Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
La Calera     Open Access  
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Forestry Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.373
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1687-9368 - ISSN (Online) 1687-9376
Published by Hindawi Homepage  [340 journals]
  • Local Community Attitude towards Forest-Based Ecotourism Development in
           Arbegona and Nensebo Woredas, Southern Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Understanding local community awareness and attitude towards forest-based ecotourism welfare is an important input for policymakers to develop and implement sustainable forest resource management strategies. However, the local community’s awareness and attitude towards forest-based ecotourism development have been poorly assessed and documented in remote areas. To this end, the present study assessed the local community’s awareness and attitude in Arbegona and Nensebo woredas’ forests, southern Ethiopia, towards ecotourism development. Household and key informant interviews and focus group discussions were used to collect data. Results indicated that more than half (57.9%) of the respondents expressed a negative attitude towards forest-based ecotourism development. The educational status of the respondents, their age, presence of conservation measures, source of energy for household consumption, and biophysical and socio-cultural variations in the study sites are significantly associated with local communities’ attitudes that have been exhibited towards the development of ecotourism and conservation of forest resources. Creating awareness through persuasion and communication of new and well-suited information, promoting alternative livelihood options, encouraging local benefits from the conservation of forest resources, and compensating costs induced by wild animals can minimise negative attitudes, thereby contributing to the enhancement of local communities’ positive attitudes towards forest resource conservation.
      PubDate: Wed, 29 May 2024 10:50:01 +000
       
  • Contribution of Fuel Wood Income from Natural Forests to Household Economy
           in Delanta District, Northeastern Ethiopia

    • Abstract: For Ethiopia’s rural homes, particularly those in the Delanta district, fuelwood is the primary energy source. This suggests that the impact of fuel wood from the forest to family energy use or income is significant. The goal of the current study was to estimate how much annual fuel wood harvested from forests contributes to household consumption and monetary income. 96% of the forest’s income comes from fuelwood. In the study area, it contributes 2,013,539 Birr, or 33%, of all family income. 703,014 ETB, or 23.8% of the total subsistence income, and 1,310,525 ETB, or 40.65% of the total cash income of the tested households, are both covered by fuelwood from the forest. Both socioeconomic and physical characteristics close to the users influenced how dependent a household was on fuelwood income from the forest. The data obtained from randomly selected households by survey method have been subjected to multiple regression analysis and obtained that households’ reliance on fuelwood income from the forest was significantly influenced by factors such as age, educational level, number of trees owned, distance to forest, distance to market, and nonforest income, all of which had a negative and significant impact. The only significant factor that significantly and positively influences reliance on fuelwood income from the forest is the number of family members. Therefore, preserving a natural forest through the use of alternative energy sources, such as electricity, or encouraging a plantation on one’s own property is a potential discipline for mandating climate change prevention.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2024 11:50:00 +000
       
  • Determinants of Farmers’ Perceptions towards Socioecological Benefits of
           Agroforestry Practices in Northwestern Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Agroforestry practices provide multiple ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes. However, within the local context, local communities hold divergent perceptions regarding the various roles of agroforestry, particularly in the Afrotropical Region. Hence, understanding these drivers is critical for adopting and promoting sustainable agroforestry practices. Here, we examined the factors that influenced farmers’ perceptions towards the socioecological benefits of agroforestry practices. A multistage stratified random sampling technique was applied to select 90 households along an urban-rural gradient. The data were gathered through semi-structured questionnaires and key informant interviews and analyzed using a descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, general linear model, and redundancy analysis with the help of R software version 4.3.2. The findings showed that approximately 69.7% of the respondents strongly agreed that agroforestry practices had benefits for society and the environment. However, 11.1% were neutral, and the others disagreed. The results of the general linear model analysis showed that household age, agricultural experience, access to land certification books, and training on tree conservation had a significantly positive effect on farmers’ perceptions of the advantages of agroforestry practices. Furthermore, farmers’ perceptions of the benefits of agroforestry in terms of income generation, educational and cultural values, and climate change mitigation were dependent on household age and farming experience. Overall, this study provides useful insights into the drivers of farmers’ perceptions of the advantages of agroforestry practices in Northwest Ethiopia. The findings of this study underscore the need for policymakers and practitioners to consider sociodemographic and institutional factors that influence farmers’ perceptions when developing policies and plans to advance the adoption and promote sustainable management of agroforestry practices. This supports the widespread adoption of agroforestry practices in tropical agroecosystems.
      PubDate: Fri, 10 May 2024 10:50:00 +000
       
  • Comparative Analysis of Impact of Soil Mixture and Fertilization on Growth
           and Seedling Quality of Selected Agroforestry Tree Species

    • Abstract: The study was conducted to determine the most suitable soil amendment for germination and early seedling growth of selected indigenous multipurpose agroforestry tree species, viz., Cordia africana, Fiadherbia albida, Millettia ferruginea, and Moringa stenopetala at Haramaya University, Ethiopia. Seedlings were raised in polythene tubes having 10 cm diameter and 15 cm height and the experimental plots were laid out with eight treatments (i.e., potting soil mixture of, A = agricultural soil, M = manure, S = sand, D = DAP, and U = Urea) and three replications. The morphological attributes of seedlings such as shoot and root height, root collar diameter, leaf area were measured to assess tree seedlings vigor and robustness. Analysis of variance indicated that the shoot height of C. africana, F. albida, and M. ferruginea were significantly different () whereas shoot height of M. stenopetala was highly significant (). Actual leaf area (cm2) of F. albida and M. stenopetala were significantly different () and estimated leaf area (cm2) of the four species were highly significant at (). Treatment 8 (3A: 2M: 1S) for C. africana, treatment 5 (3A: 2M: 1S: 23U) for F. albida and treatment 2 (2A: 2M: 2S: 25D) for both M. stenopetala and M. ferruginea exhibited the lowest sturdiness quotient, which indicates that they are good-quality seedling for plantation. The shoot-to-height ratio indicated positive correlation with most seedling growth parameters whereas root collar diameter and sturdiness quotient showed negative correlation for all species. Treatment 3 (3A: 2M: 1S: 75D) is recommended as the best pot soil mix and fertilization compared to all other treatments, though it needs further study.
      PubDate: Fri, 10 May 2024 06:35:00 +000
       
  • The Effect of Spatial Scale on the Prediction of Tropical Forest
           Attributes from Image Texture

    • Abstract: The availability of high-resolution satellite imagery has boosted the modelling of tropical forest attributes based on texture metrics derived from grey-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCMs). This procedure has shown that GLCM metrics are good predictors of vegetation attributes. Nonetheless, the procedure is also sensitive to the scale of analysis (image resolution and plot size). This study aimed to analyse the effect of spatial scale on the modelling of forest attributes, and to provide some ecological insight into such effect. Nineteen 32 × 32 m sampling plots were used to quantify forest structure (basal area: BA; mean height: H; standard deviation of height, HSD; density, D; and aboveground biomass, AGB). The 19 plots were subdivided into four 16 × 16 m, one of which was subdivided into four 8 × 8 m plots. To match this design, 12 GLCM metrics were calculated from a GeoEye-1 image (pixel size ≤ 2 m) using a 5-, 9-, and 21-pixel window from the R, NIR, NDVI, and EVI bands. For each of the windows, we modelled the five structural variables as linear combinations of the 12 metrics through linear models. The modelling potential ranged from high ( = 0.70) to low (0.11). H was the best-predicted attribute; this occurred at the smallest scale, with increasing scales producing lower values. The second best-predicted attribute was HSD, which peaked at the intermediate scale. D and AGB displayed a similar pattern. BA was the only attribute best predicted at the largest scale. Thus, in predicting tropical forest attributes from GLCM-derived texture metrics, the spatial scale to be used should reflect the spatial scale at which ecological processes occur. Therefore, understanding how ecological processes express themselves in a remotely sensed image becomes a critical task.
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Apr 2024 06:20:01 +000
       
  • Assessment of Density and Anatomical Features of Young and Old Bambusa
           vulgaris (Schrad. ex J.C. Wendl.) Culm Heights as Sustainable Structural
           Material in Ghana

    • Abstract: This study sought to assess the density and anatomical features of young and old Bambusa vulgaris Schrad. ex JC Wendl. culm heights and, therefore, evaluate their influence on the utilization potential of the culm as a sustainable structural material. Bambusa vulgaris culm of 2-year and 4-year-old were harvested and prepared to the required length of 6 meters for the study. Basic density and anatomical features were carried out. The results showed that the basic density of old bamboo ranges from 652.91 kg/m³ to 729.06 kg/m³, while the young bamboo ranges from 342.33 kg/m³ to 509.52 kg/m³. The vascular bundle arrangement was found to be in Type III and Type IV for the culm heights of both young and old bamboo. The average vascular bundle radial diameter ranged from 761.13 μm to 890.78 μm for the old culm and 727.16 μm to 844.83 μm for the young culm. The average vascular bundle tangential diameter ranged from 499.44 μm to 533.49 μm for the old culm and 425.56 μm to 483.56 μm for the young culm. The radial diameter of the metaxylem vessel of the old culm ranged from 216.81 μm to 54.74 μm, while 214.23 μm to 73.86 μm were for the young culm. Parenchyma tissues ranged from 35%– to 70% for the old bamboo culm and 45% to 75% for the young bamboo culm. Vessel proportion ranged from 6%–12% for the old culm while the young culm ranged from 5%–11%. Fiber proportion ranged from 22% to 54% for the old culm and 19% to 44% for the young culm. Old bamboo had better vascular bundle properties than that of young bamboo. The density is significantly correlated positively to the anatomical properties. Old bamboo is more suitable to be used as the engineered composite material due to its better anatomical features across the culm wall thickness.
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Apr 2024 12:05:01 +000
       
  • Exploring the Therapeutic Potential of Amburana cearensis: A Scientometric
           Study on an Endangered Medicinal Tree

    • Abstract: Amburana cearensis (Fabaceae) is a native tree of the Brazilian northeastern semiarid region, which has considerable economic, medicinal, and social importance, especially in the Caatinga biome. This study aims to identify the scientific knowledge generated about the pharmacological applicability of the species. We analyzed scientific works on the widespread pharmacological use of A. cearensis, adopting the scientometric research method. The medicinal properties were classified according to the uses mentioned in the manuscripts, considering body systems and treated symptoms. They were associated with the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health. We identified a total of 86 articles addressing the medicinal potential of the species, distributed in 57 journals published between 2005 and 2023. There was a significant increase in publications during the period evaluated. Also, the species has been widely used in traditional medicine, which has attracted new studies, especially experimental ones focusing on unraveling its pharmacological potential. One trend observed was a significant geographic bias, since most of the studies investigated were carried out by researchers linked to Brazilian institutions located mainly in the northeast. This region includes the largest number of species occurrence points, explaining the interest of these institutions in recognizing the biological potential of their local or regional flora. In-depth investigations into the medicinal properties and secondary metabolites produced by A. cearensis should continue so that its therapeutic benefits are fully understood. However, it is necessary to link research into chemical and pharmacological properties with consideration of the importance of sustainable management of the species, since it faces risks of extinction. We acknowledge that an earlier version of this manuscript was presented as a dissertation by Ayane Emília Dantas dos Santos to fulfil the academic requirements for the degree of Forest Science at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte. The dissertation is available for reference at the following link: https://repositorio.ufrn.br/jspui/bitstream/123456789/46918/1/Cienciometriaetnobotanicamodelagem_Santos_2022.pdf.
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2024 05:20:01 +000
       
  • Teak (Tectona grandis Linn. f) and Edaphic Factors Affecting the
           Regeneration of Woody Species and Their Functional Traits in Economic
           Forest Plantation, Northern Thailand

    • Abstract: Improved understanding of relationships among plant traits, stand characteristics, and soil properties can provide insights into the regenerating tree communities of commercial teak plantations. We investigated whether plant traits could be used to predict the natural regeneration of woody species in teak plantations with different soil and stand conditions. Data were collected in fifty 20 m × 20 m plots that were established in teak plantations of varying ages in northern Thailand. We analyzed differences in stand characteristics, soil properties, and community-level functional traits among sites. The RLQ analysis was performed to explore the associations among species abundances, plant traits, and a combined set of soil variables and stand characteristics. Our results showed that tree species with high leaf dry matter contents and high wood density dominated communities in an older teak plantation and were associated with high OM and N concentrations. Trees with larger leaves are increased in plantations that had experienced their first teak thinning, and were rich in organic matter. Species with high specific leaf areas increased in sites with high teak basal areas and which had experienced more intense thinning on fertile soils. Thick-leaved species had high importance values on sites with high densities of teak and infertile soils. Our results indicated that tree communities with similar conspecific traits were associated with specific soil and stand conditions in teak plantations. A knowledge of these regeneration dynamics may allow forest managers to encourage increased natural regeneration and enhanced diversity in commercial teak plantations.
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2024 10:50:01 +000
       
  • Operational Risk Assessment for the Pollination Service with Apis
           mellifera Bees in Cashew Crops in Vichada, Colombia

    • Abstract: The cashew tree relies heavily on the presence of pollinators during the peak receptivity of its flower to facilitate the transfer of pollen from the stamen to the stigma and ensure successful fruit production. Apis mellifera bees play a crucial role as intermediaries in the pollination process of the fruit, simultaneously extracting nectar and pollen from the flowers. The pollination service (PS) is susceptible to various risk factors that, if realized, could impact both the beekeeping industry and cashew production. This article aims to assess the operational risks associated with pollination service for Anacardium occidentale production in Vichada, Colombia, as a strategic measure to safeguard the business’s value. Drawing on expert opinions and relevant literature, nineteen risks were identified, encompassing threats such as fires, thefts, attacks by wild animals, unexpected rains, etc. Following the application of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), four risks were prioritized based on their severity and occurrence. Subsequently, Value at Risk (VaR) was employed for risk evaluation. The anticipated loss for the pollination service, resulting from these prioritized risks: 1, 9, 12 and 13, was quantified at $226674 ± $19096 per year for an 8000-hectare margin with a confidence level of 95%. The economic loss for 16000 hectares was $453348 ± $38192. This substantial value is of great significance to the beekeeping sector, translating to a loss of $27.3 per hectare per year and directly impacting the estimated $437824 loss in the cashew sector. Such losses have far-reaching consequences, affecting the livelihoods of peasant beekeepers in the region and potentially discouraging the maintenance of bee colonies and forests.
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Feb 2024 10:05:02 +000
       
  • Distribution and Regeneration Status of Albizia gummifera and Prunus
           africana along Agroecology in Agroforestry: The Case of Gombora District,
           Southern Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Empirical evidence on the patterns of the multipurpose trees distribution and regeneration status, which are under threats pressure is necessary for the proper management and conservation of the species. Prunus africana is listed as vulnerable while Albizia gummifera is listed as least concern amongst the multipurpose trees. This study was aimed to investigate the distribution, abundance, density, and regeneration status of Prunus africana and Albizia gummifera along agroecology and farmers’ wealth status in agroforestry. Stratification sampling and equal sampling techniques were employed. A total of 162 quadrats were laid within the randomly selected 54 households’ farms. A nested quadrat size was 20 m × 20 m for enset tree-based homegarden and parklands. For live fencing, a quadrat size was 4 m × 10 m. Abundance, diameter (cm), height (m), and growth habits of both trees were recorded. Density (stems per ha), diameter class (cm), height (m) class of both trees, and mean of growth habit were analyzed and considered. One-way ANOVA analysis and independent t-test were employed for means comparison by using SPSS V. 23.0. A total of 132 individual A. gummifera was recorded along agroecology while a total of 55 individual P. africana was recorded along agroecology. Mean density (stem/ha) of A. gummifera and P. africana showed significant difference between agroecology and farmers’ wealth groups ().A. gummifera and P. africana were sparsely distributed in the enset tree-based homegarden, parklands, and live fencing along agroecology. The overall diameter (cm) class and height (m) class distribution pattern of these tree species were observed as a J-shaped curve. The regeneration status of A. gummifera and P. africana was poor. In conclusion, distribution, abundance, and regeneration status of A. gummifera and P. africana were influenced by agroecology and farmers’ wealth status needing appropriate conservation measures.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Feb 2024 12:20:01 +000
       
  • Low-Intensity Wildfire Alters Selected Soil Properties in the Tropical
           Shorea robusta Forest

    • Abstract: Wildfires may impact specific soil properties differently, including positive, negative, or neutral effects. However, due to the absence of uniformity in comprehending how wildfires influence soil nutrients, this research endeavors to scrutinize the particular effect of wildfire on selected soil properties in the tropical Shorea robusta forest. We analyzed 42 soil samples obtained from the topsoil of 0–10 cm comprising 21 samples from the fire-affected area and 21 from the fire-unaffected area. The physicochemical parameters of the soil including soil pH, soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), available phosphorus, and available potassium were examined and compared in two sites. The impact of fire was statistically tested after comparing each variable between the two sites. Using the Mann–Whitney U test and the Pearson correlation coefficient, we analyzed the data. The results indicated that the average chemical parameters of the soil except for pH in the fire-affected area (pH = 5.43, SOC = 1.6%, TN = 0.1%, and  kg·ha−1) were greater than those in the fire-unaffected area (pH = 5.71, SOC = 1.21%, TN = 0.09%, and  kg·ha−1). There were statistically significant differences in the soil parameters, including pH, SOC, TN, and P, but not with K. The soil pH was reduced in the fire-affected area, with a significant positive correlation with SOC, TN, and K. Overall, the low-intensity wildfire facilitated the proliferation of soil chemical properties in the tropical S. robusta forest. Hence, low-intensity wildfire could be a suitable forest management strategy to alter soil nutrient status. Additionally, these findings can aid in enhancing forest fire management strategies for effectively managing the tropical S. robusta forest.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Feb 2024 05:20:01 +000
       
  • Ecological Study of the Vegetation in the Loka Abaya National Park,
           Ethiopia

    • Abstract: An ecological study of the vegetation in the Loka Abaya National Park, in the Central Rift Valley of Ethiopia, was conducted. Vegetation data and some environmental variables including physical and chemical properties of the soil, altitude, slope, and ecological disturbance were collected and subjected to the agglomerative hierarchical classification and ordination with the canonical correspondence analysis. For each of the community groups, the mean and standard errors were calculated from the environmental parameters to characterize the community types and quantitative relationships between environmental variables were analyzed by calculating Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient using the SAS computer software programme. A total of 198 plant species representing 79 families and 139 genera were collected and documented. Seven plant community types, namely, Vachellia brevispica Harms–Rhus natalensis Krauss, Ficus sur Forssk.–Vachellia albida (Del.) A. Chev., Panicum subalbidum Kunth–Cyperus latifolius Poir, Dodonaea angustifolia L. f.–Ximenia americana L., Combretum molle R.Br ex. G.Don–Combretum collinum Fresen., Ilex mitis (L.) Radlk–Olea europaea L. subsp. cuspidata, and Dichrostachys cinerea (L.) Wight & Arn, were identified. Ilex mitis–Olea europaea L. subsp. cuspidata community had the highest species richness, whereas the least species richness was recorded for the Panicum subalbidum–Cyperus latifolius community. The results of vegetation-environment relationships indicated that the measured environmental variables explained 74.99% of the total variation in floristic data. The results of the canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of community-environment relationships indicated that among measured environmental variables, altitude (r2 0.0548, ), slope (r2 = 0.0241, ), pH (r2 = 0.01855, ), sodium (r2 = 0.01316, ), CEC (r2 = 0.01424, ), magnesium (r2 = 0.01282, ), potassium (r2 = 0.0152, ), and soil moisture content (SMC) (r2 = 0.01537, ) significantly explained the variation in species composition of the communities and their distribution. Therefore, ecosystem-oriented biodiversity conservation and restoration strategies will be implemented by considering these significant environmental variables.
      PubDate: Sat, 27 Jan 2024 04:35:01 +000
       
  • Assessment of Edible Woody Plants’ Diversity, Their Threats, and Local
           People’s Perception in Borecha Woreda of Buno Bedele Zone, Southwestern
           Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Edible woody plants play an essential role in ensuring the food and livelihood security of communities. However, the management practice and diversity of those plants are declined, particularly in an urbanizing world, due to a lack of traditional awareness among the people. This research identified edible woody plants’ diversity, their threats, and local people’s perception in Borecha woreda of Buno Bedele Zone, southwestern Ethiopia. Data on edible woody plants were gathered through interviews with 105 households (67 men and 38 women) between the ages of 21 and 90. Structured and semistructured questionnaires were used to obtain the data from informants. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results showed significant differences () between the number of edible woody plants reported by age and literacy level of respondents. Forty-three species of edible woody plants, belonging to 34 genera and 24 families, were identified. Fruits (79.1%), roots (14%), leaves (2.3%), stems (2.3%), and seeds (2.3%) were identified as the edible parts of these plants. Fruits are the most edible plant part usually consumed fresh without cooking in the study area. The identified plants have a variety of growth forms: shrubs (49%), trees (37%), and lianas (14%) respectively. The most common plant growth forms in the study site were shrubs. In the study area, agricultural expansion, overharvesting, and lack of natural regeneration were the major threats to edible woody plants. In the study area, cutting for constructions was the primary hazard to edible woody plants. In situ and ex situ conservation strategies and efforts of plantation practices in the agricultural landscape are needed for sustaining the edible woody plants in the study area.
      PubDate: Wed, 17 Jan 2024 11:50:02 +000
       
  • Impacts of Grazing on the Selected Features of Herbaceous Species and
           Harvested Dry Matter Yield of Natural Pasture

    • Abstract: This study evaluated how grazing influenced the specific features of herbaceous species (basal cover, species richness, evenness, and diversity) as well as dry matter yield in the northwestern highlands of Ethiopia. For this study, the natural pastures were divided into three strata based on grazing types (grazing exclusion areas, controlled grazing, and continuous grazing). The areas in each grazing type were divided into two randomly selected (100 m × 50 m) sampling blocks. Then, each of the separated areas was divided into five 10 m × 10 m, and in each subdivided plot, (0.5 m × 0.5 m) were placed across the plots. Thus, a total of 30 (0.5 m × 0.5 m) quadrats were used to evaluate the effect of grazing on the basal cover, species richness, diversity, and dry matter yield of the herbaceous pasture layers. As the results showed, there were significant differences in dry matter yield, basal cover, species richness, evenness, and diversity among grazing areas. The dry matter yield, basal cover, species richness, and diversity were significantly () higher in both grazing exclusion and controlled grazing areas than in continuous grazing areas. Therefore, to increase the dry matter yield of natural pasture and to ensure sustainable livestock production, the livestock producers in the study areas should practice either a cut-carry system or a controlled grazing system.
      PubDate: Fri, 05 Jan 2024 10:35:00 +000
       
  • Exploration of Species Diversity as Ecological Conditions Vary to
           Determine the Possible Areas for Collecting Tree Seeds in Amhara Region,
           Ethiopia

    • Abstract: The aim of this study was to determine the forest species trees and shrubs that occur in the Amhara region, Ethiopia, for determining the possible areas for collecting seeds and propagations to meet genetic conservation and use programs as well as the recovery of degraded areas. The study was conducted at Fudi Natural Forest in Fagta Lekoma district, Amhara region, northwestern Ethiopia. Using geographic information systems (GISs), the points of presence of species were plotted on the USGS SRTM map (GTOPO30) at 1 : 250,000 scale (USGS, 2018) using Arc GIS 10.1 software (ESRI, 2011). The map has been cropped and presented only for the citizens that contained points of presence of the species. Figures were generated in the JPG format for each species individually, presenting the distribution of each according to the altitude of the region. The maps were elaborated using multiple linear regressions, relating the bioclimatic variables with the numerical models of latitude, longitude, and altitude. Descriptive statistical analysis was initially performed. This was followed by performing a normality test to observe the data distribution. In the region, 1250 individuals of 32 families and 46 species were surveyed. The families most found in the northeast, north, northwest, southwest, southeast, and west regions were Mimosoideae, Euphorbiaceae, Celastraceae, and Rubiaceae.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Dec 2023 06:35:17 +000
       
  • Influence of Elevation and Anthropogenic Disturbance on Woody Species
           Composition, Diversity, and Stand Structure in Harego Mountain Forest,
           Northeastern Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Environmental variables like elevation affect species composition, diversity, distribution, density, and horizontal and upward growth. Ecologists are constantly working to better understand how species diversity varies along elevational gradients, particularly in mountainous ecosystems. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to examine the species’ horizontal and vertical structural diversity along the Harego Mountain Forest’s elevational gradient. The area was categorized into lower, middle, and upper elevations. A total of 67 (20 m × 20 m) plots were created along gradients of elevation 2,079–2,516 meters above sea level (m a.s.l.). Information for floristic composition, diversity, stand structure, and environmental variables were measured and recorded for each plot over the three elevational gradients. Data on anthropogenic disturbances were visually evaluated for every plot in every gradient of elevation. For the diversity analysis, Hill’s diversity statistics were employed. To find significant variations between the three elevational gradients in terms of Hill’s diversity number, stand structure, and environmental variables, the one-way analysis of variance with SPSS version 26 at the 0.05 level of significance was carried out. The finding revealed that 50 woody plants that belonged to 35 families and 44 genera in the 67 sample plots with an elevation of 2,079 to 2,516 were identified. Shrubs were dominant in each elevational gradient. Species richness, abundance, and Hill’s diversity number were all significantly () greater in the upper elevational gradient of the forest. On the other hand, all stand structures were significantly () higher in the middle elevational gradient. The effect of anthropogenic disturbances and environmental variables were clearly observed in the lower and upper elevational gradients than in the middle elevation. As a result, there were fewer seedlings, saplings, trees, and shrubs in the gradients of lower and higher elevations. For the conservation of the forest, it is crucial to pay special attention to biotic elements at lower elevations and abiotic factors at higher elevations. Accordingly, involving the local community in forest management, reducing anthropogenic pressure in and around the Harego Mountain Forest through tree planting in farmlands and woodlots and implementing physical soil and water conservation structures are recommended.
      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2023 06:20:00 +000
       
  • Socioeconomic Drivers of Land Use and Land Cover Change in Western
           Ethiopia

    • Abstract: A variety of socioeconomic and environmental drivers have contributed to changes in LULC around the world in recent years. This study examines the socioeconomic drivers that accelerated LULC in western Ethiopia. The data were generated from terrestrial satellite images primary and secondary sources. Primary data sources include household surveys, field observations, group discussions, interviews, key informants, and interpreting remote sensing data. Secondary data were reviewed mainly from relevant literature both published and unpublished materials. Landsat images were classified using the supervised classification technique and maximum likelihood classifier using arc GIS 10.3 to create LULC maps of the study area. Accuracy score and kappa coefficient were used to confirm the accuracy of the classified LULC, and agricultural land, settlement, bare land, forest land, and water body were the main LULC classes in the district. Forest cover in three decades (1990–2020) in the study area decreased from 12.1% in 1990 to 2.6% in 2020. The data were also analyzed using a descriptive model, Pearson correlation, and binary logistic regression. The independent variables (age and gender) show a Pearson’s positive correlation with the drivers of LULC dynamics; that is, as these independent variables increase, the drivers of LULC dynamics also increase, whereas educational status and land holding size show a negative correlation. This shows that the drivers of the anthropogenic forces of LULC dynamics decreased as the number of educated populations and the size of land holdings increased, and vice versa. Then, the binary logistic regression model examined the relationship between the dependent and the major socioeconomic (independent) variables. Logistic regression was performed to determine how independent variables and the drivers of LULC (natural forces or anthropogenic forces) change and the model was statistically significant (x2 = 23.971, df = 5,  
      PubDate: Wed, 08 Nov 2023 07:05:01 +000
       
  • Effect of Spacing on Survival and Growth Performance of Eucalyptus grandis
           Hill ex Maiden at Holeta Research Site, Central Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Application of optimum initial plant spacing is one of the most important silvicultural practices to maximize the survival and growth performance of established plants at field. A field experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of different plant spacing on survival and growth parameters of E. grandis at the ages of 4, 17, 34, 56, 66, and 79 months after establishment at Holeta Research Site. The experimental trail was planted at the initial plant spacings of 1.5 m × 1.5 m, 2 m × 2 m, 2.5 m × 2.5 m, and 3 m × 3 m using a randomized complete block design (RCBD) in three replicates. Other than regular management intervention including regular spot hoeing, weeding, and cleaning, the experiment did not receive any other treatment applications. Evaluation was made on survival and growth performance (plant RCD, height, and DBH) at different ages from 4 to 79 months after planting. Except survival percentage, all other variables (plant RCD, height, and DBH) were significantly affected by initial plant spacing. At the age of 56, 66, and 79 months after planting, the closer plant spacing (2 m × 2 m) was most promising in producing optimum plant height and DBH. Overall, our finding confirmed that initial plant spacing has a significant effect on growth performance of E. grandis at Holeta trail site. Evaluation of basic wood properties in relation with spacing or stand density management for quality wood and wood-based production and clear bole formation is suggested.
      PubDate: Tue, 31 Oct 2023 05:35:02 +000
       
  • Value Chain Analysis of Highland Bamboo (Yushania alpina) in Banja
           District, Awi Zone, Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Bamboo is one of the most important vegetation resources in highlands of Ethiopia. In Ethiopia, understanding the socioeconomic significance of bamboo resources and linkages between policy makers and other organizations is a persistent issue for the expansion of bamboo industry. This study aims at analyzing the value chain of highland bamboo originating from Banja district, Awi zone, Ethiopia. Specifically, it investigates the current value chain structure of highland bamboo and the role of actors and identifies the existing upgrading strategies along the chain, estimates the market performance, analyzes the determinants that affect the market supply of highland bamboo, and analyzes the governance structure along the highland bamboo value chain. Primary data were collected from direct value chain actors such as 122 sampled households, 13 traders, 16 processors, and 30 final users through semistructured interview schedules, key informant interviews, focus group discussions, and personal observation. Descriptive statistics, multiple linear regression, and value chain analysis were employed to analyze the data. Government offices and international network of bamboo and rattan and micro and small enterprises were support service providers. The governance structures in the bamboo value chain differ from one stage to the other stage. The result of multiple linear regression model indicated that the land size allocated for bamboo plantation, number of culm harvested, access of market information, and silviculture management practice positively affected the market supply of bamboo culm, whereas distance to the market affected the market supply of bamboo culm negatively and significantly. Based on the findings of this study, designing policies help to increase farmers’ knowledge and skills through capacity building and help to improve information access, silviculture management practice, and market supply of culm.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Oct 2023 05:50:00 +000
       
  • Species-Specific Allometric Equations, Biomass Expansion Factor, and Wood
           Density of Native Tree Species in the Dry Afromontane Forest of Ethiopia

    • Abstract: A forest is a storehouse of carbon released from different sources when the activities of sustainable forest management, planting, and rehabilitation exist. However, few allometric equations are present to determine its contribution to carbon reduction. The target of the study was to develop species-specific allometric equations and establish a database for biomass expansion factor and wood density for five tree species grown in the dry Afromontane forest of Ethiopia. A direct or destructive sampling method was used on 62 trees from different diameter classes. The diameter at breast height and the total height of selected trees ranged from 7 to 48 cm and 6.7 to 23.4 m, respectively. Trees were felled and divided into various biomass sections. Stem and big branch discs were sampled to determine the wood density and volume of the trees. Sample wood and foliage were oven-dried for three days and two days at 105°C and 70°C, respectively, to get their dry weight. Total above-ground biomass was regressed using diameter at breast height, total height, wood density, and average crown diameter as independent variables. R software version 4.0.1 was used to fit the biomass equations. The best biomass models were determined to have lower AIC and RSE and highest adj. R2. The biomass expansion factor and wood density of five tree species ranged from 1.19 to 1.40 and 0.53 to 0.74 g/cm−3, respectively. Species-specific allometric equations were better than both mixed species and pan tropical models for the assessment of above-ground biomass in the Chilimo dry Afromontane forest of Ethiopia.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Sep 2023 05:50:01 +000
       
  • Species-Site Suitability Assessment of Bamboo and Its Detailed Study in
           Different Agroecological Zones of Kenya

    • Abstract: The site suitability assessment of Bamboo in Kenya was studied for diverse agroecological zones (AEZs) comprising one indigenous and fifteen exotic bamboo species in nine different AEZs of Kenya. Three bamboo clumps from each species that were at least five years old were assessed to accurately capture data on growth performance and yield. Soil samples collected at 0–30 cm depth from different areas varied considerably. The proportion of soil varied across the bamboo planting sites (F(1,11) = 24.94;  
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Sep 2023 06:35:01 +000
       
  • Impact of Land Use Types on Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen Stocks: A
           Study from the Lal Bakaiya Watershed in Central Nepal

    • Abstract: Understanding the role of soil carbon (C) dynamics and quantitative changes as affected by various land use patterns is very critical given the significance of carbon sequestration. In this context, the current study was conducted in the Lal Bakaiya watershed in Makawanpur District, Nepal, to assess the variation of soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (N) stocks in three different land use types, namely, natural forest, grassland, and cultivated land. Incremental soil depths method (i.e., 0–15 cm, 16–30 cm, and 31–45 cm) was applied to collect soil samples in bulk from each of the land use under the study to estimate SOC and N stocks in laboratory. A total of 90 soil samples were collected from three soil layers down the soil profile up to 45 cm for each land uses. The results show that both SOC and N contents decreased with soil depths; however, substantial amount of SOC and N stocks were reported in lower soil depths under land use with natural forest. Both SOC and N contents were found relatively higher at 0–15 cm depth in natural forest soil (1.40 ± 0.20% and 0.26 ± 0.04%) than those in grassland and cultivated land, respectively. The mean total SOC stock and N stock ranged from 46.3 ± 4.24 t ha−1 and 7.11 ± 1.86 t ha−1 in cultivated land to 62.05 ± 9.17 t ha−1 and 11.40 ± 1.92 t ha−1 in the land use with natural forest, respectively. Furthermore, the mean total carbon and nitrogen ratio (C/N ratio) of the soil was found to be higher in cultivated land (7.07 ± 1.93) than that in natural forest (5.75 ± 1.47) and grassland (5.62 ± 1.49), respectively. Two-way analysis of variance results showed that both land use type and soil depth have significantly () affected the SOC and N stocks in the study. From the results, it is suggested that well-managed land use can contribute significantly in offsetting global carbon emission.
      PubDate: Tue, 05 Sep 2023 05:50:01 +000
       
  • Prioritization of the Forest Species Most Exploited by the Communities
           Bordering the Natural Forests of Pobè and Dogo-Kétou in Southeastern
           Benin, West Africa: An Ethnobotanical Approach

    • Abstract: Benin is not a big forest country, and the sustainable management of forest relics and their resources is a priority for the managers. This study was conducted in the forest regions of Pobè and Kétou located in Southeast Benin with the objective of characterizing the ethnobotanical forest species prioritized by the local populations for their different uses. Specifically, it aimed to identify the ethnobotanical priority species for conservation, characterize the ethnobotanical value of these priority species, and analyze the tree organ harvesting methods used for the sustainable management of the forest species. Data have been collected from 287 local populations investigated and on the specimens collected on the field, which allowed to identify the scientific name. The combination of the citation frequencies, the method of reproduction, the vulnerability scores, and the IUCN status of the species has allowed to identify five priority ethnobotanical species per forest. The software Ri386_3.5.1 has been used for the different analysis such as the calculation of the various frequencies and the correspondence factor analysis to show the relationships between socioethnic groups, organs used, and the categories of use. The priority species identified in the forest of Pobè are Milicia excelsa, Khaya senegalensis, Anogeissus leiocarpa, Ceiba pentandra, and Adansonia digitata. The priority species identified in the forest of Dogo-Kétou are Vitellaria paradoxa, Prosopis africana, Pterocarpus erinaceus, Khaya senegalensis, and Anogeissus leiocarpa. This study has revealed 54 tree species gathered into 47 genera and 25 botanical families. Their different parts have been harvested for many kinds of utilization such as medicinal, commercial, feeding, medico-magic, and artisanal. The most commonly used organs were leaves, fruits, seeds, barks, roots, and wood. The harvesting methods include cutting poles, cutting twigs and branches to harvest leaves, debarking the trunk, felling trees for wood, cutting roots, picking and harvesting fruits and seeds, and harvesting of flowers. Cutting down trees and picking flowers, fruits, and seeds have been the methods of harvesting, which affect negatively regeneration of the tree populations. It is then important to sensitize the local people on the sustainable management of their forest resources through the conception and implementation of a project program focused on forest conservation.
      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2023 11:20:00 +000
       
  • The Role of Forest Ecosystems for Carbon Sequestration and Poverty
           Alleviation in Ethiopia

    • Abstract: The objective of the review was to examine and document the contributions of forests in Ethiopia to both climate change mitigation and poverty alleviation. A comprehensive analysis was conducted, encompassing several research articles from reputable journals and international report papers. The findings of the review reveal that Chilimo-Gaji forest exhibited the highest levels of above- and belowground biomass carbon sequestration, while the Egdu forest area demonstrated the highest soil organic carbon content. The variations in carbon sequestration capacity among forest areas can be attributed to several factors, including forest density, variation in diameter at breast height (DBH) among trees, tree height classes, altitude, slope, and aspect, which significantly influence carbon concentration. Furthermore, discrepancies in the application of allometric models to estimate forest biomass also contribute to these variations. In addition to their role in climate change mitigation, forests play an invaluable role in poverty alleviation, particularly in developing countries. Ethiopia has implemented various afforestation strategies to enhance the contribution of forest ecosystems to climate change mitigation and poverty alleviation.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Aug 2023 08:05:00 +000
       
  • Refining National Forest Cover Data Based on Fusion Optical Satellite
           Imageries in Indonesia

    • Abstract: Precision mapping towards tropical forest cover data is critical to address the global climate crisis, such as land-based carbon measurement and potential conservation areas identification. In the recent decade, accessibility to open public datasets on forestry is rapidly increased. However, the availability of finer-resolution of forest cover data is still very limited. As a developing country with numerous rainforests, Indonesia suffered multifaceted threats, particularly deforestation. Thus, precise forest cover data can be useful to fulfill Indonesia’s nationally determined contribution to climate change. In this study, we mapped the national forest cover data for Indonesia using a new object-based image classification approach based on combined Planet-NICFI and Sentinel-2 optical imageries. Our findings had relatively high accuracy compared with the other studies, with the F score ranging from 0.67 to 0.99 and can capture the fragmented forest in fine resolution (i.e., ∼5 m). In addition, we found that Planet-NICFI bands had a higher contribution in predicting forest cover than Sentinel-2 imageries. Utilizing forest cover data for further analyses should be performed to help the achievement of national and global agenda, e.g., related to the FOLU net sink in 2030 and the Global Biodiversity Framework.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Aug 2023 10:35:01 +000
       
  • Floral Calendar of Honeybee Plants in Kellem and West Wollega Zone,
           Western Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Beekeeping has significantly contributed to environmental conservation and the preservation of natural resources. Although the quality and quantity of flora available play a major role in the success of the sector, the botanical makeup of natural vegetation varies greatly. This study was conducted targeting the identification and documentation of major honeybee floras and their flowering calendar. Midland and lowland agroecologies were purposively selected. Continuous field plant registration was performed. Melissopalynological analysis from bee pollen and honey were used to identify floral origin. Field observations identified 59 and 63 plants in the midland and lowlands, respectively. Season 1 had the highest pollen yields, ranging from 11051.8 ± 56.4 g (midlands) to 878.3 ± 18.3 g (lowlands), while season 4 ranged from 16.8 ± 6.3 g (midlands) to 15.6 ± 7.4 g (lowlands) and had the lowest pollen yield. In both regions, February, March, July, and August are the months when pollen is not brought into the hive and could be used as starvation periods. A total of 1430.8 ± 75.4 and 1291.8 ± 71.4 g of bee pollen/hive were collected throughout the year in midland and lowland, respectively, and Asteraceae was the richest family accounting around 90% of pollen weight. In both agroecologies, honey is harvested three times a year. In the midland, monofloral honey, namely, Guizotia spp (64.42%) and Croton macrostychus (47.42%), was harvested in November and May, respectively, while honey harvested in February was multifloral type. Similarly, in the lowlands, monofloral honey of Guizotia spp (51.85%), Coffee arabica (55.22%), and Croton macrostychus (50.42%) was harvested in December, March, and June, respectively. Based on the results, Bidens prestinaria, Bidens pilosa, Guizotia spp, C. macrostachyus, Eucalyptus spp, Lepidium sativum, Zea mays, Hypostes trifolia, Vernonia spp, Trifolium spp, Helianthus annuus, C. arabica, Brassica abyssinica, Andropogon abyssinicus, Sorghum bicolor, Cordia africana, Syzygium guineense, and Terminalia spp are major bee plants. It is found that the study area is rich in bee plant diversity and hence has a potential for honey production.
      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jul 2023 04:35:20 +000
       
  • Selection of Soil and Water Conservation Technologies and Native Tree
           Species for Rehabilitation of Degraded Arid Lands in Southeast Ethiopia

    • Abstract: The large-scale commercial agriculture, mining, expansion of sedentary agricultural settlements, and overgrazing in Ethiopian pastoral areas have become a major cause of land degradation. Such activities reduce grazing capacities and impoverish already fragile living conditions of the pastoralists. Such an increase in land degradations necessitates urgent calls for interventions. The main objectives of this study were to select the best performing soil and water conservation technologies and native tree species to restore degraded lands of arid and semiarid conditions in Liben District of Guji Zone, Oromia Reginal State, Ethiopia. Four locally grown and locally preferred tree species, namely, Cordia africana, Acacia tortilis, Acacia goetzei, and Combretum molle, were planted in five soil and moisture conservation structures (control, half-moon, spot hoeing, mowing, and trench). The survival rate and height and root collar diameter (RCD) growth of planted tree species were collected two years after planting. A significantly higher survival rate, RCD, and height growth of planted seedlings were recorded from half-moon (52.44 ± 12.48%; 1.66 ± 0.31 cm; 51.57 ± 2.79 cm) and trench (64.00 ± 11.49%; 1.92 ± 0.27; 69.67 ± 2.62 cm) moisture conservation structures, respectively. Acacia tortilis (58.22 ± 12.38%) and Acacia goetzei (42.99 ± 8.81%) had better survival rate than Cordia africana (4.00 ± 1.91%) and Combretum molle (24.22 ± 7.34). Cordia africana attained the largest RCD (2.50 ± 0.34 cm) and height (95.83 ± 17.25 cm) growth, followed by Acacia tortilis and Acacia goetzei. It is concluded that Acacia tortilis and Acacia goetzei are better species to grow in degraded lands. The half-moon and trench moisture conservation structures have a great potential for degraded areas of the arid and semiarid conditions of Ethiopia for better tree establishment, survival, and enhanced growth thereby rehabilitation of degraded lands.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jul 2023 05:35:01 +000
       
  • Seasonal Decomposition Rates of Broadleaf and Conifer Wood Litter in Far
           Eastern Tropical Forest Communities

    • Abstract: Studies on wood litter decomposition sometimes show conflicting results. While low temperatures and humidity during winter in temperate climates are reported to halt the activity of decomposing agents, in the warmest and wettest tropical regions of the Far East, peat accumulates on the forest floor, indicating that the decomposition process is not proceeding well. In this study, we compared the inter-seasonal and inter-forest communities’ decomposition rate constant (k) of jabon (Anthocephalus macrophyllus (Roxb.) Havil.) and tusam (Pinus merkusii Jungh. & de Vriese) woods in three forest communities (Karst, Lowland, and Pine) on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. We placed 1,200 wooden planks (600 jabon logs and 600 tusam logs) measuring 10 cm × 10 cm × 1.5 cm on the ground in each forest community during different seasons: dry season and wet season. k was observed seasonally. We also observed the decomposing agent diversity, soil properties, and chemical content of the wood sample to examine factors affecting k values. The results showed the tendency of jabon wood k to be higher in the dry season than in the wet season, and the opposite trend was noted for tusam wood. k of both wood samples was highest in Karst, followed by Lowland and Pine forests. However, except for bacterial diversity and abundance of Odontotermes sp., there was no clear correlation between k and the diversity and abundance of decomposing agents. The k values varied distinctly, even among samples within the same forest community in the same season, causing the data not to be normally distributed. These findings indicate that decomposition processes in tropical forests vary at the microsite scale due to the high diversity of decomposing agents and their complex reciprocal association.
      PubDate: Mon, 17 Jul 2023 10:50:01 +000
       
  • Woody Species Composition, Structure, and Diversity of Dindin Natural
           Forest, South East of Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Information on species composition, structure, and diversity is essential to introduce and select different management activities to improve the forest productivity. Accordingly, species composition, structure, diversity, and regeneration status of trees were assessed in the Dindin natural forest. In this forest, trees or shrubs having ≥2.5 cm diameter at breast height and height >1.5 m were identified and measured in 35 quadrats of 20 m × 20 m. Regeneration status was assessed in 5 m × 5 m subplots that were laid within each main plot to sample seedling and sapling. Woody species diversity, density, basal area, and importance value index were calculated. To prioritize conservation efforts, the study utilized factors such as the importance value index, seedling and sapling densities, and population structure. A total of 42 woody tree species representing 30 families were recorded in the forest. The diversity and evenness of woody species in the Dindin forest were 2.66 and 0.70, respectively. Woody species density was 1403 individual ha−1, and the total basal area was 35.54 m2ha−1. About 480 seedlings per hectare were recorded in the Dindin forest. The research yielded practical insights into the dominance, population structure, importance value, and regeneration status of tree species. The analysis of population structure indicates that certain dominant species are experiencing inadequate regeneration. In addition, multiple nondominant shrubs and tree species within the forest are also at risk of extinction due to insufficient regeneration. Therefore, these important findings play a crucial role in the formulation and implementation of effective strategies to restore and rehabilitate the studied forest.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Jul 2023 08:20:01 +000
       
  • Woody Species Conservation, Management, and Its Socioeconomic Importance
           of Agroforestry Practice in Ethiopia

    • Abstract: The preservation of biodiversity is not at all a luxury. In many developing countries, the reduction in biodiversity caused by the conversion of primary forest to unsustainable agricultural landscapes has increased. Agroforestry provided habitat for various species of wildlife and had significant social and environmental advantages. However, there is a lack of knowledge on the significance of agroforestry in the management and conservation of woody species. The review’s main goal is to emphasize the socioeconomic significance of agroforestry in Ethiopia and the conservation and management of woody species. The most common agroforestry practices are typically carried out in different parts of the country on homegardens, crops, woodlots, and coffee farms. The most typical woody species utilized in agroforestry practices in southern Ethiopia are Cordia africana, Millettia ferruginea, Erythrina brucei, and Olea capensis. In Ethiopia’s northern region, you can find Croton macrostachyus, Vernonia amygdalina, Faidherbia albida, Acacia nilotica, Acacia seyal, and Grewia bicolor. The central highlands of Ethiopia also have Albizia gummifera, Cordia africana, Croton macrostachyus, Ficus vasta, and Vernonia amygdalina. Agroforestry improves the environment and the socioeconomic system by producing tree products such as timber, firewood, food, and building materials (reduce soil erosion, increase soil moisture and fertility, coffee shade, and keep microclimate balance). Woody species in agroforestry are managed through pollarding, thinning, and pruning.
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Jun 2023 06:05:00 +000
       
 
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  Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Arboriculture and Urban Forestry     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forestry Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
La Calera     Open Access  
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

           

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