Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change
Number of Followers: 3  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2624-893X
Published by Frontiers Media Homepage  [96 journals]
  • Monitoring vegetation degradation using remote sensing and machine
           learning over India – a multi-sensor, multi-temporal and multi-scale
           approach

    • Authors: Koyel Sur, Vipan Kumar Verma, Pankaj Panwar, Gopal Shukla, Sumit Chakravarty, Arun Joyti Nath
      Abstract: Vegetation cover degradation is often a complex phenomenon, exhibiting strong correlation with climatic variation and anthropogenic actions. Conservation of biodiversity is important because millions of people are directly and indirectly dependent on vegetation (forest and crop) and its associated secondary products. United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) propose to quantify the proportion of vegetation as a proportion of total land area of all countries. Satellite images form as one of the main sources of accurate information to capture the fine seasonal changes so that long-term vegetation degradation can be assessed accurately. In the present study, Multi-Sensor, Multi-Temporal and Multi-Scale (MMM) approach was used to estimate vulnerability of vegetation degradation. Open source Cloud computing system Google Earth Engine (GEE) was used to systematically monitor vegetation degradation and evaluate the potential of multiple satellite data with variable spatial resolutions. Hotspots were demarcated using machine learning techniques to identify the greening and the browning effect of vegetation using coarse resolution Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) of MODIS. Rainfall datasets of Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation with Station data (CHIRPS) for the period 2000–2022 were also used to find rainfall anomaly in the region. Furthermore, hotspot areas were identified using high-resolution datasets in major vegetation degradation areas based on long-term vegetation and rainfall analysis to understand and verify the cause of change whether anthropogenic or climatic in nature. This study is important for several State/Central Government user departments, Universities, and NGOs to lay out managerial plans for the protection of vegetation/forests in India.
      PubDate: 2024-06-06T00:00:00Z
       
  • Evidence to support phytosanitary policies–the minimum effective heat
           treatment parameters for pathogens associated with forest products

    • Authors: Meghan K. Noseworthy, Eric A. Allen, Angela L. Dale, Isabel Leal, Esme P. John, Tyranna J. Souque, Joey B. Tanney, Adnan Uzunovic
      Abstract: Research on reducing the movement of pests on wood products has led to several options for safer trade including heat treatment of wood to mitigate pests. In this study, pathogenic organisms commonly regulated in the trade of forest products were tested to determine the minimum heat dose (temperature and time) required to cause mortality. The mycelial stage of tree pathogens, Heterobasidion occidentale, Grosmannia clavigera, Bretziella fagacearum, Phytophthora cinnamomi, P. lateralis, P. ramorum and P. xmultiformis, which may be found in untreated wood products, were tested in vitro using the Humble water bath with parameters simulating the rate of heat applied to wood in a commercial kiln. RNA detection using reverse transcription real-time PCR was used to validate pathogen mortality following treatment for: P. ramorum, P. lateralis, P. cinnamomi, P. xmultiformis and G. clavigera. The lethal temperature for all pathogens ranged from 44 to 50°C for a 30-min treatment duration. Using this method to evaluate heat treatment for other forest product pests is recommended to accurately identify the minimum dose required to support phytosanitary trade. With more data potentially lower heat treatment applications may be recommended under specific conditions to produce more efficient and economical heat treatment schedules and reduce environmental impacts.
      PubDate: 2024-06-05T00:00:00Z
       
  • Time is of the essence: unveiling the rapid response of Populus to insect
           feeding

    • Authors: Filip Pastierovič, Jaroslav Čepl, Alina Kalyniukova, Kanakachari Mogilicherla, Jaromír Hradecký, Jaromír Bláha, Ivana Tomášková
      Abstract: Plant metabolism response to insect herbivores is the central theme of this publication. Genetically uniform individuals of European aspen (Populus tremula) were exposed to recurrent feeding by spongy moths (Lepidoptera) at specific time intervals. Changes in physiology, contents of phenolics and saccharides were quantified over the first hour. The unconventional experiment design, integrating analytical methods, and timeline led to the revealing of unexpected dynamics in plant metabolism. The time interval between herbivory initiation and sample collection revealed a pivotal moment, with induced defense activating strongly after 5 min of chewing resulting in an increase in catechin and procyanidin B1. After 10 min, a shift to a tolerant strategy occurs and induced substance concentrations return to control levels. Delayed physiological response was recorded as the first significant difference in transpiration between affected and nonaffected plants and was found after 10 min. A different strategy in exploitation of saccharides after spongy moths infestation was applied because the pool of selected saccharides was rising in the leaves but decreasing in the roots. Placing our results in the context of existing knowledge highlights the uncertain conceptual basis behind the often rigid and definitive classifications in induced plant defense or tolerance strategy.
      PubDate: 2024-06-04T00:00:00Z
       
  • Loss of carbon stock in the forests of Uttarakhand due to unprecedented
           seasonal forest fires

    • Authors: Himanshu Bargali, Aseesh Pandey, Dinesh Bhatt, R. C. Sundriyal
      Abstract: Unprecedented seasonal forest fires pose a significant threat to the carbon stocks of diverse ecosystems, particularly in regions like Uttarakhand, west Himalaya. Understanding the impact of varying fire frequencies on different forest types is crucial for effective conservation and management strategies. This study aims to assess the loss of carbon stock in three distinct forest types—Sal, Pine, and Mixed across an elevation gradient in Uttarakhand, facing unprecedented seasonal forest fires. By investigating pre- and post-fire conditions, analyzing biomass dynamics, and mapping fire frequencies, the research aims to provide insights into the complex interplay of fire regimes and forest resilience. The investigation covers vegetation analysis, biomass assessment, and fire frequency mapping. Biomass and carbon stock calculations were carried out using a non-destructive sampling method. Fire frequency maps were generated using Landsat satellite imagery spanning a decade, integrating MODIS hotspot data for classification. The study reveals distinct patterns in biomass changes across Sal, Pine, and Mixed forests in response to varying fire frequencies. Sal forests exhibit resilience to low-intensity fires, while Pine forests show higher sensitivity. Carbon stock contributions of dominant species varied significantly, with Sal and Chir-Pine forests emerging as crucial contributors. High fire frequencies lead to substantial carbon stock reduction in all forest types. The findings emphasize the sensitivity of aboveground biomass to fire frequency, with significant carbon stock loss observed in higher fire frequency classes. The study underscores the importance of nuanced conservation strategies tailored to distinct forest types and species characteristics. This research provides valuable insights for policymakers, forest managers, and conservationists in formulating targeted conservation and management approaches.
      PubDate: 2024-06-03T00:00:00Z
       
  • Changes in specific microbial groups characterize the impact of land
           conversion to oil palm plantations on peat

    • Authors: Siti Noor Fitriah Azizan, Shuichiro Murakami, Iain McTaggart, Nurtasbiyah Yusof, Shazwana Sha’arani, Hirofumi Hara, Kosuke Noborio
      Abstract: The conversion of tropical peat swamp forests to oil palm plantations has become a focal point in relation to global change. However, it is difficult to understand the ecological consequences of this conversion because little is known about how the microorganisms in these ecosystems respond to land-use conversion. Therefore, in this study, we assessed the microbial community structures of tropical peatland under two land uses, peat swamp forest and oil palm plantation (OP), to investigate how changes in local environmental conditions due to the conversion from forest to OP may have affected the microbial communities. For each land use, the microbial communities were assessed at three depths (0–5 cm, 20–25 cm, and 40–50 cm) using meta-16S amplicon analysis with Illumina Miseq. We found that the microbial communities under both land uses were dominated by anaerobes and fermenters, such as Acidobacteriota, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, which accounted for 80%–90% of the total abundance. There were strong similarities between the microbial communities in the 0–5 cm forest samples and the OP samples at all depths. However, the microbial communities in the 20–25 cm and 40–50 cm forest samples were different from the other samples. The differences in the deeper forest samples were likely related to water table and peat quality. CO2 fluxes from the forest were significantly higher than from OP, with mean fluxes of 190 ± 66.92 and 57.86 ± 33.66 mg m−2 h−1, respectively (p < 0.05). However, there were no differences in either CH4 or N2O fluxes between the forest and OP. We detected nine microbial taxa that characterized the differences in the microbial communities between the forest and OP (p > 0.05); Bathyarchaeia, Dadabacteriales, Syntrophobacter, and Subgroup_13 were significantly more abundant in the forest, especially in the deeper peat layers, whereas Acidobacter, Bryobacter, 11–24, Leptospirillum, and WPS-2 were significantly more abundant in the OP (p > 0.05). This study helps improve our understanding of the differences in microbial community structures between peat swamp forests and OP systems.
      PubDate: 2024-05-31T00:00:00Z
       
  • Carbon storage and carbon pool characteristics of Larix gmelinii forest in
           Daxing’anling, Inner Mongolia, China

    • Authors: Kai Zhao, Yongjie Yue, Fucang Qin, Long Hai, Lixi Yi, Pengwu Zhao, Longfei Hao, Yang Shu, Yaxiong Zheng, Long Li, Rong He, Yajie Xu
      Abstract: Larix gmelinii is an important ecological construction tree species in northern China, and its carbon storage and distribution characteristics are of great significance for evaluating the carbon balance and climate effect of forest ecosystems. However, at present, there is a lack of systematic research on the carbon storage of L. gmelinii forests and its change with forest age. In this paper, the biomass and carbon density of L. gmelinii forests at different ages and the distribution of carbon storage in vegetation and soil were analyzed by means of sample plot investigation and model simulation in the northern forest area of Daxing’anling, Inner Mongolia. The influence of forest age on the carbon storage and carbon pool distribution characteristics of L. gmelinii forests and the mechanism of influencing factors were also discussed. Results show that: (1) As forest age increased, the total amount of carbon pools initially increased and then decreased, and the distribution structure of carbon pools showed a trend of transferring from soil to trees. The proportion of soil carbon pools gradually decreased (72.72–51.87%), while the proportion of tree carbon pools gradually increased (23.98–39.33%). The proportion of shrub and grass carbon pools was also relatively stable (0.51–0.53%). (2) Soil carbon pool was affected by the input and output of soil organic matter, soil depth, soil carbon content, and soil bulk density, shrub–grass carbon pool was affected by undergrowth light conditions and soil moisture, litter carbon pool was affected by litter input and output, and the carbon pool of trees was affected by the growth rate and carbon balance of trees. This study provides scientific basis and management suggestions for the carbon storage capacity of L. gmelinii forests and the mitigation of climate change.
      PubDate: 2024-05-31T00:00:00Z
       
  • ‘Mind the Gap’—reforestation needs vs. reforestation capacity in the
           western United States

    • Authors: Solomon Z. Dobrowski, Matthew M. Aghai, Ariella Chichilnisky du Lac, Rebecca Downer, Joseph Fargione, Diane L. Haase, Tyler Hoecker, Olga A. Kildisheva, Alix Murdoch, Shaw Newman, Malcolm North, Phil Saksa, Matt Sjoholm, Tom Baribault, Michele S. Buonanduci, Marin E. Chambers, Lisa Gonzales-Kramer, Brian J. Harvey, Matthew D. Hurteau, Jonathan Loevner, Hugh D. Safford, Joshua Sloan
      Abstract: Tree establishment following severe or stand-replacing disturbance is critical for achieving U.S. climate change mitigation goals and for maintaining the co-benefits of intact forest ecosystems. In many contexts, natural post-fire tree regeneration is sufficient to maintain forest cover and associated ecosystem services, but increasingly the pattern and scale of disturbance exceeds ecological thresholds and active reforestation may be warranted. Our capacity to plant trees, however, is not keeping pace with reforestation needs. This shortfall is uniquely apparent in the western U.S., where wildfire size and severity have increased in recent decades and long-term divestment in the reforestation supply chain has limited our ability to respond to existing needs. Here we present an analysis of key facets of both the supply and demand side of reforestation in the western U.S. and address six questions: (1) What is the current backlog of potential reforestation needs driven by high-severity wildfire'; (2) How will increasing wildfire activity through the end of the century affect potential reforestation needs'; (3) What is our capacity to meet current and future reforestation needs'; (4) How can we scale the reforestation supply chain to meet current and future demands'; (5) What approaches to reforestation can promote forest resilience to climate change and wildfire'; and (6) Where are opportunities emerging from recent policy initiatives, innovative public-private partnerships, and natural capital markets for scaling reforestation' Between 1984 and 2000, annual tree planting capacity met post-fire needs but cumulatively over the last two decades (2000 to 2021) it has fallen short of fire-driven needs by an estimated 1.5 million ha (ca. 3.8 million ac). We anticipate this gap will increase 2 to 3 fold by 2050. Scaling up reforestation efforts to close this gap will require increased investment across all facets of the reforestation supply chain, public-private partnerships, and novel approaches to reforestation that increase the resilience of western forests to drought and wildfire. We highlight emerging opportunities from recent policy initiatives and conservation finance for expanding reforestation efforts.
      PubDate: 2024-05-29T00:00:00Z
       
  • Mātauranga Māori framework for surveillance of plant pathogens

    • Authors: Waitangi Wood, Audrey Lustig, Maria C. Latham, Dean P. Anderson
      Abstract: Faced with growing biosecurity risks and threats, countries worldwide seek to protect their biodiversity from ecosystem degradation and loss. Biosecurity surveillance of plant pathogens and the diseases they cause is fundamental for management and eradication of these risks. To date, the surveillance systems in Aotearoa New Zealand have reflected empirical scientific principles and have been largely devoid of mātauranga and te ao Māori, which have seldom been regarded as valid or relevant knowledge systems to inform biosecurity. Because of this, mana whenua themselves have been disconnected from these systems. The inclusion of mana whenua and their mātauranga is important, not only to recognise their role and rights as indigenous peoples of Aotearoa New Zealand, but because it is through place-based approaches that better biodiversity and environmental outcomes can be achieved. Here, we describe a mātauranga Māori framework for surveillance (MMFS) of plant pathogens, which introduces the principles and methodologies that aim to elevate mana whenua and mātauranga research into the biosecurity and science systems. The MMFS facilitates the co-existence of mātauranga and empirical scientific knowledge without the need for inter-dependent validation, on the assumption that this will lead to better research and operational outcomes. It addresses issues around data ownership and sovereignty, informed consent, and cultural licence. We present a case study where the MMFS has been applied to research initiatives aimed at addressing myrtle rust and kauri dieback in Aotearoa New Zealand. The MMFS informed the development of a data storage platform, which anchors data to the place of origin, recognising its provenance and giving effect to Māori data sovereignty. This process ensures mana whenua have timely access and use of existing and emergent data. Following the principles of the MMFS, we developed and used a “proof of pathogen absence” tool to co-design with mātauranga environmental experts a risk-based surveillance plan for the purpose of demonstrating freedom from disease in areas where a pathogen has not been detected. The MMFS provides a way of planning and implementing environmental surveillance that can be applied to the full range of environmental problems internationally where indigenous populations are involved.
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T00:00:00Z
       
  • Biogeographic patterns of daily wildfire spread and extremes across North
           America

    • Authors: Jared A. Balik, Jonathan D. Coop, Meg A. Krawchuk, Cameron E. Naficy, Marc-André Parisien, Sean A. Parks, Camille S. Stevens-Rumann, Ellen Whitman
      Abstract: IntroductionClimate change is predicted to increase the frequency of extreme single-day fire spread events, with major ecological and social implications. In contrast with well-documented spatio-temporal patterns of wildfire ignitions and perimeters, daily progression remains poorly understood across continental spatial scales, particularly for extreme single-day events (“blow ups”). Here, we characterize daily wildfire spread across North America, including occurrence of extreme single-day events, duration and seasonality of fire and extremes, and ecoregional climatic niches of fire in terms of Actual Evapotranspiration (AET) and Climatic Water Deficit (CWD) annual climate normals.MethodsRemotely sensed daily progression of 9,636 wildfires ≥400 ha was used to characterize ecoregional patterns of fire growth, extreme single-day events, duration, and seasonality. To explore occurrence, extent, and impacts of single-day extremes among ecoregions, we considered complementary ecoregional and continental extreme thresholds (Ecoregional or Continental Mean Daily Area Burned + 2SD). Ecoregional spread rates were regressed against AET and CWD to explore climatic influence on spread.ResultsWe found three-fold differences in mean Daily Area Burned among 10 North American ecoregions, ranging from 260 ha day−1 in the Marine West Coast Forests to 751 ha day−1 in Mediterranean California. Ecoregional extreme thresholds ranged from 3,829 ha day−1 to 16,626 ha day−1, relative to a continental threshold of 7,173 ha day−1. The ~3% of events classified as extreme cumulatively account for 16–55% of total area burned among ecoregions. We observed four-fold differences in mean fire duration, ranging from 2.7 days in the Great Plains to 10.5 days in Northwestern Forested Mountains. Regions with shorter fire durations also had greater daily area burned, suggesting a paradigm of fast-growing short-duration fires in some regions and slow-growing long-duration fires elsewhere. CWD had a weak positive relationship with spread rate and extreme thresholds, and there was no pattern for AET.DiscussionRegions with shorter fire durations had greater daily area burned, suggesting a paradigm of fast-growing short-duration fires in some regions and slow-growing long-duration fires elsewhere. Although climatic conditions can set the stage for ignition and influence vegetation and fuels, finer-scale mechanisms likely drive variation in daily spread. Daily fire progression offers valuable insights into the regional and seasonal distributions of extreme single-day spread events, and how these events shape net fire effects.
      PubDate: 2024-05-27T00:00:00Z
       
  • Host–parasite interaction: an insight into the growth and physiological
           responses of sandalwood and associated host species

    • Authors: Kamlesh Verma, Ashwani Kumar, Raj Kumar, Ajay Kumar Bhardwaj, Sunita Devi, Aarju Sharma, Prashant Sharma
      Abstract: IntroductionSandalwood (Santalum album L.) is categorized as vulnerable in the IUCN Red list and is also an industrially important tree species valued for its heartwood and aromatic oil. Sandalwood is a semi-root parasite tree that relies on its host plants for its water and nutrient requirements. Therefore, there is need to understand the growth and physiological interactions between sandalwood and its hosts.MethodsSandalwood were planted with ten different host species viz., Syzygium cumini, Punica granatum, Phyllanthus emblica, Melia dubia, Leucaena leucocephala, Dalbergia sissoo, Casuarina equisetifolia, Citrus aurantium, Azadirachta indica and Acacia ampliceps to assess the interactive effect on the change in growth and physiology of both sandalwood and host tree species.ResultsThe findings revealed that sandalwood grown with hosts D. sissoo and C. equisetifolia showed higher growth performance, while among hosts, S. cumini, followed by C. aurantium and L. leucocephala, showed better growth and physiobiochemical traits. The stepwise regression analysis and trait modeling indicated that the six traits, namely, plant height, photosynthetic rate, relative water content, water potential, intercellular CO2 concentration, and total soluble protein, contributed greater growth in the sandalwood, while four traits, namely, water potential, osmotic potential, leaf area, and total soluble protein, contributed greater growth in the host species. The traits modeling study predicted greater growth of sandalwood with the hosts D. sissoo and C. equisetifolia, whereas among host species, prediction revealed greater growth of S. cumini and C. aurantium.DiscussionThe study concluded that host–parasite interaction modulated the growth and physiological processes in both sandalwood and hosts and sandalwood plantations can be successfully developed with the hosts D. sissoo and C. equisetifolia.
      PubDate: 2024-05-27T00:00:00Z
       
  • Assessment of plant biodiversity in tropical dry forests of Sialkot,
           Pakistan; insight into environmental, anthropogenic influence and
           conservation strategies

    • Authors: Khurram Shahzad, Waqar Shoukat Ali, Sohaib Muhammad, Junhu Dai, Umar Zeb, Mengyao Zhu
      Abstract: The tropical dry forests (TDF) have an enormously rich flora and fauna that offer various ecological services to the surrounding human societies. Biodiversity assessment is mandatory for implementing any sustainable forest management policy, which is why it is one of the important criteria and indicators currently used. Threats to TDF biodiversity are the primary challenges arising from environmental concerns caused by anthropogenic activity leading to global warming issues. The study aimed to investigate the vegetation assessment and several environmental and anthropogenic variables influencing forest biodiversity from 5 threatened forest sites of District Sialkot (Ghalotian, Kishan Garh, Daburgi Chanda Singh, Pir Kot, and Ghulab Garh), Pakistan. We collected 170 distinct plant species, including 135 dicots, 27 monocots, seven pteridophytes, and one bryophyte, categorized into 138 genera and 62 families, divided into 114 herbs, 32 trees, and 24 shrubs. The phytosociological analysis described the quantitative characteristics, including % frequency, % density, % cover, and importance Value Index (IVI) of all forest areas. Gulab Garh forest has the richest biodiversity forest area, and herbs are the dominant species that have been documented. Environmental factors such as temperature, precipitation, organic matter, soil pH, Ca+2, Mg+2, Na+, Cl−, and electric conductivity (EC) strongly affect forest vegetation investigated by principal coordinate analysis. Shannon and Simpson’s diversity indexes reveal that all sites contain loamy and sandy soil and display a significant relationship between alpha diversity and richness. Increasing trends in temperature and decreasing trends in rainfall suggested that climate significantly affects the Sialkot region’s plant biodiversity. SWOT analysis highlighted that population growth leads to increasing anthropogenic activities such as constructing housing societies and roads, inadequate farming, and excessive grazing, impacting the forest vegetation and altering TDF ecosystem properties/services and functioning. Our findings reinforce the vegetational assessment and importance of local forest biodiversity and significant environmental drivers that influence the plant species diversity in TDF areas. Future conservation strategies are suggested to reduce unlawful resource consumption, restore plant biodiversity in designated protected areas, and conserve rare species locally.
      PubDate: 2024-05-24T00:00:00Z
       
  • Regional divergent evolution of vegetation greenness and climatic drivers
           in the Sahel-Sudan-Guinea region: nonlinearity and explainable machine
           learning

    • Authors: Yelong Zeng, Li Jia, Massimo Menenti, Min Jiang, Chaolei Zheng, Ali Bennour, Yunzhe Lv
      Abstract: IntroductionThe vegetation dynamics of the Sahel-Sudan-Guinea region in Africa, one of the largest transition zones between arid and humid zones, is of great significance for understanding regional ecosystem changes. However, a time-unvarying trend based on linear assumption challenges the overall understanding of vegetation greenness evolution and of tracking a complex ecosystem response to climate in the Sahel-Sudan-Guinea region.MethodsThis study first applied the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) method to detect the time-varying trends in vegetation greenness based on normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data in the region during 2001–2020, and then identified the dominant climatic drivers of NDVI trends by employing explainable machine learning framework.ResultsThe study revealed an overall vegetation greening but a significant nonlinear spatio-temporal evolution characteristic over the region. Trend reversals, i.e., browning-to-greening and greening-to-browning, were dominant in approximately 60% of the study area. The browning-to-greening reversal was primarily observed in the southern Sahel, Congo Basin north of the Equator, and East Africa, with a breakpoint around 2008, while the greening-to-browning reversal was mainly observed in West Africa, with a breakpoint around 2011. The sustained greening primarily took place in northern Sahel, Central African Republic and South Sudan; while sustained browning clustered in central West Africa and Uganda, mainly in agricultural lands. Furthermore, the combination of Random Forest (RF) algorithm and the SHapley Additive exPlanations (SHAP) method could robustly model and reveal the relationships between the observed trends in NDVI and in climatic variables, also detected by applying EEMD. The results suggested that air temperature and precipitation were the most important climatic drivers controlling the NDVI trends across the Sahel-Sudan-Guinea region. The NDVI trends were more likely to have negative correlations with solar radiation and vapor pressure deficit in arid areas, while they could have positive correlations in humid areas. The study also found that large-scale climate changes induced by sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies had strong relationships with trend reversals in vegetation greenness at a sub-continental scale. These findings advanced the understanding of the impacts of climatic drivers on vegetation greenness evolution in the Sahel-Sudan-Guinea region.
      PubDate: 2024-05-23T00:00:00Z
       
  • Editorial: Root functional traits in the context of forest ecology and
           management

    • Authors: Jiacun Gu, Liang Kou, Ivika Ostonen
      PubDate: 2024-05-23T00:00:00Z
       
  • Restoring understory and riparian areas in oil palm plantations does not
           increase greenhouse gas fluxes

    • Authors: Julia Drewer, Ribka Sionita Tarigan, Lindsay F. Banin, Stella White, Elizabeth Raine, Sarah H. Luke, Edgar C. Turner, Ute Skiba, Nicholas J. Cowan, Jassica Prajna Dewi, Andreas Dwi Advento, Anak Agung Ketut Aryawan, Jean-Pierre Caliman, Pujianto
      Abstract: Oil palm (OP) plantations have replaced large areas of forest in the tropical landscape of Southeast Asia and are major emitters of greenhouse gases (GHGs). To move towards more environmentally friendly plantation management, a hopeful approach is to implement strategies to increase vegetation complexity. These options include relaxed management of understory vegetation to increase complexity in productive plantations, passive restoration of forest areas around rivers by leaving mature oil palm during replanting, and active forest restoration along river margins with planting of forest trees. These practices have the potential to deliver a range of benefits such as soil protection, reduced erosion and sedimentation in rivers, pest control and support for biodiversity, but little is known about their impact on greenhouse gas fluxes. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of improved understory growth management and the use of riparian forestry on GHG fluxes in OP plantations, making use of two long-term experiments (the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function in Tropical Agriculture Understory Vegetation (BEFTA UV) Project; the Riparian Ecosystem Restoration in Tropical Agriculture (RERTA) Project) in Riau Province, Sumatra, Indonesia. We measured nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and ecosystem respiration (CO2) from mature OP sites with different levels of understory vegetation and different riparian buffer restoration treatments using the static chamber method. We used linear mixed effects models to test for treatment effects, whilst accounting for soil moisture and experimental design factors (time and space). The understory vegetation treatments (normal, reduced and enhanced complexity of understory) had no effect on N2O and CH4 flux. Regarding differences in ecosystem respiration, effects attributable to the understory vegetation treatments were not strong. For the riparian restoration treatments, the fixed effects variables in the models explained little variation in the fluxes of all GHGs. Therefore, given the proven benefits of more complex understory vegetation for supporting biodiversity and healthy ecosystem functioning, plus the potential for restored riparian buffers to support biodiversity and services and to reduce GHG emissions over time, our findings reinforce the concept that these features bring environmental benefits in OP landscapes, with no measurable effects on GHG emissions.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:00:00Z
       
  • Short-term effects of understory removal on understory diversity and
           biomass of temperate forests in northeast China

    • Authors: Yanyan Zhang, Quan Yuan, Jiaojiao Deng, Li Zhou, Dapao Yu, Wangming Zhou, Qing-Wei Wang
      Abstract: IntroductionUnderstory removal is a traditional practice in forest management to reduce fire risk and promote seedling regeneration. However, its effect on understory diversity, biomass and soil nutrients in temperate forest ecosystems is less known, which limits our assessment of the effectiveness of understory vegetation management.MethodsWe quantified the composition of the understory species, their diversity, and the biomass of the understory and factors driving changes in these parameters in primary mixed broad-leaved Pinus koraiensis forest (BKF), secondary Betula platyphylla forest (BF), and Larix gmelinii plantation (LF) in northeast China after a 5-year understory removal.ResultsAfter understory removal, the number of shrub and herb species in BKF and LF decreased, while the number of shrub species in BF increased significantly and that of herb species decreased; the species with strong light preference, Equisetum hyemale, Impatiens noli-tangere, and Filipendula Palmata, were dominant in the herb layer of the three forest types; Shannon–Wiener diversity, Pielou evenness, and Simpson diversity of the herb layer in LF increased significantly (P < 0.05), while those of the shrub and herb layers in BF and LF showed no significant changes (P> 0.05). The total understory biomass of understory of BKF and LF decreased by 0.94 t·hm−2 and 1.32 t·hm−2, respectively, while that of BF increased by 1.31 t·hm−2; soil NH4+-N and total phosphorus (TP) were the key factors regulating understory vegetation diversity and biomass, respectively.ConclusionThese results suggest that understory removal is a beneficial management strategy for increasing shrub biomass and diversity in secondary forests, while it should be avoided in primary forests and plantations to prevent the reduction of understory plant diversity and soil nutrient loss.
      PubDate: 2024-05-17T00:00:00Z
       
  • Mitigating Norway spruce mortality through the combined use of an
           anti-attractant for Ips typographus and an attractant for Thanasimus
           formicarius

    • Authors: Nataliya Korolyova, Jaromír Bláha, Jaromír Hradecký, Jaroslav Kašpar, Barbora Dvořáková, Rastislav Jakuš
      Abstract: This study investigates the efficacy of combined treatment strategy, incorporating pheromones for bark beetle I. typographus (IT) and attractant of its natural enemy T. formicarius (TF), along with anti-attractants for IT (containing 1-hexanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanol, eucalyptol, trans-thujanol, and trans-conophthorin), to enhance protection methods for Picea abies against biotic disturbances. Two field experiments—trapping experiment and tree protection experiment—were conducted in June 2023 in managed spruce-dominated beetle-affected stands in Czechia. We anticipated higher catches of IT in traps baited with IT pheromone (containing s-ipsdienol, s-cis-verbenol, and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol) and TF attractant compared to traps using IT pheromone alone, since compounds intrinsic to IT pheromone, namely 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, ipsenol, and ipsdienol, are integral components of the attractant designed for TF. We hypothesized that application of TF attractant and IT anti-attractant would enhance the treatment's protective properties, assuming that attracted TF would function as a predator, reducing bark beetle population and increasing tree survival rates. Semiochemical composition declared by the producers was verified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. In the trapping experiment, EcoTrap-type traps were baited with six combinations of lures and anti-attractant. In the tree protection experiment, 28 mature Norway spruce trees situated at newly created forest edges underwent four treatment types: TF attractant, IT anti-attractant, their combination, and no treatment (“control”). Traps baited solely with TF attractant did not capture either beetle, whereas traps lured with IT pheromone, TF attractant and anti-attractant showed no captures of IT but recorded the highest numbers of TF, suggesting significant potential for combined treatment efficacy. Surprisingly, tree mortality was observed exclusively among trees treated only with TF attractant and in their vicinity, suggesting unique bark beetles' response to the mixture of predator's attractant and host tree kairomones, a phenomenon that was not previously reported. Application of anti-attractant and TF treatment effectively prevented tree mortality, demonstrating the repellent potential of IT anti-attractant against bark beetles. However, mortality rates showed no significant differences among control trees, those treated with anti-attractants, or those treated with the combination of anti-attractants and TF attractant, underscoring necessity for further research to optimize treatment efficacy.
      PubDate: 2024-05-16T00:00:00Z
       
  • Soil organic carbon, pH, and ammonium nitrogen controlled changes in
           bacterial community structure and functional groups after forest
           conversion

    • Authors: Xiaoqing Cao, Kai Xia, Hongfei Zhao, Pengfei Deng, Zhen Teng, Xiaoniu Xu
      Abstract: IntroductionLand-use changes significantly impact soil properties in forests, which is an area of concern. Therefore, the effects of changing forest types on soil microbial communities and their functions in northern subtropical forest regions need to be further researched.MethodsWe used 16S rDNA sequencing and Functional Annotation of Prokaryotic Taxa (FAPROTAX) to assess the variation of soil bacterial communities and potential functions related to carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in two soil layers (0–10 and 10–30 cm) after the conversion of the secondary masson pine (Pinus massoniana, PM) forest to plantations of slash pine (Pinus elliottii, PE) and Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata, CL) located in Jingde County, Anhui Province, China.ResultsThe study found that converting coniferous secondary forests to coniferous plantations resulted in a notable increase in soil pH and a decrease in nitrate nitrogen and organic carbon contents. Additionally, soil microbial diversity increased significantly, and microbial community structure changed, particularly in the topsoil. These changes might affect the C- and N-cycling mediated by soil bacteria. The analysis revealed a significant decrease in the abundance of functional groups associated with C-cycling and a significant increase in the abundance of functional groups associated with N-cycling, particularly those associated with denitrification. Soil organic carbon, pH, and ammonium nitrogen were the most critical variables affecting changes in the soil microbial community.DiscussionThese findings provide valuable information for ecological restoration and future sustainable forest management.
      PubDate: 2024-05-15T00:00:00Z
       
  • Firewood transport and invasive insect spread in Michigan

    • Authors: Erin Budzyn, Emily S. Huff, Heidi Frei
      Abstract: Transportation of firewood can be a vector for invasive insect spread resulting in damage to surrounding areas. In 2016 and 2021, surveys were conducted at campgrounds around Michigan to understand where campers were sourcing their firewood, awareness of the ‘Do not move firewood’ campaign, knowledge of invasive insects and pests, reactions to a potential ban on bringing firewood to campgrounds, and perspective on kiln-dried firewood – all potential policy levers to reduce the spread of invasive insects. Results indicated that campaign awareness slightly decreased between the survey years, personal firewood transport has decreased, and knowledge of invasives remains low. There is an opportunity for intensifying invasive species and firewood outreach efforts, however, regulation (and enforcement) may be more effective among those who would not comply or support a ban.
      PubDate: 2024-05-09T00:00:00Z
       
  • Editorial: Assessment of anthropogenic pollution as a cause of forest
           disturbance

    • Authors: Yan Li, Ke Liu, Zhenyi Jia, Yang Liu, Mohammad Faizan
      PubDate: 2024-05-08T00:00:00Z
       
  • Diel activity patterns of a canopy-inhibiting beetle community
           (Coleoptera) in a Neotropical rainforest

    • Authors: Susan Kirmse
      Abstract: Diel activity is one main feature of animal‘s behavior and is often an intrinsic trait characterizing distinct taxonomic groups. Abiotic conditions such as temperature may influence the diel activity patterns of arthropod communities associated with a particular ecosystem or habitat. Similarly, biotic factors, such as resource availability, affect arthropod activity. In addition, diel activity is thought to be an important factor in niche partitioning of arthropod communities. As part of a larger beetle survey in a lowland tropical rainforest in southern Venezuela, I analyzed the diel activity of an arboreal beetle community collected from 23 canopy-tree species over a cumulative year. Diel activity was observed in 535 beetle species, comprising 5,948 individuals, using a canopy crane installed in the study area. Of the 535 beetle species, 198 (37%) showed diurnal activity, and 281 (52.5%) showed nocturnal activity. In contrast, the proportions of nocturnal (n = 2,024, 34%) and diurnal (n = 1,983, 33.3%) individuals were balanced. Most of the observed beetles occurred only during the activity phase in their host trees. This particularly applies to extrafloral nectary- and flower-visiting beetle species. Flowering trees attracted different proportions of diurnal and nocturnal species according to flowering syndrome, whereas extrafloral nectaries were mainly visited at night. Thus, the beetle communities associated with single tree species showed distinct compositions of nocturnal and diurnal species.
      PubDate: 2024-05-07T00:00:00Z
       
 
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  Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

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