Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Selbyana     Open Access  
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access  
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access  
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Forestry Studies     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Canadian Journal of Forest Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.969
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 28  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0045-5067 - ISSN (Online) 1208-6037
Published by NRC Research Press Homepage  [19 journals]
  • Wild edible mushroom knowledge and use in five forest communities in
           central México

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      Authors: Mariano Torres-Gómez, Roberto Garibay-Orijel, Diego R. Pérez-Salicrup, Alejandro Casas, Mario Guevara
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      Wild edible mushrooms are non-timber forest products highly valued as food supplements and a source of income for rural communities. The objective is to quantify the use and knowledge of wild edible mushrooms across forest socio-ecosystems of central México. We conducted 40 household structured surveys in five Mestizo communities in the state of Michoacán (central-western México) to evaluate their mycological knowledge. We also compare the knowledge of these Mestizo people with that of the surrounding Indigenous communities. We compiled and updated a list of the wild edible mushrooms used in the whole state, which contains 243 mushroom species used out of the 371 used in México. Here, in these five communities, we recorded 13 species currently used (a median of seven). In four communities, 1 kg of mushrooms on average is collected per harvesting trip, whereas in one of the communities, people extracted 3 kg of mushrooms per trip on average and 5–15 kg per season, respectively. The most used and valued species were Amanita basii, Amanita jacksonii, and Hypomyces lactifluorum. Despite being highly valued resources, land managers do not include mushrooms in the decision-making process for planning forest management. We found that knowledge and use of wild edible mushrooms in Mestizo communities are lower than those in regional Indigenous communities in localities with similar climate and forest vegetation. Fungal resources like wild edible mushrooms in the area are therefore underutilized, making forested areas more vulnerable to land-use change. Promotion of mycological knowledge may contribute to enhancing forest conservation policies.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-02T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0043
       
  • Biogeochemical responses to multiyear above-canopy applications of
           nitrogen at a jack pine (Pinus banksiana) forest in northern Alberta,
           Canada

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      Authors: Andrew M. McDonough, Shaun A. Watmough, Adam W. Bird
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      Elevated atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can alter forest biogeochemistry leading to adverse impacts on terrestrial ecosystems. Experimental studies often apply N to the forest understorey at greatly elevated loads, bypassing important canopy interactions. Using a narrow N deposition gradient (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 kg N·ha−1·year−1), we measured changes in jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) forest biogeochemistry in the bituminous sands region of northern Alberta, Canada after 5 years of above-canopy N additions. The canopy intercepted approximately 46% of applied N across all treatments, but during the final year, N interception was reduced to 7% in the highest treatment. Nitrogen concentrations in nonvascular organisms increased with treatment and N was also immobilized in decomposing litter in the highest treatment. Otherwise, vascular plant biomass, foliar chemistry, and soil processes exhibited no relationship with treatment over 5 years. This work suggests that jack pine forests in the region have a high capacity to immobilize N inputs over the short-term (5 years), which restricts other biogeochemical responses traditionally associated with elevated N deposition.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0041
       
  • Greater tree species diversity and lower intraspecific competition
           attenuate impacts from temperature increases and insect epidemics in
           boreal forests of western Quebec, Canada

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      Authors: Raphaël D. Chavardès, Lorena Balducci, Yves Bergeron, Pierre Grondin, Véronique Poirier, Hubert Morin, Fabio Gennaretti
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated how the surrounding environment influences the growth of dominant trees and their responses to temperature and insect epidemics in boreal forests of eastern Canada. We focused on 82 black spruce and jack pine focal trees in stands spanning a double gradient of species diversity and soil texture within a 36 km2 area of western Quebec. For these trees, we compared their diameter at breast height, growth rates, temperature–growth relations, and growth during insect defoliator epidemics. We used linear models to study how surrounding tree attributes and soil properties affected the growth of focal trees. Models showed that tree growth responses and responses to temperature and insect epidemics were generally negative with higher intraspecific competition and positive with greater tree species diversity. Growth of both species benefitted from lower soil sand content. Our research offers novel insights on the potential role of the surrounding environment, notably tree competition and species diversity, in mitigating the vulnerability of eastern Canada's boreal trees to anthropogenic climate change and insect epidemics.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-09-27T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0114
       
  • Economic analysis of uneven-aged forest management in the southeastern
           United States

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      Authors: Andres Susaeta, Ajay Sharma, Kotryna Klizentyte, Damian C. Adams
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      We determine the economic revenues and optimal forest management of uneven-aged loblolly pine, longleaf pine, and slash pine forests considering timber and carbon benefits in the southeastern United States. Our results show that uneven-aged management of southern pines generates positive total revenues, with the exception of those stands managed with high residual basal areas and long cutting cycles. The uneven-aged management of pine forests is economically more attractive with loblolly pine stands than with longleaf pine or slash pine for all cutting cycles and residual basal areas; on average, loblolly pine returns $1389.60·ha−1 more than slash pine and $1500.70·ha−1 more than longleaf pine for all cutting cycles. For uneven-aged loblolly pine forests, our results suggest that landowners should experience highest profits with the shortest viable cutting cycle (10 years) and a medium-high residual basal area (11.5 m2·ha−1). For uneven-aged longleaf pine forests, landowners would be economically better off with a longer cutting cycle (20 years) and a lower residual basal area (6.9 m2·ha−1). Notably, uneven-aged management of longleaf pine and slash pine for timber production becomes unprofitable with low-medium or high residual basal areas (9.2–11.5 m2·ha−1).
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0109
       
  • Soil fungal communities vary more with soil characteristics than tree
           diversity at a local scale

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      Authors: Steve Kutos, Elle M. Barnes, J.D. Lewis
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      Soil fungal communities vary spatially due to factors including variations in plant diversity and soil characteristics; however, the relative influences of these factors on composition and therefore function remain unclear. Small-scale variation in fungal communities may drive local variation in nutrient cycling and decomposition and may respond more to local factors compared with large climatic variations. Clarifying the roles of these factors can improve our predictions of soil fungal community and biogeochemical cycling responses to anthropogenic changes. Therefore, we examined relationships among abiotic and biotic factors and soil fungal communities associated with sapling and mature trees in a mixed-hardwood woodland. We also compared community composition and fungal enzymatic activity. Fungal community composition was most associated with spatial heterogeneity of soil characteristics, while sapling and mature tree species identity were poor predictors of community composition. Further, most of the compositional variation was unexplained by measured variables, suggesting stochasticity and other environmental characteristics may drive spatial variation in these communities. Additionally, enzymatic activity did not clearly correlate with fungal community composition. Overall, soil fungal communities and enzymatic activity adjacent to trees in this woodland are most likely influenced by soil characteristics and not plant species identity.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-09-08T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2021-0360
       
  • Identifying and analyzing spatial and temporal patterns of
           lightning-ignited wildfires in Western Canada from 1981 to 2018

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      Authors: Olivia S.R. Aftergood, Mike D. Flannigan
      First page: 1399
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      To assess wildfire risk linked to lightning-caused wildfires, the present study tests the spatial- and temporal-scale distribution variability of lightning fires in Western Canada between 1981 and 2018. We examined clustering, trends, distances between clusters, and the fire season. For this study, the nearest neighbours, K-function, Moran's I, Mann–Kendall, and the Getis-ord Gi* statistics were used. These statistics were visualized by a Space Time Cube model with a hexagon grid. Lightning-ignited wildfires cluster spatially up to 270 km with an observed overall nonsignificant decreasing trend for the number of fires. Overall, northeastern Alberta, central Saskatchewan, and southeastern British Columbia show clustering of lightning fires. In June, there is significant clustering in northwestern and eastern Alberta, while in July fires cluster in northeastern Alberta and in southeastern British Columbia. In August, fire clusters occurred only in southeastern and south-central British Columbia. These results highlight regions that are experiencing persistent lightning fire clustering activity. This provides a focal point to assess wildfire risk to communities and values at risk, while informing local and regional management agencies in preparedness, resource capacity management, and detection. Additionally, it provides a baseline for future research into biophysical modelling of wildfire initiations.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2021-0353
       
  • How do advance regeneration and planted seedlings of Thuja occidentalis
           and Picea rubens acclimate under a first irregular shelterwood cut'

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      Authors: Claudelle Bourque, Daniel Dumais, Jean-Claude Ruel, Catherine Larouche, Patricia Raymond
      First page: 1412
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      Eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) and red spruce (Picea rubens) contribute to the biodiversity and resilience of mixedwood forests. However, cuts that remove most or all the forest cover can cause the decline of these species. Among partial cutting options, the irregular shelterwood system (ISS) can create successful conditions for the development of advance regeneration and enrichment planting. We studied 6 years of ecophysiology of lower advance regeneration and planted seedlings of eastern white cedar and red spruce growing under a first ISS cut according to three cutting intensities: light cut (35% removal, 20 m2·ha−1 residual basal area), moderate cut (42%, 18 m2·ha−1), and heavy cut (52%, 15 m2·ha−1). Light-saturated photosynthesis and height growth of planted cedar and both spruce types decreased with increasing cutting intensity, in response to an increase in competing vegetation. Therefore, to limit the negative impact of competing species on cedar and spruce regeneration, we recommend protecting tall advance regeneration (2 m+) during partial cut operations and using large-sized containerized seedlings (40–50 cm height) for enrichment planting. Results also suggest that a mechanical release could help optimize the physio-morphology and growth of both regeneration types of cedar and red spruce.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0072
       
  • Interactive decision support and trade-off analysis for sustainable forest
           landscape planning under deep uncertainty

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      Authors: Babooshka Shavazipour, Dmitry Podkopaev, Kaisa Miettinen
      First page: 1423
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      Sustainable environmental management often involves long-term time horizons and multiple conflicting objectives and, by nature, is affected by different sources of uncertainty. Many sources of uncertainty, such as climate change or government policies, cannot be addressed using probabilistic models, and, therefore, they can be seen to contain deep uncertainty. In this setting, the variety of possible future states is represented as a set of scenarios lacking any information about the likelihood of occurring. Integrating deep uncertainty into multiobjective decision support increases complexity, calling for the elaboration of appropriate methods and tools. This paper proposes a novel interactive multi-scenario multiobjective approach to support decision-making and trade-off analysis in sustainable forest landscape planning under multiple sources of uncertainty. It includes new preference simulation models aimed at reducing the decision-maker’s cognitive load and supporting the preference elicitation process. The proposed approach is applied in a case study of long-term forest landscape planning with four sustainability objectives in 12 scenarios and a forestry expert as the decision-maker. The approach is demonstrated to be efficient in exploring trade-offs in different scenarios, helping the expert gain deep insights into the problem, understand the consequences of alternative strategies, and find the most preferred robust strategy.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0084
       
  • Competition intensity varies with hardwood species identity and constrains
           stand-level productivity in southeastern pine–hardwood mixtures compared
           to loblolly pine monocultures

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      Authors: John L. Willis, Michael A. Blazier
      First page: 1439
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      We examined the performance of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.), and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in two-species pine–hardwood mixtures (sweetgum : loblolly pine and cherrybark oak : loblolly pine) at various planting densities (1482–1976 trees per hectare (TPH)) over 23 years in northern Louisiana, USA. Species were planted in alternating rows with hardwood establishment occurring 1 year prior to loblolly pine. Mixtures were also compared to loblolly pine monocultures at a common density (1482 TPH) to assess whether mixing improved productivity. Sweetgum exerted more competitive pressure on loblolly pine than cherrybark oak. At final measurement, sweetgum survival statistically exceeded that of loblolly pine across mixture density. Moreover, sweetgum cumulative basal area and volume growth nearly tripled that of loblolly pine in balanced high-density mixtures (1976 TPH, 50 pine : 50 hardwood). In contrast, cherrybark oak basal area and volume growth did not significantly exceed loblolly pine at any density. At a common density (1482 TPH), loblolly pine monoculture cumulative basal area and volume significantly exceeded those of mixtures with sweetgum and cherrybark oak by 19% and 24%, respectively. Collectively, these results indicate that growing loblolly pine in mixture with these two species did not produce complementary interactions and negatively affected stand-level growth.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-23T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0125
       
  • Immediate effects of chemical and mechanical soil preparation techniques
           on epigaeic arthropod assemblages during reclamation of in situ oil and
           gas sites in northern Alberta, Canada

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      Authors: H.E. James Hammond, Philip G.K. Hoffman, Jaime Pinzon, Richard Krygier, Linhao Wu, Dustin J. Hartley
      First page: 1459
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      Epigaeic arthropods have been used worldwide as indicators of post-disturbance recovery in many different types of ecosystems. We used them to evaluate the merit of different reclamation prescriptions applied to areas disturbed by oil and gas exploration and extraction. We compared the short-term effects of different mechanical and chemical site preparation techniques on the epigaeic arthropod fauna of previously reclaimed borrow pits in arrested succession with results from plots in untreated disturbed sites and undisturbed adjacent forest. In general, arthropod diversity increased and abundance decreased with the severity of soil disturbance involved in the silvicultural prescription. We place arthropod communities into four discrete groups reflected in the treatments and the environmental characteristics of the sites: forest species, grassland species, species primarily found in herbicide plots, and species found in disturbed soil. Individual borrow pits accounted for a significant amount of variation in faunal assemblages, suggesting that site location, vagaries of colonization, or disturbance history play a significant role in how the fauna recovers post disturbance. Our study provides baseline data required to document the trajectory of recovery in these sites. Long-term monitoring is essential to evaluate the relative usefulness of reclamation prescriptions in meeting targets established by law.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0097
       
  • Factors influencing black spruce reproductive potential in the northern
           boreal forest of Quebec

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      Authors: Tadeusz B. Splawinski, Yan Boucher, Mathieu Bouchard, David F. Greene, Sylvie Gauthier, Isabelle Auger, Luc Sirois, Osvaldo Valeria, Yves Bergeron
      First page: 1499
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      The reproductive ecology of the semi-serotinous species black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) in northern boreal forests remains poorly understood. There is a general lack of data on cone/seed production and viability as a function of biotic tree-level characteristics and abiotic variables. No studies currently exist to quantify these differences over a large gradient in temperature, elevation, and precipitation. Extensive physical, ecological, dendrometric, and reproductive data were collected from young to very old black spruce stands in northern Quebec. ANOVA and general linear mixed models were used to examine interannual cone production, and the relative importance of the biotic and abiotic explanatory factors in determining total cone production; length of the cone-bearing zone; filled seeds per cone; proportion of filled seeds; and seed viability. The results illustrate that the reproductive ecology of black spruce in northern cold forests is mainly explained by biotic variables such as age and diameter at breast height, and by abiotic variables related to temperature such as elevation, length of the growing season, and growing degree-days. Black spruce exhibits a lower reproductive potential in northern cold forests, making it possibly less resilient to increased fire frequency, particularly in unproductive and very young or very old stands.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0092
       
  • A decision support tool for forwarding operations with sequence-dependent
           loading

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      Authors: Linnea J. Hansson, Victoria Forsmark, Patrik Flisberg, Mikael Rönnqvist, Anders Mörk, Petrus Jönsson
      First page: 1513
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      High productivity in forest harvesting requires efficient forwarding. Planning is complicated by multiple choices of routes and their order, the number and types of assortments, the loading sequence, and pile organization at the landing. This paper develops and tests a decision support tool for forwarder routing with sequential co-loading of assortments. Input data are the harvester production file (including Global Navigation Satellite Systems tracking), placement of landing, and machine specifications. The trail network is generated from the harvester production data when devising routes to pick up all log piles, including specific assortments and volumes. Multiple assortments can be loaded along each route, and a certain loading sequence of assortments is preferred and (or) required. Sorting time during co-loading varies, depending on the assortment combinations and bunk loading pattern. Route planning is modeled using a set-partitioning problem, and the solution method is a metaheuristic based on repeated matching. In addition to routes and loading sequences, solutions include the organization of assortment piles at the landing, depending on the total volume of each assortment. The tool produces similar results to those attained by skilled forwarder operators on five clearcuts (3–11 ha) in northern Sweden, when the results are compared with data from actual forwarder production files.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0011
       
  • Cost-effectiveness of Natura 2000 forest contracts for biodiversity
           conservation

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      Authors: Seyed Mahdi Heshmatol Vaezin, Damien Marage, Serge Garcia
      First page: 1527
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      Natura 2000 contracts in the European Union aim to maintain or restore natural habitats to a favorable conservation status. This article aims to analyze the cost-effectiveness of Natura 2000 forest contracts at the individual level of intervention areas in France. The level of long-term biodiversity was assessed using ex ante and ex post levels of conservation status, evaluated on a 100-point scale. Data collection was conducted on the contract areas using a combination of plotless and line intersection sampling methods. Cost-effectiveness was analyzed by modeling a cost function of conservation measures that is estimated simultaneously with the ex ante and ex post biodiversity equations. We performed an empirical illustration based on a small number of observations, and, therefore, the results deserve to be confirmed using larger databases. The conservation measures implemented in the contracts studied had a significant effect on maintaining and restoring biodiversity. Nevertheless, we found pronounced diseconomies of scale and low cost-effectiveness. This suggests the possibility of less ecologically ambitious contracts with lower average costs. Our results also recommend new targeting and prioritizing rules to implement more cost-effective conservation measures (e.g., veteran trees) in a less costly context (e.g., targeting main tree species in larger intervention areas). These recommendations could make Natura 2000 contracts significantly more cost-effective.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2021-0204
       
  • Vulnerability of larch forests to forest fires along a latitudinal
           gradient in eastern Siberia

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      Authors: A.V. Ivanov, M. Neumann, G.F. Darman, A.V. Danilov, E.S. Susloparova, I.D. Solovyov, O.M. Kravchenko, I.N. Smuskina, S. Bryanin
      First page: 1543
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      The predicted increase in frequency and intensity of boreal forest fires is considered a significant source of carbon dioxide emissions and linked with the degradation of permafrost covering more than half of Russia. Here we analyzed the stand structure and growth of East Siberian larch forests in response to fire severity. We measured 23 sites in the southern part of eastern Siberia along a latitudinal transect with a length of more than 1500 km. Live tree volume differed significantly across geographical regions (p 
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0161
       
  • Translocating seed sources to new geoclimatic environments has limited
           effect on lumber quality of eastern Canadian white spruce

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      Authors: Isabelle Duchesne, Patrick R.N. Lenz, Martin P. Girardin, Nathalie Isabel
      First page: 1553
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Ahead of Print.
      Assisted gene flow according to expected climate gradients is considered as a forest management strategy to mitigate impacts of environmental change on forest growth. However, the effects of seed translocation on wood properties and lumber quality remain unknown. This study evaluated the effect of provenance origin on lumber production and quality at rotation age in two white spruce provenance trials established in contrasting environments in eastern Canada. Based on 108 sample trees, which resulted in 943 pieces of lumber, average volume production per tree at the southernmost site was twice that of the production at the northern site. Provenance had a significant influence on growth and lumber strength in the first sawlog but had no effect on lumber stiffness and wood density. Although visual grade yields of No. 2 and better were high in both trials (over 86%), the machine stress rated (MSR) grade potential and percentage of lumber that met the bending stiffness design values of the visual grades were generally low (12%–26%). Hence, plantation-grown lumber should preferably be machine stress rated to ensure its fitness for structural applications in buildings. Management strategies aiming to efficiently sequester carbon should primarily maximize volume productivity in northern sites, as moving seed sources north still reduces provenance productivity, while breeding programs should aim to prevent decrease in lumber stiffness due to augmented productivity and shortened rotation cycles.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Forest Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-31T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2022-0075
       
 
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