Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

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Parks Stewardship Forum
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2688-187X
Published by eScholarship Homepage  [73 journals]
  • Research put into action: How a fossil inventory informed paleontological
           resource monitoring efforts preceding road construction at Theodore
           Roosevelt National Park

    • Authors: Salcido; Charles , Tweet, Justin S. , Santucci, Vincent L.
      Abstract: Theodore Roosevelt National Park (THRO) in western North Dakota that comprises badlands that surround the Little Missouri River in three separate units. Established initially as a national memorial park in 1947 and redesignated as a national park with its current boundaries in 1978, THRO was founded for its connection to its namesake, the United States president, and continues to memorialize Roosevelt’s ideals of stewardship with its management of its diverse cultural and natural resources. The badlands in the park expose the highly fossiliferous Paleocene-age Bullion Creek and Sentinel Butte Formations that have been investigated extensively outside of the park’s boundaries but not as much within them. Following a survey between 1994 and 1996 and later paleontological discoveries in the park, a Paleontological Resource Inventory was conducted during 2020 and 2021 to gauge these resources within THRO and determine best management and protection practices. This inventory was...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Ancient bat remains illustrate the role of caves as habitat anchors in the
           temporally dynamic landscape of the Grand Canyon

    • Authors: Chambers; Carol L. , Thomas, Shawn , Santucci, Vincent L. , Oswald, Hattie , Ballensky, Jason
      Abstract: Globally, caves provide important refugia for bats. The Grand Canyon, more than 400 km (250 mi) long, consists of steep-sided, rocky formations with hundreds to thousands of natural caves. Two of these, Double Bopper and Leandras Caves, are remarkable because of the presence of desiccated bat carcasses, ranging in condition from skeletal to well-preserved animals identifiable to species. Both caves are complex but differ in length and structure. Double Bopper Cave, >60 km (37 mi) long, is variable with narrow passages. Leandras Cave, 24 km (15 mi) long, has wide, open passages. We surveyed both caves, collecting information for 482 specimens. We initially hypothesized that a single catastrophic event caused the deaths of many individuals or that bats died of various causes over a long period. We expected bat communities to differ between caves, since different cave structures would favor different species based on flight maneuverability. Radiocarbon dating of 67 samples...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Sharks in the dark: Paleontological resource inventory reveals multiple
           successive Mississippian Subperiod cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes)
           assemblages within Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky

    • Authors: Hodnett; John-Paul M. , Toomey, Rickard , Olson, Rickard , Tolleson, Kelli , Boldon, Richard , Wood, Jack , Tweet, Justin S. , Santucci, Vincent L.
      Abstract: A focused search for ancient Mississippian Subperiod marine vertebrates during a paleontological resource inventory of Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky, has yielded a wealth of new fossil data, previously unrecognized at this park. To date, we have identified marine vertebrate fossils from four primary horizons at the park, two of which are the first records of marine vertebrate fossils occurring in those horizons. Mammoth Cave sites have produced more than 70 species of ancient fish, about 90% representing cartilaginous fishes (sharks and kin), including several new species. The paleontological resource inventory of Mammoth Cave demonstrates that this park is an important resource for providing data on how fish assemblages changed during the formation of the super-continent Pangea. The inventory data also can help correct antiquated information on fossil sharks found in the region (in some cases not updated since their publication in the late 19th century).
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Microtomography of an enigmatic fossil egg clutch from the Oligocene John
           Day Formation, Oregon, USA, reveals an exquisitely preserved
           29-million-year-old fossil grasshopper ootheca

    • Authors: Lee; Jaemin , Famoso, Nicholas A. , Lin, Angela
      Abstract: Eggs are one of the least understood life stages of insects, and are poorly represented in the fossil record. Using microtomography, we studied an enigmatic fossil egg clutch of a presumed entomological affinity from the Oligocene Turtle Cove Member, John Day Formation, from the National Park Service-administered lands of John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon. A highly organized egg mass comprising a large clutch size of approximately 50 slightly curved ellipsoidal eggs arranged radially in several planes is preserved, enclosed in a disc-shaped layer of cemented and compacted soil particles. Based on the morphology of the overall structure and the eggs, we conclude that the specimen represents a fossilized underground ootheca of the grasshoppers and locusts (Orthoptera: Caelifera), also known as an egg pod. This likely represents the oldest and the first unambiguous fossil evidence of a grasshopper egg pod. We describe Subterroothecichnus radialis igen. et...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • From Yosemite to Presidio: Everyone Welcomed

    • Authors: Diamant; Rolf
      Abstract: In this "Letter from Woodstock," our columnist considers new ideas for welcoming a more diverse group of visitors to Yosemite National Park and the Presidio, part of Golden Gate National Recreation Area.
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Checking in on fossil sites: Advancing monitoring protocols and techniques
           for paleontological localities in National Park Service units

    • Authors: Bonde; Aubrey M. , Santucci, Vincent L. , Nyborg, Torrey
      Abstract: Paleontological site monitoring in National Park Service units can deviate from the recommended cyclical protocol because of unique challenges each unit may face. These challenges include staffing limitations or turnover, difficulty accessing remote sites, and high work volume. Insufficient monitoring of fossil sites might result in the loss of knowledge or data due to degradation or loss of resources. New monitoring protocols were tested at the Copper Canyon ichnofossil locality in Death Valley National Park (DEVA) to address the highlighted management challenges. The monitoring protocol presented here was designed to be streamlined and simple, to be utilized by paleontologists and non-paleontologists alike, and to overcome challenges, thereby, improving undermanaged sites. The monitoring protocol included baseline evaluation and imaging of the 78 track localities within Copper Canyon. Each site was assigned a sensitivity status; identifying its recommended monitoring cyclicity...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • How protecting shark teeth can lead to finding dolphins: George Washington
           Birthplace National Monument as a case study in developing and
           implementing paleontological resource monitoring

    • Authors: Tweet; Justin S. , Santucci, Vincent L.
      Abstract: George Washington Birthplace National Monument (GEWA) is a National Park Service (NPS) unit located in the Northern Neck of Virginia, situated on low bluffs overlooking the Potomac River. This small park unit, focused primarily on cultural and historical resources, may seem at first glance to be an unlikely candidate for notable paleontological resources. However, the bluffs are composed in large part of the fossiliferous early–middle Miocene-age Calvert Formation, and these bluffs and the adjacent shoreline have long been known by locals and rockhounds as places to find fossil shark teeth and other fossils. Following initial contact in the late 1990s and early 2000s, the NPS Paleontology Program has worked closely with GEWA since 2014 on the dual aims of stemming illegal fossil collecting and monitoring non-renewable paleontological resources in the face of rising river levels, increasing storms, and other effects of climate change. The working relationship is a case study...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The price of neglect: Revisiting Fossil Cycad National Monument
           (1922–1957)

    • Authors: Santucci; Vincent L. , Tweet, Justin S. , Connors, Tim
      Abstract: The history associated with the discovery, research, preservation, protection, and loss of the fossil cycadeoid locality near Minnekahta in the southern Black Hills of South Dakota—which for 35 years was designated as Fossil Cycad National Monument—has gained considerable public attention. Several publications have attempted to capture portions of this history through the assimilation of information from archives, reports, correspondence, photographs, and other records associated with the monument. Previously unknown records continue to emerge, helping to expand and reshape the understanding of the monument’s unfortunate history, and also raising new questions. Some of the newly uncovered information is presented here. Additionally, several questions are identified that hopefully might be advanced through communication with individuals who are able to share additional information or historical records to fill in some of the gaps related to the history of Fossil Cycad National...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Origins and Innovations of Science in the US National Parks: The 2023
           Leopold Lecture at the University of California, Berkeley

    • Authors: PSF Editorial Team; The
      Abstract: A brief report on the latest annual A. Starker Leopold Lecture, with a link to video of the lecture.  The speakers were Jerry Emory and Alison Forrestel.
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Almost Human

    • Authors: Markus; Peter
      Abstract: A poem in the "Verse in Place" section of Parks Stewardship Forum.
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The dinosaur-bearing rocks of Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve: A
           fossil resource of global interest

    • Authors: Fiorillo; Anthony R. , Hamon, Troy
      Abstract: The first discovery of any dinosaur remains in a US National Park Service unit in Alaska occurred in 2001 in Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve. The record consisted of the track of a pes impression, or track made by the foot of a hadrosaur (duck-billed dinosaur) and an associated manus impression, or track made by a hand. Subsequent work has shown the original track discovery was not unique, and that the coastal exposures of the Cretaceous Chignik Formation in Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve contain a remarkable number of tracks. Further, because of the limited faulting, the several hundred meters of section found along this coastal set of exposures provide a remarkably complete look at an ancient high-latitude dinosaurian ecosystem and are of outstanding universal value.
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Incredible discoveries and devastation of paleontological resources in a
           changing world preserved at White Sands National Park

    • Authors: Bustos; David , Santucci, Vincent L. , Odess, Daniel , Martinez, Patrick J. , Connelly, Clare J.
      Abstract: In recent years the discovery of paleontological and archaeological resources exposed because of natural disasters and rapid erosion—mostly linked to climate change—has occurred at a phenomenal rate. Each year wildfires, floods, landsides, retreating glaciers, snow melt, soil erosion, and receding lakes and reservoirs are uncovering valuable resources. Unfortunately, these same forces often lead to the loss of these resources before they can be preserved or documented. At White Sands National Park, as moisture within the soil is being reduced by persistent droughts and rising temperatures, 23,000-year-old fossil prints of people and Ice Age megafauna are being exposed—and then rapidly lost to soil erosion. Consequently, there is an urgent need to document the fossil prints before the record is lost. This is a concern not only for White Sands, but also for dry lake beds throughout the Southwest and around the world where fossil prints may not have yet been discovered but are...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Cover, Masthead, and Table of Contents, PSF Vol. 40 No. 1

    • Authors: PSF Editorial Team; The
      Abstract: Cover, Masthead, and Table of Contents, PSF Vol. 40 No. 1
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Fossil woods of Yellowstone National Park

    • Authors: Wheeler; Elisabeth A.
      Abstract: Among the wonders of Yellowstone National Park are the spectacular fossil forests of Amethyst Mountain and Specimen Ridge in the northeastern section of the park and the Gallatin Fossil Forests in the northwestern section. In 1898, John Muir, who was instrumental in establishing the US National Park System, wrote: “Yonder is Amethyst Mountain … beneath the living trees the edges of petrified forests are exposed to view ... standing on ledges tier above tier where they grew, solemnly silent in rigid crystalline beauty after swaying in the wind thousands of centuries ago, opening marvelous views back into the years and climates and life of the past time.” Muir’s visit to Amethyst Mountain was no doubt prompted by the early descriptions and diagrams showing multiple layers of fossil forests there (Figure 1A) (Holmes 1878, 1879). Specimen Ridge and the Gallatin Fossil Forests also have successive tiers of fossil forests. Erling Dorf’s 1964 Scientific American article “The...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Interdisciplinary approaches to reconciling legacy paleontological
           collections to advance discovery and improve resource management

    • Authors: Parry; Lauren E. , Eichenberg, Erin E.
      Abstract: Like many National Park Service sites, Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument in Nevada has associated off-site legacy paleontological collections in museum repositories across North America. These legacy paleontological collections, which were created during past expeditions, are at risk of becoming forgotten or inaccessible, yet they hold the potential to revisit old questions and old sites utilizing new techniques, methods, and ideas. The authors present a case study that outlines a suggested framework to reconcile problematic or underutilized legacy paleontological collections based on the 2020–2023 inventory of the Southwest Museum Expedition Tule Springs Collection curated at the Autry Museum of the American West. The authors also explore the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary approach to paleontological resource management. Digitization of associated historic archives and photographs can help assign updated geologic context to unprovenienced fossils, as well as...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Discovery, preservation, and protection of notable paleontological
           resources from Dinosaur National Monument, Utah and Colorado

    • Authors: Hunt-Foster; ReBecca
      Abstract: Dinosaur National Monument was established in 1915 to protect and preserve the globally significant paleontological resources of the Carnegie Dinosaur Quarry. The park was expanded in 1938 and now protects 210,844.02 acres in northeastern Utah and northwestern Colorado. Extensive inventory, monitoring, excavation, and research work has taken place in the monument, mostly focusing on the Late Jurassic-age Morrison Formation over the past 113 years since the Carnegie Quarry’s discovery in 1909. This work has helped to increase not only our knowledge of the dinosaur fauna, but also of the less well-known reptiles, amphibians, mammals, invertebrates, and plant communities that lived alongside these Jurassic giants. To protect and preserve these notable fossil discoveries, Dinosaur National Monument has explored several approaches. Public tours of the Carnegie Quarry have taken place since its discovery in 1909. In the early 1950s the monument erected a temporary building over a...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The National Park System fossil record: Uncovering significant new
           paleontological discoveries through inventory, monitoring, research and
           museum curation

    • Authors: Santucci; Vincent L. , Tweet, Justin S. , Visaggi, Christy , Hodnett, John-Paul M.
      Abstract: The fossil record preserved throughout the parks, monuments, and other areas administered by the National Park Service spans at least 1.4 billion years and reveals rich and diverse paleontological resources available for scientific research and public education. Fossils documented in at least 286 different NPS areas represent important and iconic components of the history of North American paleontology. Our knowledge of the fossil record within the national parks continuously expands based on new paleontological discoveries every year. Most of the new fossil discoveries are associated with four primary management activities undertaken by the NPS Paleontology Program, parks, partners, and cooperating scientists: paleontological resource inventories, monitoring, research, and assessment of fossils curated in museum collections. Paleontological resource inventories focus on the scope, significance, distribution (both temporal and geospatial), and resource management issues associated...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Past, present, and future: A synthesis of paleontological resource
           monitoring and management at Badlands National Park

    • Authors: Thompson; Wayne A. , Starck, Ellen N.
      Abstract: Paleontological monitoring at Badlands National Park is extremely complex. The monitoring program has steadily evolved from its formalization in 1994 with the hiring of the first park paleontologist. Changing regulations, increases in protections for paleontological resources, positive interdivisional communication, sympathetic leadership, and the hiring of a full-time monitor have allowed staff to move from being purely reactive to taking an active role in planning park projects. This entails commenting on compliance through the National Park Service’s Planning, Environment & Public Comment portal, conducting pre-construction surveys, attending pre-construction meetings, providing resource training for construction personnel, consulting with the Federal Highway Administration as subject-matter experts, and acting as the contracting officer’s representative on select projects. The monitoring program strives to hire qualified personnel according to best practice guidelines...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • No longer news that’s fit to print' Climate change goes missing from
           national park newspapers

    • Authors: Lull; Robert B. , Wise, Wesley
      Abstract: Every year approximately 300 million Americans visit at least one of the over 420 units of the US National Park System. At many parks, visitors pass through an entrance gate where a ranger provides a map and newspaper for wayfinding and essential information, while at many others a map and newspaper are freely available at visitor centers and other locations. Surveys involving 19 units of the National Park System that are designated as “national parks” suggest that approximately 37% of their visitors use the newspapers provided to them, meaning that the newspapers reach more than 30 million visitors each year in these parks alone. We propose that park newspapers are well-placed but underappreciated assets for park managers to set an agenda communicating climate change to hard-to-reach audiences. Therefore, we conducted a series of analyses, focused on 17 parks that published newspapers on a near-annual basis from 2005–2022, to examine climate change coverage in them. We found...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Find Hope with Climate Crisis Triage

    • Authors: Davis; Gary E. , Davis, Dorothy A.
      Abstract: This visual essay in "The Photographer's Frame" draws on the example of highway accident triage to apply principles of "Protect—Assess—Act" to the climate change crisis as a way people can build hope over hopelessness.
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Updating conservation techniques for paleontology collections associated
           with Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument

    • Authors: O'Connor; Conni J. , Burr, Elizabeth , Cooper, Catherine , Meyer, Herbert W.
      Abstract: Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument (FLFO) was established to protect the rare abundance and diversity of fossil resources preserved in the Florissant Formation. The majority of fossils are plants and insects preserved in laminated shale, which is prone to conservation issues. These issues result from the inherent thinness of individual laminae (≥0.1 mm) and high clay content, and, during collection, sharp fluctuations in relative humidity (RH) and moisture content. The purpose of this paper is to describe historical and current stabilization methods, and report on two current research efforts at separate institutions to mediate these issues using controlled drying techniques and selection of appropriate adhesives and consolidants following best practices in fossil preparation. Response of shale units to humidity is being investigated at the Western Archeological and Conservation Center facility in Tucson, Arizona, along with the viability of consolidation with tetraethyl...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Keeping Snow and Ice Frozen with Renewable Energy Solutions to Halt
           Climate Change

    • Authors: Gonzalez; Patrick
      Abstract: Human-caused climate change has reduced snowfall and melted snowpack, glaciers, and sea ice around the world. Eliminating coal, oil, and other fossil fuels and replacing them with solar, wind, and other renewable energy is essential to halt climate change.
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Breaking out of the fishbowl: Integrating paleontological resource
           management and public engagement while inspiring stewardship through an
           open-door fossil preparation lab at Badlands National Park

    • Authors: Welsh; Ed , Carpenter, Mary , Starck, Ellen N.
      Abstract: Badlands National Park has been implementing an experimental “open door” concept to their fossil preparation lab, where visitors are allowed into the workspace to experience paleontological work behind the scenes. The combined effort of Resource Education and Resource Management divisions have addressed safety and security issues to optimize the maximum benefits towards resource stewardship as well as public education and enjoyment. These efforts have manifested through various interpretive opportunities combined with strategies towards visitor inclusion into the scientific realm, through encouraging citizen science. The efforts supporting the “open door” lab concept has provided significant, measurable impacts towards inspiring public engagement and stewardship. Since the lab’s opening, there has been a 400% increase in Visitor Site Reports, the parks fossil reporting citizen science program. The past decade of having an “open door” lab has led to the revelation that if the...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Health challenges of rangers—a planetary health workforce

    • Authors: Rerolle; Francois , Singh, Rohit , Mascari, Thomas , Aisha, Hamera , Avino, Felipe Spina , Gajardo, Osvaldo Barassi , Urh, Melina , Mcvey, Drew , Belecky, Mike , Moreto, William
      Abstract: Rangers safeguard the balance between humans and nature by protecting and managing biodiversity and natural resources. The challenging working conditions that rangers face make them vulnerable to wildlife attacks and exposure to zoonotic and vector-borne diseases. Despite all of these work-related challenges and threats to their health, a vast majority of rangers lack access to adequate medical treatment facilities. This research has used data from the one of the largest and most comprehensive surveys of rangers across multiple countries, collected as part of the Global Ranger Perception Survey, to examine the relationship between the precarious working conditions of rangers and their health outcomes. By comparing data from the 2020 World Malaria Report, our study highlights the severe malaria burden carried by rangers around the world. Malaria prevalence in rangers working in Central Africa, East Africa, and South America was estimated to be four times higher than in the general...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • New perspectives on NPS paleontological resource stewardship: Scientific,
           curatorial, and educational outcomes at Petrified Forest National Park

    • Authors: Parker; William G. , Marsh, Adam D. , Smith, Matthew E. , Kligman, Ben T. , Wagner, Deborah E. , Varela, Phillip , Boudreau, Diana M.
      Abstract: Petrified Forest National Park (PEFO) was established to preserve fossils from the Triassic Period. After long relying solely on external partners, an internal program was established consisting of permanent staff and appropriate facilities to manage these extensive resources, primarily through active collection and curation. Goals based on National Park Service (NPS) policies allow managers to guide internal research priorities and those of external partners, more effectively reducing repetitive studies and increasing collaborations. Student interns play a crucial part of this effort, and many have gone on to establish or augment paleontology programs at other institutions and federal agencies, developing new partnerships with the NPS. PEFO permanent staff grew as park and regional management recognized the utility of the program. PEFO staff collaboratively develop new collecting and laboratory processing techniques that preserve high quality data, including a public laboratory...
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Searching for the “S” Word at Gettysburg: The Battlefield in the Era
           of Black Lives Matter

    • Authors: Creighton; Margaret
      Abstract: The author returns to Gettysburg National Military Park nearly 20 years following the publication of her book The Colors of Courage, Gettysburg’s Forgotten Battles to see how things might have changed in terms of what visitors learn when they come to the park and the surrounding borough.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Wildfire, Climate Change, Forest Resilience, and Carbon Solutions

    • Authors: Gonzalez; Patrick
      Abstract: Wildfire is natural in many temperate forests but unnatural in tropical rainforests and certain other ecosystems. Human-caused climate change is intensifying the heat that drives wildfire. Preventive burning in temperate forests, halting deforestation in tropical forests, and cutting carbon pollution reduce wildfire risks and increase forest resilience under climate change.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Omnipresent Stories

    • Authors: Rogers; Pattiann
      Abstract: A poem in the "Verse in Place" section of Parks Stewardship Forum.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • To Lift All Boats: An Interview with Jerry Emory, Author of George
           Meléndez Wright: The Fight for Wildlife and Wilderness in the National
           Parks

    • Authors: Diamant; Rolf
      Abstract: In this "Letter from Woodstock," our columnist interviews the author of the first-ever biography of George Meléndez Wright, pioneering conservationist and namesake of the George Wright Society.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The Second Stage of Violence: An Excerpt from Violence and Public Memory

    • Authors: Blatt; Martin Henry
      Abstract: In this excerpt from his introduction to Violence and Public Memory, editor Martin Blatt discusses his family history connected to the Holocaust and how this history propelled him to a lifelong commitment to social justice through the telling of history in public contexts. He then identifies how the relationship of violence to public memory has been a central theme throughout his professional career as a public historian. Blatt proceeds to define how he employs the terms “violence” and “public memory” in this book. He examines contemporary literature and the public history arena to highlight exemplary works focused on violence and public memory. Subsequently, he highlights a range of publications that examine this connection. Blatt explores the contents of this edited volume regarding geography, types of memorialization, and historical timeframe. He stresses his belief that the measure of the integrity of a nation or culture is the degree to which there is an unflinching...
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Remembering Labor Conflict as an American Battlefield

    • Authors: Shackel; Paul
      Abstract: Anthracite coal extraction developed in northeastern Pennsylvania during the late 18th century, and through the early 20th century the industry was supported by new waves of immigration. New immigrant workers faced various forms of structural racism, often being underpaid, assigned the toughest jobs, and provided substandard housing. In 1897, as 400 men marched on a public road with the goal of closing a company mine, a sheriff and his posse fired upon them, killing 19. An additional six men died a few days later of gunshot wounds. While the incident, known as the Lattimer Massacre, was noted as one of the most tragic labor strikes in US history, the event faded from national public memory within a few decades. A type of historical amnesia settled in until 75 years later when the community and labor organizations erected a memorial near the site. Although annual commemorations are now held at the site, the Lattimer Massacre remains absent from textbooks and it is still not...
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The Winds of Minidoka: Preserving the Japanese American Past

    • Authors: Hayashi; Robert T.
      Abstract: Like other sites of Japanese American incarceration, Minidoka Relocation Center was long neglected after World War II. Buildings were removed or deteriorated, and few visited the isolated spot. Increased public recognition of the injustice of mass incarceration, culminating in the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, catalyzed public history projects to preserve sites of Nikkei1 World War II history and led to the eventual establishment of Minidoka National Historic Site. In recent years, significant restoration and interpretation projects have transformed the site, providing visitors with a rich historical context. However, its future is threatened by a proposed massive wind farm near the historic site. The project has mobilized both Japanese Americans and local Idahoans in resistance for divergent reasons that speak to the historical tensions over land use in the American West. The situation underscores the precarious state of Japanese American history, how its establishment and...
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Examining Factors Influencing the Governance of Large Landscape
           Conservation Initiatives

    • Authors: Mirza; Sanober R. , Thomsen, Jennifer M. , Wurtzebach, Zachary , Oppler, Gabriel , Halvorson, Sarah J.
      Abstract: With increasing threats facing ecosystems around the world, conservationists are looking for innovative approaches to address the complex nature of transboundary issues. Large landscape conservation (LLC) extends beyond protected area boundaries and potentially national borders. Though the recognition of LLC is growing, we have a limited understanding of what supports or inhibits LLC efforts across diverse geographies, which limits the efficacy of LLC as a strategy to combat ecological threats. Networks can provide support for individual LLC initiatives through collaboration, knowledge exchange, and resource mobilization. Despite the growth in LLC initiatives around the world, there has been a lack of research assessing a network of initiatives—research that is critical to complement individual case studies. To gain a greater understanding of LLC, we conducted a survey of the Transboundary Conservation and the Connectivity Conservation Specialist Groups of the IUCN World Commission...
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Back to the Battlefields: An Introduction

    • Authors: Conard; Rebecca
      Abstract: This short essay introduces the featured theme articles in this issue of Parks Stewardship Forum, titled "Back to the Battlefields: Historians Take a Fresh Look at American Sites of Conflict. In early 2022, we issued invitations to a select group of scholars who had written penetratingly on sites of conflict and commemoration. We asked them to travel to a particular site and take a look at it in a reflective mode, pondering what led to the conflict memorialized at that place and reflecting on the site’s meaning and how it has changed over the years, how their own personal understanding of the site has evolved, and the site’s relevance to America’s current socio-political situation. We also gave them license to analyze how well interpretation at “their” site presents historic events within a broader historical context, connects lessons of the site’s story (or stories) to contemporary issues and concerns, and encourages meaningful engagement from diverse audiences. The...
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Revisiting Slavery, the Civil War, and Reconciliation at Arlington
           National Cemetery and Arlington House

    • Authors: Quigley; Paul
      Abstract: Arlington National Cemetery, containing the graves of around 400,000 people, mostly veterans, is one of the United States’ most treasured cultural sites. The site also contains Arlington House, former enslaved labor plantation and home of Confederate general Robert E. Lee. Together, the cemetery and the plantation house played important roles in the divisions of the Civil War; the flawed North–South reconciliation that took place in the decades that followed; and the struggles over racial equality and historical memory that have continued into the 21st century. Following a National Park Service rehabilitation of Arlington House, accounts of enslaved people and their descendants are now considerably more prominent in the historical interpretation. Yet questions remain over how best to remember slavery, the Confederacy, and the Civil War.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Ripples of Memory from Sand Creek

    • Authors: Kelman; Ari
      Abstract: On November 29, 1864, troops from the 1st and 3rd Colorado Regiments attacked an Arapaho and Cheyenne peace camp along the banks of Sand Creek in southeastern Colorado Territory. The soldiers killed some 200 or more Native people, razed what remained of their village, and desecrated the bodies of the dead. Initially celebrated by Colorado settlers as a heroic battle, in time the violence came to be known nationally as the Sand Creek Massacre. Almost a century and a half later, on April 27, 2007, the National Park Service opened its 391st unit: Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site. This essay explores the politics of memory surrounding the Sand Creek Massacre, focusing on the impact of the historic site in reshaping official and popular recollections in the 16 years since it opened to the public.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • “As They Have Formerly Done”: Unraveling the Entanglements at
           Historic Fort Snelling

    • Authors: Phillips; Katrina M.
      Abstract: The United States built Fort Snelling at the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers in the 1820s. Initially conceived as a means to protect American interests in the region, the fort was used in military operations across multiple wars until it was decommissioned in 1946. This essay examines the fort’s role in American expansion, particularly through the lens of the US–Dakota War of 1862. In the wake of the war, Dakota survivors were forced to spend the winter in a concentration camp erected outside the fort. A century later, efforts to restore and reconstruct the fort led to the opening of Historic Fort Snelling in 1970. The fort’s lengthy history—and its role in so many historical eras and events—has led to continued contestations over interpretation at the site, and even the name itself.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Meeting visitor interest to advance conservation: A study from Indiana
           Dunes National Park, USA

    • Authors: Merson; Martha , Valoura, Leila , Forist, Brian E. , Hristov, Nickolay I. , Allen, Louise C.
      Abstract: Thousands of visitors to parks take part in ranger-led programs annually. During these programs rangers work to evoke and maintain interest in order to connect visitors with cultural and natural resources. Researchers have found interest is a powerful driver of learning, yet its role in the experience of adults who participate in ranger-led programming has not been well studied. Open-ended telephone interviews conducted months after a ranger-led hike to a prominent dune in Indiana Dunes National Park illustrate the extent to which visitors’ recollections show continuity with their reasons for attending the ranger-led hike and their uptake of resource messages. Like other ranger-led programming, this hike was designed to make intellectual and emotional connections, to fuel long-held interests, and activate new stewards. The program was the result of collaboration among rangers and local scientists. Responses to a pre-hike survey were matched with post-hike recollections transcribed...
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Old Battles Are New Again: Revisiting the Selma to Montgomery National
           Historic Trail

    • Authors: White; Tara Y.
      Abstract: The author revists Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail, created by Congress to commemorate the historic march of 1965. The only African American site in the entire National Trail System, Selma to Montgomery represents the historical tension between the ideals of American democracy, where all citizens have equal protection and equal rights by law, and the reality of the fight waged by Black voters against discrimination in America. Further, the trail represents the struggle to preserve the history and memory of civil rights sites of conflict as a part of the nation’s historical landscape. Finally, the trail represents the symbolic battle, in real time, of the voting rights movement (which some characterize as “a relic of the past”) in the face of ongoing tangible assaults on voting rights in the 21st century.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • National Parks Can Improve Society by Revealing Destructive Historical
           Conflicts

    • Authors: Davis; Gary E. , Davis, Dorothy A.
      Abstract: This visual essay in "The Photographer's Frame" investigates the potential of using experiential learning in the National Park System to mitigate the repetition of harmful societal practices, such as relying on destructive conflict to resolve differences of opinions and beliefs.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • From “Gibraltar of the Chesapeake” to “Freedom’s Fortress”:
           Reinterpreting Fort Monroe

    • Authors: Newby-Alexander; Cassandra
      Abstract: Historians, community activists, leaders with the Fort Monroe Authority, and the National Park Service collaborated to reimagine the legacy of Fort Monroe, long known as the “Gibraltar of the Chesapeake,” after 188 years of service as a military base. However, Fort Monroe also was the site where America’s institution of slavery began evolving and where that institution also began unraveling. This is the legacy that is foregrounded for 21st-century visitors. In 2019, Fort Monroe hosted the commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the landing of the first Africans in the Virginia colony. A new Welcome Center focuses on this legacy. While Fort Monroe continues to highlight its military history and the natural landscape to countless visitors, the primary narrative interprets 1619 and the Civil War-era contraband story. Adding to this important story is the 2021 designation of Fort Monroe as a Site of Memory Associated to the Slave Route by the United Nations Educational,...
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Cover, Masthead, and Table of Contents, PSF Vol. 39 No. 3

    • Authors: PSF Editorial Team; The
      Abstract: Cover, Masthead, and Table of Contents, PSF Vol. 39 No. 3
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Greco in Oz

    • Authors: Greco; CJ
      Abstract: An overseas trip provides adventure, self-discovery, and a measure of healing to the author.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Cover, Masthead, and Table of Contents PSF Vol. 39 No. 2

    • Authors: PSF Editorial Team; The
      Abstract: Cover, Masthead, and Table of Contents PSF Vol. 39 No. 2
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The designation of Stonewall National Monument: Path and impact

    • Authors: Jarvis; Jonathan B. , Springate, Megan E.
      Abstract: This article provides two different perspectives on the designation of Stonewall National Monument. which was proclaimed by President Obama in 2016. First, former National Park Service (NPS) Director Jonathan Jarvis shares his experiences leading up to and beyond the designation. In the second section, Megan Springate places Stonewall into the larger context of the NPS Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ+) heritage initiative and the preparation of LGBTQ America, the LGBTQ+ theme study, which is a document commissioned by the National Park Foundation for the National Park Service.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Understanding the outdoors and conservation through a queer lens

    • Authors: Forist; Brian , Heath, Sandy , King-Cortes, Forrest
      Abstract: A brief introduction to the theme articles on LGBTQIA+ Experiences and Expertise in the Outdoors and in Conservation.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Restoring the great cloud forests of Santa Rosa Island

    • Authors: Warneke; Alexandria , Lombardo, Keith , Ready, Michael
      Abstract: This visual essay in "The Photographer's Frame" describes the restoration of oak and pine forests on an island in Channel Islands National Park, California.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Queering eco-activism: Ways of organizing and uplifting conservation
           efforts by queer and trans eco-activists

    • Authors: DeMirjyn; Maricela
      Abstract: This essay explores a cohort of eco-activists within the queer and trans community who specifically link social justice concerns with environmental activism. Areas of focus include climate crisis, activist eco-interventions, the development of social media platforms as eco-activist hotspots, and sites (places) of public protest. An intersectional environmentalist framework is applied throughout this paper, highlighting insights and strategies by queer and trans eco-activists of color.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Neurodivergence is also an LGBTQ+ topic: Making space for
           “neuroqueering” in the outdoors

    • Authors: Loy-Ashe; Tarah
      Abstract: Recently, the field of research exploring the links between neurodivergence and the LGBTQ+ community has grown. Many queer adults who were not diagnosed as children are just now receiving neurodivergent diagnoses. Nick Walker coined the term “neuroqueer” in 2015 to describe the intersection of being both neurodivergent and queer. “Neuroqueering” refers to the embodying and expressing of one’s neurodivergence in ways that also queer one’s performance of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and/or other aspects of one’s identity (Walker 2021). Considering the increase of queer representation in the outdoors, it is necessary to also address neuroqueering and its implications for the outdoor community. This conceptual article will address the connection between neurodivergence and the LGBTQ+ community, implications for the queer outdoors, and ways to include neuroqueer recreationalists and outdoor advocates in efforts to make the outdoors more equitable.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Out in Nature

    • Authors: Chapman; Corinne , Greco, CJ
      Abstract: A introduction and link to a short video on the queer meetup group Out In Nature.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Natural Carbon Solutions Contribute to Halting Climate Change

    • Authors: Gonzalez; Patrick
      Abstract: By storing carbon in vegetation and soils, ecosystems naturally prevent emissions that cause climate change. Protected areas effectively conserve forests and carbon. Halting deforestation would cut 10% of global carbon emissions.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Queer ecology through national park social media

    • Authors: Farish; Abi
      Abstract: A collaboration between Zion National Park and Stonewall National Monument produces two social media posts that give examples of queer ecology.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The Science of __________

    • Authors: Koets; Julia
      Abstract: A poem in the "Verse in Place" section of Parks Stewardship Forum.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Planning for change: Lessons of survival from queer and trans lives

    • Authors: Garrett; Cal Lee
      Abstract: Drawing on the case of parks and marginal spaces in Chicago, considered as novel ecosystems, this essay works to unpack some of the costs and limitations of how conservation value has been defined by conservationists. Namely, conservation value tends to center pristine, historical ecosystems like tallgrass prairie over the small pockets where many native species continue to survive and form new ecological relationships. By engaging queer and trans theories and thinkers who argue that fixation on the past can limit evaluations of the present, I argue for a wider vision of conservation value that is more open to creative possibilities for survival into the future.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Centering narratives from the margins: Interpretive tools for
           destabilizing colonial foundations

    • Authors: Porteroff; Shelbie
      Abstract: Place matters. It connects people to nature, ancestry and culture, history, and complex emotions that are much harder to name. Place fosters a sense of identity and a sense of belonging. As interpreters, we have a habit of prescribing meaning to place, and after some time, we take that meaning as the only meaning that a place has. We share it with visitors at parks, museums, or other heritage sites, and hope that they garner as much thrill from the place we love as we do. But a place’s meaning is not set in stone, nor is it singular. Interpreters can present multiple perspectives, but there will always be other perspectives that they do not know; after all, an interpreter is just one person. The perspectives and meanings of place are complicated, and the narratives that have dominated the field of interpretation, especially in the United States, have been framed by a colonial past, which persists in our present. Centering narratives from the margins, or narratives from groups...
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Coming out as a gay ranger in the era of the assassination of Harvey Milk
           and the HIV/AIDS crisis

    • Authors: Sealy; Dan
      Abstract: The essay tells the story of a gay man, working as a National Park Service ranger, coming out to himself and in his workplace. This personal story parallels the national reckoning with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Asexual + issues ,including the assassination of the first openly gay elected official in San Francisco and the unfolding crisis of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The story tells how secrets can impact employee confidence and careers. It also shows how seemingly benign actions by colleagues and supervisors can have both positive and negative effects on the personal coming out process. It also suggests how supportive actions and the workplace environment can strengthen both the individual and the agency.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Forest Magic

    • Authors: Ahnam; Lyri
      Abstract: The author describes her joys and vulnerabilities as part of a lesbian couple experiencing two of their favorites places in nature.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Queer, Fat, and OUTdoors

    • Authors: Potvin; Leigh , Niblett, Blair
      Abstract: This narrative highlights our personal experiences of being in queer and fat bodies accessing (or trying to access) outdoor spaces. We present a brief overview of literature that lays the foundation and helps situate this work’s contribution to understanding the in/accessibility of outdoor recreation and parks. Our narratives present personal stories of mapping our (fat) bodies and our queerness relative to the outdoors and to the systems of power that govern the so-called wilderness and wild spaces we have encountered. We conclude with a series of recommendations for institutions, individuals, and groups who are interested in more queer and fat inclusion in parks and recreation spaces.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Picturing the Cost of Freedom

    • Authors: Diamant; Rolf
      Abstract: In this "Letter from Woodstock," our columnist highlights a few short videos that address human dignity and human rights in America’s national park system.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Self-care through nature photography: A visual journey through fall with a
           queer eye

    • Authors: Gastelum; Mario
      Abstract: A portfolio of photographs of places in and around Chicago taken during nature outings of LGBTQIA+ people.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Queerness in the age of surviving climate change

    • Authors: Kostecka; Emilie A.
      Abstract: This essay looks at Elizabeth Weinberg’s book Unsettling: Surviving Extinction Together through the lenses of interconnectedness between communities, understanding of the role of queerness in the fight against climate change, and the importance of understanding just how connected everything on this planet is to everything else. Through personal reflection, photos, consideration of current events, and shared memories, the writer looks at Weinberg’s work as a call to a better future with the hope of prevailing against problems of white supremacy, climate change, and human turmoil through the lessons being taught by the youth.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Am I Visionary, or Just Crazy' An excerpt from George Meléndez Wright:
           The Fight for Wildlife and Wilderness in the National Parks

    • Authors: Emory; Jerry
      Abstract: An excerpt from the newly published, first-ever biography of the American conservationist George Meléndez Wright.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Section 2: The Hierophant

    • Authors: Adams; Henry Crawford
      Abstract: One of three Tarot illustrations that serve as frontispieces to sections of the theme papers on LGBTQIA+ Experiences and Expertise in the Outdoors and in Conservation. Each illustration represents an aspect of the character of the LGBTQIA+ community.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Ten principles of outdoor recreation: An excerpt from Studies in Outdoor
           Recreation: Search and Research for Satisfaction (fourth edition)

    • Authors: Manning; Robert E. , Anderson, Laura , Budruk, Megha , Goonan, Kelly , Hallo, Jeffrey , Laven, Daniel , Lawson, Steven , McCown, Rebecca Stanfield , Minteer, Ben , Newman, Peter , Perry, Elizabeth , Pettengill, Peter , Reigner, Nathan , Valliere, William , van Riper, Carena , Xiao, Xiao
      Abstract: An excerpt from the concluding chapter of the 4th edition of this standard textbook.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Section 3: The Chariot

    • Authors: Adams; Henry Crawford
      Abstract: One of three Tarot illustrations that serve as frontispieces to sections of the theme papers on LGBTQIA+ Experiences and Expertise in the Outdoors and in Conservation. Each illustration represents an aspect of the character of the LGBTQIA+ community.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • A “plan to heal their hearts”: The lives of Ann and Tat

    • Authors: Forist; Brian
      Abstract: From 1861 to 1904, Miss Harriet Colfax served as keeper of the federal lighthouse at Michigan City, Indiana. For the full 43 years of her service her companion, Miss Ann Hartwell, lived with her. While original source documents are a record of the lives of “Ann and Tat,” as they were known to their friends, newspaper articles published during their lives and in the decades after their passing (both in 1905) provide insights on the ways they were seen and their relationship described. A difference is noted after their deaths, with an apparent distancing of Ann from Harriet. Through reporting and analysis of news articles details, are revealed about Harriet Colfax and her relationship with Ann Hartwell. A sort of disappearing of that relationship in the news, and an official distancing by the historical society now managing the lighthouse as a museum, are described. While there is no specific evidence that Ann and Tat were lesbians, there is similarly no evidence that they were...
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • A transmasculine experience of a career in outdoor recreation

    • Authors: Heath; Sandy , Duffy, Lauren
      Abstract: The outdoor recreation industry is heavily influenced by a dominant, heteronormative culture—a culture that defines the experience not only for the participants but also the people working within the industry (Warren 2015; Holland, Powell, Thomsen, and Monz 2018). Those interested in advancing a career as a professional in the outdoor recreation industry, particularly related to outdoor leadership and adventure guiding, are often required to engage in a variety of unique living situations, arrangements, and contexts. This may include, for example, moving to rural and remote communities that sit adjacent to wildlands where many outdoor recreation organizations operate their programs. It may also require extended overnight trips with shared housing and rooming arrangements that require a level of intimacy with people they work with that is uncommon to most employment settings. Unique to this field, then, is how entangled personal identities are in the professional settings where...
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Our nature: A queer relationship with wilderness

    • Authors: Garland; Lance
      Abstract: A re-envisioning of our understanding of wilderness, informed by a queer understanding of our place in it, can offer new ways of looking at the climate crisis. A deeper relationship with wilderness offers us new pathways of understanding and connection. For queer people this relationship can offer a healing salve for the historical abuses inflicted upon us by societal structures and can promote a sense of purpose and connection in our existence here as a part of this environment.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Section 1: Strength

    • Authors: Adams; Henry Crawford
      Abstract: One of three Tarot illustrations that serve as frontispieces to sections of the theme papers on LGBTQIA+ Experiences and Expertise in the Outdoors and in Conservation. Each illustration represents an aspect of the character of the LGBTQIA+ community.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Woven in the River

    • Authors: Martin; Emily
      Abstract: An account of the author's experience as a queer person working in conservation in Iowa.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Rethinking Boundaries in a Half-Earth World

    • Authors: Hiss; Tony
      Abstract: The author of "Rescuing the Planet: Protecting Half the Land to Heal the Earth" provides an introduction to the Half Earth idea: that "up to half of the earth’s land and water must remain permanently available as living space for other species." The goal, he continues, "is not to exclude people or banish people’s activities, but create a series of shared spaces where people will tread lightly." Doing so will "keep 90% of life and awareness alive."
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Cover, Masthead, and Table of Contents PSF Vol. 39 No. 1

    • Authors: PSF Editorial Team; The
      Abstract: Cover, Masthead, and Table of Contents PSF Vol. 39 No. 1
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Sun of Honey

    • Authors: Coyote; Peter
      Abstract: A poem in the "Verse in Place" section of Parks Stewardship Forum.
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • One Beat in the Infinite Heart of Haida Gwaii

    • Authors: Klaagangs (Ernie Gladstone; Nang Kaa , Yu, Brady Ruyin
      Abstract: The authors begin this essay with these remarks: "There’s a phrase in X̱aayda Kil, the Skidegate dialect of the Haida language, that describes the horizon when you can’t tell where the ocean ends and the sky begins: 'Ḵuuya ḵaagan ad siigaay G̱ud gii ts’ahlsgiidan Sky and sea glued together.' Which is to say that the distinction between even the most immutable of boundaries can be blurred. As we approach the tipping point to catastrophic climate change and the world sits precariously at the edge of a potential shift away from respectful co-existence towards intolerance, what lessons can the examination of these liminal spaces offer us' For decades, people have looked to Haida Gwaii for some of these lessons."
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Moving transboundary conservation from Indigenous engagement to Indigenous
           leadership: Working across borders for a resilient Cascadia

    • Authors: Krosby; Meade , Bridge, Gwen , Asinas, Erica T. , Hall, Sonia
      Abstract: As the number of transboundary conservation initiatives continues to grow in response to the twin threats of climate change and biodiversity loss, so too have calls for Indigenous-led conservation that recognizes Indigenous rights and supports Indigenous land and wildlife stewardship. And yet, because many transboundary initiatives have historically been settler-led, such efforts are now contending with how best to pivot toward models of more meaningful Indigenous engagement and leadership. Here, we describe the Cascadia Partner Forum’s recently completed Blueprint for a Resilient Cascadia, a collaborative strategy for supporting large-landscape resilience in the transboundary region of Washington and British Columbia. We reflect on the history of the Cascadia Partner Forum, the collaborative process employed in its development of the Blueprint for a Resilient Cascadia, and its commitment and ongoing effort to ethically and effectively engage with Tribes and...
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Direction for interpretive programming from Alberta Provincial Park
           management plans

    • Authors: Hvenegaard; Glen , Olson, Kiva , Halpenny, Elizabeth
      Abstract: Park management plans provide strategic direction for the future management of specific parks. These plans set goals and strategies for many park management concerns, including ecological integrity, visitor services, facilities, boundaries, and resource allocation. Understanding interpretive goals, topics, and strategies will help a park or park system develop a coherent approach to interpretive planning, delivery, and evaluation. This study determined how interpretation was prioritized in Alberta provincial parks’ management plans. We analyzed 32 management plans based on length (average of 80 pages), age (average of 14 years), goals, topics, and strategies. Overall, 84% of the plans addressed interpretation, devoting an average of 3% of their length to interpretation. The most targeted interpretive goals were “learning,” “increasing positive attitudes,” “behavior change,” and “enjoyment.” The most frequent interpretive topics were “heritage,” “culture,” “conservation,” and...
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Invisible boundaries

    • Authors: Mather; Peter
      Abstract: In the essay prefacing this portfolio of his work, photographer Peter Mather says: "There is nothing we like more as a species than creating boundaries. Boundaries for our yards, our city, our friends, our work, our nations, and our landscapes. It is so interesting to see how animals adapt to, and sometimes ignore, our boundaries. I find that wildlife, whether bears, foxes, or ravens, all have their own personalities, much like us as people, and that every individual animal has a different set of boundaries."
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The Once and Future Advisory Board

    • Authors: Diamant; Rolf
      Abstract: In this "Letter from Woodstock," our columnist makes the case for why a revived and substantive National Park System Advisory Board is so important for the US National Park Service and the National Park System as a whole.
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Blurring boundaries: An invitation to the imagination

    • Authors: Leong; Leslie
      Abstract: The author shares her personal journey of meeting, pushing through, and overcoming boundaries in many guises: as an outdoors and wilderness enthusiast, an engineer, a park administrator, and, now, a photographer and mixed-media artist. She asks: "I wonder if we can blur boundaries of protected areas and re-imagine parks and PAs' Can boundaries of PAs be vague enough to ignite creativity and imagination' How might these re-imagined boundaries achieve protection in perpetuity'"
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Courageous Conversations: Risks, Race, and Recreation in the United States

    • Authors: Pinckney; IV, Harrison P.
      Abstract: The narrative remains unchanged. The racial and ethnic demographics of the United States are changing, yet the agencies that manage our protected areas have not figured out how to prepare for these changes. Researchers and agencies working within protected areas are concerned with one simple question: How do we increase visitation and participation among communities of color' Several studies have focused on issues of constraints and barriers. Initiatives have centered on marketing strategies. Agencies have conducted surveys to examine their hiring practices. Sadly, these have not led to the desired outcomes. So, what are we missing, what ideas have we not explored, what are the appropriate next steps towards closing the perceived gap' It is the position of this paper that researchers have prioritized research questions and methodologies with which they are most familiar and comfortable. Collectively, we have failed to take on the hard questions and processes that are necessary...
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • A Solution to Existential Climate Crisis: RTFM

    • Authors: Davis; Gary E. , Davis, Dorothy A.
      Abstract: This visual essay in "The Photographer's Frame" says that he first step to resolving humanity’s greatest existential threat, the current climate breakdown, may be as simple as “read Earth’s operating manual.”
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Obstacles to removing non-native species from a national park

    • Authors: Dilsaver; Lary M.
      Abstract: Throughout its history, the National Park Service has sought to eliminate or control non-native species within its units. The growing influence of science in natural resource management has made this mandate ever more imperative. Removal of invasive vegetation has proven extremely difficult and may never be complete in many parks. Efforts to eliminate domesticated animals and feral or wild invaders have met many obstacles as well. Channel Islands National Park has managed to get rid of sheep, cattle, pigs, burros, horses, deer, elk, rats, cats, rabbits, turkeys, Argentine ants, and European honey bees. In the process, park managers have had to work through or overcome eight types of impediments as well as virulent opposition. Lessons learned from these campaigns can inform other park managers facing the same types of problems.
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Hug a tree, hug a building: Reflections on the management of natural and
           built heritage

    • Authors: Kalman; Harold
      Abstract: A veteran forester refuses to cut down a mammoth, millennium-old Douglas fir on British Columbia’s Vancouver Island. The city council in nearby Victoria designates the stately Empress Hotel as heritage property. The former was an act of environmental conservation; the latter, of built heritage conservation. This essay looks at the two events in the contexts of forest management, historic preservation, climate change, and sustainability. It describes the increasing threats to old-growth and heritage trees, discusses the mitigative tools that are available, and reflects on analogies between safeguarding natural heritage and built heritage. A new management and legislative approach is needed, one that balances science with Indigenous Traditional Knowledge. Until then, advocacy will continue to lead the way. The theme may have been expressed best by an Aboriginal writer from Australia, who reacted to a proposed freeway’s threat to destroy dozens of 800-year-old trees: “Their survival...
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Climate Change Challenges and Science-Based Optimism

    • Authors: Gonzalez; Patrick
      Abstract: The first edition of the new “Climate Change Solutions” column concisely reviews the latest science from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and reasons for hope, if you help with one meaningful carbon solution.
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Open to change but stuck in the mud: Stakeholder perceptions of adaptation
           options at the frontlines of climate change and protected areas management
           

    • Authors: Barr; Stephanie L. , Lemieux, Christopher J. , Larson, Brendon M.H. , Parker, Scott R.
      Abstract: In recent decades, the literature on climate change and biodiversity conservation has proposed numerous climate change adaptation options; however, their effectiveness and feasibility have rarely been evaluated by those involved in frontline decision-making. In this paper, we use data from a two-day climate change adaptation workshop held at Bruce Peninsula National Park and Fathom Five National Marine Park, in Ontario, Canada, to understand stakeholder views on different types of adaptation options. We found that most (45%) adaptation options identified by participants were “conventional” (i.e., they are already in use and are relatively low risk and familiar to practitioners) and oriented towards directing change (i.e., they aim to help species and ecosystems respond to change and transition to a desired future state). These options also received higher effectiveness and feasibility ratings than “novel” ones. The remaining options (55%) were either “conventional” and aimed towards...
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Boundary Thinking Transformed

    • Authors: Walton; Mike
      Abstract: The Guest Editor introduces the theme papers in this issue, and adds his own thoughts and experiences.  As he says: "Created by imagination, and made real by imaginary borders, parks and protected areas invite passionate debates about fundamental human rights, and individual rights and freedoms."
      PubDate: Sun, 15 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +000
       
 
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  Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

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