Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
La Calera     Open Access  
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Canadian Journal of Plant Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.383
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0008-4220 - ISSN (Online) 1918-1833
Published by NRC Research Press Homepage  [19 journals]
  • C17-833 camelina

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      Authors: C. Eynck, A.M. Zatylny, H.W. Klein-Gebbinck, K.C. Falk
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Camelina (Camelina sativa) elite germplasm C17-833 was developed at the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Saskatoon Research and Development Centre. It was developed through hybridization of camelina cultivar AAC 10CS0048 and F4 line 11CS0231-24-10 and subsequent pedigree selection. C17-833 yields significantly higher (114%) than the check cultivar AAC 10CS0048. It also has significantly higher seed oil content (42.6% vs. 41.9%) and significantly larger seeds (126%). C17-833 has very good resistance to downy mildew disease caused by Hyalonospora camelinae and is adapted to all soil zones of the Canadian Prairies.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-06-04T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2024-0035
       
  • Evaluation of spring-type and winter-type Brassica napus germplasm for
           genetic diversity in response to flea beetle herbivory in typical and
           atypical planting windows

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      Authors: Julian Heath, Laima Kott, Mohsen Yoosefzadeh Najafabadi, Istvan Rajcan
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Current practices of flea beetle (Phyllotreta spp.) control in Brassica napus L. rely heavily on seed treatments and due to growing concerns regarding the safety of such treatments on non-target and beneficial insect populations, genetic resistance would be beneficial for a more balanced integrated pest management strategy. However, none of the registered B. napus. canola varieties exhibit measurable resistance to flea beetle injury. To this end, an evaluation of 14 winter-type B. napus breeding lines and 15 spring-type B. napus breeding lines for resistance to flea beetle feedings was conducted, as it was found that at least one line in each family exhibited noticeably reduced flea beetle damage compared to sister lines in a breeding nursery. The study revealed natural genetic variation within B. napus for flea beetle antixenosis which could be used by dedicated breeders to develop canola varieties with higher levels of flea beetle resistance. Data indicated that host plant resistance did not vary between feeding by newly emerged adult flea beetles in the fall and the overwintered adults in the spring in either winter-type or spring-type canola, as well as for adult feeding preferences. This indicates that favourable genes identified in in either habitat-type could be used interchangeably to confer resistance even though the flea beetle life cycle is different for each planting period, while either overwintered adults or newly emerged adults can be used to evaluate feeding damage.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-15T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0105
       
  • Cropping system typologies perform differently under climate stress in
           Manitoba, Canada: multi-criteria assessment

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      Authors: S.K. Curtis, M.H. Entz, K.A. Stanley, D.J. Cattani, K.D. Schneider
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Information is required to understand how novel biodiversity strategies can improve cropping system resilience to climate change. A “business as usual” (BAU) rotation (wheat–canola–wheat–soybean) was compared with a “warm-season crop” (WS) rotation (corn–sunflower–dry bean–canola); a “biodiverse” (BD) rotation (fall rye with cover crop– corn/soybean intercrop—pea/canola intercrop–green fallow mixture); a “perennial grain” (Kernza) rotation (Kernza grain intermediate wheatgrass); and an organic (ORG) rotation (millet-green fallow mixture-wheat). Drought conditions prevailed in both study years. The BAU rotation had the lowest average yield (1821 kg ha−1 compared with 2533 and 3083 kg ha−1 for the BD and WS rotations, respectively), less post-harvest residual biomass, and a lower net return than the WS rotation. The WS rotation was limited by herbicide-resistant weeds in dry beans. Kernza seed yield was five times lower than for spring wheat. ORG wheat yielded the same as other wheat and had a higher net return. Live roots days, a measure of soil health potential, were 95 for the BAU rotation and 174 and 113 for the BD and WS rotations, respectively; the most were recorded for Kernza (365). Seasonal crop growth duration was increased by including Kernza and fall rye for early season growth, and corn, sunflower, a corn–soybean intercrop, a cover crop, and fall-seeded rye for late season growth. WS and BD rotations outperformed the BAU rotation and the BD system accomplished this with half the N fertilizer. Results demonstrate the potential of biodiverse rotations; barriers to their adoption should be addressed.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-12T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0177
       
  • Assessing the influence of climate controls on grapevine biophysical
           responses: a review of Ontario viticulture in a changing climate

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      Authors: Jessica A. Williamson, Richard M. Petrone, Riccardo Valentini, Merrin L. Macrae, Andrew Reynolds
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Climate change presents unique challenges for grape growers across the world. In Ontario, three distinct viticultural regions are experiencing climatic shifts towards warmer growing seasons. According to historical records collected from Environment and Climate Change Canada, Lake Erie North Shore has transitioned from an intermediate-to-warm growing season classification, the Niagara Peninsula from the lower to upper limits of the intermediate zone, and Prince Edward County from cool to intermediate, when analyzing their average growing season temperatures. Terroir is directly related to vine water status, an indicator of grapevine stress. Biophysical responses controlled by air temperature and precipitation include fluctuations in vapour pressure deficits, evapotranspiration, and water-use-efficiency rates, as well as soil water content levels. By conducting an extensive literature review, the development of a conceptual model addresses how variations in climatic controls, under the scope of climate change, may influence grapevine water status, biophysical responses, and associated production outcomes for Ontario vineyards. Cool-to-intermediate air temperatures, when paired with increased precipitation will lead to no or low vine stress, increasing photosynthesis and transpiration rates, and variable plant water-use-efficiency levels, producing higher yields and lower quality grapes, if no management strategies are applied. Oppositely, higher air temperature as a product of climate change, when paired with variable precipitation may produce mild-to-severe stress, reducing yield, and increasing grape quality. With the appropriate management strategies, both traditional and new, growers may be able to accommodate for the influence of climate change on their vineyards.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-12T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0161
       
  • The effects of pre-harvest glyphosate rate and timing on yield and
           pre-malt quality of malting barley

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      Authors: John T. O'Donovan, Hiroshi Kubota, K. Neil Harker, T. Kelly Turkington, William May, Eric N. Johnson, Brian Beres, Marta Izydorczyk, Lori Oatway, Henry de Gooijer, Alick Mulenga, Timothy Schwinghamer, Breanne D. Tidemann
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      The production of barley cultivars with malting and brewing quality characteristics is subject to strict grading and technical standards for the end-use market. Environmental and management factors can significantly alter grain quality, and the qualities required for malting. Crop and kernel uniformity are critical factors where variability can exceed the tolerance for meeting malt quality. A practice to address variations in crop maturity is the application of pre-harvest glyphosate. Pre-harvest glyphosate applications can, however, alter malting characteristics in barley, and, if mis-timed, can also reduce yield. A 4-year study at five locations in Alberta and Saskatchewan from 2013 to 2017 was conducted to determine the effects of pre-harvest glyphosate applications on malting barley characteristics. Glyphosate was applied at 900 and 1125 g ae ha−1 on malting barley cultivars ‘CDC Meredith’ and ‘AC Metcalfe’ malting barley at soft dough, hard dough, and physiological maturity growth stages. Yield reductions of up to 12% were observed from glyphosate applications at soft dough, and yield was maximized with applications at physiological maturity. Glyphosate application, at two rates, reduced percentage plump kernels, but did not affect kernel weight or protein concentration. The growth stage of barley plants did not provide an accurate indicator of seed moisture levels at the time of application, which motivated our conclusion that glyphosate applications can be mistimed by inaccurate indicators. The results motivate our questioning of the utility of pre-harvest glyphosate applications, given the adverse effects to barley yield and quality observed, even when applied according to the label instructions.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-05T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0167
       
  • The effects of roller crimping direction for termination of fall sown
           cereal rye (Secale cereale L.)

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      Authors: Hayley L. Brackenridge, François J. Tardif, Kerry Bosveld, Robert E. Nurse
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Consensus around the optimal direction of roller crimping a row-planted cover crop has not been established. Several publications report crimping either parallel or perpendicular to the direction of cover crop planting with little to no justification apart from unpublished observations or hypotheses. This study explicitly compared the effects of roller crimping direction on crimping efficacy, weed suppression, and cash crop yield. At Elora, ON in 2020 and 2021, and Harrow, ON in 2021, a cereal rye (Secale cereale L.) cover crop was planted in three orientations (north-south vs. east-west vs. no rye control) then terminated with a roller crimper parallel or perpendicular to the direction of planting. A sweet corn (Zea mays L.) cash crop was planted either north–south or east–west in the same direction as roller crimping. A split plot treatment of weediness (weedy vs. weed-free) was applied. It was found that roller crimping direction did not have a consistent effect on rye mortality or number of upright tillers, nor did it affect weed control. However, total marketable sweet corn fresh weight decreased in perpendicular crimped rye compared to parallel crimping, despite equivalent cob counts. We did not find evidence in this study to suggest that perpendicular roller crimping improves ground cover and therefore weed suppression, contrary to other unpublished observations. Given the effect on sweet corn yield, roller crimping perpendicular to the direction of cover crop planting may not be a suitable practice. Alternative methods for improving cover crop-based weed control should be investigated.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-05T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0184
       
  • Low temperature and excess moisture affect seed germination of soybean
           (Glycine max L.) under controlled environments

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      Authors: Rongzhen Suo, Sandhu Kulbir, Frank You, Robert Conner, Elroy Cober, Mingjiu Wang, Anfu Hou
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Cold and excess moisture pose a serious threat to soybean production especially during seed germination in short-season environments. In this study, the effects of low temperature and excess moisture stress on seed germination were investigated in 187 soybean accessions originating from 18 countries. The experiment used a combination of three temperature conditions (i.e., 20 °C/14 °C, 14 °C/10 °C, and 10 °C/10 °C day/night) and two moisture levels (i.e., normal and excess). The seed germinability traits measured included germination rate (GR), germination index, germination time, germination uniformity, and coefficient of velocity of germination. Overall, GR was lowest in the 20 °C/14 °C + excess moisture and germination time was longest in the 10 °C/10 °C + excess moisture. When compared with 20 °C/14 °C + normal moisture treatment, GR at 10 °C/10 °C + excess moisture decreased by 38%; germination time increased by 20 days; seed viability decreased by 83%; germination uniformity decreased by 70%; germination speed decreased by 73%. Differences in GR, germination index, and germination velocity under different treatments were affected by temperature, moisture, and their interaction. Variation in germination time uniformity was determined by temperature, with no significant effects of moisture conditions and the interaction of temperature and moisture. It was shown that the temperature–excess moisture interaction led to a sharp decrease in seed germination. Two genotypes including PI 603147 and PI 507702 were identified with a GR over 90% at 10 °C/10 °C + excess moisture. This study generated new knowledge and data to further the understanding of genetic resistance to cold and excess moisture stress in soybean.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-03-28T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0162
       
  • Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats.) and waterhemp (Amaranthus
           tuberculatus (Moq.) J.D. Sauer) biovigilance in Canadian Agro-ecosystems

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      Authors: Shaun M. Sharpe, Sara L. Martin, Eric R. Page, Charles M. Geddes
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      The evolution and spread of herbicide-resistant weeds threatens long-term sustainability of Canadian agro-ecosystems. Herbicide-resistant weeds increase management inputs and costs, increase off-target and environmental exposure to pesticides, reduce yield quality and quantity, and impede harvest efficiency. Amaranthus species including Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats.) and waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus (Moq.) J.D. Sauer) are particularly concerning due to both their propensity towards herbicide resistance evolution, their history of invasion, and their spread in agro-ecosystems. A biovigilance approach is taken to build awareness of these pigweeds' initial invasion and spread in the USA. Characteristics of their identification, potential hybridization, and known herbicide resistance evolution are reviewed. Fourteen species of Amaranthus are found in Canada, nine of which (including waterhemp) possess herbicide-resistant biotypes. A total of 45 hybrids between various Canadian Amaranthus species with each other or Palmer amaranth have been noted. Hybrids have been experimentally produced or observed from herbarium specimens, with three cases of herbicide resistance transfer notably with Palmer amaranth or waterhemp. Mitigation strategies will depend on successful species identification and herbicide resistance status determination. Common pathways for Palmer amaranth introductions in the northern USA include both animal feed systems with grain screenings and crop production systems including seed and equipment contamination. Regional awareness campaigns will be critical to support Canadian farmers in identifying and quickly mitigating invasions of Palmer amaranth and waterhemp to prevent establishment and spread of infestations into new areas.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-03-22T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0193
       
  • Optimizing the evaluation of root system architectural traits in Brassica
           napus

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      Authors: Chunxiao Yang, Rudolph Fredua-Agyeman, Sheau-Fang Hwang, Linda Y. Gorim, Stephen E. Strelkov
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      A semi-hydroponic system was developed to assess canola (Brassica napus L.) root architectural traits. Four cultivars were grown under controlled conditions in germination paper rolls immersed in half-strength Hoagland’s solution. Eight parameters, including total root length, total root surface area, average root diameter, tip number, total primary root length, total lateral root length, total tertiary root length, and basal link length, were analyzed using the WinRHIZO software after 7, 14, and 21 days. The results suggested that 14 days in the semi-hydroponic system were optimal for accurate root trait assessment, as clear differences were observed while maintaining ease of handling and scanning.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-03-13T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0169
       
  • Identification of Canadian barley varieties by high-throughput SNP
           genotyping

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      Authors: Sung-Jong Lee, Maria Eckhardt, Mathieu Dusabenyagasani, Marta Izydorczyk, Tigst Demeke, Daniel Perry, Sean Walkowiak
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Barley is a major grain crop in Canada and is used for generating malt, in addition to being used as human food and animal feed. Differentiating barley varieties is important for malt quality assurance and grain handling. Here, we present a DNA-based testing method for the identification of Canadian barley varieties. The method uses 24 custom TaqMan genotyping assays, which are analyzed using the high-throughput SmartChip system (Takara Bio Inc.). Using this method, we are able to distinguish 124 barley varieties commonly grown in Canada.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-03-12T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0187
       
  • Validation of a delivery strategy for reducing nutrient inputs and
           improving nutrient use efficiency in greenhouse-grown sub-irrigated pot
           chrysanthemums

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      Authors: Barry J. Shelp, Katherine R. Teeter-Wood, Edward J. Flaherty, Lou M. Schenck, Jamie Aalbers
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Two experiments were conducted in a naturally lit research greenhouse to validate our modified strategy for delivering nutrients to sub-irrigated chrysanthemum plants. A split-plot design was used with four blocks arranged randomly, three nutrient rates as the main plot, and two contrasting cultivars as the subplot. The entire nutrient supply was removed at bud break and markedly reduced during vegetative growth, compared to common commercial fertilizer formulations, without adversely affecting tissue nutrient levels and plant/inflorescence quality, indicating that the plants were functioning in the low nutrient sufficiency zone. Specific nutrients (Nt) were more likely to exhibit improved uptake efficiency (shoot Nt content/Nt supply) than improved utilization efficiency (inflorescence DM/shoot Nt content) with decreasing nutrient supply. Thus, the common practice of delivering superfluous nutrient levels to greenhouse-grown chrysanthemum has little scientific merit in terms of nutrient accumulation and plant longevity. Applying a low‐input nutrient delivery strategy to the cultivation of indoor-grown, potted ornamental plants would improve the overall sustainability of the Canadian floricultural industry.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-03-06T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0120
       
  • Fusarium head blight detection, spikelet estimation, and severity
           assessment in wheat using 3D convolutional neural networks

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      Authors: Oumaima Hamila, Christopher J. Henry, Oscar I. Molina, Christopher P. Bidinosti, Maria Antonia Henriquez
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Fusarium head blight (FHB) is one of the most significant diseases affecting wheat and other small-grain cereals worldwide. Developing FHB-resistant cultivars is critical but requires field and greenhouse disease assessment, which are typically laborious and time consuming. In this work, we developed automated applications based on three-dimensional (3D) convolutional neural networks (CNNs) that detect FHB symptoms expressed in wheat, estimate the total number of spikelets versus the total number of infected spikelets on a wheat head, and subsequently calculate FHB severity index. Such tools are an important step toward the creation of automated and efficient phenotyping methods. The data used to generate the results are 3D point clouds consisting of four colour channels—red, green, blue (RGB), and near-infrared (NIR)—collected using a multispectral 3D scanner. Our 3D CNN models for FHB detection achieved 100% accuracy. The influence of the multispectral information on performance was evaluated; the results showed the dominance of the RGB channels over both the NIR (720 nm peak wavelength) and the NIR plus RGB channels combined. Our best 3D CNN models for estimation of total and infected number of spikelets achieved mean absolute errors (MAEs) of 1.13 and 1.56, respectively. Our best 3D CNN models for FHB severity estimation achieved 8.6 MAE. A linear regression analysis between the visual FHB severity assessment and the FHB severity predicted by our 3D CNN showed a significant correlation.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0127
       
  • CDC Kernen oilseed flax

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      Authors: Helen M. Booker, H. Randy Kutcher, Khalid Y. Rashid, Bunyamin Tar'an
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      CDC Kernen, a late maturing oilseed flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), was registered in 2021 by the Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. This cultivar had a significant yield advantage (107%) compared to CDC Glas (the yield check) in all soil zones of the Northern Prairies. The yield of CDC Kernen was 115%, 98%, and 105% of CDC Glas in the Black, Brown, and Black and Grey soil zones of Western Canada, respectively. This cultivar has medium (45.1%) oil content, oil quality (iodine value (IV) 192; alpha linolenic acid content 57.1%), equivalent to CDC Glas (the seed quality standard) coupled with larger seed size (thousand seed weight 6.1 g) than CDC Glas. It is immune to North American rust (race 371) caused by Melampsora lini and moderately resistant to wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lini and powdery mildew caused by Oidium lini.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0185
       
  • Evaluation of nitrogen fertilization of hybrid hazelnuts (Corylus
           americana × Corylus avellana) based on leaf nitrogen sufficiency
           thresholds

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      Authors: Lois C. Braun
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Hybrids between Corylus avellana and Corylus americana are one of several new perennial and winter annual crops being developed as part of the Forever Green Initiative at the University of Minnesota. As a woody perennial shrub, hazelnuts in agroforestry systems can provide a new revenue source for rural landowners; continuous living cover to prevent soil erosion, sequester soil carbon, protect water quality, and provide wildlife habitat; and a delicious and healthful new local food. If hazelnuts are to fulfill their potential, better germplasm and better nitrogen fertilization recommendations are both needed. We modeled these trials after trials by R.E. Worley, who showed that yields of pecan trees fertilized only when leaf nitrogen (N) fell below critical thresholds were maintained with lower levels of applied N, benefitting both the environment and growers’ profits. Results of trials at three Minnesota sites, comparing N applied only when leaf N fell below 1.8%, 2.0%, or 2.2% with annual N applications and no N over 4 years, support using 2.2% leaf N as the critical threshold for N fertilization. Our results showed that whereas only 8% of N applied annually ended up in the harvested nuts and husks, N that was applied to plants that demonstrated hunger for it was more efficiently taken up. Our results suggest a need for more productive germplasm and further research to develop best management practices for N fertilization.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0001
       
  • Warmer future climate in Canada—implications for winter survival of
           perennial forage crops

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      Authors: Budong Qian, Qi Jing, Guillaume Jégo, Gilles Bélanger, Ward Smith, Andy VanderZaag, Jiali Shang, Jiangui Liu, Brian Grant, Marianne Crépeau
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Significant increase in wintertime air temperature, especially the reduced cold extremes under climate change, might be beneficial to the winter survival of perennial crops. However, climate warming could result in less snowfall, reduced snow cover, as well as changes in climate conditions for fall hardening and winter thaws. How these changes might impact the risks of winter damages to overwintering crops, such as perennial forage crops requires a comprehensive assessment for proactively adapting to climate change in the agricultural sector, especially the beef and dairy industries. Based on the most up-to-date climate projections from a set of global climate models, we used a snow model and a suite of agroclimatic indices for perennial forage crops to assess potential changes in the risks of winter injury to perennial forage crops across Canada in the near-term (2030s), the mid-term (2050s), and the distant future (2070s). Our results show that the risk of exposure to extremely low temperatures (daily Tmin ≤ −15 °C) without snow protection is projected to decrease across Canada with improved conditions for fall hardening. However, winter thaws and rainfall are projected to increase, and this would increase the risk of winter injury due to loss of hardiness together with potential soil heaving and ice encasement.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0192
       
  • A comparative study of fodder Galega (Galega orientalis LAM.) and common
           forage legumes in monoculture and grass–legume binary mixture in
           Canadian Prairies

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      Authors: Bill Biligetu, Jillian Bainard, Nityananda Khanal, Hu Wang
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Fodder Galega (Galega orientalis Lam.) is a perennial legume adapted to the temperate regions of the world. The objective of this research was to compare the performance of fodder Galega to alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.), and cicer milkvetch (Astragalus cicer L.) in monocultures and grass–legume mixtures. From 2018 to 2020, a multiple-location trial was conducted at Swift Current, Saskatoon, Melfort, SK and Beaverlodge, AB, Canada. The average forage mass of fodder Galega in monoculture was 3226, 1176, and 1678 kg·ha–1 at Melfort, Saskatoon, and Swift Current, respectively, and was lower than alfalfa. However, fodder Galega and alfalfa had similar forage mass at Beaverlodge (7900 and 7670 kg·ha−1, respectively). The proportion of fodder Galega in the grass–legume mixtures was 36%–42% in 2019, decreasing to 3%–27% at Saskatoon. At Swift Current, fodder Galega in the mixtures was 11%–13% in 2019, which almost disappeared from the stand in 2020. At Beaverlodge, fodder Galega maintained 38%–47% in 2019 and increased to 47%–69% in 2020. Fodder Galega had similar acid detergent fiber to cicer milkvetch at two of four sites, which was lower than those of alfalfa and sainfoin. The crude protein of fodder Galega and its mixtures with grasses was lower than other mixtures at the three Saskatchewan sites, but was higher at Beaverlodge. Our results indicate that fodder Galega has potential to be utilized as a forage legume in cooler northern regions, but its productivity was low in the Dark Brown and Brown soil.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0089
       
  • CDC Esme oilseed flax

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      Authors: Bunyamin Tar'an, Helen M. Booker, Megan A. House, Kenneth I. Jackle, H. Randy Kutcher
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      CDC Esme, a high-yielding, late-maturing oilseed flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) cultivar, was registered in 2023 by the Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. CDC Esme had a superior yield (106%) compared to the check variety, CDC Glas, in all soil zones of the Northern Prairies. The yield of CDC Esme was 106%, 105%, and 105% of CDC Glas, in the long-season Black, Brown, and short-season Black and Grey soil zones of Western Canada, respectively. CDC Esme has larger seeds (thousand seed weight) than that of check cultivar, CDC Glas, with improved quality based on the iodine value of 192 and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) content of 57.1%. This cultivar is immune to the North American rust (race 371) caused by Melampsora lini and moderately resistant to wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lini.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0186
       
  • Copy number variation at Vrn-A1 and haplotype diversity at Fr-A2 are major
           determinants of winter survival of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in
           Eastern Canada

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      Authors: Yi Chen, Mina Kaviani, Mohsen Yoosefzadeh Najafabadi, Michel McElroy, Istvan Rajcan, Alireza Navabi
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Winter survival is an essential trait for winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars grown in high latitude regions such as Eastern Canada. Indoor studies have identified that copy number variation of genes influencing freezing is an essential component. Although Canadian winter wheat is predominantly grown in Eastern Canada, the extent to which allele variation in freezing tolerance genes affects winter survival in this region remains unknown, as there are presently no studies characterizing such variation in Canadian winter wheat germplasm. In this study, we characterized a panel 415 Canadian winter wheat cultivars for haplotype diversity of the Frost Resistance-2 (Fr-A2) locus and copy number variation of Vernalization-A1 (Vrn-A1) and C-repeat binding factors-A14 (CBF-A14). Additionally, this study evaluates each gene’s effect on winter survival across two locations and 2 years. We found that a combination of Vrn-A1 copy number and Fr-A2 haplotype accounted for 67.38% of the genotypic variance. Most of the cultivars tested (77.3%) carry the allele combination of three copies of Vrn-A1 and the Fr-A2-T haplotype, which was associated with the best winter survival. Interestingly, copy number of Vrn-A1 did not significantly affect heading time, therefore, selecting for higher copy number of Vrn-A1 would not affect maturity.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-02T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0101
       
  • Improved methods to estimate days and temperature to fifty percent
           mortality of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under low-temperature
           flooding and ice encasement

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      Authors: Jaber Husiny, Alexandra Ficht, Rachel Whiting, Helen Booker, David C. Hooker, Michel McElroy, Eric Lyons
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Low-temperature flooding and ice encasement (LTFIE) cause variable survival of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in Ontario, which limits the adoption of wheat into crop rotations by growers. The development of novel cultivars capable of withstanding LTFIE is a promising avenue for improvement, but the methods used to assess the survival of winter wheat under LTFIE are restricted. This study developed updated methods to determine the survival of wheat cultivars under LTFIE using controlled environments and, to our knowledge, is the first method since the 1980s to use Canadian eastern soft red winter wheat (CESRW) to conduct cold tolerance studies. Chamber-acclimated plants of AC Carberry (spring wheat control), Branson (CESRW), CM614 (CESRW), and Norstar (hardy Canadian western red winter control) cultivars were used to estimate the days (LD50) and temperature (LT50) to reach 50% mortality under ice and without ice treatments. Norstar had the longest LD50 at 33 days, Branson and CM614 had similar LD50 of 18 and 20 days, and AC Carberry did not reach an LD50 as it died early in both treatments. The LT50 of each cultivar was different; Norstar had the lowest LT50 (−13.6 °C day 0 and −13.2 °C day 7), and AC Carberry had the highest LT50 (−6.6 °C day 0 and −2.7 °C day 7). The detailed methods developed in this study were more reliable compared to older methods based on the more accurate reported LD50 and LT50 of the cultivars, therefore, these methods can be used to screen winter cereals for LTFIE in the future.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0143
       
  • The potential of growing soybean in Saskatchewan and its irrigation water
           needs under climate change scenarios—a modelling study

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      Authors: Budong Qian, Barrie Bonsal, Qi Jing, Ward Smith, Guillaume Jégo, Yinsuo Zhang, Rosa Brannen, Brian Grant, Marianne Crépeau
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      The soybean industry in Canada is seeking opportunities to expand cultivation due to economic and environmental benefits of growing soybean. Climate projections indicate that soybean expansion into Saskatchewan would be possible with the increases in the available crop heat units under a future warmer climate; however, crop water availability could limit yields. Using a crop growth model, we simulated soybean yields within the Canadian Regional Agricultural Model regions in Saskatchewan for the near-term (2030s), mid-term (2050s), and distant future (2070s) periods under different climate scenarios. Soybean yields were simulated without water stress (potential yield), with water stress (rainfed yield), and under full and partial irrigation scenarios. Irrigation water needs were estimated under the irrigation scenarios and irrigation water availability was discussed. Our results suggest that reasonable and likely more profitable yields (∼2000–2500 kg ha−1) can be achieved under rainfed conditions in the Black soil zone neighbouring Manitoba but soybean production would be less favourable in the Dark Brown soil zone and least favourable in the Brown soil zone. Northeastern regions in the Black soil zone were found to be suitable for growing soybean cultivars in the maturity group (MG) 0 in the distant future and MG 00 in the mid-term under the medium–high greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Soybean would still not be suitable in the northwestern region. Our results indicate that regions in central Saskatchewan requiring 120–170 mm of irrigation are more likely to benefit from the proposed Lake Diefenbaker Irrigation Projects in the future.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0148
       
  • Factors that influence measurements of sweet cherry (Prunus avium) flower
           bud cold hardiness obtained using differential thermal analysis

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      Authors: Elizabeth Houghton, Kirsten Hannam, Denise Neilsen, Louise M. Nelson
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Differential thermal analysis (DTA) is a technique commonly used to evaluate the cold hardiness of plant organs that supercool as a means for cold survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different pretest bud storage conditions, cooling rates, and bud excision techniques on dormant sweet cherry flower bud low temperature exotherms (LTEs) measured using DTA. Furthermore, this study compared cold hardiness estimates made using DTA and controlled freezing tests. We determined that buds stored at warmer temperatures (12.5 °C and room temperature) for 2–6 h prior to DTA or transported to the lab in a moist environment underwent biologically relevant changes in their apparent sensitivity to cold, as indicated by LTEs produced at warmer temperatures. The DTA cooling rate also significantly affected LTEs, with faster cooling resulting in the production of LTEs at warmer temperatures. Overall, LTEs were comparable among buds with varying amounts of plant material remaining attached to the bud base. It is important to note that the region directly subtending the primordia was always left intact on the buds being compared. This study demonstrated that overall, DTA and controlled freezing tests resulted in comparable measures of cold hardiness. The findings presented in this study are pertinent to researchers interested in conducting cold hardiness measurements in sweet cherry and highlight that consistency in DTA pretest conditions and bud preparation are required to achieve reliable LTE results that can be compared among studies.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2023-0087
       
 
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  Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
La Calera     Open Access  
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

           

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