Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access  
Annals of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access  
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access  
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access  
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
La Calera     Open Access  
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Selbyana     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Current Landscape Ecology Reports
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2364-494X
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Basin Approach as a Tool for Landscape Assessment and Planning

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review In this paper, I review the interplay between landscape and basin structures in Russian landscape geography, landscape ecology, landscape hydrology, and landscape planning. This discussion includes the following topics: (1) drainage basin as a geosystem; (2) effects of flows in basin on landscape structure formation; (3) landscape paradigm as an alternative approach to mathematical-physical hydrological modeling; (4) the hydrological functions of landscapes; and (5) landscape-basin interactions in environmental management and spatial planning. Recent Findings Recent Russian developments in the field of landscape-basin interactions are the natural continuation of the work begun in previous years. The new results show that the large area of Russia, the presence of ungauged catchments, and the deficiency of hydrological information make the landscape paradigm a good alternative and addition to mathematical-physical runoff modeling. Most researchers agree that the combination of basin and landscape grids is the best way to optimize environmental management. The combination of landscape-genetic and basin approaches turned out to be effective in water consumption management, multifunctional forest management, prevention of erosion, ecological tourism, etc. Summary The basin organization of the territory supplements the landscape organization of objects and phenomena. The idea of the hydrological functions of the landscape is the basis for the hydrological zoning of river basins. Such zoning makes it possible to identify areas in the river basin for which it is possible to predict changes in runoff in various hydrological phases under the influence of natural factors or anthropogenic impacts. The landscape-hydrological analysis is adapted to the methodology of spatial planning. Nevertheless, the spatial planning based on the basin-landscape approach has difficulties, since environmental management is entirely connected to administrative units.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
       
  • Connectivity in the Urban Landscape (2015–2020): Who' Where'
           What' When' Why' and How'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review This review uses a combination of narrative and systematic review techniques, including automated content analysis (ACA), to summarize the last 5 years of research on urban connectivity. It addresses the evolution of the field relative to prior reviews, identifies common themes and research gaps in the studies, and assesses the use of novel methods and data. Recent Findings We found a broadening of geographic and taxonomic scope in recent studies, including more research from Chinese cities and on multiple species. We also found more studies that covered multiple time periods than have been documented in prior reviews. However, we observed a continuing reliance on best professional judgment rather than empirical field data to parameterize models and on analytic methods that are 10–20 years old. Our review framework identified several distinct conceptual themes in the literature including foci on land cover, including roads, water, and vegetation; green spaces and infrastructure; ecological conservation, planning, and management; habitat structure and function; and species movement. Summary Urban areas offer the opportunity to leverage unique data sets and novel analytical methods that incorporate both human and other biological needs for connectivity, acknowledging that these two needs may not always align. In terms of data, few of the connectivity results were supported by or tested with empirical data. While nearly two-thirds of the papers reviewed included some measure of functional connectivity, which is an increase from previous reviews, future research would benefit from new modeling approaches that explicitly incorporate the challenges of measuring landscape connectivity within the urban context and from a clear set of shared objectives and goals.
      PubDate: 2022-03-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-021-00068-x
       
  • Diversifying Landscapes for Wild Bees: Strategies for North American
           Prairie Agroecosystems

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review We reviewed the common mechanisms through which intensively cropped landscapes are modified to increase wild bee abundance and diversity in North American prairie ecosystems. We categorized these efforts into three main categories: retaining parcels of land identified as important to wild bee communities, augmenting currently cropped areas to increase available resources, and restoring spaces from cropland to pollinator habitat. We discuss considerations that should be included at both the farm and “farm-neighborhood” scale, and review the literature pertaining to the costs and benefits of each strategy. Recent Findings Wild bee conservation has been a topic of much interest in the past decade, with research generally focused at the field scale. Initial studies have focused on providing evidence that restoring, augmenting, and retaining land for wild bees shows the desired effects. Research quantifying the costs associated with each method still has significant knowledge gaps, as does understanding patterns of variability common in natural prairie ecosystems. Summary Retaining, augmenting, and restoring habitat for wild pollinators can create “win-win” scenarios for both wild bees and land-use decision-makers, whereby increased insect abundance has the potential to increase yield. There are considerations to be taken into account at both the farm and farm-neighborhood scale, and we present a framework which can be used to demonstrate the value of non-cropped areas to land-use decision-makers. Rapidly developing technology, such as GPS yield monitoring, has the potential to dramatically increase our power to detect which areas of a field may be ideal candidates for restoration or augmentation efforts.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-021-00066-z
       
  • Open-source Tools in R for Landscape Ecology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review Landscape ecology, the study of the complex interactions between landscapes and ecological processes, has hugely benefited from the increase in widely available open-source software in recent years. In particular, the R programming language provides a wealth of community developed tools for landscape ecology. Recent Findings In this paper, we examine existing packages for downloading, processing and visualisation of spatial data, as well as those specifically developed for spatial ecological analysis. Additionally, we outline the results of a survey of R users within the landscape ecology community. Summary We found that landscape ecologists are generally satisfied with the functionality available within R, and that as a community they are continually further developing the functionality available. Suggested future developments include improvement of computation performance; additional methods for landscape characterisation such as surface metrics; and advanced, accessible visualisation tools.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-021-00067-y
       
  • Responses of Vertebrate Wildlife to Oil and Natural Gas Development:
           Patterns and Frontiers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review Anthropogenic activities can lead to the loss, fragmentation, and alteration of wildlife habitats. I reviewed the recent literature (2014–2019) focused on the responses of avian, mammalian, and herpetofaunal species to oil and natural gas development, a widespread and still-expanding land use worldwide. My primary goals were to identify any generalities in species’ responses to development and summarize remaining gaps in knowledge. To do so, I evaluated the directionality of a wide variety of responses in relation to taxon, location, development type, development metric, habitat type, and spatiotemporal aspects. Recent Findings Studies (n = 70) were restricted to the USA and Canada, and taxonomically biased towards birds and mammals. Longer studies, but not those incorporating multiple spatial scales, were more likely to detect significant responses. Negative responses of all types were present in relatively low frequencies across all taxa, locations, development types, and development metrics but were context-dependent. The directionality of responses by the same species often varied across studies or development metrics. Summary The state of knowledge about wildlife responses to oil and natural gas development has developed considerably, though many biases and gaps remain. Studies outside of North America and that focus on herpetofauna are lacking. Tests of mechanistic hypotheses for effects, long-term studies, assessment of response thresholds, and experimental designs that isolate the effects of different stimuli associated with development, remain critical. Moreover, tests of the efficacy of habitat mitigation efforts have been rare. Finally, investigations of the demographic effects of development across the full annual cycle were absent for non-game species and are critical for the estimation of population-level effects.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-021-00065-0
       
  • Changes in Land Use and Land Cover Along an Urban-Rural Gradient Influence
           Floral Resource Availability

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review While several hundred thousand species of insects, mammals, and birds rely on flowers for food or reproduction, a surprising dearth of literature focuses specifically on floral resources. An understanding of floral resource availability is particularly necessary in urban areas, which have recently been proposed as important habitat for declining pollinator populations. In this study, we aim to synthesize existing information and provide new insights about the effects of land use and land cover (LULC) change and urbanization on the distribution, diversity, and abundance of floral resources. Recent Findings Our results suggest that certain LULC types provide more floral resources than others. In particular, urban lands may have higher floral density than agricultural or natural lands. However, we also observed inconsistent findings between studies, and the relationship between urbanization and floral resource availability may vary by city, with this variation possibly due in part to city size, LULC composition, regional biome, and biases in sampling. Summary It appears that cities have the potential to provide an important source of floral resources. However, a complete understanding of the effects of urbanization on floral resources requires that landscape composition and heterogeneity be taken into account. We recommend that more studies estimate floral resource availability at a landscape scale by combining data about LULC composition with data about floral resource availability within various LULC types. These studies should focus specifically on flower communities and be conducted along a full urban-rural gradient.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-021-00064-1
       
  • Urban Landscape Genetics: Are Biologists Keeping Up with the Pace of
           Urbanization'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review Urbanization has the potential to jeopardize the sustainability of populations of organisms living within and dispersing across urban areas. Landscape genetics approaches offer a great promise for quantifying how urban features affect ecological and evolutionary processes for species living within and around cities. In this review, we assess the current state (2015–2020) of urban landscape genetics research, examining what types of urban features are quantified, what genetic measures are used, what species are studied, and in which geographic regions they are conducted. We then make recommendations for future research. Recent Findings We identified relatively few landscape genetic studies conducted within urban areas published in the last 5 years. We also found a publication bias towards certain taxa and geographic regions (mainly mammals studied in North America), based on results from relatively few molecular markers. These studies used varied measures of urbanization in their analysis, but the most common was urban land use/land cover measured at different resolutions, followed by buildings/development and transportation infrastructure (roads, railroads, and tramways). The results of these studies reflect previously conducted urban research findings that urban features may inhibit, facilitate, or have no correlation with gene flow, usually a product of which focal taxa is being studied, as well as what urban features are present/measured within variable cityscapes. Summary We urge future research to directly measure urban features and stress the need for explicitly sampling within and around urban areas to gain full understanding of whether urbanization impedes, facilitates, or does not affect genetic differentiation between populations. To facilitate the development of robust theory, we urge the formation of a global network of urban landscape geneticists to collaborate and sample diverse taxa, in varied global landscapes and climates, and analyze genome-wide datasets for more robust conclusions about gene flow and genetic diversity. We advocate for analyzing urban features at multiple scales to allow broad conclusions about the effects of urbanization across studies, taxa, and regions. Finally, we recommend that study designs include social, cultural, and economic differences in human land use, which have the potential to affect how species disperse, survive, and reproduce in urban areas. Taking these factors into account, we can make novel advances in understanding how complex urban landscapes shape contemporary evolution.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-021-00062-3
       
  • Mismatches in the Ecosystem Services Literature—a Review of Spatial,
           Temporal, and Functional-Conceptual Mismatches

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review The objective of this review is to identify commonly researched ecosystem service mismatches, including mismatches concerning management and policies implemented to manage ecosystem service delivery. It additionally discusses how mismatches affect the ability to develop effective policies and management guidelines for ecosystem services. Recent Findings Recent ecosystem service literature considers mismatches in the ecosystem, the social system, and as social-ecological interactions. These mismatches occur over three dimensions: spatial, temporal, and functional-conceptual. The research field incorporates not only ecological aspects but also social ones like the management and governance of ecosystem services. However, the focus of the reviewed literature is mainly on spatial and temporal dimensions of mismatches and the production of scientific knowledge, rather than the implementation of the knowledge in management and policies. Summary Research on ecosystem service mismatches reflects the complexity and interconnectedness of social-ecological systems as it encompasses a broad variety of approaches. However, temporal mismatches received less attention than spatial mismatches, especially in regard to social and social-ecological aspects and could be a topic for future research. Furthermore, in order to develop effective policies and management guidelines, research must work closer with decision-makers to not only advance scientific understanding of ecosystem service mismatches but also create understanding and support the uptake of this knowledge.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-021-00063-2
       
  • Distance-Dependent Landscape Effects in Terrestrial Systems: a Review and
           a Proposed Spatio-Temporal Framework

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review We review recent methodological advancements in estimation of distance-dependent landscape effects on terrestrial species. These methods address key theoretical elements from landscape and metapopulation ecology that were ignored in previous approaches. Models that treat landscapes as circles within which all land features are equally important to a focal population ignore distant-dependent population processes, such as dispersal, resource selection, and social interactions. Realistic models that estimate variation in landscape-scale effects over space and time are necessary to understand the complex processes that influence population dynamics. Recent Findings The addition of kernel smoothers to generalized linear models has potential to increase the biological realism of landscape-species models. These models include estimation of parameters that dictate the relationship between distance and importance of landscape features to focal populations. There are examples of implementing these models in both maximum likelihood and Bayesian frameworks, as well as examples using model selection to determine appropriate smoothing kernel shape. One key limitation of these models is computational effort, although we provide some guidance for reducing model runtime. Summary Models allowing for inference on explicit ecological processes are critical to advancing knowledge of the basic landscape ecology of species and will benefit efforts to prioritize conservation and evaluate species recovery efforts. We describe how distance-dependent landscape-scale effect models can be used for these purposes in a variety of scenarios. We conclude by proposing a process-based, spatio-temporal framework for understanding the mechanisms behind the spatial scale at which landscapes influence species.
      PubDate: 2021-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00061-w
       
  • Consequences of Urban Living: Urbanization and Ground Beetles

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review Urbanization is increasing worldwide, transforming environmental and habitat parameters, and causing adverse effects on organisms living in urban habitats. Urban studies on ground beetles are exponentially increasing and cover all levels of biological organization. Still, to date, there is no comprehensive paper reviewing the impacts of urbanization on ground beetles at different levels of biological organization. Recent Findings At the population level, urbanization induces changes in the morphological characters, including fluctuating asymmetry, physiological condition, behavioral characteristics, seasonal activity, population size, and genetic diversity in ground beetles. Different species groups (habitat specialists vs. generalists, large vs. small-sized species, poor vs. good dispersers, predators vs. herbivores) respond differently to urbanization. Community-level changes associated with urbanization include the abundance, taxonomic as well as functional diversity, community assembly mechanisms, composition, and body size distribution. At the ecosystem level, urbanization influences several ecosystem processes and functions related to ground beetles, but data are only available concerning the edge effect and predation. Summary Urbanization has a considerable effect at various levels of the biological organization on ground beetles living in urban habitats. However, results—especially at the population and community levels—show inconsistent patterns. This discrepancy may result from individual responses and different sensitivity of species to urbanization, suggesting the importance of individualistic and functional approach in future urban studies. To preserve a rich carabid diversity in urban areas, multi-scale greenspace planning and management schemes are needed; these will also ensure both the recreational and the diversity-preserving function of urban green spaces.
      PubDate: 2021-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00060-x
       
  • A Review of Overlapping Landscapes: Pseudoreplication or a Red Herring in
           Landscape Ecology'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review Identifying the spatial scale at which a species or population most strongly responds to habitat composition and configuration is known as scale-of-effect and is a fundamental pursuit of landscape ecology. In conducting scale-of-effect studies, it is common to measure habitat in landscape buffers of varying sizes surrounding sample sites. When sample sites are in close spatial proximity to one another, these landscape buffers will overlap. Researchers commonly worry that data generated from these overlapping landscapes, and subsequently used as predictor variables in statistical modeling, represent a form of pseudoreplication that violates the assumption of independence. Recent Findings Here, we review the concept of overlapping landscapes and their theoretical and practical implications in landscape ecology. We suggest that the perceived problem of overlapping landscapes is distinct from more important issues in landscape ecology, such as a robust sampling design complete with a discrete assessment of spatial autocorrelation. Through simulation, we demonstrate that changing the amount of landscape overlap does not alter the degree of spatial autocorrelation. Yet, in reviewing over 600 journal articles, we found that a third (29%) of the studies perceived overlapping landscapes as an issue requiring either changes in sampling design or statistical solutions. Researchers concerned with overlapping landscapes often go to great lengths to alter their sampling design by removing or aggregating sites. Overlapping landscapes remain a prevalent concern in landscape ecology despite previous studies that show that overlapping landscapes are not a violation of independence and represent an oversimplification of the statistical concerns of spatial autocorrelation. Summary The concern over overlapping landscapes as a form of pseudoreplication persists in landscape ecology, but acts as a potential red herring detracting from more relevant concerns of proper sampling design and spatial autocorrelation in ecological studies.
      PubDate: 2020-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00059-4
       
  • What Hampers Implementation of Integrated Landscape Approaches in Rural
           Landscapes'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review In rural areas, frameworks of integrated landscape approaches are increasingly being used to reconcile conflicting objectives of stakeholders and sectors, such as agriculture and conservation. In accommodating multiple land uses, social, economic, and environmental trade-offs need to be balanced. Different social processes underly integrated landscape approaches. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the barriers described in peer-reviewed case studies to better understand what hampers the implementation of integrated landscape approaches. To this purpose, we conducted a systematic literature study. We clustered the barriers into the following barriers groups: (1) participation problems, (2) interaction problems, (3) resource problems, and (4) institutional problems, and analyzed how these barriers hindered implementation of the following key landscape processes: planning and visioning, developing and implementing practices, establishing good governance, and monitoring and evaluation. Recent Findings We analyzed barriers described in 56 peer-reviewed papers that document 76 cases of integrated landscape approaches in 35 countries worldwide. Main stakeholder problems were related to absence of specific stakeholder groups, varying levels of engagement, or lack of stakeholder experience and skills. Interaction problems included a lack of communication, collaboration, or coordination, a lack of agreement due to different stakeholder visions, and power relations. Institutional problems were related to incompatible (national) policies and institutional structures hindering integration, and resource problems included limited availability of financial resources and a lack of data. These barriers hampered the implementation of the key processes needed to transition towards integrated landscape approaches in different ways. This paper provides an overview of the main barriers found for each landscape process. Summary Rural landscapes are often characterized by a variety of stakeholders and land use sectors, such as agriculture and natural resource conservation. Landscape approaches aim to integrate different goals such as conservation, production, and livelihoods simultaneously, but their implementation appears to be challenging. In this study, we take stock of the barriers described in the literature and analyze how different types of challenges related to stakeholder engagement, interaction between stakeholders, resources, and institutions hinder implementation of landscape approaches. According to this analysis, we demonstrate why particular problems pose challenges to the implementation of specific elements of landscape approaches. Few barriers were related to testing and implementing sustainable business practices since business stakeholders were often not involved. Most approaches were still in an early stage of development. The continuity of approaches is mostly not secured and calls for better institutionalization of landscape approaches. The set of identified barriers and their relations to key processes can be used as a diagnostic tool to enhance learning and improve the performance of landscape approaches in the transition towards integrated landscape management.
      PubDate: 2020-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00057-6
       
  • Recent Methodological Solutions to Identifying Scales of Effect in
           Multi-scale Modeling

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review This review summarizes the characteristics of contemporary multi-scale studies (i.e., those that quantify ecological relationships over multiple spatial extents), outlines limitations associated with analyses typically used to model multi-scale ecological relationships, and highlights recent methodological progress overcoming these limits. Recent Findings The majority of recent studies investigating scales of effect in ecological relationships were conducted within a simplified model selection, information theoretic framework that suffers under the specters of collinearity, imperfect detection, and limited candidate scale space. The few studies that deviate from this framework offer greater flexibility in identifying or directly estimating relevant scales of effect by allowing predictors to have independent scales of effect, simultaneously evaluated, and explicitly consider the unique issue of collinearity in multi-scale studies, with extensions to hierarchical models that account for imperfect detection. Summary Accurate ecological inference requires that the scales of ecological processes, observations, and analyses align. Wider adoption of emerging analytical methods for identifying important scales of effect, though not traditional, and in some cases more computationally intensive, will broaden the scope for understanding the ecological factors operating on organisms at different scales. By estimating full models (i.e., not single-predictor models), which are not scale constrained (i.e., each predictor can have its own scale of effect), and that disentangle ecological processes from observational processes when relevant will provide a comprehensive base of estimates from which to explore underlying mechanisms governing scale dependence in ecology.
      PubDate: 2020-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00055-8
       
  • Influencing Landscape-Scale Revegetation Trajectories through Restoration
           Interventions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review This review focuses on potential approaches to restoring vegetation across former agricultural land, mainly considering the relatively well-studied case of once-forested landscapes. It presents an ecological framework within which the potential consequences of different practical interventions are described and compared, and then identifies implications for restoration decision-making. Recent Findings There is a still-growing range of restoration interventions other than high-cost intensive tree-planting. These aim to accelerate vegetation recovery at different stages of forest redevelopment, by removing factors that would otherwise have an inhibitory influence. Potential interventions include adding seed, installing structures to attract seed dispersers, selectively protecting or removing different vegetation elements (trees or ground plants) in the regenerating communities, and managing fire, livestock grazing or wildlife. Summary Given the potential variety of approaches, at a landscape scale, the best solution is most likely a spatial mosaic that tailors specific restoration interventions to differing contexts and outcomes. However, the current evidence base is insufficient to adequately guide decisions about how to match method to site, landscape and cost. Research has typically been small-scale and often disconnected from restoration practice. Larger-scale investment in collaborative and innovative restoration trials and experiments is needed to enable better decision-making.
      PubDate: 2020-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00058-5
       
  • How Does the Landscape Affect Metacommunity Structure' A Quantitative
           Review for Lentic Environments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review We conducted a literature review to understand how landscape patterns affect ecological processes in metacommunities in lentic environments. Our aim was to identify trends in these studies considering taxa, aquatic systems, landscape metrics, and response variables. We also recorded whether studies were presenting the exclusive effect of landscape on metacommunities (i.e., the effect of landscape independent from other environmental variables). Finally, we provide some guidelines for future studies. Recent Findings We identified a consistent increase in the number of studies from 2006 to 2018. Insects and amphibians were the most studied organisms and ponds (ponds and pools) were the systems most studied. Patch-level metrics and landscape-level metrics were similarly reported. Beta diversity was more common than alpha diversity as a response variable, especially for those employing taxonomic data. Finally, most studies reported the effect of landscape separated from other variables, although the metrics used and their effects on metacommunities varied. Summary Our understanding of how landscape affects the structure of metacommunities in lentic systems is still limited, because of the low number of studies, the approaches used to assess the contribution of landscape, and the variety of landscape metrics used in these studies. We recommend that future studies aiming to understand the role of landscape on metacommunities should avoid summarizing local and landscape variables or different landscape metrics into a single variable, but carefully choose the best landscape metric to match the hypothesis being tested.
      PubDate: 2020-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00049-6
       
  • Restoration at the landscape scale as a means of mitigation and adaptation
           to climate change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review Although landscape-scale restoration efforts are gaining traction worldwide, their success is generally unknown. We review landscape-scale restorations to gain insight to whether focal ecological outcomes have been achieved, in the face of changing environmental conditions. Recent Findings Only 9% of the 477 articles that resulted from our search were studies of landscape-scale restorations. The majority (73%) of the landscape restorations from our study have occurred since the 1990s, indicating that this type of restoration has gained in popularity in the last 30 years. Furthermore, 67% of these restoration studies occurred in a single country: China. Many scientific studies have addressed the ability of a species to shift ranges with climate change, yet few of the landscape-scale restoration studies used for our study addressed this question. Instead, 87% of the studies focused on ecosystem function, rather than community-level processes, as a result of restoration. Summary There is a clear need for more research to be undertaken on the ecological outcomes of landscape-scale restorations to understand whether they enable species and communities to shift their ranges or adapt to climate change. Conservation practitioners could utilize our decision matrix as a tool to guide restoration of individual sites within a landscape context, as well as current and future climatic conditions, to guide ecological outcomes of interest. Optimal biodiversity maintenance requires habitat conservation in concert with restoration activities at the landscape scale, and the latter, likely increasingly so in a world of changing climate.
      PubDate: 2020-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00056-7
       
  • Remote Sensing’s Recent and Future Contributions to Landscape
           Ecology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review The purpose of this article is to review landscape ecology research from the past 5 years to identify past and future contributions from remote sensing to landscape ecology. Recent Findings Recent studies in landscape ecology have employed advances made in remote sensing. These include the use of reliable and open datasets derived from remote sensing, the availability of new sources for freely available satellite imagery, and machine-learning image classification techniques for classifying land cover types. Remote sensing data sources and methods have been used in landscape ecology to examine landscape structure. Additionally, these data sources and methods have been used to analyze landscape function including the effects of landscape structure and landscape change on biodiversity and population dynamics. Lastly, remote sensing data sources and methods have been used to analyze historical landscape changes and to simulate future landscape changes. Summary The ongoing integration of remote sensing analyses in landscape ecology will depend on continued accessibility of free imagery from satellite sources and open-access data-analysis software, analyses spanning multiple spatial and temporal scales, and novel land cover classification techniques that produce accurate and reliable land cover data. Continuing advances in remote sensing can help to address new landscape ecology research questions, enabling analyses that incorporate information that ranges from ground-based field samples of organisms to satellite-collected remote sensing data.
      PubDate: 2020-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00054-9
       
  • Are Flagship, Umbrella and Keystone Species Useful Surrogates to
           Understand the Consequences of Landscape Change'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review Umbrella, flagship and keystone species are among the most widely employed surrogate species concepts. We explored whether these concepts are useful for understanding the consequences of landscape change. We assessed the literature on surrogate species in relation to landscape change and identified key foci and notable gaps within the existing evidence base. We outlined strengths and limitations of surrogate species as proxies for landscape change. Recent Findings We found that few studies evaluated whether taxa claimed to be surrogate species were in fact robust proxies. This is particularly so for flagship species but is also common in work on umbrella species. We also found marked differences in how the terms and concepts of umbrella, flagship and keystone species were used, both between studies and between disciplines (e.g. forestry versus community ecology). Research into surrogates is often conducted independently of research on landscape change. This leaves a major gap in knowledge about how surrogates can inform decision-making in relation to ongoing threatening processes, including landscape change. Summary Based on results of our literature search and insights from large-scale, long-term empirical studies in south-eastern Australia, we identified a diverse mix of examples where the application of surrogate approaches has been successful, and where it has not. However, it is currently not possible to determine a priori where a given surrogate approach will work. Resolution of this problem requires considerable further work. Surrogates should be used in a critical way to help avoid mistakes in resource and biodiversity management.
      PubDate: 2020-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00052-x
       
  • Are Habitat Fragmentation Effects Stronger in Marine Systems' A Review
           and Meta-analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of the Review The importance of habitat fragmentation in driving biodiversity loss has been recently debated. While the negative effects of habitat loss are well-documented, the effects of habitat fragmentation independent of habitat loss (e.g., habitat configuration) are more equivocal. Marine ecosystems have been underrepresented in past reviews, yet may differ fundamentally from terrestrial systems in their responses to habitat fragmentation because of the nature of energy/material flow, open population structure of most marine species, and narrow habitat extents. We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis on the effects of habitat fragmentation in marine ecosystems. Recent Findings In our review of 180 studies from 28 articles, we found that habitat fragmentation effects were more often negative than positive, although the overall mean effect did not differ from zero. Interestingly, the mean effect was positive when the response was a measure of abundance, biodiversity, or population/ecosystem stability. Habitat fragmentation had overwhelmingly negative effects when it involved hydrological fragmentation. We found some support for the fragmentation threshold hypothesis via a weak negative relationship between habitat percent cover in the landscape and the habitat fragmentation effect. Summary Results of this review on the effects of habitat fragmentation in marine ecosystems are largely consistent with another recent review finding that habitat fragmentation (independent of habitat loss) does not have consistent, negative impacts on biodiversity, and in many cases may increase biodiversity. Future work should focus on factors driving this variability and employ multi-scale frameworks to test for congruence between patch- and landscape-scale studies.
      PubDate: 2020-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00053-w
       
  • Beneficial Health Outcomes of Natural Green Infrastructure in Cities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Purpose of Review We examined recent literature on the human health impacts of natural green infrastructure (NGI). NGI refers to green space that requires less maintenance than traditional formal urban green spaces such as city parks. Where declining cities have excess land and fewer funds for land maintenance, NGI is globally emerging as a cost-effective way to convert abandoned land into useful green space producing ecosystems services. Our goal was to determine if recent studies show that NGI provides human health benefits. Much previous work shows that urban green infrastructure in general has human health benefits but we ask the question whether this specific kind of green infrastructure also provides human health benefits. Recent Findings We found 29 studies reporting positive human health impacts from NGI. Most reported mental health benefits but wellbeing, crime reduction, obesity, and recreation were also reported. These studies also reveal the specific characteristics of NGI that contribute to the positive health impacts: forests, trees, wilderness, biodiversity, and tranquility. We also found an additional 13 studies of low-maintenance greening projects on urban vacant land that all report health benefits including crime reduction, mental health, and pro-social behavior. These 42 studies utilize a variety of different research designs and metrics. Summary The recent literature indicates that NGI may be a low-cost way to convert abandoned land in declining urban areas into green space that provides health benefits to people who often lack access to green space. NGI provides benefits of mental health, wellbeing, and crime reduction that are comparable, if not better, than other, more costly urban green infrastructure.
      PubDate: 2020-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40823-020-00051-y
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.238.180.255
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-