Subjects -> FORESTS AND FORESTRY (Total: 130 journals)
    - FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)
    - LUMBER AND WOOD (1 journals)

FORESTS AND FORESTRY (129 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 12 of 12 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access  
Advance in Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Agroforestry Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Annals of Forest Research     Open Access  
Annals of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Appita Journal: Journal of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Artvin Çoruh Üniversitesi Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Artvin Coruh University Journal of Forestry Faculty     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Banko Janakari     Open Access  
Bartın Orman Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Bartin Faculty of Forestry     Open Access  
BIOFIX Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Canadian Journal of Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Central European Forestry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forestal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dissertationes Forestales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Eurasian Journal of Forest Science     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Engineering     Open Access  
European Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Folia Forestalia Polonica. Seria A - Forestry     Open Access  
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Forest Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Forest Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Forestry : Journal of Institute of Forestry, Nepal     Open Access  
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Forestry Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forestry Studies     Open Access  
Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Forests     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Forests, Trees and Livelihoods     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
iForest : Biogeosciences and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Forester     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indonesian Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INNOTEC : Revista del Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay     Open Access  
International Forestry Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Forest Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranian Journal of Forest and Poplar Research     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bioresources and Bioproducts     Open Access  
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Forest and Natural Resource Management     Open Access  
Journal of Forest Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Horticulture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sustainable Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Chemistry and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Wood Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Ilmu Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan Wallacea     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Sosial dan Ekonomi Kehutanan     Open Access  
Jurnal Pertanian Terpadu     Open Access  
Jurnal Sylva Lestari     Open Access  
La Calera     Open Access  
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Lesnoy Zhurnal     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Maderas. Ciencia y tecnología     Open Access  
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
New Forests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ormancılık Araştırma Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Forestry Research     Open Access  
Parks Stewardship Forum     Open Access  
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Proceedings of the Forestry Academy of Sciences of Ukraine     Open Access  
Quebracho. Revista de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Research Journal of Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Ciencias Forestales     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Revista Ecologia e Nutrição Florestal - ENFLO     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Forestal Mesoamericana Kurú     Open Access  
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue forestière française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rwanda Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Selbyana     Open Access  
Silva Balcanica     Open Access  
Small-scale Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Textual : Análisis del Medio Rural Latinoamericano     Open Access  
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trees, Forests and People     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Wahana Forestra : Jurnal Kehutanan     Open Access  
Wood and Fiber Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Forest Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.89
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0015-749X - ISSN (Online) 1938-3738
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Comment on Economic Contributions from Conserved Forests: Four Case
           

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      Authors: Radcliffe S.
      Pages: 125 - 126
      Abstract: Murray, et al. (2021) describe a study of the USDA Forest Service Forest Legacy Program (FLP) that “…quantified economic activities on FLP land in four areas to assess how these activities contribute to the economy of the multistate region in which the projects are located”. This study is purported to illustrate “…the contributions of FLP to local economies”.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxac003
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Reply to Comment on Economic Contributions from Conserved Forests: Four
           Case Studies of the USDA Forest Service Forest Legacy Program

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      Authors: Murray H; Catanzaro P, Markowski-Lindsay M, et al.
      Pages: 127 - 127
      Abstract: We appreciate the opportunity to clarify the purpose and scope of our study. The commenter is correct that we did not evaluate the economic impact of the Forest Legacy Program but rather used land conserved through the program as a case study of how intact, conserved forests can contribute to local economies. An economic impact study would have assessed the change in economic contributions caused by the Forest Legacy Program. This study estimates the economic contributions from land that was conserved with FLP funding and other funding sources (Murray et al 2021). The terms “economic contribution” and “economic impact” are often used interchangeably for studies about how spending and production flows influence the economy. However, because we did not analyze consumer behavior or alternative scenarios, we are using the term “economic contribution” to describe our analysis per the definitions outlined in Watson et al (2007).
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxac002
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Landowner Willingness to Accept Monetary Compensation for Managing Forests
           for Ecosystem Services in the Southern United States

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      Authors: Adhikari R; Grala R, Petrolia D, et al.
      Pages: 128 - 144
      Abstract: AbstractDistributional specifications of the willingness-to-accept function affect the accuracy of welfare estimates when the contingent valuation model includes unsure responses. By exponentiating the bid variable, we implemented an improved methodological approach to estimate four discrete choice models reflecting treatment of unsure responses. Landowners required an average compensation of $93 acre−1 year−1 to participate in a 10-year conservation program. The probability of participation was positively influenced by payment amount, concern about wildlife habitat loss, contact frequency with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, and education level. Findings will help determine regional-level budgets for various conservation scenarios facilitating an increased production of ecosystem services.Study ImplicationsConservation agencies can decrease landowner uncertainty that arises from limited information about conservation programs and motivate landowners to enroll in a conservation program facilitating an increased production of ecosystem services by offering adequate monetary incentives. Conservation agencies can provide similar financial compensation for conservation of bottomland hardwoods and pine stands but will most likely need to offer greater compensation for the protection of forests prone from impacts by wildfires, hurricanes, and tornadoes. Available funding should be prioritized for conservation of critical habitats and freshwater sources vulnerable to land disturbances.
      PubDate: Fri, 28 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxab063
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Douglas-fir Tree Mortality Caused by the Douglas-fir Beetle in Thinned and
           Unthinned Stands in Montana, USA

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      Authors: Sturdevant N; Haavik L, Negrón J.
      Pages: 145 - 151
      Abstract: AbstractBark beetles are casual agents of tree mortality, often affecting landscapes with diverse topography. The Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins) (DFB) uses Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco), as its primary host. Populations often increase following disturbances such as defoliation, fires, or blowdowns and then transition into live healthy trees. Mitigating tree mortality where high mortality levels are incompatible with land manager objectives is of relevance. In this study, we compared mortality levels in eighteen thinned and twelve unthinned pure Douglas-fir stands in the Helena National Forest in Montana. Managed stands were thinned during the summers of 2014 and 2015 and tree mortality evaluated in 2017 and 2018. Douglas-fir beetle populations were at endemic levels in the study area, as represented by low observed tree mortality. Even under endemic populations, 3.6% of Douglas-firs > 12 in diameter at breast height (dbh) were killed in unthinned stands compared to 1.6% in thinned stands. Basal area of trees killed in unthinned stands was 5.4 (± 2.4) ft2/ac compared with 0.5 (± 0.3) ft2/ac in thinned stands. Although insect pressure was low, this study indicates that vegetation management could be a tool to mitigate DFB-caused tree mortality. Additional studies conducted under higher insect populations are needed.Study Implications: Douglas-fir beetle (DFB) can cause extensive mortality of Douglas-fir, particularly in dense stands of large-diameter trees with a high percentage of hosts. Vegetation management through silvicultural thinnings has been proposed as a long-term strategy to mitigate tree mortality from bark beetles. In this study, we compared tree mortality caused by DFB in thinned and unthinned Douglas-fir stands. Douglas-fir beetle populations were at low levels post-thinning and mortality levels were limited. Regardless, we observed increased mortality in denser, unthinned stands compared with thinned stands with lower tree density, suggesting that stand density reductions may mitigate DFB-caused tree mortality.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxac006
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Allometric Relationships for Predicting Aboveground Biomass, Sapwood, and
           Leaf Area of Two-Needle Piñon Pine (Pinus edulis) Amid Open-Grown
           Conditions in Central New Mexico

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      Authors: McIntire C; Cunliffe A, Boschetti F, et al.
      Pages: 152 - 161
      Abstract: AbstractPinus edulis Engelm. is a short-stature, drought-tolerant tree species that is abundant in piñon-juniper woodlands throughout semiarid ecosystems of the American Southwest. P. edulis is a model species among ecophysiological disciplines, with considerable research focus given to hydraulic functioning and carbon partitioning relating to mechanisms of tree mortality. Many ecological studies require robust estimates of tree structural traits such as biomass, active sapwood area, and leaf area. We harvested twenty trees from Central New Mexico ranging in size from 1.3 to 22.7 cm root crown diameter (RCD) to derive allometric relationships from measurements of RCD, maximum height, canopy area (CA), aboveground biomass (AGB), sapwood area (AS), and leaf area (AL). Total foliar mass was measured from a subset of individuals and scaled to AL from estimates of leaf mass per area. We report a strong nonlinear relationship to AGB as a function of both RCD and height, whereas CA scaled linearly. Total AS expressed a power relationship with RCD. Both AS and CA exhibited strong linear relationships with AL (R2 = 0.99), whereas RCD increased nonlinearly with AL. We improve on current models by expanding the size range of sampled trees and supplement the existing literature for this species.Study Implications: Land managers need to better understand carbon and water dynamics in changing ecosystems to understand how those ecosystems can be sustainably used now and in the future. This study of two-needle pinon (Pinus edulis Engelm.) trees in New Mexico, USA, uses observations from unoccupied aerial vehicles, field measurements, and harvesting followed by laboratory analysis to develop allometric models for this widespread species. These models can be used to understand plant traits such biomass partitioning and sap flow, which in turn will help scientists and land managers better understand the ecosystem services provided by pinon pine across North America.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxac001
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The Effects of Rehabilitation Treatments on Landscape Function Within a
           Softwood Plantation After Fire: Implications for Catchment Management

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      Authors: Liu J; Colloff M, Freudenberger D.
      Pages: 184 - 192
      Abstract: AbstractThere is global interest in enhancing the ecosystem services provided by landscapes and catchments dominated by plantation (monoculture) forestry. Partial reversion of plantations to locally native species (reforestation) is one option. However, the ecological outcomes of this kind of plantation reversion are poorly known. The partial reforestation of a pine plantation (Pinus radiata D. Don 1836) in the Australian Capital Territory with native species following a wildfire provides a rare case study of the environmental consequences of such a reversion. We estimated changes in landscape functionality by measuring indices of water infiltration, nutrient cycling, and soil surface stability across five landscape-scale treatments after the 2003 Lower Cotter Catchment bushfire: (1) natural regeneration of a native forest burned in 2003, (2) burned pine plantation replanted to pines, (3) burned plantation replanted to native trees and shrubs, (4) burned plantation allowed to naturally regenerate, and (5) forest roads rehabilitated by planting native trees and shrubs. At 14 years after the fire, we found that the regenerating native forest had the highest indices of water infiltration, nutrient cycling, and soil surface stability. The burned pine plantation that was replanted to pines in 2005 had indices of functionality that were higher than the burned plantation areas that were either allowed to naturally regenerate to native eucalypt forest or were planted with native forest species. These two types of native forest rehabilitation treatments had only minor differences in functionality. The rehabilitated closed roads were the least functional. We found that a pine plantation at the closed canopy stage can supply regulating services of water infiltration, nutrient cycling, and soil surface stability comparable to a native forest at a similar stage postfire; however, a significant limitation of the plantation was its low ecosystem resilience. It required massive soil disturbance to replant postfire and long-term maintenance of an extensive unpaved road network. The active or passive rehabilitation of native forest is justified to improve the natural resilience to wildfire. However, this rehabilitation of a native forest following use as a pine plantation is a multidecade process in this relatively low-rainfall environment.Study ImplicationsThe 2003 Canberra bushfire destroyed the entire pine plantation at Lower Cotter Catchment, a water catchment in Australian Capital Territory, but also provided an opportunity to examine and quantify changes in ecosystem functions with different restoration treatments. Landscape Function Analysis, including three indices (water infiltration, nutrient cycling, and soil surface stability), was used in this study. Findings suggest that both native eucalyptus forests and pine plantations recovered to relatively high levels of functionality within just 15 years after the bushfire, compared with all other restoration treatments, but plantations of Pinus radiata are not resilient to wildfire from a commercial perspective. These results help to justify the controversial decision to restore the majority of the catchment with native species in 2005. However, long-term monitoring is needed to determine how long it will take for the replanted and natural regeneration treatments to approach the functionality of the native forest.
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxab060
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Quantifying the Value of Log Sorting Based on the Location of Timber
           Harvest Sites Across Wisconsin

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      Authors: Wysocki A; Gautam S, Rijal B, et al.
      Pages: 193 - 199
      Abstract: AbstractIt is generally understood that sorting logs based on grade generates maximum value for all stakeholders. However, the benefits of sorting logs may depend on the location of a timber sale and distances to manufacturing mills. The objective is to quantify the potential value of log sorting through scenario-based analysis in different areas with divergent forest and mill types. An optimization model was developed to allocate logs from the timber sale to the highest profit-yielding mills. Factors considered by the model included logging and transportation cost, timber sale tract-to-mill distances, mills’ acceptance criteria, and price at the mill gate. Four timber sales from across Wisconsin were selected for the study. Three scenarios were tested, with each scenario yielding different proportions of log sorts. The results showed that log sorting increased profit by up to $41.10 per cord in certain locations but was not profitable in other locations.Study ImplicationsThe methods proposed in this study can help foresters and landowners increase the value of harvested timber. Practitioners can use the proposed method to systematically assess the gain or loss in profit associated with log sorting at each timber sale. It also provides directives on the best mill for each log sort to be sent. The proposed method should be adopted to minimize underutilization of timber, especially in areas where profits are marginal.
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxac005
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Recognizing Uncertainty in Forest Planning: A Decomposition Model for
           Large Landscapes

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      Authors: De Pellegrin Llorente I; Hoganson H, Windmuller-Campione M.
      Pages: 200 - 213
      Abstract: AbstractMultiple ecological, economic, social, and political facets influence forest-planning decisions. Decision models have been widely used in forest management planning, but most are deterministic models. However, long-term forest planning problems are surrounded by potential uncertainties. To begin to account for uncertainty surrounding growth and yield under climate change conditions, a stochastic forest planning model was developed and tested. The intent of the model is to help identify potential current forest management actions that will perform well over a range of plausible climate change scenarios (futures). The stages of the model address how uncertainty about the future might unfold, with model solutions providing immediate management actions plus detailed contingency (recourse) plans for each future. The use of specialized decomposition methods of operations research has allowed for testing the model in a detailed and large application. Results from the case study showed that planning for an average deterministic case produces a misleading solution, underestimating the potential impact of climate change. On the other hand, only planning for a worst-case scenario ignores the potential value of management opportunities under other likely futures in which harvesting benefits could be greater. Overall, results advance our understanding of recognizing forest-wide uncertainty in forest management planning models.Study ImplicationsStand-level decisions often have forest-wide implications. Forest planning helps coordinate management of stands to address ecological, economic, and social aspects. Decision models are often used, but most assume all the information is known. However, long-term forest planning is surrounded by potential uncertainties, such as climate change. We developed a model to identify current forest management actions that will perform well over a range of plausible climate change scenarios instead of just one. The novelty lies in how we solve the problem. Breaking it into smaller subproblems allows us to include more stand-level details while still tackling a large problem.
      PubDate: Sat, 22 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxab061
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Growth Response of Ponderosa Pine to Intensive Cultural Treatments Varies
           with Site Quality and Plantation Age

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      Authors: Zhang J; Finley K, Young D, et al.
      Pages: 214 - 227
      Abstract: AbstractLong-term forest experiments provide valuable knowledge in managing forests for productivity and other ecosystem services. California’s “Garden of Eden” experiment was established to determine growth potential of Pinus ponderosa plantations in response to intensive cultural treatments. We examined the 20-year growth-response of tree volume to intensive cultural treatments consisting of combinations of herbicide on competing vegetation (H), fertilization (F), and insecticide (I). We found that both H and F treatments synergistically increased tree growth at intermediate and lower-quality sites. Growth increased by 1.5–2.1 times with F, 2.1–2.5 times with H, and 2.3–3.8 times with HF treatments versus control (range = 39.3–109.2 m3 ha−1). Across the highest productive site, H and F effects on volume seemed additive at younger ages, but largely dissipated by age 20, with volume increasing by 1.6, 1.2, and 1.6 times relative to control in F, H, and HF treatments, respectively. However, 20-year mean annual increment was 21.7 m3 ha−1 yr−1 for the F treatment, the highest volume reported for ponderosa pine in California. The results underscore how site-specific cultural treatments, especially H and F, may widely enhance plantation productivity and boost stand development.Study ImplicationsIn Mediterranean climates, competing vegetation control is essential for ponderosa pine planation establishment and early growth, especially at intermediate and poor-quality sites. At higher-productivity sites, fertilization enhances stand growth and development, although fertilization’s beneficial effects on growth do not appear until canopy closure. Precommercial thinning in herbicide and fertilization treatments will not reduce overall stand growth 10 years postthinning. Intensively managed plantations appear to have a higher maximum stand density index compared to natural stands or unmanaged plantations. Therefore, these cultural treatments can be used to rapidly reforest areas after disturbances and subsequently promote larger trees on reforested landscapes.
      PubDate: Fri, 28 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxab065
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Change in Doctoral Dissertation Topics in Forest Resources from US
           Universities Over Four Decades

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      Authors: Wagner R; Bellisario K, Kong N.
      Pages: 228 - 238
      Abstract: Changes in forest resources expertise from 1978 to 2017, as measured by annual number of doctoral dissertations published on twenty topics, were examined. Using the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global database, titles and abstracts from 11,530 dissertations produced by fifty-six universities in the United States were selected. Automated content analysis and latent Dirichlet allocation were used to identify the optimal number of topic groupings among 7,742 dissertations that met selection criteria. Substantial differences were found in the pattern of publication among the twenty topics over time. The number of dissertations related to forest growth and silviculture; tree seedling propagation, physiology, and regeneration; and forest soil nutrients, ecology, and management declined over the past two decades. Dissertations related to forest wildlife management, including terrestrial wildlife ecology and management; wildlife food and nutrition; and fish ecology and management also declined during the same period. The number of dissertations in the fields of forest policy, politics, and social science; forest modeling, biometrics, and statistics; wood science; forest vegetation ecology; and avian ecology increased during the four decades. Dissertations published in the fields of forest economics, and forest entomology and pathology, remained relatively stable.Study Implications: We found decreasing production of doctoral dissertations focused on applied forest and wildlife management topics in recent decades. Declining doctoral-level expertise in applied fields after the early 2000s suggest that there may be reduced capacity to address practical problems facing both forest and wildlife managers. This decline also suggests that finding university instructors qualified to teach more applied forest and wildlife courses may have been more difficult over the past decade and possibly into the future. Our analysis indicated that the increased number of dissertations in adjacent sciences supporting forest resources has substantially increased capacity in these areas.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxac004
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Corrigendum to: Removal of Woody Debris from Logging Gaps Influences Soil
           Physical and Chemical Properties in the Short Term: A Case Study in
           Central Amazonia

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      Authors: Trindade A; Ferraz J, DeArmond D.
      Pages: 239 - 239
      Abstract: National Council for Scientific and Technological Development10.13039/501100003593INPA10.13039/501100007188
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxab062
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Carbon Accumulation and Partitioning Above and Belowground under Coppiced
           and Replanted Eucalypt Plantations

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      Authors: Pegoraro R; Silva I, Souza I, et al.
      Pages: 162 - 171
      Abstract: AbstractThe extent to which the C sink strength of eucalypt plantations can be affected by coppicing or replanting remains unclear. To address this issue, we evaluated variations in C stocks under coppiced or replanted eucalypt stands formed by clones or seedlings. For each field assessment (0 [T0], 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5 and 7.0 years [at harvest]), tree biomass, litterfall, and soil C stocks (0–120 cm depth) were determined. At harvest, debarked stemwood productivity was similar under coppice or replanting, about 50.0 Mg C ha–1. Generally, coppiced stands favored subsoil C storage (40–100 cm), whereas replanted stands favored soil C accrual in topsoil (0–20 cm), depending on the genetic material. Relative to T0, soil C increased about 2.14, 1.91, and 1.84 Mg C ha–1 yr–1 under coppice, replanting with seedlings and clones, respectively. Coarse root biomass under these stands were about 17.3, 13.4, and 9.5 Mg C ha–1, respectively, equivalent to 50% of total harvest residues. Hence, inputs from coarse roots could represent a large contribution to soil C over multiple rotations under coppiced or replanted stands. Otherwise, short-term C losses can be high where stumps and coarse roots are harvested, especially following successive coppice cycles.Study Implications: Our findings have important implications for forest managers growing eucalypt plantations aiming to maximize C accumulation. Both coppiced and replanted stands can fix up to 50 Mg C ha−1 only in debarked stemwood over 7 years, with a comparatively higher C storage in coarse roots under coppice. Despite the increasing demand for forest residues in bioenergy production, harvesting stumps and coarse roots should be avoided, especially upon replanting eucalypt stands after successive coppice cycles.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxab058
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Mexican Management Forest: Simulation of
           Biomass Harvesting and C and N Amendments

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      Authors: Ordoñez M; Galicia L, Valladares-Samperio K.
      Pages: 172 - 183
      Abstract: AbstractSustainable silvicultural management requires the maintenance of long-term ecosystem processes. We used the CENTURY model to simulate the impact of wood extraction and organic amendments on aboveground biomass, carbon (C) storage, and the availability of nitrogen (N) in the two dominant silvicultural methods in Mexico: the silvicultural development method (SDM) and irregular forest management (IFM). The values of the mean absolute percentage error for the SDM and IFM were 2.1% and 3.3% for C in aboveground biomass, 5.7% and 5.0% for soil organic carbon (SOC), and 14.9% and 21.6% for N, respectively. Simulation for the SDM (1967–2068) suggested a reduction of ~7% in C in soil, microbial biomass, and litter, 9% in aboveground biomass C, and ~20% in the mineral N available. For IFM, the simulation (2009–2019) suggested a reduction of 14% in the accumulation of aboveground biomass and 13% in the mineral N available. Simulation of the adoption of management practices suggested that N mineral availability would increase by 2%–3% without drastically reducing the SOC, improving aboveground biomass production by ~7%, in each management system.Study ImplicationsIn Mexico, current silvicultural management is causing alterations in the biological and chemical processes of the soil, but the future impacts on the production of forest wood and loss of fertility cannot be estimated by direct measurements. We simulated two silvicultural management alternatives with two rotation cycles and measured the response in terms of SOC, nitrogen availability, and aboveground biomass. The model shows that improving forest residue management by adding organic amendments to the soil would counteract changes in soil microbial activity, nitrogen availability, SOC, and aboveground biomass in the future. Managers should consider this information to reorient current crop residue management to achieve the objectives and the sustainability of forest management in Mexican temperate forests.
      PubDate: Sat, 18 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/forsci/fxab059
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2 (2021)
       
 
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