Subjects -> MATHEMATICS (Total: 1120 journals)
    - APPLIED MATHEMATICS (92 journals)
    - GEOMETRY AND TOPOLOGY (23 journals)
    - MATHEMATICS (822 journals)
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MATHEMATICS (822 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 538 of 538 Journals sorted alphabetically
Uniform Distribution Theory     Open Access  
Unisda Journal of Mathematics and Computer Science     Open Access  
Unnes Journal of Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Unnes Journal of Mathematics Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Unnes Journal of Mathematics Education Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Ural Mathematical Journal     Open Access  
Vestnik Samarskogo Gosudarstvennogo Tekhnicheskogo Universiteta. Seriya Fiziko-Matematicheskie Nauki     Open Access  
Vestnik St. Petersburg University: Mathematics     Hybrid Journal  
VFAST Transactions on Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Vietnam Journal of Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Vinculum     Full-text available via subscription  
Visnyk of V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University. Ser. Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Mechanics     Open Access  
Waste Management Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Water SA     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Waves     Hybrid Journal  
Wavelet Analysis and Its Applications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Waves, Wavelets and Fractals - Advanced Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zamm-Zeitschrift Fuer Angewandte Mathematik Und Mechanik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
ZDM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für angewandte Mathematik und Physik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift fur Energiewirtschaft     Hybrid Journal  
Zetetike     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

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Vinculum
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0157-759X
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [387 journals]
  • Volume 55 Issue 2 - E day is 'ere
    • Abstract: Wrigley, Andrew
      Monday July 2, or if you live in America, Wednesday February 7, sees the digits in the date align exactly to a very important letter in mathematics. I am referring to the number e which approximates to 2.718 (or 2/7/18).

      PubDate: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 02:25:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 2 - Prime number sieves
    • Abstract: Stewart, Andrew; Walter, Roger
      The Sieve of Eratosthenes of Cyrene (c. 276-195 BC) is most often demonstrated (Lowe and Amos, 2017) with the first one hundred counting numbers laid out in a 10 10 grid. What is not often clearly demonstrated, most probably for space reasons, are the patterns generated at each of the steps of the process as the multiples of 2, 3, 5 and 7 are eliminated.

      PubDate: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 02:25:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 2 - Solar cookers: More mathematical modelling from your
           browser
    • Abstract: Todd, Phil
      Free and easy to use web based versions of sophisticated mathematical packages make it possible to take a technological approach to mathematical modelling with little investment either of time or resources. Combining Wolfram Alpha, a free single-line window into Mathematica, with the free web version of Geometry Expressions (GXWeb) from my own company gives you a low barrier-to-entry way of getting your feet wet with the use of these technologies.

      PubDate: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 02:25:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 2 - Solutions for passionless moments and chess problem
    • PubDate: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 02:25:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 2 - Squircles and superellipses
    • Abstract: Walter, Roger
      One method of softening the sharp corners of a rectangle is to replace each corner with a quarter circle, or quadrant. This looks ok and produces a continuous shape with a continuous derivative (except for the vertical part). However, we can do better than this. When you consider curvature, a concept sadly omitted from our curriculum, we find that the curvature of this shape is discontinuous. In fact, it has only two values, 0 along the straight parts and the constant curvature of whatever sized circle is chosen around the curved corners.

      PubDate: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 02:25:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 2 - Constructivism in mathematics
    • Abstract: Mallamaci, Luke
      Constructivist teaching is founded on the assumption that the student is a naturally active learner who constructs new personalised knowledge by linking prior knowledge and new knowledge. Mercer & Jordan (1994) and Gordon (2007) proposed that constructivist learning leads to learner-centred, authentic teaching and allows us to assess and remediate student learning and critically evaluate our teaching methods. As outlined by Draper (2002), while not explicitly stating a constructivist paradigm, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics in 2000 called for 'a more student-centred math classroom that deemphasises rote memorisation of isolated skills and facts and emphasises problem solving and communication, whereby students can gain mathematical power' (Draper, 2002), clearly indicating a push towards constructivist approaches to mathematics education. Also, Stemhagen (2016) proposed that constructivist philosophies and approaches focus on the development of what it means to do mathematics on a conceptual level.

      PubDate: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 02:25:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 2 - The mathematics of voting
    • Abstract: Do, Norman
      In the animal kingdom, leaders are chosen by instinct, brute force and occasionally the bumping of heads. We humans, on the other hand, have moved away from such primitive and barbaric behaviour. Democracy, from the same people who brought us the Olympic Games, necessitated a method to elect leaders in a way that would accurately reflect the will of the people. Thus, voting was born.

      PubDate: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 02:25:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 2 - Chess problem
    • Abstract: Mills, Terence
      PubDate: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 02:25:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 2 - Passionless moments: Theon's ladder
    • Abstract: Ruthven, Bruce
      Students often find the concept of irrational numbers difficult to grasp because irrationals don't seem to count 'things' and can't easily be placed on a number line. This passionless moment will look at a novel way of arriving at the approximation for the square root of a number. The technique has been around for a long time. Certainly it seems the Pythagoreans were aware of the process, but it is generally known as the 'Theon's Ladder', named after the Greek philosopher Theon of Smyrna.

      PubDate: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 02:25:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 2 - From the editor
    • Abstract: Walter, Roger
      PubDate: Sat, 28 Apr 2018 02:25:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - From the editor
    • Abstract: Walter, Roger
      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - Chess problem
    • Abstract: Mills, Terence
      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - Passionless moments: The shoelace formula
    • Abstract: Ruthven, Bruce
      One of the most common questions in a mathematics competition is one in which students have to calculate the area of a polygon with vertices located as ordered pairs on a plane or grid system. An example is finding the area of ΔABC with vertices A (1, 6), B (2, 2) and C (5, 1).

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - Maths of a veggie garden
    • Abstract: Clarke, Stephen
      I was given a raised bed for a veggie garden the other day, made of four metal sheets that screwed together to form a rectangular garden 1.2 m by 0.9 m, an area of 1.08 m2, enough room to plant some carrots. I thought later that I might buy a second unit, and have twice the area for planting and room for some parsnips. While lying in bed (I do a lot of thinking in bed), I realised that with two units I could get a lot more than just double the area.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - Why I do what I do
    • Abstract: Walter, Roger; Harradine, Anthony
      At the 2016 MAV annual conference, I attended a session by Anthony Harradine who led us through a sample lesson introducing Pythagoras' theorem to demonstrate strategies which would be effective in promoting mathematical and investigative thinking. After the session, I felt it would be a great idea to share his thoughts with Vinculum readers. This article is, of course, all about why Anthony does what he does. I hope that this will not only give you some ideas to engage your students, but will also encourage you to reflect on your teaching practices. Why do you to do what you do in your classroom'

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - Eva's elsendots
    • Abstract: Williams, Doug
      I read about De Bono's L Game in Vinculum 2/17 at a critical time in my life. Downsizing from a home of 19 years to a house one third the size is a critical time. Almost everything went - but not Eva's magnificent project. I just couldn't do it.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - Passionless solutions
    • Abstract: Ruthven, Bruce
      In this case it does not matter. All the coordinates are positive and it really only comes into effect when some of the vertices are in the third quadrant. The absolute value of the difference takes care of the clockwise or anti-clockwise order. What is important is that the points are consecutive.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - Overseas and Australian educational concerns
    • Abstract: Noura, Karim
      In early 2017 I had a great opportunity to visit universities and schools, as well as meet with mathematics teachers in Oman, Lebanon and the United Arab Emirates. There were common and serious concerns about the learning and teaching of mathematics. There was also a great concern for engaging and motivating mathematics students at both high schools and university levels. This led me to question, 'What should be done to improve teachers' performance and students' motivation and engagement''

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - 3.5!
    • Abstract: Walter, Roger
      If we want to think like mathematicians I believe we must always be ready to push the boundaries! At about Year 11 our students learn that n! = 1 2 3 ... n for any positive integer n. Start at 1 and keep multiplying by a number one more than the previous until you get to n. We extend this to define 0! = 1. Why' Because it makes our probability and combinatorics work when selecting no objects.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - Order of operations: The importance of holistic
           thinking
    • Abstract: Kanbir, Sinan; Goegel, Kyle; Clements, Ken; Ellerton, Nerida
      In 2016 we interviewed 28 seventh-grade students on a oneon- one basis at a rural public school in Illinois, USA. During the interviews, we asked each student to answer the following questions mentally, without writing anything down, and without using a calculator.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - Chess solution
    • Abstract: Mills, Terry
      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 1 - A hard day's maths
    • Abstract: Walter, Roger
      The next time your students question the usefulness of mathematics, you may wish to refer them to noise addicts.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:24:49 GMT
       
 
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