Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Agroforestry Systems
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.663
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0167-4366 - ISSN (Online) 1572-9680
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Botanical composition gradients in silvopastoral systems on temperate
           native grasslands of Uruguay

    • Abstract: Abstract Silvopastoral systems may provide important production and environmental benefits. The loss of cool-season (C3) grasses from temperate grazed native grasslands is associated with selective grazing and excessive solar radiation that limit their survival. Silvopastoral systems integrate trees with grasslands that provide shade to both cattle and herbaceous plants, potentially favoring C3 species. There is limited information about the effect of trees on the species and functional composition of native grasslands in the Campos biome in South America. The objective of this study was to detect gradients in the botanical composition of grasslands as affected by changes in the shade associated with distance to the trees and cardinal orientation in three situations defined by the combination of soil and tree species (Prosopis on Solonetz, Acacia on Brunisols, and Eucalyptus on Brunisols). Soil cover of the herbaceous species under trees was recorded in double transects located in the four cardinal directions. In all situations there were changes in pasture composition in the different shaded regions (total shade, partial shade, or full sun). Under the canopy, there was an increase of cool-season grasses such as Bromus catharticus Vahl, Lolium multiflorum Lam., Stipa hyalina (Nees) Barkworth, and S. setigera J.Presl. At greater distances from trees, cover of warm-season grasses, such as Axonopus affinis Chase and Paspalum notatum Flueggé increased. These gradients suggest that trees in silvopastoral systems can increase the abundance of cool-season species and potentially improve the forage nutritive value of the native pasture.
      PubDate: 2024-07-09
       
  • The potential of agroforestry to buffer climate change impacts on
           suitability of coffee and banana in Uganda

    • Abstract: Abstract Coffee, an important global commodity, is threatened by climate change. Agroforestry has been considered as one option to maintain or enhance coffee production. In this study, we use a machine learning ensemble consisting of MaxEnt, Random Forest and Boosted Regression Trees to assess climate change impacts on the suitability to grow Arabica coffee, Robusta coffee and bananas in Uganda by 2050. Based on this, the buffering potential of Cordia africana and Ficus natalensis, the two commonly used shading trees in agroforestry systems is assessed. Our robust models (AUC of 0.7–0.9) indicate temperature-related variables as relevant for Arabica coffee suitability, while precipitation-related variables determine Robusta coffee and banana suitability. Under current climatic conditions, only a quarter of the total land area is suitable for growing Arabica coffee, while over three-quarters are suitable for Robusta coffee and bananas. Our results suggest that climate change will reduce the area suitable to grow Arabica coffee, Robusta coffee and bananas by 20%, 9% and 3.5%, respectively, under SSP3-RCP7.0 by 2050. A shift in areas suitable for Arabica coffee to highlands might occur, leading to potential encroachment on protected areas. In our model, implementing agroforestry with up to 50% shading could partially offset suitable area losses for Robusta coffee—but not for Arabica coffee. The potential to produce valuable Arabica coffee thus decreases under climate change and cannot be averted by agroforestry. We conclude that the implementation and design of agroforestry must be based on species, elevation, and regional climate projections to avoid maladaptation.
      PubDate: 2024-07-03
       
  • Impact of common shade tree species on microclimate and cocoa growth in
           agroforestry systems in Ghana

    • Abstract: Abstract Climate change is a growing threat to agriculture globally, with most substantial impacts expected in tropical smallholder systems such as cocoa farms in West Africa. Cocoa agroforestry is widely believed to enhance resilience to climatic extremes due to protection and a favourable microclimate under the shade trees. Morphological traits of many locally used shade tree species and their specific contribution to microclimate for climate-resilient cocoa production remain unclear. Therefore, aboveground morphology and sub canopy microclimate of eight common shade tree species were investigated in cocoa agroforestry systems in the Ahafo region, Ghana. Additionally, the growth of cocoa trees in three different distance zones to the shade tree stem was measured. The eight different shade tree species exhibited considerable variation in their impact on microclimate and cocoa growth. M. indica and M. excelsa allowed lowest light transmission, with the highest microclimatic buffering effect, i.e., reducing vapour pressure deficit and daily fluctuations of temperature and relative humidity. Cocoa trees around M. lucida and F. capensis were the highest in growth, characterized by height and stem diameter. However, a universally superior shade tree species could not be identified implying the need for shade tree diversity allowing various microclimatic conditions within an agroforestry system to spread risk of climate extremes. Cocoa tree growth was more affected by distance to the shade tree than by shade tree species, resulting in enhanced growth with distance to the stem. These findings provide a better understanding of species-related differences on cocoa growing conditions and climate change adaptation strategies.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Assessing the potential of different economic incentives for stimulating
           temperate agroforestry. A study in Flanders, Belgium

    • Abstract: Abstract Many studies point to the social and environmental benefits of agroforestry, also in temperate regions such as Flanders. Nevertheless, farmers do not yet see agroforestry as an equally valuable option alongside other farming systems because of the uncertain economic profitability and the current incompatibility of this system with existing market conditions. This paper has the aim to identify and evaluate – existing and hypothetical- economic incentives for agroforestry in Flanders. Data was collected over the period 2015—2021 through focus groups at conferences and in thematic living labs in Flanders with a broad range of stakeholders (e.g. farmers, processors, policy makers, researchers, etc.). The results were analysed qualitatively in Nvivo12 to make a classification of incentives and instruments in a first phase. In a second phase they were evaluated based on an adjusted SAF (Suitability, Acceptability and Feasibility) framework. Four types of incentives were identified: (1) government based; (2) payment for agroforestry products; (3) payment for ecosystem services; and (4) community based incentives. Currently, the highest potential is expected from payment for ecosystem services and the least potential from payment for products and community-based incentives due to a lack of consumer demand for agroforestry products specifically and the unfamiliarity of agroforestry to a broader public. At the end of the data collection period, a positive evolution was already observed in the development of these instruments. To accelerate this evolution, initiatives supporting awareness among a broader public and more insights into the preferences of a wide range of stakeholders is needed.
      PubDate: 2024-06-26
       
  • Shea tree (Vitellaria paradoxa C.F. Gaertn.) agroforestry systems in
           Northern Ghana: population structure, management of trees and impact of
           below canopy microclimate

    • Abstract: Abstract The shea tree (Vitellaria paradoxa C.F. Gaertn.) is an important tree species in agroforestry systems in West Africa and shea nuts constitute a fundamental resource for rural livelihoods in this area. This study investigated the sustainability and interactions in agroforestry systems of shea trees around the village Nakpalli in Northern Ghana. The focus of the study was the population structures and densities of shea trees on different land types, below-canopy microclimate and co-cultivation of yams (Dioscorea rotundata (Poir.) J. Miége) under shea tree canopies, and water stress of the trees in the driest season. Shea tree populations are overall well-conserved in this area, but Weibull-distributions of the tree populations and quantification of seedlings showed a lower tree density in both cultivated and fallowed lands, as compared to undisturbed bushlands. Although farmers may deliberately manage the density of larger trees, the low densities of seedlings and saplings indicate that intensified management practices, including shortened fallow periods and intentional clearing of land by fire before sowing, might negatively affect the long-term regeneration of the shea trees. Co-cultivation of yams below shea tree canopies allowed production of 11.5 t/ha as compared to 20.8 t/ha at open field conditions. The lower yields may have been caused by an almost 74% reduction of photosynthetically active radiation below canopies, relative to outside the canopies. Shea trees in the fields, fallows and bushlands had close-to-zero predawn leaf water potentials, indicating low water stress, even in the middle of the dry season. Thus, shea trees are both well-adapted and highly valued in this area, which underlines the importance of conserving this indigenous tree species in the agroforestry systems of northern Ghana.
      PubDate: 2024-06-19
       
  • Silvopastoral transitions in Latin America: toward diverse perennial
           systems

    • Abstract: Abstract Agroecosystems with greater diversity and perenniality have been proposed to promote resilience to climate change, stability of production, multiple ecosystem services, and socioeconomic outcomes. A wide diversity of silvopastoral systems have been promoted in Latin America for their production and environmental outcomes. In this brief perspective article, we discuss the implications of different trajectories towards silvopastoral systems within the framework of ecological intensification. Transitioning from agricultural systems dominated by annual crops towards complex silvopastoral systems integrating multiple perennial species and livestock constitutes a clear trajectory of ecological intensification. In the context of the tropical dry forests and Amazon rainforests, re-introducing native trees into degraded sown pastures to establish silvopastoral systems increases biodiversity, perenniality, and ecosystem services. In contrast, in the context of native grasslands, plantations of exotic trees for timber or silvopastoral systems reduce biodiversity and ecosystem services. Therefore, transitioning to silvopastoral systems is not always a trajectory of ecological intensification but depends on the contexts and native ecosystems.
      PubDate: 2024-06-18
       
  • Comparing the economic performance of poplar-based alley cropping systems
           with arable farming in Brandenburg under varying site conditions and
           policy scenarios

    • Abstract: Abstract Agroforestry can address multiple environmental challenges across the agricultural sector, for example biodiversity loss and soil degradation. However, agroforestry uptake remains low in Germany. Since economic considerations are important for farmer uptake, this paper compares the economic performance of conventional arable farming with silvoarable alley cropping in Brandenburg. Using a modelling approach, the net present value (NPV) is calculated to assess the competitiveness of alley cropping with poplar compared to arable farming under different scenarios. These scenarios cover a range of crops, rotation schedules, alley widths, woodchip prices, and yield levels. Additionally, policy measures that can compensate for potential economic losses associated with transitioning to agroforestry are considered. Results show that short rotation alley cropping had higher NPVs than medium rotation alley cropping, mainly due to cash-flow characteristics. Short rotation alley cropping can be competitive at high woodchip prices without policy support, while at low or average prices alley cropping needs subsidies to be competitive. Medium rotation systems at all price levels were not competitive unless policy support was provided. Current policy payments were unable to make silvoarable alley cropping competitive except at high woodchip prices. When subsidies increase, alley cropping can be competitive even at low or average woodchip prices and over a range of site conditions. Besides policy support, economic performance was strongly influenced by woodchip prices, relative yield potential of poplar and arable crops, and site conditions.
      PubDate: 2024-06-18
       
  • Effects of intercropping on the herbage production of a binary
           grass-legume mixture (Hedysarum coronarium L. and Lolium multiflorum Lam.)
           under artificial shade in Mediterranean rainfed conditions

    • Abstract: Abstract Growing perennial legumes in the understory layer in agroforestry systems is a strategy to improve the sustainability of agricultural systems, i.e., by increasing land productivity, fostering carbon sequestration and nutrient cycling and reducing reliance on inorganic nitrogen fertilizers for tree crops. In many parts of Central Italy, sulla, a biennial autochthonous legume, is widely adopted in forage cropping systems for its productivity and nutritive value and it is often intercropped with ryegrass for a better utilization as grazed temporary grassland. To evaluate the agronomic performance of these perennial species grown under different levels of light reduction, an artificial shade plot trial was established in the coastal plain of Pisa, Central Italy, with the aim to simulate the effect of tree presence with different levels of shade intensification in rainfed conditions. The experiment layout complies with a 2-way completely randomized design with four replicates. The two factors tested were the forage species (namely sulla, ryegrass and their intercropping) and the level of shade (no shade, moderate shade − 30% light reduction-, and intense shade − 50% light reduction-). Shading significantly reduced the above ground biomass (AGB) production, especially for the intense shading (on average about − 20% with respect to the full sun). The mixture resulted as the most productive crop, yielding on average about + 30 and + 40% AGB in comparison to sulla and ryegrass pure stands, respectively. The findings about the effect of the shading on AGB production showed that mixture was a suitable sward, especially under moderate shading conditions. Further studies are needed with the purpose to investigate the productive performance of these swards in real agroforestry conditions.
      PubDate: 2024-06-15
       
  • Diversity and composition of agroforestry species in two agro-ecological
           zones of Rwanda

    • Abstract: Abstract This study delves into the diversity and composition of agroforestry species in Rwanda's Eastern Plateau and Eastern Savannah agro-ecological zones. Examining these systems across diverse landscapes is crucial for selecting species adapted to local conditions. We surveyed four landscapes with varying tree cover levels, using stratified random sampling to allocate 240 plots for detailed field inventory. We analyzed dendrometric characteristics of woody vegetation, focusing on plants with ≥ 4 cm diameter at breast height (DBH). Exotic tree species comprised over 75% of trees across all landscapes. Diversity indices indicated significant differences in plant communities between the Eastern Savannah and Eastern Plateau, with higher diversity in the former. Sørensen's similarity coefficient for woody species between the two regions showed a moderate level of similarity (approximately 53%). However, there was a significant difference in the equitability of on-farm tree species between the zones, suggesting non-identical distribution patterns. The most common and dominant tree species were Grevillea robusta, Mangifera indica, and Persea americana, primarily used for timber and fruit production. Most encountered trees were small and scattered, with nearly 80% having a DBH below 20 cm, highlighting the prevalence of young trees. The dominance of exotic species emphasizes the need for further research on their impact on agricultural biodiversity, informing sustainable land management practices in Rwanda and similar contexts.
      PubDate: 2024-06-13
       
  • Future perspectives of Brazilian beef production: what is the role of
           Silvopastoral systems'

    • Abstract: Abstract Against the backdrop of changing production conditions and market requirements, it seems time has come to rethink Brazil’s beef production systems. We analyse the economic and environmental performance of three beef production systems: classic beef production system (CB), and two types of silvopastoral systems: the integrated crop-livestock-forestry system (ICLFS) and the natural regeneration system (NR) in a comparative case study analysis. We find that, though costs of production are the lowest for CB, only the ICLFS and NR case studies are generating long-term profits. While greenhouse gas emissions per kg live weight added are lowest in ICLFS, followed by NR and CB, per hectare (ha) emissions are highest in NR, followed by ICLFS and CB. Considering the system’s carbon removal, NR and potentially ICLFS are sequestering more than releasing. Additionally, the land required to produce beef is lowest in NR, followed by ICLFS and CB. Considering the additional outputs produced by ICLFS and NR, they showcase the potential of multifunctional production systems for future scenarios, where land scarcity puts land-demanding production systems, such as beef, under pressure. The three production systems perform differently depending on the indicators analysed. How they will reply to future challenges depends on the location and the specific environment. Yet, from the analysed systems, CB is the least sustainable, economically and environmentally.
      PubDate: 2024-06-03
       
  • Silvopastoral systems in local livestock landscapes in Hopelchén,
           Southern Mexico

    • Abstract: Abstract Deforestation for livestock remains one of Mexico’s key socio-environmental problems. The municipality of Hopelchén is a deforestation hotspot despite being part of the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve, the largest forestland on the Yucatan Peninsula. Livestock are part of the local culture and economy, and there is potential for the development of traditional and improved silvopastoral (SP) systems. It is therefore important to identify SP elements in the local livestock landscape and explore the reasons or limitations for their adoption. The quality and quantity of SP elements in a landscape depend on practices carried out by each rancher throughout the livestock production cycle. We aimed to identify local livestock practices that result in SP landscape elements and explain their impact on forest cover in Hopelchén. We identified seven SP elements, six traditional and one improved, being forest strips combined with live or dead fences the most common. Stand-alone live fences are the least common, due to negative local perceptions about their construction and maintenance. Scattered trees are present at very low densities to prevent shading of grass, while forest fragments are maintained as a source of timber. The full potential of traditional SP elements is not being reached as they are mainly used for protection and construction, without exploiting their use as fodder and live fences. Only four producers have alley grazing, the only improved SP element found. To prevent further forest degradation and deforestation, more integrated management and use of forest and tree cover in the livestock landscape should be encouraged.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Soil nitrogen dynamics affected by coffee (coffea arabica) canopy and
           fertilizer management in coffee-based agroforestry

    • Abstract: Abstract Nutrient management in coffee-based agroforestry systems plays a critical role in soil nitrogen (N) cycling, but has not been well documented. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of coffee canopy management and fertilization on soil N dynamics. This study used a randomized complete block design (2 × 3 × 2) with four replications. There were three factors: 1) coffee canopy management (T1: Pruned, T2: Unpruned), 2) fertilizer type (O: Organic, I: Inorganic; M: 50% Organic + 50% Inorganic), and 3) fertilizer dose (D1: low, D2: medium, D3: high). Soil N dynamic indicators (i.e., total N, ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3−), net N-NH4+, net N-NO3−, soil microbial biomass N) were measured at two soil sampling depths (0–20 cm and 20–40 cm). Results showed that pruning increased soil total N and microbial biomass N (MBN) by 10–56% relative to unpruned coffee trees. In contrast, the unpruned coffee canopy had 15–345% higher NH4+, NO3−, net N-NH4+, net N-NO3−, and microbial biomass N concentration than pruned coffee. Mixed fertilizer application increased NO3− and net N-NH4+ accumulation by 5–15% relative to inorganic and organic fertilizers. In addition, medium to high dose fertilization led to a 19–86% higher net N-NO3− concentration and microbial biomass N as compared to low dose fertilization. The treatment of no pruning and mixed fertilizer at low to medium doses was the optimal management strategy to maintain soil available N, while pruning combined with organic fertilizer has the potential to improve soil total N and MBN.
      PubDate: 2024-05-27
       
  • Gender and endogenous knowledge inclusion for agroforestry systems
           improvement in Benin, West Africa

    • Abstract: Abstract In West Africa, and Benin particularly, local forest resources can potentially contribute to both increasing and stabilizing soil productivity. However, these resources continue to be neglected with efforts instead concentrated on promoting exotic species. This study aimed to prioritize local agroforestry species on agricultural landscape by investigating the gendered, socio-demographic and agro-pedological factors of local knowledge and use of agroforestry species amongst small-holder farmers in Benin. An agroforestry inventory combined with an ethno-agroforestry survey was conducted on 364 farms with 364 farmers. A cluster analysis based on farmers' socio-demographic and agroecological factors was used to cluster farmers into two homogeneous agroforestry systems. Median score, species diversity and ecological networks were established for these two systems. Results illustrate that gendered difference exist between the priority that farmers give to multi-purpose species and this prioritization depends on priority ecosystem services for farmers and gender. Therefore, it would be useful first to consider gender and specific needs of each category of farmer to optimize the choice of agroforestry species to be promoted in such systems. The successful introduction of identified species through extension programs requires more advanced research related to the real contribution of these species to farmland fertilization, as well as the nutrient transmission pathways to associated crops in an agroforestry system to address simultaneously specific ecological, economic and socio-cultural sustainability criteria, as well as improved crop production.
      PubDate: 2024-05-25
       
  • Cork oak woodlands and decline: a social-ecological review and future
           transdisciplinary approaches

    • Abstract: Abstract Cork oak woodlands are socio-ecosystems recognized as biodiversity hotspots, a fundamental economic source for companies and local communities as well as an identitarian landscape for residents and visitors. Cork oak woodlands, however, are facing tree mortality and lack of regeneration. Considering the oak decline scenario, we present Iberian cork oak montado/dehesa as a socio-ecosystem facing climate change, management transformations, local knowledge crisis and social uncertainty. We review montados/dehesas research through time and by different scholar perspectives. We defend that from an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary perspective, including the experience and evidence observed in terrain, debate should be stimulated, and novel conceptual approaches may contribute to finding solutions. We argue that the confluence of ecology, genetics, anthropology and local knowledge can be explored to unveil the complexities and the challenges of these socio-ecosystems and contribute to prevent and mitigate threats to it. We propose a methodological approach built together with scientists, managers and workers, that can explore oak translocations, socio-ecological interactions models, knowledge transfer and other ways to overcome Iberian cork oak woodlands socio-environmental crisis.
      PubDate: 2024-05-19
       
  • Performance of a winter wheat composite cross population in two temperate
           agroforestry systems – a Swiss case study

    • Abstract: Abstract In agroforestry systems (AFS), where environmental conditions are highly variable at small spatial scales, the use of uniform genetic material of a single cultivar commonly grown in monoculture cropping might not be optimal. However, the use of composite cross populations (CCPs) that contain an inherent genetic variability might be a promising approach under the environmental variability created by trees in AFS. In this experimental trial, the performance of a CCP (‘CC-2 k’) of winter wheat was compared to a commercial variety (‘Wiwa’) in a split-plot design at two AFS (Feusisberg and Wollerau) in Central Switzerland. Yield of CC-2k (1.9 ± 0.7 Mg ha−1) was higher than yield of Wiwa (0.7 ± 0.4 Mg ha−1) in Wollerau, but yields did not differ between CCP and variety in Feusisberg (1.9 ± 0.7 Mg ha−1 and 2.0 ± 0.8 Mg ha−1, respectively). The interaction of site and variety was significant (p < 0.05). Wiwa had a higher protein, Fe and Ca content than CC-2k. Therefore, while the CC-2k outperformed Wiwa in terms of yield in one of the two AFS, Wiwa outperformed CC-2k in terms of quality. In this one-year field experiment, the composite cross population might have been better adapted to the heterogenous environment of agroforestry systems (found in one out of two sites) but failed to reach the high-quality product of modern cultivars. These initial results must be seen as first insights which need to be complemented by larger field experiments for generalisation. The findings of this study may be interpreted as an indication that further improvements in terms of quality might make CCPs a viable option for diversified agricultural systems with larger environmental heterogeneity than common monoculture cropping systems.
      PubDate: 2024-05-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s10457-024-00997-6
       
  • Agroforestry in Madagascar: past, present, and future

    • Abstract: Abstract Agroforestry systems promise a high multifunctionality providing cash and subsistence yields as well as other ecosystem services. Such land systems may be particularly promising for smallholders in tropical landscapes due to high labour intensity and productivity on limited land. Focusing on Madagascar, we here describe the history of agroforestry in the country and review the current literature on agroforestry outcomes as well as factors promoting and hindering agroforest establishment and maintenance. From this, we discuss the potential future of agroforestry in Madagascar. Historically, many crops farmed today in agroforestry systems were originally introduced as plantation crops, mostly in the nineteenth century. Since then, people co-opted these crops into mixed agroforestry systems, often focusing on clove, vanilla, coffee, or cocoa in combination with fruit trees or, for clove, with livestock. Other crops are also integrated, but shares are comparatively low. Overall, 27.4% of Malagasy exports are crops typically farmed in agroforestry systems, providing income for at least 500,000 farmers. Outcomes of agroforestry for biodiversity and ecosystem services are commonly researched, showing benefits over annual crops and monocultures. Social-economic outcomes, including yields, are more scarcely researched, but findings point towards financial benefits for smallholder farmers and a sense of community and collective memory. However, findings emphasize that research gaps remain in terms of geographic and crop coverage, also for ecological outcomes. Looking to the future, we highlight the need to overcome hurdles such as land tenure insecurity, financial barriers to implementation, and unstable value chains to scale agroforestry in Madagascar to the benefit of multifunctional land systems and human wellbeing.
      PubDate: 2024-05-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s10457-024-00975-y
       
  • “Historical signs in the landscape”: Ecosystem services, motivation
           and challenges of pollarding in Western Norway

    • Abstract: Abstract Pollarding in agroforestry systems was traditionally an important practice for fodder acquisition in Western Norway, as well as in many other parts of the world. The practice has long been in decline, but to maintain cultural landscapes and biodiversity enhancement from pollarding, farmers now receive a public grant for each tree they pollard. In this interdisciplinary study we investigate which ecosystem services modern pollarding practices provide, under the influence of the current pollarding policy. We have performed both in-depth interviews and a quantitative survey targeting all pollarding farmers in the county of Vestland in Western Norway. We find that bioresources obtained from the branches from pollarding are to some extent still taken into use, mainly in the form of tree fodder for farm animals and firewood, but a lot of the branches remain unused. Biodiversity benefits are obtained from preserving old trees that often are located on agricultural land as solitary trees, as these trees provide important habitats, particularly for species growing on the bark, such as lichens and mosses, or within the decaying wood, such as, for example, fungi and insects. The modern practice of letting branches rot in the field provide habitats for insects and hence additional benefits to biodiversity. For the farmers, the main motivations to pollard are the cultural, aesthetic and historical values of pollarded trees. They see few disadvantages with pollarding, and most of them plan to continue in the future. The grant provides an incentive for pollarding, but our results indicate that the practice would continue without it, although less than now, especially with the establishment of new pollards.
      PubDate: 2024-05-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s10457-024-00994-9
       
  • What challenges impede the adoption of agroforestry practices' A global
           perspective through a systematic literature review

    • Abstract: Abstract Despite the extensive amount of evidence in the literature regarding the benefits of agroforestry systems including carbon sequestration, soil erosion reduction, climate change resilience, biodiversity conservation and other ecosystem services, the adoption of agroforestry practices presents several barriers for farmers and other stakeholders, thus requiring comprehensive examination from the scientific community. We performed a systematic literature review following the methodology described in the PRISMA framework, to provide a novel comprehensive and systematic overview of what is present in the literature regarding the obstacles stakeholders perceive with regards to agroforestry adoption, gathered through participatory research methods, which are methodologies that engage stakeholders in the research process. In this work, we highlighted and categorized 31 obstacles that stakeholders around the globe perceive according to the examined literature (n = 90) with regards to agroforestry adoption, pertaining to i) technical-agronomic, ii) socio-economic and iii) policy-legislative aspects. We produced a consultable database of the examined literature presenting the extracted and categorized data including 1) Region of interest; 2) Investigated agroforestry system; 3) Methodologies utilized in the papers; 4) Number, gender ratio and type of stakeholders; 5) Main relevant obstacles found in the paper. We highlighted the five most frequently encountered issues i) the availability or quality of knowledge or experience on technical and agronomic matters, or knowledge diffusion necessary to implement or maintain agroforestry systems ii) the perceived socio-economic issue related to the market, marketing of agroforestry products, supply chain or jobs in agroforestry; iii) issues related to the amount of labor or time necessary to implement or maintain agroforestry systems; iv) issues related to the upfront economic investment necessary to establish an agroforestry system and availability of capital; and v) issues related to the availability of technical support necessary to implement or maintain agroforestry systems.
      PubDate: 2024-04-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s10457-024-00993-w
       
  • An assessment of the shade and ground cover influence on the mitigation of
           water-driven soil erosion in a coffee agroforestry system

    • Abstract: Abstract Coffee cultivation under agroforestry systems is one of the main agricultural activities in Central America, but climate change is putting its sustainability at risk. Rainfall erosivity has worsened, thus driving soil losses. Although the vegetal covers in coffee agroforestry systems play a crucial role in controlling erosion, the specific influence of each cover layer remains unclear. In this study, we assessed the influence of the canopy (tree and banana cover and coffee cover) and ground cover (weed and litter) on water driven soil erosion, to determine which type of cover has the most influence on soil erosion control. The study site is situated in the core and buffer zones of the Macizo de Peñas Blancas National Park (Nicaragua), where seventeen coffee sampling plots with an agroforestry system composed of an Inga spp and Musa spp canopy cover were analysed. The results showed that the 19.2 ± 3.4% of the soil surface was affected by erosion and it was mainly related to the litter ground cover (r = –0.95, P < 0.001). Also, this cover presented the best partial correlation (ryl.tcw = –0.93, P < 0.001) when the effects of the other vegetal covers were eliminated. Specifically, the litter cover accounted for 90% of the erosion variability, while the impact of the other types of cover was negligible, accounting for just 1% of the erosion. We conclude that litter layer is more important than canopy cover for effective erosion control, and the main function of shade trees is as a source of litter biomass.
      PubDate: 2024-04-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s10457-024-00989-6
       
  • Soil quality: an indicator of recovery in a nature reserve in the
           Colombian Andes

    • Abstract: Abstract Soils provide essential ecosystem services for the existence of ecosystems and biodiversity. It is crucial to understand their quality through the evaluation of ecological processes. However, only some studies estimate the effectiveness of ecosystem restoration based on evaluating soil quality (SQ) indicators. This research evaluated the five most common land-use scenarios in Andean ecosystems within the Natural Reserve of the Civil Society (RNSC) “La Montaña Mágica” under natural forest, coffee plantation, badlands, and active and passive restoration. The main objective was to analyze the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics concerning land use, establish the baseline for SQ indicators in different land use activities, and determine the status of restoration systems for other land uses in the study site. ANOVA and Dunnett's test evaluated SQ parameters. In passive and active restoration, soil bulk density, porosity, and the number of individuals and families of macroinvertebrates were improved. The latter presented low pH and aluminum values but increased potassium compared to other soil uses. The restoration strategies favored changes in SQ indicators due to the contribution of organic carbon, a developed root system, and the recirculation of nutrients in the edaphic system. This study provided information on changes in SQ with soil usage as a practical tool to evaluate ecological restoration methods in natural areas of the eastern Colombian Andes.
      PubDate: 2024-02-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s10457-023-00951-y
       
 
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  Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

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Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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