Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Selbyana     Open Access  
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access  
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access  
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Forestry Studies     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Canadian Journal of Plant Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.383
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0008-4220 - ISSN (Online) 1918-1833
Published by NRC Research Press Homepage  [19 journals]
  • Note of appreciation

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      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Volume 103, Issue 1, Page iii-iv, February 2023.

      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0265
      Issue No: Vol. 103, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Root morphology, growth, and physiology in Begonia (Malus × micromalus)
           grown in copper hydroxide containers

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      Authors: Yumei Zhou, Ming Yang, Jifeng Deng, Zhijuan Tai, Dongtao Luan, Siyi Zhu, Jingjing Jia, Zhuo Yang, Yuxin Luo, Wen Wu
      First page: 101
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      A major concern with container seedlings is root circling and deformation that will affect post-planting performance and stability. To improve root quality, 3-year-old Begonia (Malus × micromalus) plants were grown in the containers treated on interior surfaces with different concentrations of copper hydroxide (Cu(OH)2) (0, 40, 80, 120, 160, and 200 g L−1) for 1 year. Compared with the standard container control (SC) and carrier asphalt container control (AC), the number of terminal lateral roots and lateral root volume were increased by 21% and 13% at 80 and 120 g L−1 Cu(OH)2 but decreased by 8% and 10% at 200 g L−1 Cu(OH)2. Only 80 g L−1 Cu(OH)2 increased the plant height and root weight, while other concentrations of Cu(OH)2 resulted in the declines. Phosphorus and potassium were improved with lower concentrations of Cu(OH)2 but decreased with 160 and 200 g L−1 Cu(OH)2. No significant difference in the concentrations of soluble protein and sugars in leaves was observed between Cu(OH)2 treatments and the controls. AC decreased nitrogen concentration in leaves by 12% over the SC across the whole growing season and increased taproot diameter by 17%. Our results indicate that 80 g L−1 Cu(OH)2 was the optimum concentration for root pruning and the maintenance of physiological function. Disadvantages in growth and physiology gradually showed up with increased concentrations.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0090
       
  • Correction: Triticale cultivars and seeding rates affect wheat stem sawfly
           survivorship and parasitism by Bracon cephi

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      Authors: H. Carcamo, B. Beres, A. Wijerathna, T. Schwinghamer
      First page: 145
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0254
       
  • Integration of perennial forage seed crops for cropping systems resiliency
           in the Peace River region of western Canada

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      Authors: Nityananda Khanal
      First page: 1
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      The Peace River region is one of the northern agricultural frontiers in Canada, undergoing farmland expansion as well as intensification with input-intensive industrial agriculture. The cropping systems evolved with the rotations between annual grain and perennial forage crops as a prudent adaptation to fragile, crust-forming, runoff-prone, poorly developed, platy-structured acidic Luvisolic soils. In recent years, there is a decline in the acreage of perennial forage seed crops leading to simplified low-diversity cropping systems with heavy reliance on external inputs. The production systems have been prone to the rapid evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds, and outbreaks of crop diseases and insect pests in the face of global warming. A number of studies conducted in the Peace River region and other parts of North America have shown multiple benefits of integrating perennial forage crops in the cropping systems. By virtue of high root-to-shoot ratio and perennial growth, forage seed crops can provide multiple ecological services in the fragile Luvisolic soil through increased soil organic matter, carbon sequestration, soil biological diversity, soil structural improvement, nutrient mobilization, crop protection and environmental health, thereby creating conducive effects to the resilient performance of the cropping systems. This review discusses the merits of crop rotations in general and those of perennial forage seed crops in particular in the face of changing climate, with special reference to studies conducted in the Prairies and Peace region of western Canada. Research opportunities are highlighted to elucidate multidimensional ecosystem services from diversified cropping sequences integrating perennial forage seed crops.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-24T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0125
       
  • Soybean (Glycine max L.) seed germination in response to waterlogging and
           cold climate: a review on the genetics and molecular mechanisms of
           resistance to the abiotic stress

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      Authors: Rongzhen Suo, Kulbir Sandhu, Mingjiu Wang, Frank You, Robert Conner, Elroy Cober, Anfu Hou
      First page: 13
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Soybean (Glycine max L.) is the most important legume crop in the world and provides protein and oil for human consumption and animal feed. Cold and waterlogging or flooding are abiotic stress that are commonly encountered during soybean germination in short-season growing conditions in the Northern latitudes. Imbibition of cold water during the germination disrupts the cell membranes and increases leakage of their contents and makes seeds vulnerable to biotic stress. The cold tolerance is associated with the ability of cells to avoid or repair the damage to their membranes and organelles, restoring membrane function and metabolism, and managing the reactive oxygen species generated during the process. Excess moisture impedes aerobic respiration by oxygen deprivation and increases the likelihood of soil-borne diseases further reducing the germination rate. Tolerance to waterlogging is associated with mechanisms that slow down the rate of water uptake and help maintain efficient anaerobic metabolism. The quantitative trait loci mapping, transcriptomics, and proteomic studies have revealed several genes and pathways that likely play a role in seed response to cold and waterlogging stress. This review discusses the effects of cold and waterlogging on soybean seed germination at the physiological level, describes the molecular mechanisms involved, and provides an overview of soybean waterlogging and cold tolerance research. The methodologies commonly used to study the molecular mechanisms controlling tolerance to waterlogging and cold stress are also reviewed and discussed.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0111
       
  • Soil fumigation with Vapam (metam sodium) to control clubroot
           (Plasmodiophora brassicae) of canola (Brassica napus)

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      Authors: Krista A. Zuzak, Stephen E. Strelkov, George D. Turnbull, Victor P. Manolii, Sheau-Fang Hwang
      First page: 29
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Clubroot, a damaging disease of canola (Brassica napus L.) caused by the soilborne parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin, is spreading across Alberta and other provinces of western Canada. The movement of infested soil on field machinery is the main mechanism of dispersal, with clubroot generally occurring first as localized patches near field entrances. In this study, the soil fumigant Vapam (metam sodium) was evaluated as a management option for foci of P. brassicae infestation. Replicated experiments at two field sites in central Alberta showed reductions in clubroot severity ranging from 9% to 51% following treatment with varying rates of Vapam. Decreases in clubroot severity of up to 28% were observed in the year following Vapam treatment, indicating some potential residual effects and (or) a reduction in the amount of inoculum returned to the soil in the previous year. While Vapam shows some promise as a clubroot management tool, an integrated approach will be required for the sustainable management of this disease on canola.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-07T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0086
       
  • Increasing bioactive compound levels in Agastache rugosa by hydrogen
           peroxide soaking in a hydroponic culture system

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      Authors: Vu Phong Lam, Vu Ky Anh, Dao Nhan Loi, Jong Seok Park
      First page: 39
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a reactive oxygen species that can damage a variety of cellular structures. Recent studies have shown that H2O2 can mediate multiple physiological and biochemical processes by acting as a signaling molecule. This study was performed to explore the optimum H2O2 treatments for increasing the bioactive compounds in Agastache rugosa Fisch. & C.A. May plants with roots temporarily immersed in H2O2 concentrations of 0 (control), 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, and 128 mmol L−1 in a hydroponic culture system. All cultivated plants were subjected to root soaking with diniconazole (120 µmol L−1) at 7 days after transplanting to restrict plant height. H2O2 concentrations of 4, 16, and 64 mmol L−1 significantly reduced root length compared with no H2O2 treatment. Root fresh weight was significantly lower in response to exposure to 128 mmol L−1 H2O2 compared with control plants. Although shoot and root dry weights were lower in plants exposed to 128 mmol L−1 H2O2 compared with control plants, no significant differences were detected among treatments. Soaking roots in 16 mmol L−1 H2O2 induced the highest rosmarinic acid (RA) content, and 16, 32, and 64 mmol L−1 H2O2 significantly increased tilianin content in the whole plant compared with the control. The highest acacetin content was detected under 32 mmol L−1 H2O2. In addition, root extract of A. rugosa had the highest RA concentration, and the tilianin concentration was the highest in flowers. Collectively, these results show that soaking roots in 16 and 32 mmol L−1 H2O2 at 3.5 weeks after transplanting promotes secondary metabolites of hydroponically grown A. rugosa.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-07T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0088
       
  • Diversity in genetic and downy mildew resistance among wild and
           mutagenized hops as revealed by single nucleotide polymorphisms and
           disease rating

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      Authors: Mohsin Zaidi, Ashok Somalraju, Kaushik Ghose, Jason McCallum, Aaron Mills, Sherry Fillmore, Bourlaye Fofana
      First page: 48
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Studies on wild and landrace hops from the Canadian Maritimes are scarce. This study was undertaken to broaden the genetic base of hops and to assess the reaction of the generated variants to downy mildew (DM) disease. A landrace hop (PE Royalty (P-RL)) and a commercial cultivar (Alpharoma) were mutagenized using ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS), and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variations were determined using an amplicon sequencing genetic diversity study. A subset of wild types and a subset of mutagenized hops were inoculated with DM spores and rated for disease symptoms in a controlled environment. The data showed large EMS-induced genetic diversity in the target genes along with natural variations in the wild types. A diversity in DM resistance within the studied collection was also observed. The study showed DM tolerance in some P-RL landrace seedlings, suggesting that these P-RL landraces must have acquired and developed adaptation mechanisms to co-evolve with DM disease in the environment. Further, EMS-induced mutagenesis increased allelic variations that contributed to increased DM resistance in some seedlings. The data recommend the use of true hop seeds for increased genetic variability in breeding programs.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0102
       
  • Forage sorghum grown in a conventional wheat–grain sorghum–fallow
           rotation increased cropping system productivity and profitability

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      Authors: Johnathon D. Holman, Augustine K. Obour, Yared Assefa
      First page: 61
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Intensifying winter wheat (Triticum aestivum)–grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]–fallow (W–GS–FL) crop rotation with annual forages can increase productivity and resource use efficiency. The objective of this research was to quantify the impact of increasing crop intensity by growing forages in a traditional W–GS–FL rotation on cropping system productivity, water use, precipitation use efficiency, and net income. The study was conducted at the Southwest Research-Extension Center near Garden City, Kansas, from 2013 through 2020. Winter wheat (W), grain sorghum (GS), forage sorghum (FS), and forage oats (FO, Avena sativa L.) were used to generate six crop rotation treatments. These rotation treatments interspersed with fallow periods (FL) were W–GS–FL, W–FS–FL, W/FS–GS–FO, W/FS–FS–FO, W/FS–GS–FL, and W/FS–FS–FL. A W/FS indicates winter wheat double crop FS planted in the same year. The yield of FS was 45%–56% more with W/FS–FS–FO and W/FS–FS–FL compared with W–FS–FL. Available soil water at GS planting was 23%–30% less, and GS yield was 52%–60% smaller with W/FS–GS–FL compared to W–GS–FL. Water productivity and pre-season soil water storage were greatest with W/FS–FS–FL and W/FS–FS–FO. Inclusion of W/FS increased cost of production compared with W–GS(FS)–FL rotations. Gross return was greatest with W/FS–FS–FO and W/FS–FS–FL. The W/FS–FS–FO increased cropping intensity, productivity, resource use, and gross margin relative to other rotations in the semi-arid Great Plains. Producers should consider double-cropping of FS after wheat harvest, followed by a second year of FS in dryland cropping systems if there is sufficient forage demand.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0171
       
  • Effects of postharvest deficit irrigation on sweet cherry (Prunus avium)
           in five Okanagan Valley, Canada, orchards: I. Tree water status,
           photosynthesis, and growth

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      Authors: E. Houghton, K. Bevandick, D. Neilsen, K. Hannam, L.M. Nelson
      First page: 73
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      The timing and availability of water supply are changing in the Okanagan Valley, and the availability of irrigation water in the late summers is a growing concern. Postharvest deficit irrigation (PDI) is a strategy that can be used to reduce water demands in sweet cherry orchards; previous studies in this region have reported no change in plant physiology or tree growth with irrigation volume reductions of up to 25%, postharvest. However, the effects of more severe postharvest reductions in irrigation volume remain unknown. We compared the effects of full irrigation (100% of conventional grower practice through the growing season) with 27%–33% reductions in irrigation postharvest (∼70% of conventional grower practice) and 47%–52% reductions in irrigation postharvest (∼50% of conventional grower practice) over a 3-year period (2019–2021) in five commercial sweet cherry orchards that ranged in elevation and latitude across the Okanagan Valley, BC, Canada. In the growing season following treatment application, PDI had no effect on stem water potential or photosynthesis in any year and at any site; there were also no effects of PDI treatment on tree growth. Findings from this study suggest that postharvest stem water potentials from −0.5 to −1.3 MPa, and one-time stem water potentials as low as −2.0 MPa, have no lasting effects on future plant water status, rates of photosynthesis, or plant growth. PDI shows potential as an effective water-saving measure in sweet cherry orchards in the Okanagan Valley.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0200
       
  • Precipitation irregularity and solar radiation play a role in determining
           short-season soybean yield

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      Authors: Elroy R. Cober, Malcolm J. Morrison
      First page: 93
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Climate change, resulting from increased atmospheric CO2, will affect temperature and precipitation amount and regularity. Changes in solar radiation have been observed in the recent past. Precipitation irregularity is a measure of rainfall distribution during a growing season (calculated as the standard error of the slope from regression of cumulative precipitation on day of the growing season). We investigated whether precipitation irregularity and solar radiation contributed to soybean yield. Fourteen short-season cultivars, released from 1930 to 1992, were grown from 1993 to 2019 at Ottawa, Canada. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to investigate the contribution to seed yield of precipitation irregularity and solar radiation, and also previously modeled parameters genetic improvement, annual [CO2], and cumulative precipitation and average minimum temperature during the vegetative, flowering and podding, and seed filling growth stages. While solar radiation and precipitation irregularity did not trend over the years of our study and precipitation irregularity was not related to growing season precipitation, both were significant factors in our model, accounting for 2.5% and 6.5%, respectively, of the seed yield variability. Precipitation during all three stages were similar as they each accounted for 4%–7% of seed yield variability. We observed contrasting temperature effects where higher minimum temperature during vegetative and seed filling reduced yield, while during flowering and podding increased yield. Estimated yield improvement due to elevated [CO2] was 7.8 kg ha−1 ppm−1 and to genetic improvement over time was 7.1 kg ha−1 year−1. Over the extremes of our study we found that precipitation irregularity could cause up to a 30% yield reduction.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0104
       
  • Evaluation of acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides for red
           sorrel (Rumex acetosella L.) management in lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium
           angustifolium Aiton)

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      Authors: Scott N. White
      First page: 111
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Red sorrel is a common herbaceous perennial weed species in lowbush blueberry fields that may be managed with acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides. Greenhouse and field experiments were established to determine the crop tolerance and potential efficacy on red sorrel of tribenuron-methyl, nicosulfuron + rimsulfuron, foramsulfuron, flazasulfuron, pyroxsulam, and halosulfuron-methyl. Ramet density of greenhouse-grown red sorrel plants established from root fragments was reduced by tribenuron-methyl, flazasulfuron, and pyroxsulam, though tribenuron-methyl and flazasulfuron were the most consistently effective herbicides under field conditions. Spring non-bearing year tribenuron-methyl and flazasulfuron applications reduced both non-bearing and bearing year total red sorrel ramet density and reduced non-bearing year red sorrel flowering ramet and seedling density without injuring lowbush blueberry. Fall non-bearing year tribenuron-methyl and flazasulfuron applications reduced bearing year red sorrel total and flowering ramet density, and this application timing should be evaluated further to improve understanding of crop injury risks. Fall bearing year tribenuron-methyl and flazasulfuron applications reduced non-bearing year red sorrel total and flowering ramet density but did not reduce seedling density. Nicosulfuron + rimsulfuron, foramsulfuron, pyroxsulam, and halosulfuron-methyl efficacy on red sorrel were inconsistent or limited, and these herbicides are not recommended for red sorrel management in lowbush blueberry.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0136
       
  • Shrub willow chips incorporated after potato harvest enhance soil
           properties in Prince Edward Island, Canada

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      Authors: Judith Nyiraneza, Yefang Jiang, Tandra D. Fraser
      First page: 123
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Willow (Salix viminalis spp.) shrubs are being planted along riverbanks, on erodible and marginal farmland. Wood chips made from the woody biomass could improve the properties of light-textured soils with low organic matter content in potato-based systems. Willow chips were applied at 0, 20, 40, and 60 mg ha−1 (fresh weight) as a soil amendment. Soil health parameters were evaluated after 12 months, followed by C and N contents in whole soil, particulate, and mineral-associated organic matter fractions after 18 months. Willow chip application increased soil aggregation, respiration, C and N contents in whole soil, and plant-available K.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-27T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0154
       
  • Tools for climate resilience in tree fruit I: large-dwarfing rootstocks
           can alleviate sunburn damage in “Buckeye Gala” apple

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      Authors: Hao Xu, Suzanne Blatt, Danielle Ediger
      First page: 128
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      Suitable rootstock enhances apple tree resilience. In 2021, we studied “Buckeye Gala” apple (Malus domestica var. Buckeye Gala") on nine rootstocks with contrasting vigor in NS and BC, Canada. Rootstock effects on vigor, yield, and midday stem water potential were significant in BC. After sustained heat events, the large-dwarfing rootstocks Geneva 935, Geneva 4814, and Geneva 969 had lower ratio of sunburn fruits, resulting in higher projected damage-free yield. We discussed how higher stem water potential and larger canopy volume supported by vigorous rootstocks contributed to alleviate heat stress and improve apple resilience to global warming.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0080
       
  • AAC Aberdeen field pea

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      Authors: Deng-Jin Bing, Don Beauchesne, Richard Cuthbert, Hamid Naeem
      First page: 133
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      AAC Aberdeen is a semi-leafless, yellow cotyledonary field pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivar developed at Lacombe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lacombe, AB, Canada. It has a maturity of 98 days, 1000-seed weight of 243 g, and a lodging score of 3.3 on the scale of 1–9. The seed crude protein content of AAC Aberdeen is 20.1%. AAC Aberdeen is resistant to powdery mildew (caused by Erysiphe pisi D.C.) and moderately susceptible to mycosphaerella blight (caused by Mycosphaerella pinodes) and Fusarium root rot (caused by Fusarium avenaceum (Fr.) Sacc.).
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0122
       
  • AAC Julius field pea

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      Authors: Deng-Jin Bing, Don Beauchesne, Michelle Miller, Richard Cuthbert, Brett Mollison, Hamid Naeem
      First page: 136
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      AAC Julius is a semi-leafless, yellow cotyledonary field pea (Pisum sativum L.) variety developed at Lacombe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada , Lacombe, AB, Canada. It has a maturity of 100 days, 1000-seed weight of 210 g, and a lodging score of 3.6 on the scale of 1–9. The seed crude protein content of AAC Julius is 24.8%. AAC Julius is resistant to powdery mildew (caused by Erysiphe pisi D.C.) and moderately susceptible to mycosphaerella blight (caused by Mycosphaerella pinodes) and Fusarium root rot (caused by Fusarium avenaceum (Fr.) Sacc. and F. solani).
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0123
       
  • AAC Prairie barley

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      Authors: Ana Badea, W.G. Legge, James R. Tucker, T.G. Fetch, J.G. Menzies, Thomas Kelly Turkington, Raja Khanal, Barbara A. Blackwell
      First page: 138
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Ahead of Print.
      AAC Prairie is a hulled two-row spring malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivar widely adapted to western Canada. It was developed from the cross CDC Kindersley/TR08204 made in 2008 and it was evaluated in the Western Cooperative Two-row Barley Registration Test (2017–2018) as well as the Collaborative Malting Barley Trials (2018–2019) conducted by the malting and brewing industry before being registered in 2021. AAC Prairie’s good combination of agronomic and disease resistance traits as well as a desired malting quality profile should make it a useful cultivar for the barley industry.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Plant Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-21T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cjps-2022-0236
       
 
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