Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

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Journal Cover
Trees
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.726
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0931-1890 - ISSN (Online) 1432-2285
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • February–March minimum temperature record from cold-arid Lahaul-Spiti,
           Himachal Pradesh, India, and its hydrological implications

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      Abstract: Abstract The increasing number of climate-associated disasters in the Himalayan region causing a huge impact on human life and the ecosystem are the bellwethers of climate change. Weather records from the high Himalayas, though sparse and limited to the past few decades, show its sensitivity to global climate change. However, short observational records preclude our understanding of long-term climate variation over the topographically controlled Himalaya. In view of this, tree-ring data of Himalayan birch trees from the cold-arid Lahaul-Spiti, Himachal Pradesh, western Himalaya is analyzed in the present study. The response function analysis of Himalayan birch chronologies with climate variables revealed a significant impact of February–March minimum temperature in radial growth of Himalayan birch. Taking this relationship as a guide, we developed the first record of winter/spring (February–March) minimum temperature for this region. The reconstructed minimum temperature record reveals annual to decadal scale variability associated with several prolonged cold and warm periods. A strong association of warm/cold phases of February–March temperature with low/high snow water equivalent of western Himalaya, as well as seasonal snow and glacial derived streamflow of the upper Indus River basin was identified. The observed hydrological linkages were further tested using river flow records of the Satluj and Indus Rivers of the western Himalaya. The observed opposite relationship between winter–spring minimum temperature and the summer hydro-climatic records can be of immense use to policymakers, agriculture stockholders, and hydropower project officials to take precautionary measures in advance.
      PubDate: 2024-04-18
       
  • Effect of water stress and UV-B on the production of outer stem waxes of
           Bulnesia retama seedlings from different eco-regions: alternatives for
           non-timber resources in drylands

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      Abstract: Key message The yield of epicuticular waxes of Bulnesia retama was increased mainly by water stress, and marginally by UV-B. Natural populations from the most stressful ecoregions showed higher productivity and plasticity. Bulnesia retama is a tree/shrub endemic to the arid and semi-arid zones of South America. This species produces outer stem waxes that can be used in industry, and has been exploited in the past degrading natural populations. Considering the need to diversify marginal dryland economies by making sustainable use of local resources, we aimed to study the productivity of outer stem waxes of natural populations of B. retama from three eco-regions with different environmental stress (rainfall and altitude). We studied the wax productivity of the three populations in response to water stress and UV-B. We conducted two pot experiments with seedlings propagated from seeds of the different environmental backgrounds. We regulated water availability by differential irrigation and manipulated UV-B using selective absorbance filters. We collected stem waxes by the traditional method of brushing dry stems. We found that water stress was the main promoter of stem wax production in this species, while the effect of UV-B was marginal, and was only detected in combination with water stress. Seedlings from the most stressful eco-regions showed the highest stem wax productivity and were the most plastic to variations in environmental conditions. Environmental stress, particularly water stress, was the determining factor in the outer stem wax yield of this species, and in the productive potential of different natural populations, which could be related to ecotypes with different wax yield potential. This knowledge can be used for exploiting this resource sustainably, to select ecotypes for cultivation, and to develop productive varieties through classical breeding.
      PubDate: 2024-04-17
       
  • Variation of anatomical characteristics of Nothofagus alpina wood grown
           under three silvicultural conditions

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      Abstract: Key message There were significant differences in the anatomical characteristics of Nothofagus alpina between the site with silvicultural condition similar to a regrowth forest, and with the sites with plantation regime. Nothofagus alpina has been a species of interest due to the high quality of its wood. To evaluate the early use of this wood in plantation regimes, wood from intermediate cuts has to be studied. Therefore, the variations in some anatomical characteristics of juvenile wood obtained from thinning of N. alpina trees growing under three different silvicultural conditions were evaluated. Using the decreasing granulometry sanding technique, wood samples were prepared to capture images from the transverse plane using reflectance microscopy. The anatomical characteristics considered in this work vary, from pith to bark, with statistically significant differences being found in the position closest to the bark. On the other hand, there were some similarities between the specimens that came from sites with a plantation regime and differences with the sites similar to a regrowth forest. Therefore, the possible impact of silvicultural conditions on the anatomical characteristics of N. alpina wood was pointed out, mainly the diameter of the vessels and wall thickness.
      PubDate: 2024-04-09
       
  • A systematic review of leaf and wood traits in the Neotropics:
           environmental gradients and functionality

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      Abstract: Key message Resource-limited environments showed a tendency towards conservative and coupled leaf and wood traits, while displaying an acquisitive and decoupled pattern in resource-rich ones. Water and elevation were the most studied gradients. In the Neotropics, spatial and temporal environmental gradients subject plants to distinct abiotic conditions, requiring functional adjustments. This promotes changes in trait expression, resulting in individual trait variation or covariation. We have systematically reviewed the literature focusing on leaf and wood traits in the Neotropics along major abiotic gradients (water, irradiance, temperature, soil fertility, and elevation), and assessed their spatial and temporal variation and covariation trends. Thus, we compiled 141 published papers from 2010 to 2022. Most of the studies of leaf and wood traits were related to: (1) the gradients of water avalability and elevation, (2) leaf traits at the expense of wood traits, with specific leaf area and wood density the most studied traits, respectively, (3) the morphological leaf traits to a greater extent than to biochemical, ecophysiological, or anatomical ones. In general, more conservative traits were observed in environments with lower resource availability. Although there is still no consensus, coupling was predominantly linked to water balance during periods of water restriction or in dry ecosystems, and papers have focused on single ecosystems rather than making comparisons across multiple ecosystems. This systematic review highlights the tendency for systems with fewer resources to show a bias towards greater coordination between leaf and wood traits compared to systems with more resources. This review also adresses how traits are expressed based on the integration of more than one environmental driver and the qualitative variation of these resources. Finally, we emphasize the importance of analyzing different aspects of trait expression when assessing species’ responses to environmental gradients, especially in megadiverse regions such as the Neotropics.
      PubDate: 2024-04-03
       
  • Emerging insights into nitrogen assimilation in gymnosperms

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      Abstract: Key message The current status of molecular regulation of nitrogen assimilation and recent advances made in gymnosperms are reviewed. Gymnosperms are a heterogeneous and ancient group of seed plants that includes conifers, ginkgos, cycads and gnetophytes. Molecular studies on extant gymnosperms have been constrained by some discouraging features for experimental research such as their long life cycles, large sizes, complex megagenomes and abundant phenolic compounds in their woody tissues. However, the development of high-throughput sequencing and refined multiomics technologies in the last few years has allowed to explore the molecular basis of essential processes in this ancient lineage of plants. Nitrogen is one of the main limiting factors determining vascular development and biomass production in woody plants. Therefore, nitrogen uptake, metabolism, storage and recycling are essential processes for fundamental gymnosperm biology. Here, recent progress in the molecular regulation of nitrogen assimilation in gymnosperms is reviewed and some future perspectives on this topic are outlined.
      PubDate: 2024-04-01
       
  • Explant age and genotype drive the somatic embryogenesis from leaf
           explants of Acrocomia aculeata (Jacq.) Lodd. ex Mart. (Arecaceae), an
           alternative palm crop for oil production

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      Abstract: Key message A complete system of regeneration, via somatic embryogenesis, from the in vitro culture of leaflets explants of young A. aculeata donor-plants has been reported. In the present study, a complete regeneration protocol of Acrocomia aculeata (Jacq.) Lodd. ex Mart., via somatic embryogenesis is reported, and the influence of the genotype and its age on the induction of the embryogenic process determined. Leaflets explants of 4 genotypes, aged 2 and 5 years, were inoculated in the induction medium consisting of salts and vitamins Y3 supplemented with different concentrations of picloram (9.0, 18.0 and 36.0 µM). In the control, no plant growth regulators were added. Picloram concentrations of 18.0 and 36.0 µM induced greater formation of embryogenic calluses in all genotypes studied. However, 2-year-old genotypes had higher percentages of embryogenic calluses. In addition, at the highest concentration of picloram (36.0 µM), 5-year-old genotypes had the highest oxidation rates. Differentiation of somatic embryos was observed in medium supplemented with 9.0 and 18.0 µM picloram and 1 mM putrescine. However, at a concentration of 9.0 µM, the somatic embryos showed a high degree of fusion. Embryogenic lines were only obtained in medium supplemented with 18.0 µM picloram and 1 mM putrescine. Histochemical analysis showed the presence of pectins in embryogenic cultures and starch grains in peripheral regions of embryogenic calluses, which were not directly involved in regeneration. Somatic embryos were converted into plantlets after 90 days in germination medium containing 0.54 µM NAA, 1 mM putrescine and 3.0 g L−1 activated charcoal, highlighting the potential of the propagation system proposed here for clonal propagation of A. aculeata.
      PubDate: 2024-04-01
       
  • Genetic diversity and population structure in natural populations of Toona
           ciliata in the Uttarakhand state of Himalaya

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      Abstract: Abstract Indian Mahogany (Toona ciliata, Family: Meliaceae) is a fast-growing and multi-purpose timber species. The species is well adapted to sub-tropical climates and generally grows in moisture-prone areas. It is frequently naturalized throughout the western sub-Himalayan tract, valleys of the outer Himalayas, and Eastern and Western Ghats and also cultivated on a fairly large scale in the plains of India, but no information about SSR-based genetic diversity and population structuring of T. ciliata in the Indian context has been available till now. Notably, population genetic analysis of T. ciliata is important for its long-term conservation, management, and genetic improvement programs. Thus, the present study was conducted to characterize natural populations of T. ciliata using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. In total, 444 individuals collected from 15 distant geographical locations in the western Himalayas were analyzed with 10 SSR loci. A total of 71 alleles were generated, with a mean of seven alleles, which ranged from 4 to 12 alleles for individual marker loci. Overall, a low level of genetic diversity (mean He = 0.315, range = 0.251–0.366) and high genetic differentiation (FST = 0.338) were recorded for the analyzed populations. Genetic clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a strong genetic structure where most analyzed populations were grouped into two major clusters, indicating the existence of two gene pools. Further, the partitioning of genetic variance was significant (p ≤ 0.001) which revealed 34% of genetic variance among the populations. The Mantel test was used to estimate the genetic distance in relation to horizontal and altitudinal geographical distance, but a non-significant correlation was obtained. The results indicated that genetic distance between populations is not influenced by horizontal and altitudinal geographical distance. Overall, the study on population genetic analysis of T. ciliata will be of paramount importance to the researchers, foresters, and policymakers for guiding future conservation decisions.
      PubDate: 2024-04-01
       
  • Nutrient distribution and bioaccumulation in silver birch (Betula pendula
           Roth) biomass grown in nutrient-poor soil

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      Abstract: Key message Silver birch growing on extremely nutrient-poor stands of inland dunes was characterized by low contents of these nutrients in its biomass. The nutrient accumulation also depended on its age. Silver birch (B. pendula) often colonizes inland dunes, as geomorphologically sensitive and unstable environments. Considering its importance in the protection of ecosystems associated with such landforms, we aimed to evaluate the nutrient distribution and bioaccumulation in the organs of that tree. The study covered three stands, aged 12, 20, and 34 years. Ten average trees were sampled from each stand, including fine and coarse roots, stemwood, bark, coarse and fine branches, and leaves along with soil samples at depths of 0–10, 10–20, 20–40, and 40–80 cm. The contents of macro- and micronutrients were analyzed in collected soil and biomass samples. The soils were strongly acidic and very poor in the studied elements. The nutrient distribution in the birch biomass was highly variable. For most of the elements, the highest contents were recorded in leaves. The highest amounts of Fe were found in fine roots, while Mn and Zn were the most abundant in the bark. Wide variability was also apparent in the bioaccumulation factors. These were usually the highest in the leaves or bark and the lowest in the stemwood. Among the studied elements, N was the most bioaccumulated, followed by S, Zn, Cu, Mn, and P. Nutrient distribution in the birch biomass was typical for tree species. Nutrient levels were generally low, however, significantly higher than their concentrations in the soil, indicating a strong bioaccumulation. The relationship between nutrient accumulation and stand age was observed.
      PubDate: 2024-04-01
       
  • Photosynthesis adaptation to long- and short-term water restriction in
           commercial plantlets of Eucalyptus grandis and hybrids with Red Gums

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      Abstract: Key message Eucalyptus grandis and Red-Gum hybrid plantlets differ in the photosynthetic responses to long and short-term water restriction, leading to different adaptation mechanisms to cope with stress. Eucalypts are the most planted forest species in Uruguay and face frequent drought events, which impact plantlet's establishment. Information needs to be included regarding the behavior of promising clones in such conditions. This work aimed to analyze the effects of short and long-term water restriction (WR) on photosynthetic parameters and whether they enable the plant to cope with water shortage. One clone of Eucalyptus grandis (GG) and interspecific hybrids of E. grandis × E. camaldulensis (GC) and E. grandis × E. tereticornis (GT) were subjected to WR defined by soil water potential. At 6 and 16 weeks after treatment imposition, chlorophyll (%Chl) carotenoids (%Carot), maximum net assimilation rate (Amax), stomatal conductance (gS), leaf transpiration rate (E), light saturation point (LSP) and quantum efficiency (ΦPSII) were assessed. Our results showed that the clones behaved differently. GG minimized water loss significantly to avoid the stress condition through strong stomatal regulation while GC and GT adapted their photosynthetic structure and thus were able to cope with water shortage. Unexpectedly, GT increased Amax significantly under short-term WR, suggesting an early adaptation mechanism to WR. In the long-term WR condition, both hybrids increased %Chl, ΦPSII and Amax while reducing gS and water uptake. These results suggest that Red-Gum hybrids experienced a “priming” effect of a sublethal dose of WR that enabled them to cope with drought stress in the long term.
      PubDate: 2024-03-21
       
  • Cortical microtubule dynamics during reaction wood formation ensures
           context-appropriate cellulose microfibril angle in woody trees

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      Abstract: Key message Cortical microtubule arrays are the primary mechanism for guiding the re-orientation of cellulose microfibrils and determining MFA in secondary cell wall of wood fibre and tracheid cells in reaction wood. Microtubules are directly and indirectly involved in guiding cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs) through the plasma membrane. The angle of cellulose deposition is a critical response to environmental signals and/or stress conditions, and particularly crucial during reaction wood formation, a process in which woody plants deposit additional cell wall material to counteract gravitational forces. Tubulin genes are upregulated in response to gravitational stimulus during reaction wood formation, which can result in changes to microtubule assembly. In this study, microtubules were visualised in three woody tree species (two angiosperms: Eucalyptus globulus Labill., Populus alba L., and one gymnosperm: Pinus radiata D. Don.) using immunofluorescence to quantitatively evaluate microtubule organisation during reaction wood formation. Our results suggest that reorientation of the cortical microtubule array affects secondary cell wall deposition, even across different types of reaction wood, by ensuring context-appropriate orientation of cellulose microfibrils and determining MFA in wood cells. Pharmacological studies conducted on in vitro cultured stem segments or in vivo during reaction wood formation corroborated these important roles for microtubules during wood development. This study starts to unveil the role of tubulins during wood formation by exploring cortical microtubule array organisation in trees subjected to gravitational stimulus and it sheds light on cellular and molecular mechanisms behind cellulose deposition in tree species.
      PubDate: 2024-03-19
       
  • Patterns of water use by the Australian native Melaleuca styphelioides in
           urban environments and comparison of transpiration prediction by three
           different micrometeorological models

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      Abstract: Key message The high-quality sap flow dataset of Melaleuca styphelioides could assists local councils in assessing tree water use and aids in the development of an urban tree sustainable planting management plan Trees have a vital part to play in urban ecosystems, offering ecological, economic, and social advantages in addition to beautifying our suburbs. Knowledge of tree water use in urban environments is crucial for facilitating urban greening when there is a perception that growing trees on the street verge on expansive soils poses a risk to pavement and buildings. Information on long-term water use by individual trees in an urban environment is essential for local councils in developing urban tree management plans for sustainable planning of trees; however, this information is scarce. Micrometeorological models have commonly been used to estimate the canopy transpiration of plants in the absence of sap flow data. However, the reliability and accuracy of these models have rarely been assessed using sap flow measurements at the field site. This study aimed to provide the water use data of four individual Australian native Melaleuca styphelioides Sm. using sap flow instruments over 25 months. Tree transpiration, estimated based on three commonly used micrometeorological models using weather parameters and tree characteristics, was assessed and compared with sap flow measurements by employing the linear regression statistical analysis. The results revealed that the modified Penman–Monteith (PM) model demonstrated the highest level of accuracy among the evaluated models, consistently yielding lower errors and providing more reliable estimates of tree water use. This suggests that this model may be more appropriate for predicting plant water use in situations where sap flow data are unavailable.
      PubDate: 2024-03-17
       
  • The provision of water and shade but not soil amendments in degraded
           habitats increases the seedling survival of woody species in restoration
           processes of the Chilean sclerophyllous forest

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      Abstract: Key message Using artificial shading in reforested seedlings is recommended for different species, irrigation levels and soil treatments in semiarid ecosystems, but the application of pork sludge and horse guano are ineffective. Application of irrigation, artificial shade and soil amendments can increase the survival of seedlings in plant restoration processes of semiarid ecosystems, however, the effects of shade and soil amendment could occur only without or with low levels of irrigation. In this study, we tested these hypotheses in four woody species (Quillaja saponaria, Lithrea caustica, Schinus polygamus, and Colliguaja odorifera) from the Mediterranean-type climate region of Chile. By mean a factorial experiment, we evaluated different irrigation frequencies (1 L/week and 1 L/2 weeks during the five driest months, no irrigation), artificial shade types (polypropylene shelter, black mesh, deep hole, and no shade) and soil amendment types (natural soil, pork sludge, and horse guano). In 2014, a total of 720 plants per species were planted at each of two sites located in a pre-Andean and a coastal area, and monitored until September 2016. The effect of the type of artificial shade did not depend on the level of irrigation. All shade treatments produced positive effects on the survival of all the species, but the mesh and polypropylene shelter had a greater positive impact than planting in a deep hole. Irrigation treatments increased the survival of all species, although the effect of the highest frequency depended on the site and species. The soil amendment treatments did not have significant positive effects under any condition. In conclusion, the use of artificial shading may be recommended for different species, sites, irrigation and soil treatments in semiarid ecosystems, although the type of shade may depend on the species.
      PubDate: 2024-03-13
       
  • Genomic survey, bioinformatics analysis, and expression profiles of TCP
           genes in Liriodendron chinense and functional characterization of LcTCP4

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      Abstract: Abstract TEOSINTE-BRANCHED/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) proteins are plant-specific transcription factors (TFs) that play a pivotal role in leaf development by controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, the authors systematically analyzed the phylogeny, sequence structure, domain feature and expression profiles of TCP genes in Liriodendron chinense, an ornamental tree species with peculiar leaf shape. A total of 17 LcTCP genes were identified in L. chinense genome, which could be grouped into two classes according to their features in the TCP domain. RT-qPCR analysis showed that the expression levels of four TCP genes in Class I (LcTCP21, LcTCP9, LcTCP19a, and LcTCP19b) and three genes in Class II (LcTCP4a, LcTCP4b, and LcTCP24) were consistently higher than those of the other LcTCP genes during leaf development. Degradome data analysis revealed that three LcTCP genes, LcTCP4a, LcTCP4b, and LcTCP24, are targeted by lch-miR319c. Further, LcTCP4a/b and LcTCP24 differed significantly in their expression levels between leaf buds and lobed leaves. However, the expression patterns of LcTCP21 and LcTCP9 contrasted with those of LcTCP19a and LcTCP19b, implying that leaf development in L. chinense may be regulated by a balance between the antagonistic roles of Class I and Class II LcTCP genes. Furthermore, overexpression of LcTCP4 in Arabidopsis thaliana caused a tendency of leaf margin smoothness, and down-regulated the expression levels of genes involved in cell division, AtCYCD3,1 and AtKNOLLE, indicating that LcTCP4 may influence leaf margin shape by inhibiting cell proliferation. Overall, this study provided a comprehensive assessment of the LcTCP gene family and serves as a cornerstone for subsequent functional verification of the LcTCP genes in regulating the leaf development of L. chinense.
      PubDate: 2024-03-05
       
  • Integration of community ecology and habitat suitability modelling for
           restoration and conservation of two endemic tree species from the Western
           Ghats, India

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      Abstract: Key message The recurrent anthropogenic disturbances, poor regeneration potential, high carbon stocks, and restricted habitat suitability warrants effective conservation and restoration of two ecologically and economically important endemic tree species. Despite a growing consensus on the application of species distribution models (SDM) in predicting species distributions, the integration of community ecology of endemic species based on field studies with SDM is largely an isolated area of research. This paper presents a detailed account of the distribution, habitat preferences, population ecology and biomass of two endemic tree species, Terminalia paniculata Roth and Lagerstroemia microcarpa Wt. from 119 (0.1 ha) plots sampled in the Shettihalli landscape of the central Western Ghats, India. MaxEnt SDM was used to predict their distribution by testing the influence of environmental factors. We found a significant difference in the density, basal area and carbon stocks of T. paniculata across the dry and moist deciduous and semi-evergreen forests (p < 0.05). Both species were found to be predominant in moist deciduous forests and contributed high biomass carbon. The regeneration potential of T. paniculata was poor in dry deciduous and semi-evergreen forests, whereas L. microcarpa displayed poor to no regeneration in all the forest types. Further, SDM predicted a high probability of distribution for both species. The main factors driving the occurrence in Shettihalli were land use and land cover, precipitation amount of the driest month, soil pH and elevation. The current high suitability of T. paniculata and L. microcarpa were around 137.66 km2 and 120.49 km2, respectively. Variations in the population structure and regeneration in different forest types are attributed to ongoing anthropogenic disturbances in the landscape. The findings of this study can be extremely helpful in developing proper conservation strategies to protect these species and restore their habitat. We highly recommend the incorporation of SDMs in conservation studies.
      PubDate: 2024-02-29
       
  • Looking for a drought-tolerant tree species among native and introduced
           mountain conifers

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      Abstract: Abstract Understanding species-specific adaptations to climate change, which exacerbates drought stress and heat waves, is crucial for sustainable forests. This knowledge can help in selecting potential alternatives for species such as Norway spruce (PIAB), which faces significant dieback in Central European forests. In this study, we focused on the adaptive capacity under novel climate of native silver fir (ABAL) and alien Douglas-fir (PSME) as potential alternatives for the most threatened old spruce stands in the Sudetes (Poland). We applied dendrochronological approach to track tree growth dynamics over the last 70 years and quantified how species resisted and recovered from the extreme drought events of 2003 and 2015. Our results revealed the highest potential to adapt to climate change manifested by ABAL. It displayed not only lower sensitivity to precipitation shortages but it also showed greater resilience and resistance to extreme drought compared to the remaining species. In addition, both ABAL and PSME could benefit from extended growing seasons. On the other hand, the non-native PSME outperformed both native species in terms of growth rate. However, it was similarly sensitive to summer precipitation as PIAB and showed low drought tolerance. Our findings supports a better understanding of species-specific differences in their adaptive potential and can help forest managers make informed decisions about species selection for climate change-adapted future forest.
      PubDate: 2024-02-28
       
  • Artificial defoliation soon after full leaf expansion leads to reduced
           shoot hydraulic conductance but constant leaf-specific conductivity in
           Fagus crenata Blume

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      Abstract: Key message Hydraulic architecture and conductivity of current-year shoots of Japanese beech trees are closely related to the leaf area soon after full leaf expansion. To assess the impact of artificially reducing leaf area at two time points after full leaf expansion on the stem xylem hydraulic architecture and conductivity of current-year shoots in Fagus crenata, we manipulated leaf area by partially cutting the leaves in various proportions of potted beech trees at different times. The reduction in leaf area soon after full leaf expansion resulted in a decrease in the mean vessel diameter, number of vessels, and sapwood area of current-year shoots. Simultaneously, it increased vessel density, leading to a proportional decrease in hydraulic conductivity (Kh) and xylem-specific hydraulic conductivity (KS). However, the leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity (KL) of current-year shoots remained unchanged, irrespective of the reduction in leaf area. In contrast, the artificial reduction of leaf area one month after full leaf expansion increased KL but did not significantly affect the mean vessel diameter, number of vessels, vessel density, sapwood area, Kh, and KS. These results suggest that the stem xylem hydraulic architecture and conductivity of current-year shoots in Japanese beech are closely related to leaf area soon after full leaf expansion.
      PubDate: 2024-02-25
       
  • Correction: Accuracy differences in aboveground woody biomass estimation
           with terrestrial laser scanning for trees in urban and rural forests and
           different leaf conditions

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      PubDate: 2024-02-24
       
  • AP2 family identification in blackberry reveals the fruit
           ripening/color-change-related expression of RuAP2-1 and RuAP2-6 targeted
           by miR172

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      Abstract: Abstract Blackberry (Rubus spp.) fruit has high nutritional value and antioxidant effects. The role of miR172 and its target gene APETALA2 (AP2) in regulating plant growth and development and secondary metabolism has been studied. However, the regulatory effects of miR172 and AP2 on blackberry fruit ripening are unclear. Here, based on the transcriptome data from blackberry fruits at different developmental stages, candidate blackberry AP2 members were identified, and their physical and chemical properties, protein structure, and phylogeny were analyzed. Digital gene expression profiles revealed that the transcripts per million of miR172 in unripe and ripe blackberry fruits were different, and the expression levels of the potential target genes AP2-1 and AP2-6 of miR172 were relatively high in unripe blackberry fruits. RT‒qPCR showed similar results. The sequencing results of the degradation group showed that miR172-z could target RuAP2-1 and miR172-y could regulate RuAP2-6. The cleavage sites were 2503 and 2329. The sequences of RuAP2-1 and RuAP2-6 were cloned, and the complementary sequence of miR172 was found. Overall, the miR172–AP2 interaction may be important in regulating the ripening process of blackberry fruit. This study provides information for future research on the posttranscriptional regulation of blackberry AP2 family members.
      PubDate: 2024-02-20
       
  • An untargeted metabolomics analysis of the components of heartwood and
           sapwood in 4 fast-growing Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.)
           Hook) clones

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      Abstract: Abstract Wood color is a crucial factor influencing the overall quality of wood products. In this study, we investigated color differences between sapwood (SW) and heartwood (HW) in 4 Chinese fir clones of the same age, using the CIE L*a*b* system. Our results revealed distinct color variations between SW and HW within the same clone, with notable discrepancies observed among different clones. Interestingly, these variation in wood color correlated with wood density, consistent with previous research. Metabolite analysis using an untargeted metabolomics approach was conducted, employing ultra-performance liquid chromatography in conjunction with a quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer (UPLC/Q-TOF–MS/MS), identifying a total of 938 metabolites spanning 12 superclasses. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) revealed distinct metabolic differences between SW and HW in various Chinese fir clones, with significant variations in abundance patterns and species-specific differences observed in the HW group. Further analysis, through Orthogonal Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA), pinpointed specific metabolites responsible for these distinctions. Among these metabolites, flavonoids, recognized for their role in color formation, stood out prominently. Metabolomic pathway enrichment analysis (MPEA) indicated the involvement of these differential metabolites in various pathways, including flavonoid biosynthesis. The study underscores the intricate relationship between metabolites and wood color variation in Chinese fir clones, accentuating potential applications in enhancing wood quality and decay to resistance.
      PubDate: 2024-02-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s00468-023-02486-2
       
  • Repeated artificial defoliation soon after full leaf expansion, simulating
           insect damage, reduces xylem hydraulic transport safety in Japanese beech
           (Fagus crenata Blume)

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      Abstract: Key message Repeated defoliation soon after full leaf expansion reduces xylem hydraulic transport safety in beech trees. Japanese beech trees undergo branch dieback and eventual mortality following years of repeated leaf loss due to leaf-feeding insects attacking immediately after full leaf expansion. To study the impact of recurrent defoliation on beech debilitation and mortality, we investigated xylem hydraulic transport safety and observed the xylem vessel architecture in field-grown medium-sized Japanese beech trees that had been artificially defoliated repeatedly for 4 years immediately after full leaf expansion. Multiple years of defoliation immediately after full leaf expansion increased the susceptibility to xylem cavitation (P50 value; − 4.46 ± 0.38 MPa (mean ± SD) for non-defoliated control beeches, and − 2.32 ± 0.20 MPa for defoliated beeches), despite a decrease in their vessel diameter and an increase in their vessel density. In defoliated beech, many irregularly shaped, axially wrinkled and partially cracked vessels, mountain-folded intervessel pits, and fibers with thin and less-lignified cell walls were observed. The intervessel double-wall thickness of the defoliated beech was thinner than that of the control beech. Furthermore, the size and shape of intervessel pits did not change in defoliated beech, but the density of intervessel pits and the total number and total area of intervessel pits per 1 mm of vessel length increased. We conclude that the increased susceptibility to xylem cavitation caused by repeated defoliation immediately after full leaf expansion may be due to an increased total area of intervessel pits with thin pit membranes per unit vessel wall area, in addition to cell wall alteration and vessel deformation and damage.
      PubDate: 2024-02-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s00468-023-02475-5
       
 
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  Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted by number of followers
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
La Calera     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  

           

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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
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