Subjects -> TRANSPORTATION (Total: 216 journals)
    - AIR TRANSPORT (9 journals)
    - AUTOMOBILES (26 journals)
    - RAILROADS (10 journals)
    - ROADS AND TRAFFIC (9 journals)
    - SHIPS AND SHIPPING (39 journals)
    - TRANSPORTATION (123 journals)

TRANSPORTATION (123 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 53 of 53 Journals sorted alphabetically
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 123)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Mobilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Transport     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Asian Transport Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Botswana Journal of Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Studies on Transport Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Danish Journal of Transportation Research / Dansk Tidsskrift for Transportforskning     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Decision Making : Applications in Management and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Economics of Transportation     Partially Free   (Followers: 14)
Emission Control Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
eTransportation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EURO Journal of Transportation and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
European Transport Research Review     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Geosystem Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
IATSS Research     Open Access  
IEEE Open Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
IEEE Vehicular Technology Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
IET Electrical Systems in Transportation     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
IET Intelligent Transport Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
IET Smart Cities     Open Access  
IFAC-PapersOnLine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Applied Logistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Crashworthiness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of e-Navigation and Maritime Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Electric and Hybrid Vehicles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Electronic Transport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Heavy Vehicle Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Mobile Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Ocean Systems Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Services Technology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Sustainable Transportation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Traffic and Transportation Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Transportation Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Transportation Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Vehicle Systems Modelling and Testing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Advanced Transportation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Big Data Analytics in Transportation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Intelligent and Connected Vehicles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of KONES     Open Access  
Journal of Mechatronics, Electrical Power, and Vehicular Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Modern Transportation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Navigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 286)
Journal of Sport & Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Sustainable Mobility     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Traffic and Transportation Engineering (English Edition)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Transport & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Transport and Land Use     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Transport and Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Transport Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Transport History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Transportation Safety & Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Transportation Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transportation Systems Engineering and Information Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Transportation Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Waterway Port Coastal and Ocean Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal on Vehicle Routing Algorithms     Hybrid Journal  
Les Dossiers du Grihl     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
LOGI ? Scientific Journal on Transport and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Logistics & Sustainable Transport     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Logistique & Management     Hybrid Journal  
Mobility in History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Modern Transportation     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Nonlinear Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Open Journal of Safety Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Open Transportation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Packaging, Transport, Storage & Security of Radioactive Material     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Periodica Polytechnica Transportation Engineering     Open Access  
Pervasive and Mobile Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part F: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Promet : Traffic &Transportation     Open Access  
Public Transport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Recherche Transports Sécurité     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Research in Transportation Business and Management     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Revista Transporte y Territorio     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue Marocaine de Management, Logistique et Transport     Open Access  
Romanian Journal of Transport Infrastructure     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SourceOCDE Transports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sport, Education and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Sport, Ethics and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Streetnotes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Synthesis Lectures on Mobile and Pervasive Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tire Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Transactions on Transport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Transport     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Transport and Telecommunication     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Transport in Porous Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Transport Problems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Transport Reviews: A Transnational Transdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Transport technic and technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transportation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Transportation Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transportation Geotechnics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Transportation in Developing Economies     Hybrid Journal  
Transportation Infrastructure Geotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transportation Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Transportation Letters : The International Journal of Transportation Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Transportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Transportation Research Part B: Methodological     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Transportation Research Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Transportation Research Record : Journal of the Transportation Research Board     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Transportation Safety and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transportation Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Transportation Systems and Technology     Open Access  
TRANSPORTES     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Transportmetrica A : Transport Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Transportmetrica B : Transport Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Transportrecht     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Travel Behaviour and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Urban Development Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban, Planning and Transport Research     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Vehicles     Open Access  
Vehicular Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
World Electric Vehicle Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Транспортні системи та технології перевезень     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Transportation
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.911
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 35  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1572-9435 - ISSN (Online) 0049-4488
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2658 journals]
  • The value of travel time savings in freight transport: a meta-analysis

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      Abstract: The value of freight travel time savings (VFTTS) is a monetary value that is considered an important input into cost–benefit analysis and traffic forecasting. The VFTTS is defined as the marginal rate of substitution between travel time and cost and may therefore differ across firms, time and countries. The paper aims to explain variations in the VFTTS by using the meta-analysis method. The analysis covers 106 monetary valuations extracted from 56 studies conducted from 1988 to 2018 in countries across the globe. The meta-analysis method determines the factors that have an impact on these VFTTS variations. The paper briefly introduces the VFTTS concept and describes the adopted meta-analysis methodology, wherein different meta-models are used in VFTTS estimations. The results highlight the necessity of including multiple explanatory variables to ensure adequate explanation of the VFTTS variations. The findings also show that GDP per capita, transport mode and type of survey respondent are statistically significant variables. The paper sheds some light on the variations, thereby advancing the understanding of each factor’s effects on the VFTTS. Furthermore, meta-model outcomes are used to generate new values of travel time savings for different transport modes in freight transport, for several countries. These implied VFTTS can be used as benchmarks to assess existing evidence or provide new evidence to countries where no such values exist.
      PubDate: 2021-07-19
       
  • Do frequent satisfying trips by public transport impact its intended use
           in later life'

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      Abstract: Previous studies have indicated that factors such as the built environment, attitudes and past behaviour can influence travel behaviour. However, the possible effect of travel satisfaction on travel mode choice remains underexplored, despite many studies focusing on travel satisfaction over the past years. It is likely that individuals experiencing satisfying trips with a certain travel mode will use this mode (more) frequently for future trips. In this study—using data from 984 students from Laval University, Canada—we analyse how satisfaction with public transport and the frequency of public transport use affect the intention to use public transport in later life stages. Our results indicate that public transport frequency, public transport satisfaction and the interaction between these two factors (i.e., the frequency of (dis)satisfying public transport trips) significantly affect people’s intentions to use public transport in later life, although variations in effect sizes exist between different life stages. Making public transport more pleasant and increasing ridership of children and young adults (e.g., by giving them free public transport passes) may consequently result in a higher public transport frequency in later life stages. We argue that travel satisfaction can play an important role in the formation of habitual mode use, and that satisfying trips (if undertaken frequently) are likely to be repeated in the future.
      PubDate: 2021-07-15
       
  • Modeling the α-max capacity of transportation networks: a single-level
           mathematical programming formulation

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      Abstract: Network capacity, defined as the largest sum of origin–destination (O–D) flows that can be accommodated by the network based on link performance function and traffic equilibrium assignment, is a critical indicator of network-wide performance assessment in transportation planning and management. The typical modeling rationale of estimating network capacity is to formulate it as a mathematical programming (MP), and there are two main approaches: single-level MP formulation and bi-level programming (BLP) formulation. Although single-level MP is readily solvable, it treats the transportation network as a physical network without considering level of service (LOS). Albeit BLP explicitly models the capacity and link LOS, solving BLP in large-scale networks is challenging due to its non-convexity. Moreover, the inconsideration of trip LOS makes the existing models difficult to differentiate network capacity under various traffic states and to capture the impact of emerging trip-oriented technologies. Therefore, this paper proposes the α-max capacity model to estimate the maximum network capacity under trip or O–D LOS requirement α. The proposed model improves the existing models on three aspects: (a) it considers trip LOS, which can flexibly estimate the network capacity ranging from zero to the physical capacity including reserve, practical and ultimate capacities; (b) trip LOS can intuitively reflect users’ maximum acceptable O–D travel time or planners’ requirement of O–D travel time; and (c) it is a convex and tractable single-level MP. For practical use, we develop a modified gradient projection solution algorithm with soft constraint technique, and provide methods to obtain discrete trip LOS and network capacity under representative traffic states. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the features of the proposed model as well as the solution algorithm.
      PubDate: 2021-07-14
       
  • Easing or tightening control strategies: determination of COVID-19
           parameters for an agent-based model

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      Abstract: Some agent-based models have been developed to estimate the spread progression of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and to evaluate strategies aimed to control the outbreak of the infectious disease. Nonetheless, COVID-19 parameter estimation methods are limited to observational epidemiologic studies which are essentially aggregated models. We propose a mathematical structure to determine parameters of agent-based models accounting for the mutual effects of parameters. We then use the agent-based model to assess the extent to which different control strategies can intervene the transmission of COVID-19. Easing social distancing restrictions, opening businesses, speed of enforcing control strategies, quarantining family members of isolated cases on the disease progression and encouraging the use of facemask are the strategies assessed in this study. We estimate the social distancing compliance level in Sydney greater metropolitan area and then elaborate the consequences of moderating the compliance level in the disease suppression. We also show that social distancing and facemask usage are complementary and discuss their interactive effects in detail.
      PubDate: 2021-07-13
       
  • Travel experience matters: Expected personal mobility impacts after
           simulated L3/L4 automated driving

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      Abstract: Automated vehicles (AVs) are expected to change personal mobility in the near future. Most studies on the mobility impacts of AVs focus on fully automated (SAE L5) vehicles, but the gradual development of the technology will probably bring AVs with more limited capabilities to begin with. This stated-preference study focused on the potential mobility impacts of conditionally automated (L3) and highly automated cars (L4). We investigated personal mobility impacts among 59 participants who experienced automated driving repeatedly in a driving simulator. Half of them drove with an L3 and half with an L4 motorway function. After the first and final drive they answered questions on their travel experience and how automated vehicles could change their mobility. After the drives, participants in both groups were willing to accept 30–50% longer travel times for a 30 min trip if they did not need to drive the whole trip themselves. This translates into savings of around 30% for the perceived value of travel time on routes where automation is available. There were no statistically significant differences between L3 and L4 in the accepted travel times. Most participants did not expect to make more trips with automated cars, but around half of them anticipated making longer trips. The amount of car travel may increase more with L4 than with L3 automation, possibly due somewhat to changes in the experienced travel quality. The results suggest that the mobility impacts of automated driving may increase with a higher level of automation.
      PubDate: 2021-07-12
       
  • Vehicle scheduling for on-demand vehicle fleets in macroscopic travel
           demand models

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      Abstract: The planning of on-demand services requires the formation of vehicle schedules consisting of service trips and empty trips. This paper presents an algorithm for building vehicle schedules that uses time-dependent demand matrices (= service trips) as input and determines time-dependent empty trip matrices and the number of required vehicles as a result. The presented approach is intended for long-term, strategic transport planning. For this purpose, it provides planners with an estimate of vehicle fleet size and distance travelled by on-demand services. The algorithm can be applied to integer and non-integer demand matrices and is therefore particularly suitable for macroscopic travel demand models. Two case studies illustrate potential applications of the algorithm and feature that on-demand services can be considered in macroscopic travel demand models.
      PubDate: 2021-07-02
       
  • Reassessing the commuting penalty for immigrants: new evidence from Spain

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      Abstract: This article examines the differences in commuting length between native and immigrant employees in Spain, a relevant issue since immigrants' longer commuting times may, among other factors, reflect an imperfect spatial matching of their labour supply and demand with negative implications for their relative labour outcomes and their individual well-being. The research differentiates immigrants according to their origin and is based on a rich, nationally representative database. A novel contribution of the research is the use of decomposition econometric techniques that allow quantifying the joint and individual influence of a wide range of explanatory factors. The evidence obtained shows that, although a relevant part of the explanation of the greater commuting observed for immigrants is related to observed elements such as a different use of modes of transport, they make overall significantly longer journeys when comparing with observationally similar natives. This commuting penalty occurs yet only in the case of immigrants from emerging countries as it does not exist for those from advanced economies. Although the penalty is overall rather similar along several sociodemographic and occupational lines, it is much more pronounced for individuals living in large municipalities, which implies that previous analyses focusing on specific densely populated territories could not be nationally representative. To conclude, we offer additional novel evidence about the potential explanations of the commuting penalty of immigrants showing that it does not seem to derive from a hypothetically greater tolerance to commuting.
      PubDate: 2021-07-02
       
  • Analysis of activity participation and time use decisions of partners: the
           context of low-and high-income households

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      Abstract: This paper investigates the non-work activity participation and time allocation decisions of couples of low- and high-income households by utilizing primary activity-travel behavior data collected from Bhubaneswar, India. The study estimates a multivariate Probit model for the decision to participate and a multivariate Tobit for the time allocation to out-of-home child maintenance, household maintenance, and recreational activities. The inter-and intra-personal linkages and the nature of the interaction (substitution or complementary effect) associated with the decisions are captured using the models. The analysis reveals that the percentage of high-income female heads participating in recreational activities is approximately 12% more than that of low-income female heads. Regarding time allocation to recreational activities, an average high-income female head spends 28 min more than a low-income female head. In comparison, a low-income mother allocates approximately 13 min more than an average high-income mother to household maintenance activities. The correlation coefficient associated with activity participation and time allocation decisions in low-income families reveals substitution effects regarding the inter- and intra-personal interactions. At the same time, the complementary nature of the interaction was reported for their high-income counterparts. In addition, it is observed that the activity participation decisions are more pronounced between spouses of high-income households compared to low-income families. In contrast, the time-allocations decisions in both household types are relatable. Further, possessing a driving license and owning a car significantly increases high-income female heads’ participation and time allocation in non-work activities. The models also reveal that locating inside the municipality increases female heads’ likelihood of participating in recreational activities. Low-income female heads tend to decrease recreational activity time use if they are within the municipality limits. High-income mothers, on the other hand, are observed to increase durations. An increase in distance to school from home significantly reduces male heads’ involvement in out-of-home child maintenance activities for both household types.
      PubDate: 2021-06-26
       
  • A clustering based traffic flow prediction method with dynamic
           spatiotemporal correlation analysis

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      Abstract: There are significant spatiotemporal correlations among the traffic flows of neighboring road sections in the road network. Correctly identifying such correlations makes an essential contribution for improving the accuracy of traffic flow prediction. Many efforts have been made by several researchers to solve this issue, but they assume that the spatiotemporal correlations among traffic flows are stationary in both time and space, i.e., the degrees to which traffic flows affect each other are fixed. In this study, we propose a clustering based traffic flow prediction method that considers the dynamic nature of spatiotemporal correlations. In order to express the short-term dependence between the target road section and neighboring ones, the spatiotemporal correlation matrices are introduced. The historical traffic data are divided into several clusters according to the similarity between spatiotemporal correlation matrices. The spatiotemporal correlation analysis and the predictor selection based on the mutual information are performed in each cluster, and the multiple prediction models are trained separately. A prediction model corresponding to the cluster to which the current traffic pattern belongs is selected to output the prediction result. Experimental results on real traffic data show that the proposed method achieves good prediction accuracy by distinguishing the heterogeneity of spatiotemporal correlations among the traffic flows.
      PubDate: 2021-06-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-021-10200-9
       
  • Impacts of highly automated vehicles on travel demand: macroscopic
           modeling methods and some results

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      Abstract: Automated vehicles (AV) will change transport supply and influence travel demand. To evaluate those changes, existing travel demand models need to be extended. This paper presents ways of integrating characteristics of AV into traditional macroscopic travel demand models based on the four-step algorithm. It discusses two model extensions. The first extension allows incorporating impacts of AV on traffic flow performance by assigning specific passenger car unit factors that depend on roadway type and the capabilities of the vehicles. The second extension enables travel demand models to calculate demand changes caused by a different perception of travel time as the active driving time is reduced. The presented methods are applied to a use case of a regional macroscopic travel demand model. The basic assumption is that AV are considered highly but not fully automated and still require a driver for parts of the trip. Model results indicate that first-generation AV, probably being rather cautious, may decrease traffic performance. Further developed AV will improve performance on some parts of the network. Together with a reduction in active driving time, cars will become even more attractive, resulting in a modal shift towards car. Both circumstances lead to an increase in time spent and distance traveled.
      PubDate: 2021-06-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-021-10199-z
       
  • Correlates of bicycling trip flows in Hamilton, Ontario: fastest,
           quietest, or balanced routes'

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      Abstract: Bicycling is an increasingly popular mode of travel in Canadian urban areas, like the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA). While trip origins and destinations can be inferred from travel surveys, data on route choice is often not collected which makes it challenging to capture the attributes of routes travelled by people who cycle. With new algorithms for cycle routing it is now possible to infer routes. Using bicycle trip records from the most recent regional travel survey, a spatial interaction model is developed to investigate the built environment correlates of bicycling flows in Hamilton, Ontario, a mid-sized city part of the GTHA. A feature of the analysis is the use of CycleStreets to compare the distance and time according to different routes inferred between trip zones of origin and destination. In addition, network autocorrelation is accounted for in the estimated models. The most parsimonious model suggests that shortest-path quietest routes that minimize traffic best explain the pattern of bicycle trip flows in Hamilton. Commercial and office locations and points of interest at the zone of origin negatively correlate with the production of trips, while different land uses and the availability of jobs at the zone of destination are trip attractors. The use of a route planner offers a novel approach to modelling and understanding bicycling flows within a city. This may be useful for transportation planners to infer different types of routes that bicyclists may seek out and consider these in travel demand models.
      PubDate: 2021-06-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-021-10197-1
       
  • Understanding bikeability: a methodology to assess urban networks

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      Abstract: A fully separated bicycle network from vehicular traffic is not realistic even for the most bicycle-friendly cities. Thus, all around the world urban cycling entails switching between streets of different safety, convenience, and comfort levels. As a consequence, the quality of bicycle networks should be evaluated not based on one but multiple factors and by considering the different user preferences regarding these factors. More comprehensive methodologies to assess urban bicycle networks are essential to the operation and planning of modern city transportation. This work proposes a multi-objective methodology to assess—what we refer to as—bikeability between origin–destination locations and over the entire network, useful for evaluation and planning of bicycle networks. We do so by introducing the concept of bikeability curves which allows us to assess the quality of cycling in a city network with respect to the heterogeneity of user preferences. The application of the proposed methodology is demonstrated on two cities with different bike cultures: Amsterdam and Melbourne. Our results suggest the effectiveness of bikeability curves in describing the characteristic features and differences in the two networks.
      PubDate: 2021-06-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-021-10198-0
       
  • Job accessibility and joint household travel: a study of Hong Kong with a
           particular focus on new town residents

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      Abstract: This study advances understanding of the role of residential location in joint household travel and activities for non-work purposes in an Asian city context. This has been done by investigating the relationship between job accessibility, and the undertaking and duration of joint travel and activities of multi-person households in Hong Kong. Particular attention was given to the difference between new town and urban-area commuters who experienced marked different levels of job accessibility as a result of their residential locations. Drawing on the 2011 household travel survey, a suite of multivariable analysis was carried out. The findings highlight that: (1) longer working hours were associated with a lower probability of joint household travel and activities for new town and urban-area commuters alike; (2) longer commute and working hours significantly reduced the time window for joint household activities; (3) and job accessibility played a more important role in affecting the opportunities for discretionary joint household activities among new town commuters than urban-area commuters. The implications of these findings can be used to inform policymaking to increase the opportunities and time window for joint household travel and activities among new town commuters. Potential avenues for future research are also identified.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-020-10100-4
       
  • Identification and mapping of spatial variations in travel choices through
           combining structural equation modelling and latent class analysis:
           findings for Great Britain

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      Abstract: This paper exploits some latest advances in structural equation modelling and latent class analysis for identification and mapping of the spatial variations in travel choices. The approach controls for a wide range of socioeconomic and demographic variables and changes in car fuel prices. The research is focused on employed and self-employed adults, and the method can be readily extended to cover other travellers where such needs arise. The developed methodology enables us to overcome some of the persistent issues that have in the past prevented researchers making a full use of highly correlated and endogenous variables found in good-quality, comprehensive travel surveys at the national or metropolitan scales. Empirical findings from an application of the methodology for Great Britain provide a precise geographical classification of neighbourhoods areas across Britain and reveal the extent to which land use and built form influence commuting travel choices, whilst accounting for residents’ self-selection, spatial sorting and endogenous interactions among the explanatory variables. The results are cogent for defining spatially adapted strategies for planning new transport and land use interventions, particularly in areas that are expected to grow the most in the coming decades.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-020-10098-9
       
  • Longitudinal analysis of activity generation in the Greater Toronto and
           Hamilton Area

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      Abstract: This paper presents a longitudinal analysis of activity generation behaviour in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA) between 1996 and 2016 for various activity types: work, school, shopping, other. The analyses are conducted using the data from the five most recent Transportation Tomorrow Surveys. For work and school purposes, the population is divided into sub-categories considering occupational sectors and educational levels respectively. Further subdivision is made by treating first work/school activity of the day and subsequent work/school activities as distinct activity types. Considerable stability over time in the majority of the model parameters is found in all cases, indicating that both work/school and non-work/school activity episode generation in the GTHA has been very stable over the 20-year period analyzed. Year-specific models and joint models, within which the data are pooled across the years, return very similar results implying that robust joint models that exploit the full time-series of survey data available can be constructed. While first-trips to work and post-secondary schools in the day can be parametrically modelled with reasonable fits, second/subsequent work/school activities and non-work/school activities display considerable randomness in occurrence. Elementary and secondary school trips generally need only be modelled using average trip rates across the student population: parametric, utility-based models provide very little additional explanatory power. In addition, investigation of survey design biases shows that there is no significant survey design effect on activity/trip generation for the first work/school-related activities, however, the models reveal significant biases when the subsequent work/school-related activities and non-work/school activities are analyzed.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-020-10089-w
       
  • An adapted geographically weighted LASSO (Ada-GWL) model for predicting
           subway ridership

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      Abstract: Ridership prediction at station level plays a critical role in subway transportation planning. Among various existing ridership prediction methods, direct demand model has been recognized as an effective approach. However, direct demand models including geographically weighted regression (GWR) have rarely been studied for local model selection in ridership prediction. In practice, acquiring insights into subway ridership under multiple influencing factors from a local perspective is important for passenger flow management and transportation planning operations adapting to local conditions. In this study, we propose an adapted geographically weighted LASSO (Ada-GWL) framework for modelling subway ridership, which involves regression-coefficient shrinkage and local model selection. It takes subway network layout into account and adopts network-based distance metric instead of Euclidean-based distance metric, making it so-called adapted to the context of subway networks. The real-world case of Shenzhen Metro is used to elaborate our proposed model. The results show that the proposed Ada-GWL model performs the best compared with the global model (ordinary least square, GWR, GWR calibrated with network-based distance metric and geographically weighted LASSO (GWL) in terms of estimation error and goodness-of-fit. Through understanding the variation of each coefficient across space (elasticities) and variables selection of each station, it provides more realistic conclusions based on local analysis. Besides, through clustering analysis of the stations according to the regression coefficients, clusters’ functional characteristics are found to be in compliance with the policy of functional land use in Shenzhen, indicating the high interpretability of Ada-GWL model from the spatial angle. In other words, the regression coefficients of different stations can provide us the local prospective to understand the influence of factors on stations’ ridership.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-020-10091-2
       
  • Stated willingness to participate in travel surveys: a cross-country and
           cross-methods comparison

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      Abstract: Travel surveys are the primary source of data that feed into the analysis and modeling of travel behaviour. Numerous studies have found that the survey method, be it pen and paper, online, interview, smartphone app, or GPS, impacts participation, diligence and accuracy of reporting. In turn, this can lead to bias both in terms of the socio-demographic mix of respondents, and under/mis-reporting of trip information. To date, there is limited understanding of if/how preferences for particular travel survey methods vary across countries. In 2014, a survey of 17,510 adults from 24 countries was undertaken by an internationally-renowned market research firm to assess stated preferences for different travel survey methods. Following an assessment of how preferences vary by country and method, the current paper focuses on responses from five of these countries with long-standing household travel surveys—Australia, USA, France, Germany, and Japan. Results suggest that for a given survey method, willingness to participate in travel surveys varies across countries and within each group of respondents (classified by their socio-demographic characteristics). Australians tend to indicate a higher willingness to participate across the different survey methods compared to their counterparts, particularly from Japan. In terms of socio-demographic characteristics, younger respondents indicate a greater willingness to engage in travel surveys regardless of the method, while females are more likely to prefer diary-based methods than mobile-based methods. Respondents also appear to trade-off effort in completing travel surveys using traditional methods against privacy concerns with mobile-based methods. Results suggest that that there is no ‘one size fits all’ methodology for travel surveys, with designers needing to carefully consider both socio-demographic and cultural differences.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-020-10096-x
       
  • Microscopic activity sequence generation: a multiple correspondence
           analysis to explain travel behavior based on socio-demographic person
           attributes

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      Abstract: Activity sequencing is a crucial component of disaggregate modeling approaches. This paper presents a methodology to analyse and predict activity sequence patterns for persons based on their socio-demographic attributes. The model is developed using household travel survey data from Germany. The presented method proposes an efficient approach to replace complex activity-scheduling modules in activity-based models. First, the paper describes a multiple correspondence analysis technique to identify the correlation between activity sequence patterns and socio-demographic attributes. Secondly, a probabilistic model is developed, which could predict likely activity sequence patterns for an agent based on the results of the multiple correspondence analysis. The model is predicting activity sequence patterns fairly accurately. For example, the activity sequence pattern home–work–home is well predicted ( \({\mathrm{R}}^{2}\) = 0.99) for all the workers, and the activity sequence pattern home–education–home is rather well predicted ( \({\mathrm{R}}^{2}\) = 0.90) for students. The model predicts the 112 most common activity sequence patterns reasonably well, which covers 72% of all activity sequence patterns observed.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-020-10103-1
       
  • Introducing shared life experience metric in urban planning

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      Abstract: Historically cities are formed to provide interaction and communication opportunities for communities. As cities become smarter, new forms of interactions are formed and the necessity to participate in activities such as traveling to a grocery store is replaced by submission of online order in Amazon fresh. If we move in this direction, it bears answering the question of what kinds of societal loss, or changes in social interactions should we expect in our future cities' In this paper, we develop the Shared Life Experience (SLE) metric, focusing on the interaction opportunities between people. We define this metric to be measured based on the pairwise reachability and interaction probabilities of city dwellers in the context of time and space. Furthermore, we present a framework discussing how this metric can be embedded into the design of a more dynamic urban form and how we can measure it using publicly available data. Two sets of analyses are presented. First: a bi-level model is proposed, composed of a heuristic search algorithm in the upper level to estimate the regional SLE value for a given set of parameters and finding the optimum solution. The lower level models in the bi-level structure are activity-based models producing mobility behavior of individuals in response to changes in the input parameters. Second: we present a simple methodology and discuss how to quantify the SLE index using household travel survey data collected within five boroughs of New York City. This analysis can highlight many equity-related objectives and be used as an informative tool for better decision making.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-020-10087-y
       
  • Understanding the modifiable areal unit problem and identifying
           appropriate spatial unit in jobs–housing balance and employment
           self-containment using big data

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      Abstract: Jobs–housing balance (JHB) and employment self-containment (ESC) have been used to examine the jobs–housing relationship. However, the effect of the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP) on ESC and JHB has received little attention. This study aims to examine the effect of the MAUP on the spatial variation of ESC and JHB by utilizing mobile positioning data from Shenzhen, China. Journey-to-work trips are examined at the individual level and then aggregated into different spatial areal units. It is found that the average ESC increases with the increase in spatial areal units and that the relationship between JHB and ESC is amplified when the spatial areal unit increases with spatial aggregation. A 2 km grid is found to be an ideal spatial unit for the analysis of ESC in Shenzhen because it is the turning point in which the increase in ESC started to slow down, and the decrease in the coefficient of variation began to diminish. In addition, workers were more likely to commute by non-motorized transport modes when their jobs were within 2 km. This study helps elucidate the effect of the MAUP on ESC and JHB as well as determine the appropriate grid size for analysis. This study further suggests that the ideal spatial unit for the analysis of ESC and JHB may be related to the transport mode of the city under study.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11116-020-10094-z
       
 
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