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  Subjects -> AERONAUTICS AND SPACE FLIGHT (Total: 124 journals)
Showing 1 - 30 of 30 Journals sorted by number of followers
AIAA Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1003)
SpaceNews     Free   (Followers: 779)
Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 702)
Journal of Propulsion and Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 570)
Aviation Week     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 412)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 307)
Advances in Space Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 296)
IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 281)
Journal of Aircraft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 264)
IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 251)
Control Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 220)
Gyroscopy and Navigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 178)
Journal of Navigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 177)
Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 165)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Space Science International     Open Access   (Followers: 118)
Space Science Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 92)
Propulsion and Power Research     Open Access   (Followers: 89)
International Journal of Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 86)
Progress in Aerospace Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 82)
Advances in Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 74)
Journal of Aerospace Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 66)
Aerospace     Open Access   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Aerospace Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Space Safety Magazine     Free   (Followers: 50)
International Journal of Aerodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I: Regular Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Space Research Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
International Journal of Aeroacoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
International Journal of Aerospace Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Canadian Aeronautics and Space Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Space Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
CEAS Aeronautical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Aerodynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Aerospace Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Egyptian Journal of Remote Sensing and Space Science     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Russian Aeronautics (Iz VUZ)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Aerospace Innovations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Aerospace Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Aerospace Engineering & Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Artificial Satellites     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Fatigue of Aircraft Structures     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Space Science & Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Frontiers in Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Space Structures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Nonlinear Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Chinese Journal of Aeronautics     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Satellite Communications Policy and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Frontiers in Astronomy and Space Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Aircraft and Spacecraft Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Aerospace Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Space Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Aviation     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Micro Air Vehicles     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Airline and Airport Management     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the Astronautical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Space Technology Management and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Population Space and Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Aviation Technology and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Aeronautical Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aerospace Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Crashworthiness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Aerospace Technology and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aeronautical Journal, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the American Helicopter Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Aviation, Aeronautics, and Aerospace     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Aviation Technology, Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Space Safety Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Applied Geospatial Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Transportmetrica A : Transport Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aerospace technic and technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aviation in Focus - Journal of Aeronautical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
New Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Space and Polity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Aerotecnica Missili & Spazio : Journal of Aerospace Science, Technologies & Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Civil Aviation High Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Air Medical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
REACH - Reviews in Human Space Exploration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
RocketSTEM     Free   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Sustainable Aviation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Astrobiology & Outreach     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Life Sciences in Space Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Aviation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cosmic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Spatial Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of KONBiN     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Astrodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Aeronautical and Space Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Transport and Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Aerospace Engineering Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Problemy Mechatroniki. Uzbrojenie, lotnictwo, inżynieria bezpieczeństwa / Problems of Mechatronics. Armament, Aviation, Safety Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Microgravity Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the Australasian Society of Aerospace Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
npj Microgravity     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ASTRA Proceedings     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
MAD - Magazine of Aviation Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia y Poder Aéreo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aviation/Aerospace Education & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Astronautics Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Engineering and Technological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
IEEE Journal on Miniaturization for Air and Space Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Perspectives of Earth and Space Scientists i     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigación Pecuaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transactions on Aerospace Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Вісник Національного Авіаційного Університету     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Science and Education : Scientific Publication of BMSTU     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spatial Information Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Xibei Gongye Daxue Xuebao / Journal of Northwestern Polytechnical University     Open Access  
Mekanika : Jurnal Teknik Mesin i     Open Access  

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Aviation Week
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.1
Number of Followers: 412  
 
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ISSN (Print) 0005-2175
Published by Aviation Week Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Daher TBM

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      Authors: user+1@localhost.localdomain
      Abstract: Daher TBMuser+1@localho…Tue, 05/17/2022 - 21:17 The TBM is a series of single-engine turboprop airplanes that are produced by French manufacturer Daher. The airplane that is now known as the TBM700 type originated with the Mooney 301, a pressurized single-engine piston airframe. However, following the purchase of Mooney Aircraft by a group of French investors, they were partnered with Socata—a French light-aircraft manufacturer—to create a high-speed turboprop. Out of that partnership, TBM s.a. was created as a joint venture between Socata—which was based in Tarbes, France hence the (TB) letters of the company name—and Mooney (M), with those manufacturers holding 70% and 30% of the joint company, respectively. Described by the manufacturer as being the first “fully pressurized, single-engine turboprop aircraft in the world,” the program was launched in 1987 and the first variant of the series—the TBM 700A—received approval from the French Civil Aviation Authority [Direction Generale de l’Aviation Civile (DGAC)] in January 1990. Beyond the origins of the TBM portion of the company name and commercial designation, the “700” portion was derived from the 700 hp that was able to be produced by the Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-64 engine that powered the TBM700 A, B, C1 and C2 variants. Subsequent to the TBM700 A variant, a further four variants of the airframe were certified—the TBM 700 B, C1, C2 and N—with the certification of the B, C1 and C2 taking place between November 1998 and July 2004. Despite being represented in the type and commercial designations of the airframe to this day, Mooney’s 30% interest in the program was purchased by Socata. The TBM700 N variant, which was first certified in November 2005, serves as the basis for a number of TBM commercial designations. Specifically, it is marketed as the TBM 850, TBM 900, TBM 910, TBM 930, TBM 940 and TBM 960. Beyond the initial TBM700 N certification date, modifications that were incorporated into that variant were approved by the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) between September 2007 and March 2022. Regardless of any differences between the variants of the TBM700 type, they share a common type certificate which is held by Daher Aerospace of Saint Julien de Chedon, France.   Certification Dates (DGAC/EASA) TBM700 A Jan. 31, 1990 (DGAC) TBM 700 B
      PubDate: Tue, 17 May 2022 21:17:19 +000
       
  • Bae Systems Future Combat Air System (Tempest)

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      Authors: matt.jouppi@aviationweek.com
      Abstract: Bae Systems Future Combat Air System (Tempest)matt.jouppi@av…Wed, 04/13/2022 - 15:31 The UK Future Combat Air System (FCAS) is a multi-national effort to replace the Eurofighter Typhoon around 2035. Rather than a single platform, FCAS will consist of a family of systems (FoS) architecture consisting of the Tempest manned fighter teamed with an unmanned aerial system (UAS). Tempest is expected to be low observable (LO), feature advanced power and thermal management capabilities (PTMS) and networked multi-spectral sensors. The UAS complement is being developed under project Mosquito. As of the time of this writing, UK and Italy remain the core Team Tempest partners but Sweden and Japan are in the process of determining their involvement. Program HistoryPre-History: Eurofighter, Rafale & Familiar Patterns (1978-1985)  The genesis of two distinct consortiums amongst European nations in the 1980s into the 1990s shares many similarities to the continent’s current fighter projects in terms of the influence of distinct national priorities, comparative industry specialties as well as diplomatic and military friction between allies. Both the Eurofighter and Rafale programs originate from a 1978 study between the UK, Germany and France on a common future fighter aircraft. Germany and the UK maintained similar requirements as F-4 Phantom operators, requiring a fighter optimized for air superiority and interception. The French desired a multi-role aircraft – with an emphasis on air-to-surface first, to replace its Mirage-2000s and Jaguar fleets. The joint program was shelved in 1981 and Panavia consortium partners involved in the Tornado program (BAE, Aeritalia, Messerschmitt-Boelkow-Blohm) launched the European Fighter Aircraft (EPA) program and associated Experimental Aircraft Program (EAP) demonstrator in October 1982. The French announced their own Avion de Combat experimental (ACX) demonstrator that December which would build upon earlier French investments in the Snecma M88 (now Safran) engine, airframe and avionics technologies. By the end of 1983, the chiefs of staff of the UK, Germany, Italy, Spain and France were again discussing a common EPA configuration, but irreconcilable differences emerged between the UK and France for design leadership between 1983-1985.The foundational element defini...
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Apr 2022 15:31:10 +000
       
  • Xian Y-20

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      Authors: user+1@localhost.localdomain
      Abstract: Xian Y-20user+1@localho…Thu, 03/24/2022 - 21:17 The Xian Y-20 Kunpeng is a four-engine transport aircraft designed to bolster the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF)’s strategic airlift capability. While China matures its own WS-20 engine for the project, early production Y-20s are powered by Russian UEC Saturn D-30KP-2 turbofan engines supplying 26,455 lbf. (117.7 kN) of thrust each at takeoff. The Y-20 is similar in configuration and role to the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III.Program HistoryIn 2003, China’s State Council authorized the establishment of a study group for a new transport aircraft. It issued a plan in February 2006 for 16 major projects from 2006 to 2020, one of which would be a heavy transport aircraft for China’s military. The program was officially authorized on Feb. 26th, 2007.China had since 2005 attempted to procure 34 Ilyushin Il-76s and four Il-78 aerial refuelers from Russia, but disputes over pricing between Russia and the (independent) plant in Tashkent, Uzbekistan producing the aircraft killed the acquisition while Russia relocated the production line. Because of labor issues and the contract dispute, the plant would not guarantee delivery of any more than 16 aircraft (the number of airframes it already had on hand).In the background, China approached Ukraine’s Antonov to negotiate cooperation on developing an all-new airlifter. Antonov had since 2000 already worked with China’s AVIC to upgrade the PLAAF’s fleet of An-12s, Y-8s and An-2s and to design the wing of the ARJ 21. By mid-2006 Ukraine had offered China the An-70, a four-engine airlifter with a supercritical wing developed in the dying days of the Soviet Union that first flew in 1994.Unfortunately, the An-70s 103,600 lb. (47,000 kg) payload capacity and 730 nmi. (1,350 km) range at maximum payload were considered insufficient for Chinese requirements. China also had no interest in the temperamental D-27 turbofan engine envisioned for the program. Instead, it proposed to design a new aircraft around the D-30KP-2. The new transport would require a range equal to or better than that of the Il-76TD. Antonov responded by suggesting a derivation of the An-77, a variant of the An-70 with a dramatically increased maximum take-off weight (MTOW) of 412,300 lb. (187,000 kg) and a 2 m (6.56 ft) fuselage plug forward of the wings to increase cargo volume. The An-77 concept originally called for CFM56-5A16 engines, but as proposed to China it would use the D-30KP-2. The proposal was designated Y-XX and included as objectives a 440,900 lb. (200,000 kg) MTOW and a 110,200 lb. (50,000 kg) payload.The design changed again, and the proposal was further enlarged in line with the An-170 proposal for an aircraft with a 507,000 lb. (230,000 kg) MTOW, 132,300 lb. (60,000 kg) payload and a standard wing profile. The requirements creep was largely driven by the desire to ensure the Y-XX could carry China’s most modern (and heaviest) tank, the Type 99-IIA, also known as the Type 99A2, ZTZ-99-IIA or ZTZ-99A2. The Type 99 weighs at most 127,900 lb. (58,000 kg) in its combat ready configuration. Discounting fuel and ammunition this equates to roughly 121,250 lb. (55,000 kg).By July 2009 work was underway at the 606 Institute on the WS-20, and by August of that year work was underway on the rear fuselage of the first prototype Y-XX. By the end of the year the aircraft was known as the Y-20. In January 2012, the airframe for the first prototype was structurally complete. The C-17 may have directly influenced the design during this period through Su Bin, a Chinese national working in the aerospace industry in Canada who helped two PLA hackers steal 630,000 documents pertaining to the C-17 from Boeing between 2008 and 2014. Bin was arrested in Canada in July 2014, extradited to the U.S., and sentenced to 46-months in federal prison after pleading guilty to conspiring to gain unauthorized access to a protected computer and to violate the Arms Export Control Act.
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:17:19 +000
       
  • Sukhoi Superjet 100 (SSJ100)

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      Authors: user+1@localhost.localdomain
      Abstract: Sukhoi Superjet 100 (SSJ100)user+1@localho…Wed, 03/23/2022 - 21:17 The Superjet 100 (SSJ100) is a clean-sheet airplane that was “developed and [is] produced by Sukhoi Civil Aircraft Co. [SCAC],” while also representing the primary “project of the company.” While SCAC has since been renamed “Regional Aircraft – Branch of the Irkut Corp.”—the latter of which is also the EASA type certificate holder—the Superjet itself is the result of a joint venture between the Russian manufacturer and European manufacturer Leonardo. According to SCAC, the SSJ100—which is the commercial designation for the RRJ-95 type—is the first airliner that has had the engine and airframe “designed together to optimize performance,” with the airplane’s PowerJet engines being produced by a joint venture of European manufacturer Safran Aircraft Engines (formerly Snecma) and Russian manufacturer United Engine Corp. (UEC). “The first SSJ100 prototype was rolled out” on Sept. 26, 2007, in Komsomolsk-on-Amur, Russia, the location of SCAC’s final-assembly facility. Subsequently, the SSJ100 first flew on May 19, 2008, and received its type certificate from the then-Interstate Aviation Committee (IAC) Aviation Register (AR)—now known as the Federal Air Transport Agency (Rosaviatsia)—on Jan. 28, 2011, ahead of the first delivery and first commercial flight. The first production SSJ100 (Serial No. 95007) was delivered on April 19, 2011, to Armenian carrier Armavia, which operated the type’s first commercial flight on April 21, 2011, from Yerevan, Aremenia, to Moscow Sheremetyevo Airport. Following its first commercial flight with Armavia, Russian airline Aeroflot took delivery of its first RRJ-95 in June 2011—Serial No. 95008 and registered as RA89001—and began service with the type on June 16, 2011.  Beyond receiving certification in Russia, the RRJ-95B was also certified by the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) on Feb. 3, 2012, which allowed “European airlines, as well as those operating in countries which use EASA regulation as a reference standard, to accept and operate the SSJ100.” SCAC stated that EASA certification of the SSJ100 made it “the first Russian passenger ‘large airplane’” to receive “EASA CS-25 certification.” Validation of the type certificate by Mexico, Indonesia, and Laos subsequently took place in April 2012, November 2012 and December 2012, respectively. Further representing the second Russian-built airplane to achieve certification from a Western aviation authority after the Tupolev Tu-204, the first Europe export certification for the SSJ100 was received in June 2013. The first delivery to a Western customer was made to Mexican carrier Interjet at that year’s Paris Air Show, with that operator taking delivery of SSJ100 Serial No. 95023, registered as XA-JLG. The first European operator of the Superjet was Irish carrier CityJet, which took delivery of its first Superjet on May 24, 2016—Serial No. 95102 and registered as EI-FWA—as part of an order placed in October 2015 for 15 leased airframes. Following that delivery to CityJet, the operator placed the type into service on June 8, 2016. In addition to the basic SSJ100, a long-range variant of the airplane—the RRJ-95LR-100—was certified by the IAC AR in August 2013, with the upgrades to the SSJ100LR also receiving approval from EASA in December 2016.CabinAccording to the EASA type certificate data sheet (TCDS) for the RRJ-95B, the maximum passenger seating capacity is 103 when three cabin crew are aboard, with SCAC stating that a minimum of two cabin crew are required. The cabin itself is marketed as providing passengers with a similar amount of space to a narrowbody airplane “in a compact airliner.” Cabin dimensions include a height, in the center aisle, of 83.46 in., with the center aisle also noted for its width. The SSJ100 is also promoted as having seats that are of a compara...
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Mar 2022 21:17:19 +000
       
  • Airbus H160

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      Authors: user+1@localhost.localdomain
      Abstract: Airbus H160user+1@localho…Tue, 03/08/2022 - 21:17 Airbus Helicopters’ H160 is a medium-twin category helicopter produced by the European manufacturer that was designated X4 during its initial development. Unveiled at the 2015 Heli-Expo, the H160 represents a number of firsts for Airbus Helicopters, including being the first airframe introduced after the company’s change in corporate identity from the former Eurocopter, as well as being the first to incorporate the company’s “new numbering designation.” In addition to changes in commercial and type designations, the H160 was also described at the time of its public debut as featuring “nose-to-tail breakthroughs” in the helicopter’s “design and systems,” changes that were meant to prioritize “customer satisfaction and operational safety.” The H160 improvements that are promoted by Airbus Helicopters include a Fenestron shrouded tail rotor that is described as being the “largest ever,” a Biplane Stabilizer and Blue Edge main rotor blades that increase payload while also reducing external noise levels. The H160 is also the first “fully composite civil helicopter,” the advantages of which include decreased airframe weight and maintenance requirements, while also making it “more robust [and] resistant to corrosion and fatigue.” Subsequent to its unveiling at Heli-Expo, the first prototype H160—designated PT1, registered as F-WWOG and powered by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW210E engines—made its first flight from Airbus Helicopters’ facilities at Marseille Provence Airport on June 13, 2015, a flight that lasted approximately 40 min. Following the completion of its flight-test program, the H160 was certified by the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) on July 1, 2020, with the first delivery—of an airframe registered as JA01NH—taking place in December 2021 from an Airbus Helicopters facility in Kobe, Japan, to Japanese operator All Nippon Helicopter (ANH). CabinAccording to the EASA type certificate data sheet (TCDS) for the H160 type—which designates the airframe the H160-B model—it is capable of accommodating up two 14 persons, including the single required pilot, in a cabin that has an internal volume of as much as 257.8 ft.3 When carrying cargo, the TCDS states that the maximum load of the cargo floor is either 661 lb. (300 kg.) or 728 lb. (330 kg.), the latter of which requires the installation of a cargo extension that is optional and “mandatory approved restraint nets.” Although it is certified to seat up to 13 passengers, Airbus Helicopters promotes the airframe as having a slightly lower maximum capacity of 12—three rows of four seats—with that configuration specifically marketed to oil-and-gas operators. Also possible for airframes utilized for offshore transportation is the ability to replace the center row of seats with a stretcher. For helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) operators, the H160’s cabin—which is promoted as being the “largest in its class”—can also be equipped with one or two stretchers arranged “in longitudinal or transversal positions,” based on the EMS kit that is installed. Beyond the size of the cabin and the number of stretchers that can be accommodated, other cabin features promoted by Airbus Helicopters include the size of the cabin itself and the sliding door, as well as the cabin environment and configuration. With regard to the latter, Airbus Helicopters states that a number of cabin configurations, seating layouts and models of stretcher a...
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Mar 2022 21:17:19 +000
       
  • Airbus A350

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      Authors: user+1@localhost.localdomain
      Abstract: Airbus A350user+1@localho…Thu, 02/24/2022 - 21:17 The A350 XWB is a series of twin-engine, widebody airliners produced by European manufacturer Airbus. First launched in October 2005, the A350 was originally designed to retain the fuselage cross-section of the company’s A330 and A340. However, following pressure from customers—notably International Lease Finance Corp. (ILFC) chairman and CEO Steven F. Udvar-Hazy—the A350 series that was ultimately developed and certified was a clean-sheet series of airplanes that was unveiled in July 2006, industrially launched in December 2006 and which was initially planned to include four passenger variants—including the -800, -900 and -1000—and a freighter variant. Another difference between the original plans for the A350 and what was ultimately brought to market was the entry-into-service date, with Airbus planning for the original airframe to enter service in 2010. In contrast to that initial timeline, the first A350 airframe—manufacturing serial number (MSN) 1, a -900—was rolled out of Airbus’ manufacturing facilities at Toulouse-Blagnac Airport in France in February 2013. That airframe, registered as F-WXWB, subsequently performed the type’s first flight on June 14, 2013, a flight that lasted 4 hr. 5 min. Following a flight-test program that included more that 2,600 flying hours, the A350-941 was certified by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) in September 2014. Subsequently, the larger A350-1000 was rolled out in 2016, with its 4 hr. 18 min. first flight—performed by airframe MSN059, registered as F-WMIL—taking place on Nov. 24, 2016. In addition to the base variants of the A350, Airbus has also developed an extended-range version of the -900 that is marketed as the A350-900 Ultra Long Range (ULR), an airplane made its first flight on April 23, 2018. Regardless of the differences between the variants of the A350—as well as between the standard and ULR versions of the -900—all A350s are powered by Rolls-Royce Trent XWB engines, with the airframe’s type certificate held by Airbus S.A.S. of Blagnac, France. A350 Variant EASA Certification Date A350-941 Sep. 30, 2014 A350-1041 Nov. 21, 2017 Cabin Configuration and Size
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Feb 2022 21:17:19 +000
       
  • Saab JAS 39 Gripen

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      Authors: user+1@localhost.localdomain
      Abstract: Saab JAS 39 Gripenuser+1@localho…Thu, 02/17/2022 - 21:17 The JAS 39 Gripen is a Swedish delta-wing canard multirole fighter produced by Saab. It is powered by a single Volvo RM12 turbofan engine supplying 18,100 lbf. (80.5 kN) of afterburning thrust. The RM12 is a license-produced variant of the General Electric F404-GE-400. The newer JAS 39NG series aircraft carry the higher-power GE F414G, which provides upwards of 22,000 lbf. (97.9 kN) of afterburning thrust. Program HistoryRequirements StageThe JAS 39 Gripen was envisaged as a fourth-generation replacement for the SAAB 37 Viggen, the preceding Swedish single-engine fighter. The Viggen program began in 1952 and yielded a flying prototype in 1967. As the world’s first production delta-canard fighter, the Viggen was historically and technically significant, but by the early 1980s a replacement program was required.Sweden’s defense procurement agency, the FMV, issued the Gripen requirement in 1980 and funded a two-year concept development and study phase. The program was then known as “JAS,” for Jakt, Attack, & Spaning (Fighter, Attack & Reconnaissance). Like the Viggen before it, the JAS program emphasized maintainability, short runway operations and high sortie rates in line with Sweden’s broader defense concept. The JAS would enter service around 1990.The ambitious timetable was owed to time lost in the 1970s, when the government vacillated over the need to replace the Viggen with an equally or more capable aircraft and whether it was necessary or wise to develop that aircraft in Sweden. To avoid a gap in fighter production at Saab the Gripen would have to enter service in the early 1990s, and fully missionized prototypes would have to be available by the late 80s. This all but guaranteed that the program would jump straight into full system development without a technical risk reduction phase, and that it would endure significant programmatic concurrency.SAAB-Scania formed an industrial partnership with Volvo Flygmotor, Ericsson and FFV Aerotech to respond to the requirement. The consortium (Industrigruppen JAS) designated its proposal SAAB 2110, and it was accepted by the FMV in June 1981. A contract was definitized in June 1982 for five prototypes and 30 production aircraft with an option for a further 110. As the 39th aircraft to be acquired by the Swedish military, JAS was officially designated JAS 39.In September 1982 the JAS received the Gripen moniker after a public competition. Gripen is Swedish for Griffin. Around this time a modified Viggen dubbed the ESS JAS first flew with developmental avionics intended for the JAS program.Parliamentary authorization came from Sweden’s Riksdag by a narrow margin of 176 for to 167 against. The huge expense of the program made it controversial from the outset, and the entire Social Democratic party voted against it. Final approval was not granted until April 1983, with the Riksdag requiring a fixed-price contract.Development and Flight TestingProduction of the prototypes ran from 1984 to 1988. Saab rolled out the first Gripen prototype to media on Apr. 26, 1987 as part of its 50th anniversary celebrations. The Gripen’s first flight occurred on Dec. 8 of that year. This period was marked by controversy over the program, which had suffered significant schedule slippage and cost overruns. A 2007 EU Institute for Security Studies report would later estimate the program’s R&D costs at €1.84 billion.Most of these cost overruns were related to flight control system software development and the wing configuration. The wing design had been frozen early in the design process, and hard tooling was developed to construct prototypes, which magnified cost growth when the prototypes experienced unexpected weight growth. The weight growth and associated center of gravity problems required aerodynamic revisions and new tooling. Moreover, it required constant changes to the FCS software, which had been under development since 1983. Saab provided new aerodynamic data to Lear Siegler six times. Each time the new data required software changes roughly half as complex as those required to write the FCS software in the first place.By the time the first prototype flew the program was 18-30 months behind schedule, and Industriegruppen JAS...
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Feb 2022 21:17:19 +000
       
  • AirAsia X to launch Kuala Lumpur-Tokyo Narita service

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      Authors: linda.blachly@penton.com
      Abstract: AirAsia X to launch Kuala Lumpur-Tokyo Narita servicelinda.blachly@…Thu, 08/22/2019 - 14:16 Malaysian LCC AirAsia X will introduce new direct service from Kuala Lumpur to Tokyo Narita starting Nov. 20.AirAsia X Malaysia CEO Benyamin Ismail announced the route via social media, writing the new route will allow passengers the ability to access Tokyo “either through Narita Airport or Haneda Airport, giving them more flexibility on flight times and connectivity ... these new services are in response to overwhelming consumer demand and ahead of what will be a big year for Tokyo tourism in 2020.”The 4X-weekly Tokyo Narita flight will complement AirAsia X’s existing daily flight to Tokyo Haneda and will add 156,000 seats to the route annually. The Haneda flights depart the Malaysian capital in the afternoon while the Narita flight departs at midnight.“Operating from two airports in Tokyo with different flight times will also entice more fly-thru guests connecting from other cities within our global network, whilst at the same time, providing Malaysians more flight options to travel to Japan’s capital and largest city,” Benyamin added.The airline did not specify if the route will use the new Airbus A330-900. Its Thai affiliate AirAsia X Thailand operates 3X-daily flights to Narita, with one of the daily flights using an A330-900, of which AirAsia has 66 on order.“AirAsia recently took delivery of the airline’s first Airbus A330neo aircraft, which flew its maiden flight from Bangkok’s Don Mueang [International Airport] to Narita on Aug. 15,” AirAsia X told ATW. “Future deliveries of additional A330neo aircraft to be based in Bangkok or Kuala Lumpur will be announced in due course.”Chen Chuanren, chuanren@purplelightvisuals.com Content summary Article type Article Primary Category Airports & Routes Content source Air Transport World Exclude from lists' No Article sub-type Article Gating ATW Plus ATW Featured Image thai-air-asia-x-a330-900-source-airbus.jpg Publication date Thu, 08/22/2019 - 10:16
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Aug 2019 14:16:00 +000
       
 
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