Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Selbyana     Open Access  
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access  
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access  
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Forestry Studies     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Forestry Chronicle
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.3
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0015-7546 - ISSN (Online) 1499-9315
Published by Canadian Institute of Forestry Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Warning: Natural and Managed Forests are Losing their Capacity to Mitigate
           Climate Change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 2 - 8
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 2-8, November 2022.

      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-007
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Associate Editors/Corédacteurs

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      Pages: 9 - 9
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 9-9, November 2022.

      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-008
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Analysis of a wood production strategy from expert perspectives

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      Authors: Claudie-Maude Canuel, Anne Bernard, Nelson Thiffault, Nancy Gélinas, Pierre Drapeau, Evelyne Thiffault, Nicolas Bélanger
      Pages: 10 - 18
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 10-18, November 2022.
      In 2020, Quebec adopted a strategy to increase the quantity and quality of timber it produces. During a roundtable discussion held in the fall of 2021, experts in forestry and in related fields expressed their views on the new strategy and its implementation challenges. The main purpose of this article is to present the key observations from the roundtable. The observations addressed two themes: the general context in which the strategy was developed, and the context of its implementation on the ground. Although most of the panellists agreed on the relevance of such a strategy, particularly as regards to climate change mitigation and wealth creation, several questions remain. The challenge of harmonizing uses, regionalization, spatialization of management decisions, labour shortage, and uncertain ecosystem dynamics make it difficult to assess the strategy’s potential impact on the ground and its ability to achieve its targets.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-004
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Analyse d’une stratégie de production de bois : perspectives
           d’experts

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      Authors: Claudie-Maude Canuel, Anne Bernard, Nelson Thiffault, Nancy Gélinas, Pierre Drapeau, Evelyne Thiffault, Nicolas Bélanger
      Pages: 19 - 27
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 19-27, November 2022.
      En 2020, le Québec a adopté une stratégie nationale de production de bois (SNPB) afin d’augmenter la quantité et la qualité de la matière ligneuse produite. Au cours d’une table ronde tenue à l’automne 2021, des experts de la foresterie et de domaines connexes se sont prononcés sur cette nouvelle stratégie et sur les défis de mise en oeuvre qu’elle pose. L’objectif principal de cet article est de présenter les principaux constats émis au cours de cette table. Les constats ont été divisés en deux thématiques, soit le contexte général d’élaboration de cette stratégie et le contexte de sa mise en oeuvre en forêt. Bien que la plupart des panélistes s’entendent sur la pertinence de créer une telle stratégie, notamment en ce qui a trait à l’atténuation des changements climatiques et à la création de richesses, plusieurs interrogations persistent. Les défis d’harmonisation des usages, de régionalisation, de spatialisation des décisions d’aménagement, de manque de maind’oeuvre et de la dynamique incertaine des écosystèmes complexifient l’évaluation des retombées potentielles de la SNPB sur le terrain et sa capacité d’atteindre les cibles établies.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-003
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Modelling temporal change in inventory attributes from a LiDAR-derived
           inventory for the United Counties of Prescott and Russell, Ontario: A
           comparison of random forest and linear regression methods

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      Authors: Benjamin Gwilliam
      Pages: 28 - 35
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 28-35, November 2022.
      This study assessed the feasibility of updating a forest inventory derived from 2014 Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data using ground plot data collected in 2021 to model change in basal area, volume, and average stand height. These attributes were determined for a subset (n=32) of stands from the original 2014 inventory. Both 2nd order polynomial regression and random forest learning methods were used to model annual growth increments for these attributes and results were compared. Except for height, the variance explained using random forest regression was greater than that explained using linear regression. As well, root mean square error was lower using random forest as opposed to linear regression for all three attributes, suggesting random forest produced more accurate results overall. Although the random forest results could not be extrapolated to the landscape with confidence due to limitations associated with that approach. Rather, the quadratic equations from the linear regression models were used to predict 2021 landscape values. The results at the landscape scale were deemed to be reasonable in terms of ecological expectations despite recognized model weaknesses. Increasing sample size to capture a greater diversity of stand types and allow for species-specific modeling would no doubt result in much better predictions.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-009
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Rebuilding Yunesit’in fire (Qwen) stewardship: Learnings from the
           land

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      Authors: William Nikolakis, Russell Myers Ross
      Pages: 36 - 43
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 36-43, November 2022.
      Yunesit’in First Nation is reclaiming fire stewardship after generations of suppression. Applying a “learning by doing” approach, Yunesit’in members plan and implement proactive fire practices to the landscape, which are low intensity cool burn fires driven by the needs of the landscape and community goals. Through a structured monitoring and evaluation process, the participants generate knowledge and science on fire stewardship; the outcomes are documented and mobilized in various ways, including video, photos, and peer-reviewed articles. The pilot program has initially been evaluated through four general measures: area stewarded (in hectares); people employed and trained (number and diversity of people employed); the level of planning, vision, and program sustainability (generating plans where fire is a tool to meet the goals in these plans, supported by carbon funds); and partnerships and knowledge mobilization, (fostering partnerships for knowledge production and mobilization). On these measures, the program is growing and is a success. A holistic framework is being developed by the community, which encompasses ecological, social, economic, and cultural indicators, including a health and wellbeing evaluation framework to assess the physical, mental health and wellbeing benefits for participants in the program. A holistic approach is critical for understanding the connection between people, place and the role that fire stewardship plays in mediating positive outcomes.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-001
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Enhancing forest resilience: Advances in Ontario’s wild tree seed
           transfer policy

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      Authors: Betty van Kerkhof, Ken A. Elliott, Pengxin Lu, Daniel W. McKenney, William C. Parker, John H. Pedlar, Ngaire Roubal
      Pages: 44 - 53
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 44-53, November 2022.
      Climate is a critical driver in shaping patterns of tree distribution and productivity in Canadian forests. Canada’s climate is changing and, as a result, tree populations may become maladapted to the climate at their current growing locations. In 2020, Ontario updated its tree seed transfer policy to respond to the evolving natural, operational, scientific, and policy environments, including a changing climate. Collaboration among federal and provincial science, operations, and policy staff was essential to update the policy, which involved a custom climate similarity analysis, a related assessment of critical seed transfer distances, various engagement efforts to assess end-user receptivity, and the development of an online interactive tool to allow users to explore seed transfer options under climate change. Here we describe several factors considered during the policy update, major steps in the update process, and highlights of the outcome. The intent of this effort is to support other jurisdictions considering similar changes and to emphasize the need for a changing culture in seed procurement and management.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-002
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • A review of climate change effects on the regeneration dynamics of balsam
           fir

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      Authors: Joe Collier, David A. MacLean, Loïc D’Orangeville, Anthony R. Taylor
      Pages: 54 - 65
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 54-65, November 2022.
      Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) is one of the most abundant softwood species in eastern Canada but is projected to be adversely affected by climate change. Balsam fir decline could occur due to a combination of reduced germination and regeneration, lower growth and competitive ability, and higher rates of mortality. However, tree regeneration represents one of the most vulnerable stages to climate-induced stress. In this paper, we synthesize potential and observed effects of climate change on balsam fir regeneration. Recent studies have shown no detrimental effects of increased temperatures on either germination or seedling growth of balsam fir, but clear deleterious effects of decreased water availability. Balsam fir seeds require 28–60 days of cold stratification to become germinable, and such conditions should still be met under climate change across most of the species’ range. Sampling along a north-south climatic gradient throughout the Acadian Forest Region of eastern Canada indicated effects are complex and do not suggest a clear decline under warmer, drier conditions for the species. Thus, effects of global warming on balsam fir may be more gradual than projected in modeling studies and occur primarily via reduced competitive ability and/or higher mortality in overstory trees, rather than regeneration failure.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-005
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Vegetation management is essential to regeneration success of red oak
           (Quercus rubra L.) at its northern range limit: results from a 10-year
           field experiment

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      Authors: Eric B. Searle, Trevor A. Jones, William C. Parker, Maara S. Packalen, Andree Morneault
      Pages: 66 - 76
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 66-76, November 2022.
      The effect of three vegetation management treatments on height, root collar diameter, mortality probability, health, and dominance class were assessed for planted and natural red oak (Quercus rubra L.) regeneration over a ten-year period in a red oak stand in Phelps Township, Ontario. Oak was planted in equally spaced positions in rows or in clusters of three seedlings. One of three vegetation management treatments was applied to both herbaceous and woody competitors within a 2-metre radius: untreated control, brush saw, and herbicide application. Oaks that received vegetation management were significantly taller, had larger root collar diameters, were in better condition, and were more dominant than in untreated control plots, and treatment differences increased with time. We found naturally regenerated oaks were taller and had larger root collar diameters followed by those planted in clusters, with oaks planted in rows being the smallest overall. Our results underscore the need to apply vegetation management around oak regeneration to control competition and promote establishment regardless of whether regeneration is natural or planted. In stands where natural regeneration is not an option and lower future oak stocking is acceptable, managers should consider cluster planting over row planting.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-006
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Understanding the effects of forest management on streams and rivers: A
           synthesis of research conducted in New Brunswick (Canada) 2014–2018

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      Authors: Maitane Erdozain, Karen A. Kidd, Lauren Negrazis, Scott S. Capell, David P. Kreutzweiser, Michelle A. Gray, Erik J.S. Emilson
      Pages: 77 - 88
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 77-88, November 2022.
      Forests play a major role in maintaining healthy streams and in providing ecosystem services such as clean drinking water, flood/drought protection and biodiversity, but studies have shown that some forestry operations can compromise these benefits. To assess whether current forest management practices impact stream ecosystems, a five-year study was conducted in J.D. Irving, Limited’s Black Brook Forestry District (New Brunswick, Canada) and in other watersheds with varying forest management intensity. This study was divided into two phases, with each addressing one main research question: 1) how different intensities of forest management affect the ecological health of headwater streams and, 2) whether the changes observed in headwater streams accumulate or dissipate in larger downstream rivers. A comprehensive approach to examining these research questions was taken by measuring multiple abiotic and biotic indicators to assess the integrity of stream ecosystems (sediments, water chemistry, insect communities, leaf decomposition, fish condition, mercury concentrations). The purpose of this paper is: 1) to synthesize the results of numerous scientific articles, and 2) to present the science and management implications in terms that regulatory and industrial forest managers can use to incorporate the lessons learned into their decision making. Results in Phase I show that streams in the most intensively managed catchments had greater inputs of terrestrial materials such as sediments, and these were incorporated into food webs, resulting in more terrestrial diets of aquatic consumers. The important stream function of leaf litter breakdown was negatively influenced by increased management intensity. Management practices related to roads warrant special attention, as roads tended to be more related to changes in stream indicators than tree removal. Additionally, results suggest that wet riparian areas were more sensitive to disturbance than drier riparian areas, which has implications for riparian buffer zone configurations. Regarding Phase II, some of the effects of forest management on small streams accumulated in larger downstream rivers (e.g., sediments, use of terrestrial resources by aquatic organisms), while others dissipated (e.g., water temperature, mercury contents). Interestingly, the impacts of forest management on streams were greater in the basin with tree removal but less silviculture than in the basin with more of both, suggesting that greater overall intensity of forest practices does not necessarily translate into greater environmental impacts, for example when considering partial versus clearcut harvesting. Overall, the study suggests that while current best management practices do not eliminate all effects, they do still offer good protection of biological integrity downstream.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-010
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Predicting aboveground biomass carbon sequestration potential in hybrid
           poplar clones under afforestation plantation management in southern
           Ontario, Canada

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      Authors: Amir Behzad Bazrgar, Derek Sidders, Naresh Thevathasan
      Pages: 89 - 102
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 89-102, November 2022.
      Afforestation systems as a pathway for natural climate solutions contributing to terrestrial C sequestration are influenced by agroclimatic conditions, tree species and clones. This study validated a regression equation to predict aboveground biomass C (AGBC) sequestration potentials of hybrid poplar clones under afforestation plantation and compared these clones’ adaptability to three levels of land suitability in four afforestation sites in southern Ontario, Canada. Results validated the proven ability of the GenOnBio model to reasonably predict AGBC content in all tested clones. This research suggests that DN154 and FFC1 having C sequestration rates of 2.19 and 2.13 Mg C ha-1 y-1, respectively, are suitable for marginal lands having high land suitability condition. In contrast, DTAC29, and DTAC26 (0.56 and 0.88 Mg C ha-1 y-1, respectively) should not be selected for the above land suitability. On marginal lands with severe limitations, NM6 (1.53 Mg C ha-1 y-1) showed the highest adaptability for AGBC sequestration. Our findings confirm that poplar afforestation on marginal lands in southern Ontario, at least up to the age of 15 years, can significantly contribute to AGBC sequestration, which in turn can have significant positive influence on the current 2 billion tree planting program initiated by the federal government.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-011
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Diverse temperate riparian buffer types promote system-level carbon
           sequestration in southern Ontario, Canada

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      Authors: Enoch Ofosu, Amir Bazrgar, Brent Coleman, Bill Deen, Andrew Gordon, Paul Voroney, Naresh Thevathasan
      Pages: 103 - 118
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 103-118, November 2022.
      Riparian buffer systems (RBSs) can sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide into terrestrial carbon (C) pools. C stocks and C sequestration potential of diverse RBSs are not adequately reported. This study, therefore, quantified: (a) C stocks in various RBSs and (b) system-level C sequestration potentials (SLCSP) [SLCSP= ΔSOC + Biomass C Pools] in southern Ontario, Canada. Results showed significant differences (p < 0.05) in system-level C stocks between tree buffers (765.8 Mg C ha-1) and grass buffers (291.7 Mg C ha-1) and between natural forest buffers (935.9 Mg C ha-1) and rehabilitated buffers (595.6 Mg C ha-1), but no difference (p> 0.05) between coniferous buffers (722.4 Mg C ha-1) and deciduous buffers (809.1 Mg C ha-1) were recorded. Tree buffers had higher SLCSP (633.5 Mg C ha-1) than grass buffers (126.7 Mg C ha-1). Natural forest buffers had higher SLCSP (806.7 Mg C ha1) than rehabilitated buffers (460.3 Mg C ha-1). There was no difference (p> 0.05) in SLCSP between coniferous buffers (615.0 Mg C ha-1) and deciduous buffers (652.1 Mg C ha-1). Results from this study confirm that the establishment of RBSs within agricultural watersheds can significantly contribute to create new terrestrial C sinks.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-012
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Killing Bugs for Business and Beauty Canada’s Aerial War Against
           Forest Pests, 1913–1930

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      Pages: 119 - 119
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 119-119, November 2022.

      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-013
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The Wildest Hunt – True Stories of Game Wardens and Poachers

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      Pages: 119 - 119
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 98, Issue 1, Page 119-119, November 2022.

      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2022-014
      Issue No: Vol. 98, No. 1 (2022)
       
 
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