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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
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International Journal of Sustainable Development
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.2
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0960-1406 - ISSN (Online) 1741-5268
Published by Inderscience Publishers Homepage  [439 journals]
  • The international impact of Manfred Max-Neef's scholarship: a
           bibliometric approach

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      Authors: María del Valle Barrera, Patricio Belloy, Benoit Mougenot, Jean Pierre Doussoulin
      Pages: 1 - 29
      Abstract: This study is the first approach to measure and assess the global scholarly impact of Professor Manfred Max-Neef's work (1932-2019). Our research uses bibliometric analysis and the Scopus database to identify the interdisciplinarity and internationalisation of Max-Neef's ideas and recognise their contribution to human and sustainable development. We measure the impact in terms of quantity and quality of citing publications, international collaboration networks, and disciplinary areas influenced by Max-Neef's work. We acknowledge that this first analysis should be strengthened by adding sources of publications and by expanding the analysis to non-academic spaces, including transition initiatives and other social organisation practices.
      Keywords: Max-Neef; human scale development; HSD; human development; sustainable development; transdisciplinarity; fundamental human needs; bibliometric analysis; wellbeing; ecological economics; transdisciplinary research
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainable Development, Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022) pp. 1 - 29
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJSD.2022.126458
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022)
       
  • Waste management in rural South Africa - perspectives from Manfred
           Max-Neef's human scale development framework

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      Authors: Rinie Schenck, Derick Blaauw, Charlotte Nell
      Pages: 30 - 52
      Abstract: The impact of limited or non-existing formalised waste management services in rural areas can have severe consequences for both the community and the environment. Unregulated waste management practices often fill the void, such as indiscriminate dumping, littering and burning waste in the open. Using Max-Neef's human scale development theory lens, a case study of a remote rural town in the Free State Province of South Africa was conducted to investigate the linkages and interdependencies between waste management in the town with other poverties experienced by the residents. The results have guided us towards synergic waste solutions and systemic satisfiers to be developed with the communities that can lead to satisfaction in more than one fundamental human need. Waste management solutions as synergic satisfiers should primarily view waste as a potentially valuable resource to enable greater participation in the enhancement of multiple fundamental human needs.
      Keywords: waste management; illegal dumping; littering; Max-Neef; fundamental human needs; FHNs; human-scale development; sustainability; South Africa; sustainable development goals; SDGs
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainable Development, Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022) pp. 30 - 52
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJSD.2022.126465
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022)
       
  • Fundamental human needs and socio-ecological transformation: a reflection
           on participatory action research in a context of tree plantations in Chile
           

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      Authors: Alejandro Mora-Motta, Till Stellmacher, Maria del Valle Barrera
      Pages: 53 - 77
      Abstract: The strength of the <i>fundamental human needs</i> (<i>FHN</i>) approach, originally developed by Max-Neef and colleagues, relies on the separation of finite needs from context-specific satisfiers and a type of participatory action research (PAR) used to define and assess people's well-being. This paper reflects on the FHN PAR workshop-based method that was adapted and used to study how expanding extractivist tree plantations in Southern Chile affect the well-being of peasant and Mapuche-Williche people. The reflection is based on intensive fieldwork conducted in 2016 and 2017 in La Unión, Southern Chile, which included FHN PAR workshops. The paper presents the practical methodological experiences with FHN PAR from that fieldwork and discusses key data analysis elements. It also relates the FHN PAR approach to the contemporary socio-ecological transformation discussion. The article concludes by illustrating the practical potentials and limitations of the FHN PAR workshop-based method to understand well-being in contexts of socio-ecological transformation.
      Keywords: fundamental human needs; FHN; extractivism; tree plantations; socio-ecological transformation; Chile
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainable Development, Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022) pp. 53 - 77
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJSD.2022.126469
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022)
       
  • Urban research for sustainability: developing a comparative
           transdisciplinary co-production approach to realise just cities

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      Authors: Henrietta Palmer, David Simon, Jan Riise
      Pages: 78 - 94
      Abstract: This paper engages with Manfred Max-Neef's approach to transdisciplinarity in relation to an innovative international cross-city research program. Given the inadequacies of conventional methods, fundamentally different approaches are required to meet the 'wicked problem' challenges of transition towards sustainable societies. Mistra Urban Futures, a Swedish-based research centre with multi-institutional partnerships in eight cities on four continents, designed a <i>co-produced comparative</i> research program to address the realisation of just cities through a typology enabling the comparison of urgent local priorities. This paper reflects on the approach and its relevance to Max-Neef's call for <i>understanding</i> as central to a transdisciplinary approach. Key findings include how understanding, together with the realisation of just cities, emerges intertwined as methodological outcomes. These outcomes also supported the processes, hence contributing to the discourses on transition and the methodologies of transdisciplinarity and comparative urban research.
      Keywords: transdisciplinarity; co-production; Manfred Max-Neef; Mistra Urban Futures; comparative urban research; realising just cities; RJC; urban justice; urban experiments; self-reflexive learning; multi-stakeholder partnerships
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainable Development, Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022) pp. 78 - 94
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJSD.2022.126473
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022)
       
  • A novel tool for quality-of-life assessment in the household
           context

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      Authors: Montagu Murray, Christiaan Pauw
      Pages: 95 - 113
      Abstract: This article describes the development and application of an original quality-of-life assessment tool. Part 1 reflects on how the practical challenges the Nova Institute faces working in the low-income context in South Africa inspired us to develop an original quality-of-life assessment tool. Part 2 examines how this endeavour builds on the insights of quality-of-life studies as a sub-discipline of sociology, but specifically also on the conceptual work of Manfred Max-Neef. Part 3 describes the methods used to design a quality-of-life assessment tool and explains how Max-Neef's concepts are expounded to develop the tool. Part 4 presents an example from the results of a general household survey in more than a thousand households, together with an in-depth quality-of-life assessment in 46 of these households, to illustrate the application of the tool. We conclude that the tool provides a practical way to sensibly combine subjective and objective indicators in quality-of-life analysis.
      Keywords: Max-Neef; needs theory; human scale development; quality of life studies; social indicators; fundamental human needs; quality of life assessment
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainable Development, Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022) pp. 95 - 113
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJSD.2022.126474
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022)
       
  • Max-Neef and sustainability: theoretical, methodological and
           empirical contributions

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      Authors: Lina I. Brand-Correa, Julia K. Steinberger
      Pages: 114 - 131
      Abstract: The work of Manfred Max-Neef has been hugely influential in many areas of academia. One of those areas has been sustainability studies in general, through to energy studies from a social science perspective more specifically. In this paper, we explore how Max-Neef's work has been used to describe energy, more specifically energy services, as need satisfiers. Moreover, we also describe how the study of energy services as need satisfiers has been undertaken in practice, with urban and rural communities in Colombia, Zambia and Nepal. Our empirical work is based on Max-Neef's workshops, albeit with some adaptations. We have named the adapted approach human scale energy services (HuSES). The HuSES approach has allowed us to understand which energy services are more synergetic for the communities we have worked with, and therefore we consider it to be a useful tool for prioritising energy interventions.
      Keywords: Max-Neef; sustainability; energy; human scale development; HSD; satisfiers; socio-technical provisioning systems
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainable Development, Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022) pp. 114 - 131
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJSD.2022.126475
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022)
       
  • Self-reflexive practice through the human scale development approach -
           competencies needed for transformative science research

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      Authors: Lina I. Brand-Correa, Julia K. Steinberger
      Pages: 132 - 159
      Abstract: Solution-oriented transformative science (TSc) is increasingly being discussed as a means to produce participatory and actionable knowledge for sustainability transitions. This requires that researchers adopt different roles, competencies and a degree of reflexivity, which thus far, are often not fully applied. This article proposes the human scale development approach (HSDA) of the Chilean economist, Max-Neef and his colleagues, as a valuable framework to engage in self-reflexive research practices. Inspired by autoethnography, I draw on my own sustainability research as a PhD-student, paying close attention to deprivations, potentials that I encountered, exploring how self-reflexive practices enhance the understanding of competencies and elucidating how to adopt and fulfil required research roles and procedures. I show how such a self-reflexive process can be a useful (training) tool not only for early PhD researchers and for supervision, but may add value for TSc scholars in general.
      Keywords: autoethnography; transformative science; TSc; self-reflexive practice; human scale development approach; HSDA; roles of researcher; competencies; values; reflexivity; sustainability science
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainable Development, Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022) pp. 132 - 159
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJSD.2022.126477
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022)
       
  • Sustainable supply chain intervention: a case-based analysis of the
           economics of land degradation

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      Authors: Gitika Goswami, Supriyo Roy, Satabdi Datta, Srishti Manna
      Pages: 160 - 190
      Abstract: Sustainability has been considered central to developmental issues across the world. The exploitation of natural resources without concern for ecological balance resulted in environmental degradation, a disorder in social structure, and economic instability. Therefore, the focus for sustenance shifted towards retaining a balance between <i>people</i>, <i>planet</i>, and <i>profit</i>. Land is one of the valuable resources, and once degraded, causes loss of productivity, thus making an imbalance to supply chain sustainability. The present study examines the economics of land degradation and its impact on natural, social, and human capital. Domain for the survey is to explore the most degraded areas of the Bundelkhand region in Madhya Pradesh, India. We performed a comparative analysis between intervention and control villages to identify land remediation measures in the concerned villages. The study's findings significantly highlighted the performance variations across intervention and control villages concerning the selected indicators to match the desired Sustainable Development Goals.
      Keywords: land remediation; supply chain intervention; social developmental indicators; economics of land degradation; ELD; sustainability
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainable Development, Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022) pp. 160 - 190
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJSD.2022.126453
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1/2 (2022)
       
 
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