary dormancy.
      PubDate: Sun, 28 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forestry/cpab053
      Issue No: Vol. 95, No. 3 (2021)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 34.231.147.28
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-