Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
European Journal of Forest Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.994
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1612-4677 - ISSN (Online) 1612-4669
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Ectomycorrhizal trees enhanced water-holding capacity in forest ecosystems
           in northeastern China

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      Abstract: Abstract Improving water-holding functions is an important purpose of sustainable forest management. However, few studies have examined whether there are differences in water-holding capacities between the forests dominated by trees associated with different mycorrhizal types and what are the main factors leading to the differences. Here, we investigated seven parameters of water-holding capacities of soils, litter, and canopy interception in 210 forest plots (10 m × 10 m). The plots were equally divided into three forest types associated with mycorrhizal types, including AM plots (arbuscular mycorrhizal trees > 75% in dominance), ECM plots (ectomycorrhizal trees > 75%), and AM + ECM plots (between 25 and 75%). We calculated tree diversity (richness, Shannon–wiener index, Simpson index, evenness), community structure (diameter at breast height, height, under branch height, density, neighborhood comparison-U, uniform angle index-W, and mingling index-M), and soil physics (soil bulk density and field water content). The results showed that: (1) ECM-dominated communities increased 1.6–2.0-fold in the litter water-holding capacities than those of AM and AM + ECM. The canopy interception of the ECM community was the highest (0.97 mm), significantly higher than that of the AM + ECM community (0.58 mm). (2) The ECM community had lower field soil water-holding capacity (p < 0.05) but 42–78% higher soil non-capillary water capacity than that of AM and AM + ECM (p < 0.05). (3) ECM forests were characterized by low tree species evenness, big-sized trees, and low bulk density, favoring increasing ecosystem water-holding capacities. Moreover, increasing ECM tree dominance enhanced the contribution of community structure to water-holding variations. (4) ECM trees increased ecosystem water-holding functions by direct effects (mainly on the litter) and indirect effects from soil physics (mainly on the soils) or tree size (mainly on the canopy) regulations. This study highlighted that ECM trees enhanced water-holding capacity, providing important information for planting and managing temperate water conservation forests.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Divergent growth and responses of conifer and broad-leaved trees to
           warming-drying climate in a semi-arid region, northern China

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      Abstract: Abstract Forests provide irreplaceable ecosystem services for human society and prevent environmental degradation but climate change has substantially undermined these fundamental functions. It is therefore important to examine the responses and adaptation of different tree species to climate warming. Here, we investigated how climate warming has affected tree growth patterns and growth-climate responses of a conifer (Pinus tabuliformis) and two broad-leaved species (Populus davidiana and Betula platyphylla) in a temperate semi-arid region in the northern China. Our results showed that P. tabuliformis had a similar regional growth pattern and two broad-leaved species shared an interspecific growth similarity at the same site. Broad-leaved trees had a higher recovery and resilience to drought than the conifer while conifers were more resistant to drought compared to broad-leaved trees, indicating a faster drought-response of broad-leaved species than that of conifers. The warming climate has hindered the tree growth by exacerbating water-deficit, and in particular, water availability has become the limiting factor for the growth of pines in the area. Trees coped with the water-deficit by taking advantage of non-growing season water to compensate the water source for tree growth. The study not only revealed the differences of growth-climate responses between species but also highlighted the necessity to consider species-specific adaptation to climate warming and diversify forest management strategies.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Mechanisms shaping the functional diversity of birds’ composition in the
           primeval forest ecosystem of the Białowieża National Park

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      Abstract: Abstract Functional diversity of bird assemblages has been disproportionally less recognized than taxonomic diversity. Especially, it has been less assessed in temperate primeval forests, serving as a reference point to the vast majority of forests more or less transformed by human activity. Therefore we aimed to determine the functional diversity of bird assemblages at the three levels of forest ecosystem organization: forest types, forest layers, and forest structures, and to determine mechanisms shaping the functional diversity of bird composition under primeval conditions of the Białowieża National Park (NE Poland). We used observations from a regular network of 96 points within six permanent plots in ash-alder and oak-lime-hornbeam forests, and we calculated functional diversity components and community-weighted mean values of birds’ functional traits. Despite higher taxonomic diversity and functional richness in the ash-alder forest, we found higher values of other functional diversity indices the in oak-lime-hornbeam forest. We also found differences in taxonomic and functional diversity among forest layers. We attributed mechanisms shaping the bird assemblages in ash-alder forests with habitat filtering, while niche partitioning or limiting similarity in oak-lime-hornbeam habitat. Bird assemblages on the crown and emergent layers seem to be shaped by niche partitioning mechanisms, whereas bird composition at shrub and understory levels seems to be shaped by habitat filters. Our study revealed that structural diversity at all three levels is crucial for maintaining the functional diversity of bird assemblages in the primeval forest.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Exploring the effects of different fertilizer application durations on the
           functional microbial profiles of soil carbon and nitrogen cycling by using
           metagenomics in Paulownia plantations in a subtropical zone

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      Abstract: Abstract Paulownia fortunei, one of the world’s fastest growing timber tree species, is universally applied with fertilizer as a management approach to meet the nutrient requirements for efficient cultivation. The substantial effects of fertilizer on soil microorganisms in Paulownia plantations have been empirically tested; however, the successive chronosequence of soil microbial carbon and nitrogen functional genes under different fertilizer application durations remains limited. The objective of this study was to explore the characteristics of soil microorganisms involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling and greenhouse gas (GHG) production under different fertilizer application durations. Different fertilizer treatments, i.e., the short-term group (SG) versus the long-term group (LG), and durations were applied to subtropical plantations in southern China and compared with zonal evergreen broad-leaved forests. Results showed that fertilizer treatment significantly increased the relative abundance of Acidobacteriota and the expression of nirK and nosZ. The functional groups that dominated metabolism in SG and LG treatments belonged to Actinobacteria and Acidobacteriota, respectively, suggesting that the nutrient preference of microorganisms in forest soil may change from copiotrophs to oligotrophs with increasing fertilizer application duration. Correlation network analysis showed that the communities that dominated the carbon and nitrogen cycles belonged to Actinobacteria and Acidobacteriota, respectively, and were closely related to ammonium nitrogen and available iron. Actinobacteria and Acidobacteriota were likely the major taxa that affected soil GHG production under different fertilizer application durations. We concluded that long-term fertilizer use changed the preference of microbial nutrient uptake into recalcitrant nutrients, and the sensitivity of the microbial community to nutrients gradually decreased with increasing fertilizer application time. The dominant Actinobacteria affected soil carbon and nitrogen cycles largely by stimulating denitrification to increase the release of nitrous oxide, which might lead to the loss of nitrogen components and the intensification of the GHG effect with increasing fertilizer application time.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Community forest dependency: re-examining established thoughts with
           empirical evidence from Eastern India

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      Abstract: Abstract The distance between forest and forest villages as a factor has specific importance in designing the interface of forest dependency. Scholars have widely adopted the forest dependency model, which, by indirectly utilising the distance decay principle, can interpret the distance impact on forest dependency. The present empirical study thus attempted to understand how, in the case of Indian forestry, community dependency altered in relation to its distance from the forest. What are the associated elements that shaped such differences, and finally, is it possible for the existing forest dependency model to explain this distance interference using the distance decay principle' In achieving these goals using multiple linear regression, the study tried to understand the impact of distance along with other factors of forest dependency in an Indian protected forest region. Further, using bivariate logistic regression, it identified the differential pattern of dependency in the forest core and fringe villages in association with their purposes and the nature of the collection. Finally, the overall findings revealed a different kind of distance and forest dependency interrelation based on the differential purposes and nature of collections that denied the acceptance of the above-mentioned model and principle in the setting of forest dependency in rural India.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Genetic origin of two Italian provenances I11 and I15 compared to possible
           eight American IUFRO provenances of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii
           (Mirb.) Franco) from North America

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      Abstract: Abstract In IUFRO experimental plots of 1969–1970, two 'Italian' provenances, I11 and I15, of unknown genetic origins, have consistently exhibited remarkable performance and stability over time and space in previous studies. It was deemed essential to acquire knowledge about the genetic origin area and conduct a genetic characterization of these two Italian provenances for their formal registration. Considering the observed intraspecific genetic variation across the American geographic cline, it was imperative to ensure that the selected provenances adequately represented diverse eco-physiological regions within the species range. To achieve this, most likely American provenances were selected, building upon historical document hypotheses and aiming to cover various geo-climatic areas. Specifically, five coastal variety and three interior variety provenances were chosen, two for each major geo-climatic region. The results obtained, using seven microsatellites, through four genetic structure analysis methods, predominantly attributed I11 to the area around 1080 origin, Washington Cascades region and 1094, Oregon Coast area. Similarly, I15 was primarily attributed to the area around the 1096 provenances, the Oregon Cascades region, compared to other coastal areas it appeared to differ. Among the three interior origins, 1162 from Arizona, Interior South area, exhibited intermediate genetic characteristics between the two varieties, despite its geographical location falling within the range of the interior variety. Similar to our expectations, comparing the distinct characteristics of the origin areas for each Italian provenance, it becomes feasible to complete their certification as 'seed stands' and to plan an appropriate management strategy for the species' diffusion.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Drivers of intraspecific variation in fecundity in rowan (Sorbus
           aucuparia)

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      Abstract: Abstract Understanding the variation in fecundity, the reproductive capacity of individual trees, is crucial for predicting population dynamics and ecosystem functioning. However, estimating tree fecundity is challenging due to the large variation in seed production observed between trees and across years that necessitates logistically challenging long-term monitoring. This study aimed to investigate the factors influencing fecundity in rowan trees (Sorbus aucuparia) using a 22-year fruit-count dataset in 167 individual trees. We examined the relationship between fecundity and intrinsic (DBH, height, and leaf nutrient concentration) and extrinsic factors (soil nutrients, light availability, and neighborhood crowding). Our findings revealed that diameter at breast height (DBH) better explained variation in fecundity than height. After accounting for tree size using DBH, light availability had the strongest, positive effect on fecundity and was the major limiting factor for rowan’s fecundity. At the same time, neighborhood crowding index with conspecifics also showed significant, but negative correlation with fecundity, suggesting competition for pollinators among rowan trees. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of seed production ecology and can inform management and conservation efforts that aim for increased fruit supply, either for plant populations or fruit consumers.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Riparian buffer zones in production forests create unequal costs among
           forest owners

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      Abstract: Abstract Riparian buffer zones (RBZs) are an important instrument for environmental policies for water and biodiversity protection in managed forests. We investigate the variation of the cost of implementing RBZs within different property size classes across the size range of non-industrial forest owner properties in Southern Sweden. Using the Heureka PlanWise decision support system, we quantified the cost of setting aside RBZs or applying alternative management in them, as the relative loss of harvest volume and of net present value per property. We did this for multiple simulated as well as real-world property distributions. The variation of cost distribution among small properties was 4.2–6.9 times higher than among large properties. The interproperty cost inequality decreased non-linearly with increasing property size and levelled off from around 200 ha. We conclude that RBZs, due to the irregular distribution of streams, cause highly unequal financial consequences for owners, with some small property owners bearing a disproportionally high cost. This adds to previous studies showing how environmental considerations differentially affect property owners. We recommend decision makers to stimulate the uptake of RBZs by alleviating these inequalities between forest owners by including appropriate cost sharing or compensation mechanisms in their design.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Limited seed dispersal, allelopathy and unfavorable microclimatic
           conditions prevent the recovery of oak forests within Eucalyptus
           plantations

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      Abstract: Abstract Plantations of exotic trees were proposed as an alternative to restore native forests in degraded lands, because they can attract seed dispersers and modulate the microclimate beneath their canopies. However, the large-scale introduction of exotic tree plantations can negatively affect native species by high competitiveness for soil resources and light, while they can also release allelopathic compounds that inhibit the germination and growth of other plants. In this study, we tested the suitability of Eucalyptus camaldulensis plantations to assist the restoration of degraded lands in central Mexico, which were originally covered with oak forests. For this, we sampled soil seed banks within forest remnants and plantations, which showed that the animal-mediated dispersal of oak propagules from forests inwards plantations is reduced. Additionally, we conducted germination trials that evidenced that the leaves of Eucalyptus trees contain allelopathic compounds that inhibit the germination of oaks seeds, also showing that these compounds accumulate in the soil of plantations. We finally conducted field experiments in which soil form forests and plantations were translocated between these two habitats, and acorns were sowed on both soil types. These field experiments revealed that, besides the accumulation of allelopathic compounds in soils of plantations, oak recruitment in these habitats is also impaired by unfavorable microclimatic conditions. Therefore, we conclude that Eucalyptus plantations are not promoting the recovery of native oak forests in central Mexico and, instead, alternative ecological restoration methods should be applied for reaching this aim.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Marginal water use efficiencies of different plant functional types along
           an elevation gradient in subalpine regions

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      Abstract: Abstract Stomata play a critical role in surface–atmosphere exchange by controlling the flux of water and CO2 between the leaf and the atmosphere. However, the driving factors for the vital parameter, the marginal water cost of the carbon gain (λ), are poorly understood in the subalpine regions. Therefore, we studied λ in subalpine plants at all across altitudes. There was a parabolic pattern in λ of trees with increasing elevation, the highest at 2700 m asl and 3500 m asl for the broadleaf trees and the coniferous trees, respectively, while the λ of species of herbs and shrub decreased with elevation. For all species, λ were higher during the mid-growing season than during the early and late growing seasons under the same conditions. Mean λ values were higher in herbs and shrubs than in trees, indicating a more conservative strategy for water use in trees than in herbs and shrubs in forest communities. Furthermore, a higher λ value of the broadleaf tree than of the coniferous tree suggests that angiosperm trees use water more profligately than gymnosperm trees. Environmental factors had opposite effects on λ for herbs, shrubs, and trees. Soil conditions were positively correlated with λ for herbs and shrubs, but negatively for trees. Vegetation factors negatively influenced λ for herbs and shrubs, while no significant relationship was found with trees. From the results of the structural equation model, the improved empirical models for the simulation of stomatal conductance(gs) simulation based on the optimal stomatal behavior theory can accurately estimate the gs of the main species in subalpine forest communities.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Carbon and nitrogen, humic and labile fractions in soil under clonal
           eucalyptus stands from cerrado

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      Abstract: Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate carbon and (C) and nitrogen (N) of the light organic matter in labile and humic fractions of the soil in a chronosequence of clonal Eucalyptus urophylla. The study was carried out on six different sites in the South-Central region of Maranhão state, northeastern Brazil, inserted in the Cerrado biome. Soil was sampled in five clonal Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake stands of different ages and one in the area with old-growth forest (OG), which represents the native vegetation area. Soil samples were collected in the 0–20, 20–40, and 40–60 cm layers to determine textural class, bulk density, C, and N in the light organic matter of labile and humic fractions. Eucalyptus plantations can have great capacity to increase stocks of soil C and N, humic, and labile fractions over the years, presenting results equal or higher than a native Cerrado forest. Thus, Eucalyptus plantations come as an effective lad use to sink C and increase soil nutrient levels.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • The illegal trade in rosewood in Indonesia

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      Abstract: Abstract Rosewoods are among the most valuable traded hardwoods, and there is a significant illegal trade. From 2017 onwards the international trade in all species of Dalbergia rosewood is regulated through the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora. I focus on two species of rosewood that occur in parts of Indonesia, Dalbergia latifolia and D. sissoo, to assess the extent of the illegal trade and to analyse geographical and temporal patterns of wildlife crime. Based on 67 seizure reports from 2014 to 2022 I show that (a) 117 logs of D. sissoo and 4,285 logs of D. latifolia were confiscated, (b) seizures occurred on the islands of Sumatra (16 seizures; 1,190 logs), Java (43; 1,780 logs), and Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa and Timor (8; 1,408 logs), (c) while there was an increase in the number of seizures per year, there were no seasonal differences in seizure activities. For 10% of the logs there was supporting evidence that they were taken from State managed forests and 18% was taken from conservation areas, thus causing more damage than just the removal of individual trees. Seizures in Indonesia over this period equals 0.12 ± 0.04% of the legal rosewood export. The illegal trade is dominated by Indonesians rather than foreign nationals and the direction of trade is towards Java from where > 95% will be exported to China. While policies are in place concerning rosewood seizures and stockpiling (including auctioning or destruction) in practise it is unclear where seized rosewood ends up. When used with caution, analysis of seizure data offers a valuable means to gain insights in illicit activities that normally remain hidden from view.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Analyzing the environmental risk factors of European spruce bark beetle
           damage at the local scale

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      Abstract: Abstract The frequent outbreaks of European spruce bark beetle Ips typographus (L.) have destroyed huge amounts of Norway spruce Picea abies (L.) forests in central and Northern Europe. Identifying the risk factors and estimating the damage level is important for strategic damage control. The risk factors of forest damage by spruce bark beetles have mostly been analyzed on the landscape scale, while the in-stand risk factors have been less investigated. This study aims at exploring the local-scale risk factors in a flat area with spruce-dominated forest in southern Sweden. The investigated factors include four abiotic factors, i.e., soil wetness, solar radiation, slope gradient, and aspect, and three biotic factors, i.e., the number of deciduous trees and trees that died from attacks in previous years that remained (TreesLeft) and removed (TreesRemoved) from the forest stand. We put up 24 pheromone bags in six stands attacked by bark beetle in the previous years, resulting in different numbers of infested trees in each plot. We explored in which microenvironment a pheromone bag resulted in more colonization, the impact radius of each factor, and the necessary factors for a risk model. The environmental factors were obtained from remote sensing-based products and images. A generalized linear model (GLM) was used with the environmental factors as the explanatory variables and the damage levels as the response variables, i.e., the number of attacked trees for the plot scale, and healthy/infested for the single-tree scale. Using 50 m and 15 m radius of the environmental factors resulted in the best fit for the model at plot and individual tree scales, respectively. At those radii, the damage risk increased both at plot and individual tree level when spruce were surrounded by more deciduous trees, surrounded by dead trees that had been removed from the forest, and spruces located at the north and east slopes (315°–135° of aspect, > 2° slope). Soil wetness, solar radiation, and remaining standing dead trees in the surrounding did not significantly impact the damage level in the microenvironment of the study area. The GLM risk model yielded an overall accuracy of 0.69 in predicting individual trees being infested or healthy. Our efforts to investigate the risk factors provide a context for wall-to-wall mapping in-stand infestation risks, using remote sensing-based data.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • A remote sensing assessment of oak forest recovery after postfire
           restoration

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      Abstract: Abstract Mediterranean Europe is experiencing a rise in severe wildfires, resulting in growing socioeconomic and ecological impacts. Postfire restoration has become a crucial approach to mitigate these impacts and promote ecosystem recovery. However, the ecological effects of such interventions are still not well understood. We employed remote sensing techniques to evaluate the impact of postfire emergency stabilization on the recovery of deciduous oak forests in Portugal. Our study encompassed 3013 sampling points located in areas with and without postfire interventions. We chose the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as an indicator of oak forest recovery over a four-year period following wildfires that took place in 2016 and 2017. We used a Generalized Additive Mixed Model (GAMM) to assess how NDVI changed over time as a function of postfire restoration, fire characteristics, topography, and postfire drought events. We found that postfire restoration had a significant positive effect on NDVI recovery over time, although this effect was small. Severe drought and fire recurrence up to six fires had a negative effect on the recovery of NDVI. Conversely, severe wetness and either low or high burn severities had a positive effect on recovery. Our study emphasizes the importance of monitoring postfire restoration effects on forest recovery to guide restoration planning and improve forest management in burned areas. This becomes even more relevant under increased wildfire severity predicted for the Mediterranean region interacting with other climate-driven disturbances, which will further negatively affect forest recovery.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Association of Dryocola boscaweniae, Gibbsiella greigii and Gibbsiella
           quercinecans with oak decline in Iran

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      Abstract: Abstract Tree decline is described as the loss in tree vigor and increased mortality initiated by climate change events, and also involves pathogens and pests. Stem bleeding and bark canker of oak (Quercus castaneifolia) were observed in Mazandaran and Golestan forests during summer 2020–2021. Symptoms included cracks in the outer bark, stem tissue necrosis, bleeding, dark exudate and dark brown lesions in the inner bark. Eighty-nine strains with a metallic green sheen pigment were isolated on eosin methylene blue agar. The pathogenicity of all strains recovered in this study was assessed on oak seedlings and acorns. Forty-four strains produced rotting on oak acorns 2 weeks after inoculation. Inoculation of six representative strains on oak seedlings resulted in twig dieback of the plants after 4 weeks. Strains were negative for Gram reaction, oxidase and levan formation from sucrose. The gyrB and infB gene sequence similarity values of strains were 98.87–99.57% with the type strain of Gibbsiella quercinecans, 98.66–98.86% with the type strain of Gibbsiella greigii and 99.46–99.64% with the type strain of Dryocola boscaweniae. In the phylogenetic tree based on concatenated sequences of gyrB and infB genes or each gene individually, the strains were divided into three clusters containing the type strains of G. quercinecans, G. greigii and D. boscaweniae, each with high bootstrap support and confirming their identity as belonging to these three species. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of oak bacterial canker caused by D. boscaweniae, G. greigii and G. quercinecans in Iran and the first report of D. boscaweniae associated with oak decline symptoms.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Forest history from a single tree species perspective: natural occurrence,
           near extinction and reintroduction of European yew (Taxus baccata L.) on
           the Darss-Zingst peninsula, southern Baltic Sea coast

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      Abstract: Abstract The forests along the southern Baltic Sea coast harbour some stands of the rare and endangered European yew (Taxus baccata L.), which are hypothesised to be autochthonous. Using the example of an occurrence on the Darss-Zingst peninsula, the population dynamics of the yew since the late Holocene are interdisciplinarily investigated and linked to the forest history of this area. Pollen analysis shows that yew has been present in the study area for at least 2600 years and thus indeed represents an autochthonous tree species in the area. The yew was probably originally part of a second tree storey and of forest margins within a mixed forest mainly consisting of several deciduous tree species and Scots pine. Historical evidence reveals that yew was still occurring in the forest in the middle of the eighteenth century, but then had nearly disappeared by the end of the nineteenth century. This was caused by several factors including forest grazing by livestock, high game populations and clear-cutting. First replanting of yew took place in the 1930s/1940s and 1950s/1960s, followed by planting campaigns in the 1990s and 2000s. Planting material from local and regional autochthonous relict populations was used, at least in part. The current yew population mainly comprises young individuals with a total number of ca. 1300 trees. It has thus been possible here to re-establish an autochthonous yew occurrence that was nearly extinct in historical times. This local example of targeted re-enrichment of native tree diversity may also encourage further measures to give this species a new chance again elsewhere in the wider region.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • The effects of canopy gaps on soil nutrient properties: a meta-analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Canopy gaps are a prevalent disturbance form in forest ecosystems that promote forest regeneration and succession by modifying the heterogeneity of the microenvironment. However, a significant knowledge gap exists in comprehending the global-scale impact of canopy gaps on soil nutrient properties, which is related to forest management and conservation tactics. In this study, 518 paired observations derived from 31 peer-reviewed articles were meta-analyzed to evaluate the overall response of soil nutrient properties to canopy gaps. The results showed that canopy gaps increased NO3−–N (+ 22.20%) and MBP (+ 194.17%). The canopy gap decreased the content of TN, MBC, and C:P ratio by 9.27%, 19.58%, and 19.25%, respectively. The size of canopy gaps significantly reduced SOC (−14.37%), MBC (−27.45%), TN (−11.98%), NH4+–N (−65.26%), C:N (−15.77%, −16.02%) and C:P ratio (−28.92%), but significantly increases NO3−–N (+ 37.25%). Hence, it is advisable to establish a critical gap size that caters to the specific soil fertility requirements of various regions for the optimal release of soil nutrients. These findings hold substantial significance for optimizing canopy gap management, comprehensively understanding the impact of canopy gaps on soil nutrient properties, and facilitating decision-making to assess soil fertility following canopy gap disturbances.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Ecotypic variation in multiple traits of European beech: selection of
           suitable provenances based on performance and stability

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      Abstract: Abstract Induced by climate change associated disturbances and further promoted by changes in forest management, the proportion of European beech, a highly competitive climax species, is increasing in Central Europe. However, its climatic stability is questioned by the recent loss of vitality. In this regard, the evaluation of seed sources used for reforestation receives great attention. Here, we present a multi-trait evaluation of height, basal area and stem quality assessed over 25 years for 85 provenances grown at three sites in northern, western and eastern Germany. Considerable provenance differentiation exists, explaining 21% (proportion of trees with acceptable stem form) to 45% (basal area) of the variance on single sites and 20 to 39% across sites, while provenance by environment interactions are absent. On the landscape level, this results in distinct patterns with spatially adjacent provenances showing a similar trait expression. These patterns are highly similar for height and basal area but divergent for stem form. They could be directly linked to geographic variables with multivariate regression tree analysis that captured 58% of the phenotypic variation, delineating eleven ‘ecotypes’ shaped by local adaptation. A selection based on two multi-trait indices gives highly concordant results. Particularly, the intermediate elevations of the central highlands in Western Germany host highly suitable provenances. Lower elevation provenances from continental climates in the south-east profit from the transfer to favorable growing conditions. Since the majority of provenances was already exposed to elevated temperatures compared to their origin during the observation period, this study gives a first indication for the potential benefits of assisted migration facing climate change.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Xylem adjustment and growth response of early- and late-successional tree
           species to rapid warming

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate changes have dramatically affected forest succession. However, how trees at different successional stages respond to climate warming is unclear in the subtropics. Here, we compared the radial growth (RW) and xylem features of the early-successional stage Castanea mollissima and late-successional stage Quercus fabri in subtropical forests and assessed their response to climate changes. All parameters, including RW, number of vessels (VN), vessel density (VD), mean (MVA) and total (TVA) vessel area, percentage of conductive area within xylem (RCTA), theoretical (Kh) and xylem-specific (Ks) hydraulic conductivity, except for MVA of C. mollissima were significantly higher than those of Q. fabri. During the drought period, a notable adverse correlation between two cluster parameters of Q. fabri, associated with hydraulic safety and efficiency, suggested a pronounced hydraulic trade-off in Q. fabri under drought conditions. Castanea mollissima was more sensitive to climate and more prone to hydraulic failure than Q. fabri. Temperatures and moisture conditions positively and negatively affected the hydraulic efficiency-related parameters of C. mollissima. Moisture conditions in the previous summer and winter were significantly negatively and positively related to the radial growth of both species. The impact of generalized warming was not evident due to variations in hydraulic strategies and species characteristics, trade-offs between non-growing and growing season climates, and specific competition. If climate warming continues, C. mollissima growth will probably significantly decline due to the increasing risk of hydraulic failure. Warming may accelerate species replacement and forest succession in the study area by changing their lifespans and competitive relationships.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Efficiency analysis and CO2 emission reduction strategies in the US forest
           sector: a data envelopment analysis approach

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      Abstract: Abstract Industrial economic activities produce pollutants and environmentally sustainable production systems in forestry aim to minimize these undesirable outputs while maintaining high production and economic growth. In this contribution, we assume that in addition to plot-specific inputs and outputs, there are some contextual variables that may be exogenously fixed or may be under the control of the decision-makers. In this sense, we first propose a novel and practical approach to calculate environmental efficiency by reducing undesirable products. Then, we utilize an inverse data envelopment analysis (IDEA) model to effectively manage and reduce CO2 emissions. In doing so, the applied models have been utilized to evaluate the efficiencies of 89 forest plots in the USA. Given our estimations in a real application to the forest plots, the study revealed that the average environmental efficiency score is nearly 0.75 (out of 1). However, there is potential for improvement by adjusting the impacts of contextual factors, which could raise the score to approximately 0.8. Furthermore, the analysis indicates a positive correlation between ownership and environmental efficiency, suggesting that increased ownership leads to higher environmental efficiency. Conversely, temperature exhibits a negative correlation with environmental efficiency. Finally, the results obtained from the IDEA indicate that in order to reduce undesirable outputs by a specific level of 5–10%, it is necessary to decrease other inputs and outputs. This is because, under the assumption of weak disposability, reducing the level of undesirable outputs requires a reduction in certain factors that influence production capacity. In other words, achieving the desired reduction in undesirable outputs inevitably involves diminishing certain aspects of the production process. As the major conclusion, the emergence of IDEA as a powerful tool for sensitivity analysis, along with its flexible nature, offers exciting opportunities for research and practical applications in various fields, including forestry activities. It has the potential to enhance overall environmental efficiency and enable better control over GHG emissions levels.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
 
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  Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
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Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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