Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Current Landscape Ecology Reports
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2364-494X
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • The Contribution of Landscape Ecology to Regionalization, Modelling, and
           Managing in Hydrology: Proposed Approach in the Context of Argentina

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review In this paper, I show three concrete examples in which the holistic approach of Landscape Ecology contributes to (i) the definition of hydrologically similar regions, (ii) the analysis and discussion of the causes of different erosive responses in sectors of a basin obtained from an empirical model, and (iii) the water resources management from an integrated perspective. Recent Findings Firstly, I propose the inclusion of certain landscape metrics for the identification of hydrologically homogeneous regions, as a way of incorporating landscape heterogeneity to the characterization of basins. Then, I particularly highlight cases in which the implementation of the Universal Soil Loss Equation from the Landscape Ecology approach allows a differential analysis of the erosive response in each landscape unit. Finally, I discuss the opportunity provided by the Integrated Water Resources Management process to incorporate the environmental dimension to achieve a holistic approach. Summary Landscape Ecology, due to its synthetic and integrative nature, provides an approach to natural systems considering their heterogeneity and complexity, helping to understand the dialectical relationships established between the different spatial and temporal scales in which hydrological processes occur. Thus, Landscape Ecology enriches hydrological regionalization for modelling through the inclusion of the spatial structure of land cover patterns. It also allows discussion about different erosive responses (e.g., through the consideration of the landscape dynamics associated with an agricultural cycle into the interpretation). Last but not least, it expands the dimensions of water resources management through the addition of the physical-human perspective allowing the adoption of a transdisciplinary strategy with an active participation of society.
      PubDate: 2023-12-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00095-w
       
  • Functional Response to Cumulative Effects as an Effective Tool for
           Wildlife Management

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review The contemporary rate of environmental change is faster than ever recorded. Wildlife will need to acclimate or adapt habitat selection strategies to persist in the face of rapid natural and anthropogenic change. We reviewed primary literature on cumulative effects and habitat selection frameworks that link to functional response. Our primary goal was to highlight how functional response to habitat selection can fit into current approaches that assess wildlife response to landscape disturbance including model structure, disturbance type, and spatiotemporal scales. Recent Findings Both functional response to habitat selection and cumulative effects assessment endeavor to capture how wildlife alter their space use across a changing landscape over time. These two methods are seldom used in combination, but together can quantify behavioral responses that may change as a function of accumulating disturbances. Most studies we reviewed included multiple measures of anthropogenic disturbance, but rarely considered how the interaction between separate disturbances may influence wildlife response. Summary We propose integrating functional response to habitat selection and cumulative effects using resource selection functions. We identify three avenues to further expand the use of this application: (A) considering different types of cumulative effects and their interactions, (B) predicting responses over space and time, and (C) using thresholds as a path to understand biological mechanisms. Allowing disturbance responses to covary as a function of resource availability will provide meaningful comparisons of habitat selection and aid in disentangling cumulative effects interactions.
      PubDate: 2023-12-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00094-x
       
  • Defining Urban India: Finding Order in Chaos

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review The growth of cities and towns in India in the past few decades has spurred a rich body of urban research across disciplines. The pace and scale of urban expansion demand that urbanization should be evaluated beyond megacities or urban agglomerations since the administrative delineations are insufficient to represent the true extent of the spatial change. This review summarizes recent studies on urbanization from the qualitative and quantitative realms that help understand the key debates and findings relevant to investigate the patterns and processes of urbanization in last two decades in India. It explores different definitions of urban used within Indian context, summarizes the existing knowledge of spatial patterns of urban change, and explores role of urban modeling that can be useful tool for planning sustainable and resilient cities in India. Recent Findings (1) A rich body of scholarship has emerged over the last decade that takes a nuanced approach to the analysis of the what should be termed as ‘urban.’ (2) Existing discrepancies in urbanization levels from different national and international sources are observed. (3) The major knowledge base of urbanization pattern and trends are from large cities. (4) Urban modeling applications in India are dominated by cellular automata (CA)-based Markov chain model. (5) There is lack of integration between theoretical urban studies and computation urban models. Summary The purpose of the review is to present the recent, interdisciplinary, rich body of literature that investigates the growth of urban regions, their impact on the urban landscape, and their connection with infrastructure development. Understanding, measuring, and monitoring the socio-economic-environmental dimensions shaping the emerging small and mega-urban regions is a crucial step toward developing resilient and sustainable cities.
      PubDate: 2023-11-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00093-y
       
  • Exploring Challenges and Lessons for Monitoring Forest Landscape
           Restoration

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Forest landscape restoration (FLR) is an approach to restoring forest ecosystems first defined in 2000 that has gained prominence since the launch of the Bonn Challenge in 2011. FLR aims to enhance ecological integrity and improve human well-being within (forested) landscapes. The monitoring of FLR is essential to ensure effective implementation and to learn from practice. Yet to this day, monitoring remains a major challenge for FLR. Monitoring FLR requires measures at a landscape scale and across social and natural sciences. We explore some of the monitoring challenges raised by these dimensions of FLR. We assess the current theory and practice behind FLR monitoring and how it relates to practices in related environmental disciplines. Recent Findings We highlight the challenges raised by the recent attempts at monitoring FLR and explore lessons from other related fields and conclude by proposing a framework of the basic issues to consider when monitoring FLR. Summary
      PubDate: 2023-09-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00092-z
       
  • Landscape Connectivity For Wildlife and Water: The State of the Literature

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review The science of landscape connectivity is widely applied to identify corridors for wildlife movement through unprotected areas. Where corridors coincide with forested or vegetated headwater catchments, they can contribute to blue water security for downstream users and recycle precipitation through green water flux to the larger region. This review examines the extent to which hydrology is recognized within studies on wildlife corridors. We illustrate the synergy between wildlife corridors and water security in the Central Indian Highlands, a globally important region for tiger (Panthera tigris) conservation and the water tower for five major rivers. Recent Findings We find that a growing but still minor component of the literature on landscape connectivity addresses hydrology. Out of 127 publications on landscape connectivity that address both hydrology and wildlife, 50% were published after 2015 and hydrology-related words appear more frequently in abstracts over time (27% in 1993–2003 and 45% in 2014–2023 of most frequently used words) The case study illustrates potential synergies for water security and conservation, with areas for wildlife connectivity twice as rugged, three times more forested, and about 1.8 times denser with small streams than other areas in the landscape. About half of the area identified for landscape connectivity overlaps with catchment areas for five major dams. Summary Freshwater resources and water security are vital in human-dominated landscapes such as central India. A holistic view of landscape connectivity beyond wildlife provides practitioners with additional rationale for conserving these areas to maintain water resources that are directly relevant to people living in the landscape.
      PubDate: 2023-08-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00091-0
       
  • Individual-Based Models for Incorporating Landscape Processes in the
           Conservation and Management of Aquatic Systems

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Ecological models can provide critical guidance to conservation programs both as problem-solving tools and by projecting future outcomes, specifically when time and resources limit directly testing alternative management approaches and scenarios. Due to the complexity of aquatic systems, environmental and climatic factors co-vary, multiple risk factors interact, and driving ecological and evolutionary processes are characterized by non-linear, higher-order interactions. Recent modeling advancements allow for better accounting of variation across time and space in ecological and genetic processes, but more progress is needed to inform conservation and address biodiversity decline. Modeling approaches that can explicitly incorporate the ongoing, rapid transformation of climate and landscapes and demogenetic and eco-evo consequences are useful for supporting and informing conservation planning strategies. In this narrative perspective, we present the history and role of individual-based models (IBMs) in aquatic systems to guide management. Recent Findings We present exemplary cases that cover (1) the conservation and management of native species in systems impacted by invasive species, (2) life history evolution impacts on the management of fisheries, (3) predictions of the interaction between changing environments and management decisions, and (4) testing factors that drive system dynamics in order to prioritize management decisions. We summarize potential platforms and software available to researchers and managers and discuss future opportunities and challenges. Summary While this review focuses on the use of IBMs in aquatic systems, we assert that this foundational knowledge is applicable across systems and encourages researchers and managers to consider incorporating individual-based modeling perspectives to inform conservation as appropriate.
      PubDate: 2023-07-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00089-8
       
  • Spatial Scaling Involving the Complexity of Biotic Interactions:
           Integrating Concepts, Current Status, and Future Perspectives

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Despite the potential and increased use of multiscale spatial analysis in landscape ecology, the theoretical and empirical information available in the literature generally focuses on species habitat modeling and the effects of landscape modification on biotic interactions have not been sufficiently explored. In this study, we provide a current and comprehensive overview on where we are and where we need to go when considering spatial scaling and the complexity of biotic interactions. Recent Findings Although the accumulated knowledge on scale dependency of biotic interactions has increased in the last decades, the use of an ecological framework involving the effects of spatial scaling on species interaction networks is still too limited. Generally, the few studies available in the literature analyzed the landscape structure at a single level or are limited to a set of a few spatial extents. Additionally, the little information available in the literature is related to some mechanisms involving species–area relationships (i.e., combining local networks into metawebs to increase the spatial sampling scales from small to regional levels) and the scale of effect (i.e., the spatial scale at which landscape structure best predicts a network structural descriptor). Summary We highlight the current status and some potential research directions on spatial scaling involving the complexity of biotic interactions, which should be considered in future studies to ensure precise, robust, and accurate interpretations of the organization of species interaction networks and help us test specific ecological hypotheses, identify potential universalities, and propose effective strategies of monitoring and management for biodiversity conservation.
      PubDate: 2023-07-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00090-1
       
  • Enhancing Resilience of Boreal Forests Through Management Under Global
           Change: a Review

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Boreal forests provide a wide range of ecosystem services that are important to society. The boreal biome is experiencing the highest rates of warming on the planet and increasing demand for forest products. Here, we review how changes in climate and its associated extreme events (e.g., windstorms) are putting at risk the capacity of these forests to continue providing ecosystem services. We further analyze the role of forest management to increase forest resilience to the combined effects of climate change and extreme events. Recent Findings Enhancing forest resilience recently gained a lot of interest from theoretical perspective. Yet, it remains unclear how to translate the theoretical knowledge into practice and how to operationalize boreal forest management to maintain forest ecosystem services and functions under changing global conditions. We identify and summarize the main management approaches (natural disturbance emulation, landscape functional zoning, functional complex network, and climate-smart forestry) that can promote forest resilience. Summary We review the concept of resilience in forest sciences, how extreme events may put boreal forests at risk, and how management can alleviate or promote such risks. We found that the combined effects of increased temperatures and extreme events are having negative impacts on forests. Then, we discuss how the main management approaches could enhance forest resilience and multifunctionality (simultaneous provision of high levels of multiple ecosystem services and species habitats). Finally, we identify the complementary strengths of individual approaches and report challenges on how to implement them in practice.
      PubDate: 2023-04-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00088-9
       
  • The Effect of Commercial Building Orientations on Indoor Climate in
           Tropical Environments: A New Insight on Thermal Comfort Studies

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review This work examines the effect of different commercial building orientations on indoor climate in tropical environments. The tropics have relatively high temperatures and humidity. Buildings, on the other hand, affect climate and could influence work productivity. Recent Findings Studies in thermal comfort in buildings considered indoor air temperature and spatial locations of buildings. Approximately 76% of builders and designers ignore the thermal performance of their projects. Even as global warming in the twenty-first century and particularly in the tropics is challenging, indoor temperature in buildings is constantly changing and recording temperature highs. This study provides new insights on seasonal variations of indoor climate in four selected building orientations (N-S, W-E, S-N, and E-W) at four spatial locations and at different synoptic hours (09:00, 12:00, 15:00, and 18:00). During the dry season, S-N, W-E, N-S, and E-W building orientations had 151, 412, 511, and 115 no. of comfort and discomfort hours, respectively. During the wet season, S-N, W-E, N-S, and E-W building orientations had 140, 68, 86, and 212 no. of comfort and discomfort hours, respectively. Hence, the best building orientation in tropical climates is the N-S or S-N. Summary Indoor air temperature, wind speed and direction, and relative humidity were measured using psychometric methods. The buildings measured had similar structural designs and makeup materials, but different orientations. Traditional building designs that do not guarantee thermal comfort must be phased out in favor of eco-friendly designs that take into account the appropriate orientation and low-carbon material specifications.
      PubDate: 2023-03-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00085-y
       
  • Urban Development in Africa and Impact on Biodiversity

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Biodiversity remains an immense source of benefit to mankind and a major contributor to his well-being. Severe loss of biodiversity necessitated the conservation of a part of the biodiversity hotspots as protected areas. Despite this initiative, a sizable part of the conserved hotspots was still lost to anthropogenic factors among which is urban development. Therefore, we assessed the current status (2014–2021) of the biodiversity hotspots in the African region by estimating landmass loss in \({\mathrm{km}}^{2}\) per biodiversity hotspot, identifying the direct-and-indirect impacts of urban development on biodiversity, while also giving recommendations for further research. Recent Findings Africa has the fifth-highest urban-population presently. Thirteen countries on the continent will become heavily urbanized within the next three decades (2016 to 2050). Perennial urban problems remain a structural constraint to Africa’s urban development; hence, African biodiversity hotspots suffer both direct-and-indirect consequences of urban development. Only 13% (86,859 \({\mathrm{km}}^{2}\) ) of the protected areas of the biodiversity hotspots remains from a total of 665,845 \({\mathrm{km}}^{2}\) . Furthermore, two out of the eight hotspots in Africa (Eastern Afromontane and Guinean forests of West Africa) are among the three global hotspots predicted to experience intense (about ten times) urban encroachment and possible loss of all their endemic species. Summary We implore future research to focus on regional studies (aside from global studies) because regional studies would provide more in-depth-analysis of the hotspots, provide mapping data and reveal their current status in terms of landmass and the surviving endemic species, among others. Furthermore, the issue of climate change in the urban development biodiversity mix needs more research. Finally, there is an urgent need for sustainability and policy development studies that would advise on the appropriate management modalities for the hotspots in the face of continuous urban development.
      PubDate: 2023-03-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00086-x
       
  • Compact or Sprawling Cities: Has the Sparing-Sharing Framework Yielded an
           Ecological Verdict'

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Global urban land area is growing faster than the urban population, raising concerns that sprawling, low-density development will reduce biodiversity and human wellbeing. The sparing-sharing framework, adapted from agroecology, provides one approach to assessing alternative urban growth patterns. It compares ecological outcomes in landscapes matched for total population and land area, but differing in configuration: land sparing (partitioned between densely urbanized and undeveloped areas) or land sharing (low-density development throughout). We reviewed the urban sparing-sharing literature since 2010 and recovered 15 studies conducted in 22 cities on four continents. Recent Findings Collectively, studies assessed effects of alternative development patterns on 296 species, 21 community metrics (such as species richness), and 26 indicators of ecosystem services or processes (such as carbon sequestration). Sparing was the best option for 51% of individual species; 43% of community metrics; and 27% of ecosystem service indicators. Summary Existing ecological research does not clearly favor one pattern or the other, and new approaches are needed to facilitate decision making and ecological insight. Specifically, future work could (1) explicitly evaluate optimized urban development patterns across multiple competing priorities (such as providing housing, delivering ecosystem services, and protecting priority species), (2) tackle issues of spatial scale and connectivity that are often ambiguous in sparing-sharing research, and (3) improve geographical representation. These advances can be made while preserving the key insight of the framework–that choices between alternative landscape configurations are only meaningful when those landscapes are matched for total area and the level of human needs met.
      PubDate: 2023-02-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-022-00081-8
       
  • Contextualising Landscape Ecology in Wildlife and Forest Conservation in
           India: a Review

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Biodiversity values frequently encounter challenges from developmental needs despite having strong forest and wildlife laws in developing countries like India. Landscape ecology offers the relevant scientific backstopping and sophisticated tools to support conservation of several species. To aid the future development of landscape ecology in India within current and emerging contexts, we reviewed the spatio-temporal and thematic trends in the published research involving forest and wildlife conservation. Recent Findings Spatial modelling and land use land cover change assessments have been well established conceptually and methodologically, but an increase in studies involving impact of climate change on species habitat suitability is comparatively very recent. Thematic research gaps in this field include impact of scale on ecological processes, and uncertainty and error quantification in modelling. Dedicated studies on characterisation of biodiversity and its dynamics in biogeographic transition zones can scientifically inform management of forest and wildlife. Summary The review of 494 peer-reviewed articles published between 1994 and 2021 showed an increase in published research on landscape ecology over time. We found that the studies were dominated by the ‘Pattern–Process–Scale’ related questions and spatially clustered in the Western Ghats (biodiversity hotspot) and Uttarakhand state. Considerable research efforts are required in riverine and coastal ecosystems. Nevertheless, the increasing trend of research across themes and regions is a positive indicator of the growing role of landscape ecology in forest and wildlife management in India.
      PubDate: 2023-02-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00084-z
       
  • Understanding Drivers of Land Use and Land Cover Change in Africa: A
           Review

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review To develop a clear understanding and a critical assessment of current research efforts on the changes and underlying drivers of LULCC in Africa, we provide a global and systematic synthesis of research, aiming at (i) identifying change in land cover and land use; (ii) determining drivers of change and associated consequences for African vegetation and major ecoregions; and (iii) identifying research gaps in the existing literature. Recent Findings Despite the divergence in the way changes are driven in African LULC, the main driver of LULCC is change in agricultural practices through reduction in fallow duration, unprecedented population growth with associated needs, and climate variabilities. The consequences of these factors on LULCC include the loss of vegetation cover, soil erosion, and reduction of agricultural yields in specific areas. Studies have shown that shift in forest cover could be linked to the poverty level of the population and the needs for cultivated land, and introduction of marked-oriented agriculture system. Summary The main challenge is to develop and implement appropriate context-specific land management strategies, combined with population growth control. It also urges to compute long-term on-site data to assess change in land cover and associated contribution of climate change into the observed changes. Moreover, the relationship between human activities/population growth and the environment causing changes in land cover call for conservation action for a sustainable balance between agricultural production and natural resources conservation. There is a need for agreeing on a common methodology to study for consistent and comparable results in Africa.
      PubDate: 2023-02-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-023-00087-w
       
  • Urban Ecosystems Research in India: Advances and Opportunities

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review This article provides an overview of major research themes that address urban issues from a landscape perspective in India in the last 5 years. Landscape ecology research on urban ecosystems in India is largely focused on four themes—(i) landscape characterization, (ii) urban dynamics, (iii) urban heat island, and (iv) urban green spaces. Recent Findings Urban ecosystem research in India is dominated by studies utilizing remote sensing and GIS tools. Moderate resolution satellite data is most preferred to analyze changes within the city and its surroundings. Most of the studies from India are concentrated on urban dynamics and its characterization. In terms of size, studies are skewed, and focus more on larger cities. Also, studies are focused on analyzing changes in one city as compared to multiple cities. Urban growth modelling holds the potential to steer future urban growth policies of governing bodies and develop sustainable cities in the future. However, this is not well explored in Indian context and is still in its nascent stage. Research on thermal environment is concentrated on the nonlinear spatial relationships between multiple factors, and less on their interactions. In terms of green spaces, landscape connectivity and multifunctionality are largely missing. Much of the research addresses the availability of green spaces while accessibility is poorly understood. Summary Urban ecosystems in India are still in early developmental stages and research on mending urban issues from landscape perspective is one of the most promising choices. Learnings from past developmental trends, patterns, and policies can have a large impact on how future policies are drawn. For this, it is important to steer research into most pressing urban issues and advance them with new methodologies and actionable inferences. Research on urban problems in India is diversifying over time but needs cautious redirecting to address the needs of fast-paced unplanned urbanization. Studies in the past 5 years show a general trend towards individual case studies which provide quantitative measures of various themes. However, these studies fall short of analyzing government policies and their impacts on urban development and their consequences. Studies should also explore the integration of landscape planning and findings from urban heat island (UHI)– and urban green space (UGS)–related research to improve the living conditions in urban ecosystems. This would also require research on coupling of natural and socio-economic factors. The full potential of landscape research can only be realized by combining different themes of research as urban ecosystem is highly interdependent.
      PubDate: 2023-01-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-022-00083-6
       
  • Does a Species’ Mobility Determine the Scale at Which It Is Influenced
           by the Surrounding Landscape Pattern'

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Species at a site interact with environmental variables of the surrounding landscape, but the spatial extent (scale) at which such interaction is strongest (“scale of effect,” SOE) varies among species. SOE is hypothesized to be driven mainly by species’ mobility, as a more mobile species should interact with environmental variables across larger scales. Yet, previous reviews found little evidence for this expectation. This may be because the actual SOE is often outside the assessed range of scales, as suggested by the fact that the estimated SOE frequently equals the smallest or largest scale investigated. We conducted a systematic review of studies published during the last decade to assess whether SOE can be predicted by mobility-related species traits. We controlled for the effects of several study attributes, and repeated all analyses excluding the SOE values that equaled the smallest or largest scales investigated. Recent Findings We found 70 studies reporting 1059 SOE values for 291 species, but ~ 50% of SOE values were not scale sensitive. SOE was weakly related to six mobility-related traits, independently of the taxonomic group, especially after controlling for study attributes. They remained weak after excluding the SOE values that equaled the smallest or largest scales investigated. Summary Our results imply that SOE cannot be predicted a priori from mobility-related traits. Therefore, we suggest that multi-scale analyses covering a wide range of scales should become standard practice to ensure we are not missing landscape context effects due to studying them at the wrong scale.
      PubDate: 2023-01-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-022-00082-7
       
  • Forest Certification in the Context of the Functional Complex Network
           Approach for Forest Management

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review At its core, sustainable forest management should maintain all ecological functions and resilience within a range of natural variation. Thus, the main challenge is to develop and implement management strategies that focus on a scalable multi-purpose approach where multiple forest resources are extracted while promoting biodiversity, water and soil conservation, and carbon sequestration. Acknowledging that the complexity of the interactions among forest functions and biodiversity makes it difficult to understand the full consequences of forest management actions, we discuss the concepts of forest resilience and forest complexity as key elements of well-functioning forests and in the context of forest certification programs. Recent Findings Forest management has followed an approach based on complex adaptive systems and more recently as a functional complex network using functional traits of forest patches and network theory as pillars for its development. Summary We propose that the intrinsic nature of the forest certification program and the mechanisms associated with the development of certification standards present themselves as an encouraging path for landscape-level implementation of management actions for sustainable forests. Functional complex network approach to forest management addresses the complexity and conservation of forest ecological processes. In this context, we suggest that forest certification programs offer the means for implementation of this approach. Developing scalable forest management strategies that result in well-functioning forests will probably continue to be a problem for the foreseeable future, but we propose that the forest certification programs such as those presented in this paper are a step in the right direction.
      PubDate: 2022-12-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-022-00080-9
       
  • Why We Need to Invest in Large-Scale, Long-Term Monitoring Programs in
           Landscape Ecology and Conservation Biology

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Large-scale and/or long-term monitoring has many important roles in landscape ecology and conservation biology. We explore some of these roles in this review. We also briefly discuss some of the key design issues that need to be considered when developing long-term, large-scale monitoring to ensure it is effective. Recent Findings Much has been written on the importance of ecological monitoring, but the record on monitoring in landscape ecology and conservation remains generally poor. For populations of many species and for many environmental management interventions, monitoring is rarely done, or done well. This review outlines some of the reasons it is critical to invest in well-designed, implemented, and maintained monitoring. New ways of using monitoring data, such as in environmental accounting and mandated environmental reporting, might provide avenues for garnering greater support for monitoring programs in the future. Summary We discuss seven of the most important roles of monitoring in landscape ecology and conservation biology. These are (1) documenting responses to environmental change, (2) answering key ecological questions, (3) testing existing ecological theory and developing new theory, (4) quantifying the effectiveness of management interventions, (5) informing environmental prediction systems, (6) engaging citizen scientists and the general public, and (7) contributing data and other insights to environmental initiatives. We illustrate these key roles with examples, drawn from existing large-scale, long-term work in a range of environments in Australia. We argue that some of these functions can only be realized if a monitoring program is well designed, implemented, and maintained.
      PubDate: 2022-10-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-022-00079-2
       
  • Evidence for the Combined Impacts of Climate and Landscape Change on
           Freshwater Biodiversity in Real-World Environments: State of Knowledge,
           Research Gaps and Field Study Design Recommendations

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Multiple stressor studies conducted in real-world environments play an important role in discovering how stressor pathways may vary relative to ecological complexity and study scale. We reviewed the evidence for climate and landscape change impacts on freshwater biodiversity in real-world ecosystems at the global scale. Using our compiled database of 150 studies, we asked (1) what are the study characteristics within the available evidence base and (2) what are the main knowledge gaps and recommendations for future research' Recent Findings Most studies employed an observational design and examined climatic and landscape change trends over a broad regional spatial scale (median = 97 sites/study). Ecological complexity was well represented in studies with a median of 11 predictor variables that characterized the relevant climate, landscape condition, and many other environmental attributes. Community-level metrics were common response types across all biota including larger, more mobile organisms such as fish that are challenging to examine in an ecologically-relevant context within controlled laboratory settings. Summary We identified several knowledge gaps including the need for more published time-series data, particularly with respect to understanding climate change impacts. Other opportunities for improved future research included incorporating more stressor and biological interactions, examining potential climate stressors over multiple seasons and streamlining methods for dealing with the pervasive challenges of multicollinearity in real-world systems. We emphasize the unique role of ‘natural experiments’ in validating experimental findings and provide a suite of recommendations for creating more strategic field studies to inform conservation efforts.
      PubDate: 2022-09-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-022-00074-7
       
  • Recent Evidence of Scale Matches and Mismatches Between Ecological Systems
           and Management Actions

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review In reviewing the most recent literature, this article seeks to assess whether empirical studies support the proposition that scale mismatches between ecological processes and resource management actions—with a focus on conservation measures—result in poorer performance of those actions. Furthermore, the article aims to identify patterns and valuable insights from recent empirical literature in relation to this conceptual framework. Recent Findings We reviewed 122 case studies in 93 papers published mainly in the last 5 years. We identified the outcomes of the relevant management action and evaluated the nature of these scale matches and mismatches in time, space, and functional properties across five different conservation strategies and five distinct types of ecological systems. Summary Our findings largely support the scale fit conceptual framework. Spatial scale (mis)matches are documented and published far more frequently than temporal and functional case studies. Furthermore, mismatches outnumber matches in the reviewed literature. However, certain realms of conservation practice such as farmland and fishery management were exceptions to this rule. We encourage documenting and publishing more examples of successful scale matches, especially in areas where they are lacking, in order to provide valuable experience and inspiration for the planning of future conservation efforts.
      PubDate: 2022-08-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-022-00076-5
       
  • Mathematical Modeling: Does Landscape Science Need to Become
           an Exact Science'

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review In this article, I consider how ideas about the role of mathematics in the formation of landscape studies as those lying between inexact (descriptive) and exact (physical) sciences have changed historically. In his little-known work of 1888, V. V. Dokuchaev answered the question of what was required for a descriptive science, like soil science, to turn into an exact discipline. It took more than a hundred years for Soviet and Russian landscape studies, established in the late 1940s, to move on in the direction of exact sciences owing to informatization. Recent Finding This work was perfomed in the Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences within the framework of state assignment. Recent developments in the field of mathematical modeling in Russian landscape science concern the creation of the theory of polygeosystem modeling by applying abstract entities (fiber categories) to characterize landscape entities. Another important direction is presented by geophysical foundation of polystructural landscape organization. A new approach to the development of theory of landscape studies based on landscape radioecology (a branch of landscape ecology) investigating the transformation of patterns of radionuclide pollution has also been proposed. Summary V. V. Dokuchaev’s rhetorical question formulated more than a hundred years about requirements necessary for landscape science as a descriptive science turning into an exact science has so far not been finally resolved. A borderline position of modern landscape science — between exact (modeling) and inexact sciences (applied landscape science) — is one of its strengths, whose benefits can be used to further its progress.
      PubDate: 2022-07-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-022-00071-w
       
 
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  Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

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Heriot-Watt University
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