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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 278)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 195)
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 98)
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Oryx     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Environment Conservation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access  
Recursos Rurais     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Intervención     Open Access  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access  
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access  
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access  
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access  
Recycling     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access  
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access  
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Regional Sustainability     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2514-8486 - ISSN (Online) 2514-8494
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Publication Notice

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1696 - 1696
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Volume 5, Issue 3, Page 1696-1696, September 2022.

      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T03:15:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221125709
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • All dried up: The materiality of drought in Ladismith, South Africa

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      Authors: Elisa Savelli, Maria Rusca, Hannah Cloke, Tyrel J Flügel, Abdulrazak Karriem, Giuliano Di Baldassarre
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper conceptualises droughts as socioecological phenomena coproduced by the recursive engagement of human and non-human transformations. Through an interdisciplinary approach that integrates political ecology, material geographies and hydroclimatology, this work simultaneously apprehends the role of politics and power in reshaping drought, along with the agency of biophysical processes – soil, vegetation, hydrology and microclimate – that co-produce droughts and their spatiotemporal patterning. The drought-stricken Ladismith in Western Cape, South Africa, is the instrumental case study and point of departure of our empirical analysis. To advance a materiality of drought that seriously accounts for the coevolution of biophysical and political transformations, we alter the spatiotemporal and empirical foci of drought analyses thereby retracing Ladismith’s socioecological history since colonial times. In turn, such extended framework exposes the agency of soil, vegetation, hydrology and microclimate and their metabolic exchanges with processes of colonisation, apartheid, capitalist and neoliberal transformations of South African economy. We argue that the narrow pursuit of profits and capital accumulation of the few has produced a fundamental disruption between nature and society which contributed to transform Ladismith’s drought into a socioecological crisis. Whilst advancing debates on materiality, we note two fundamental contributions to the study of drought. First, our approach makes hydrological accounts of droughts less politically naive and socially blind. Second, it develops a political ecology of droughts and socioecological crises more attuned to the materiality of drought. We contend that apprehending the materiality of drought and the active role of its non-human processes can further understandings of the workings of power and the production of socioecological injustices.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T02:12:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221126617
       
  • Indigenous companion planting in the great churn: Three sisters in
           Kalapuya ilihi

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      Authors: Brian Klopotek, Talon Claybrook, Joe Scott
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article addresses place, culture, community, and mobility in relation to Indigenous food sovereignty and TEK (traditional ecological knowledge). We start with a reflection on what it means to live in the Pacific Northwest of the United States for people from tribes that use Three Sisters agriculture. Two of the authors grew corn, beans, and squash using wintertime, indoor hydroponics and other methods in a performance art mode in Kalapuya ilihi (Western Oregon, USA). Growing these sacred companion plants out of soil, out of sun, out of season, and out of place served as a meditation on our own senses of dislocation and disjuncture as well as modes of connection as Southeastern Natives living in the Pacific Northwest. The politics and practice of growing and/or tending traditional Indigenous food plants in both traditional and non-traditional ways and places provided new language for understanding Indigenous cultural and social health in relation to Indigenous traditions, mobility, and relationality. The three authors (two from Southeastern tribes, one from a Northwestern tribe) provide a model for collaborative intercultural Indigenous ecological projects as a mode of learning, a mode of relational Indigenous mobility, a mode of community-building, and a mode of engaging in Indigenous food sovereignty. Working on community and educational projects together helped us understand companion planting as an analogy, an aesthetic, a method, and a mode for building relational futures.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T07:51:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221126618
       
  • Care and its discontents: Commodification, coercive cooperation, and
           resistance in Copenhagen Zoo

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      Authors: Eimear Mc Loughlin
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Through ethnographic attunement to the emotionally complex relationships between zookeepers and nonhuman animals, commodification in the political economy of Copenhagen Zoo produces a form of care characterized by coercive cooperation. Amidst the coercive constraints of captivity, keepers depict relationships as ranging from those of explicit coercion, where the animals are made to work, to those of cooperation, where the animals are perceived as working with. Within this context, zoo animals can be better understood as “cooperative commodities”, lively commodities that are perceived as cooperating in their commodification. The belief in cooperation also reframes potential moments of resistance as opportunities to respond and thereby lessen the emotional toll on zookeepers when maladaptive behaviors highlight the failings of their captive environment.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T07:48:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221125227
       
  • The multiple environmentalities of conservation mapping in
           Patagonia-Aysén

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      Authors: Juan Astaburuaga, Agnieszka Leszczynski, Michael E. Martin, JC Gaillard
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, we mobilise a multiple environmentalities framework that captures overlapping rationalities of governing nature to engage and identify the role of maps and mapping practices in Patagonia-Aysén, Chile, a peripheral region where government and institutional actors have embraced (eco)tourism as a conservation strategy in protected areas. Through interviews with key stakeholders situated in conservation and tourism institutions in both the public and private sector, we identify two dominant environmentalities at play in the relationship between protected area management and tourism development in Patagonia-Aysén: a neoliberal environmentality, which seeks to promote conservation through the commodification of nature as a tourism product, and an environmentality of truth predicated on a singular, pristine and beautiful nature as an object of conservation and advantage for tourism. Through an analysis of conservation maps and mapping rationalities specific to the Cerro Castillo protected area in Patagonia-Aysén, we trace how these multiple environmentalities are consolidated, rendered real and actionable through geovisualisations and cartographic practices. We argue that conservation maps and mapping emerge as an ‘encounter point’ wherein multiple environmentality strategies and rationalities converge, producing a form of governing the spaces of conservation – what we term a spatial environmentality – rooted in neoliberal and aesthetic logics. Spatial environmentality, we contend, constitutes a form of governing conservation spaces by inscribing and assigning (in)appropiate uses to nature that operationalises institutional interests in conditioning the active engagement of ‘environment subjects’ to control, administer, and take care of the spaces of conservation while in turn making environmental stewardship profitable.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T06:25:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221125228
       
  • Wastewater and wishful thinking: Treatment plants to “revive” the
           Santiago River in Mexico

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      Authors: Cindy McCulligh
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article grapples with issues of urban wastewater sanitation in one of Mexico's most polluted river basins, through an analysis of a river restoration project centered on the construction of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Taking an ethnographic approach to the study of infrastructure, the main argument is that, beyond their possible contribution to reducing pollutant loads, in this context municipal WWTPs can best be understood through the concept of “duplication,” whereby the infrastructure works serve as a vehicle for the transfer of public resources to the private sector, through construction and operation contracts. At the same time, these plants also fulfill objectives related to their symbolic value, in this case as indicators of a commitment to resolving one of the state's main socio-environmental conflicts, while studiously avoiding its root causes, including industrial pollution sources. From an urban political ecology perspective, the paper also examines how investment in wastewater treatment infrastructure in the basin continues to reinforce social and environmental inequities, particularly for peri-urban communities along the Santiago River.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-09-19T04:53:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221125230
       
  • (Dis)Entangling livestock marketplaces: Cattle purchasing, fluid
           engineering and market displays

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      Authors: Gareth Enticott, Ruth Little
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Livestock markets are pathological sites in which contrasting biopolitical regimes compete to reconfigure agricultural practices and identities. Whilst the circulation of cattle is central to agricultural geographies, little is known about the practices of cattle trading or the role of livestock markets in cattle purchasing. Drawing on recent attempts to conceptualise the process of marketisation, this paper seeks to invigorate research into livestock markets. Specifically, the paper conceptualises cattle purchasing as a market encounter in which socio-technical arrangements, devices and bodily performances entangle cattle and farmers, enabling markets to work. Using data collected from interviews, focus groups and participant observation at livestock markets in England, the paper makes two contributions. Firstly, the paper shows how farmers’ cattle purchasing practices are organised by practices of ‘fluid engineering’ that seek to maintain the ‘farm system’. Secondly, the paper shows how at livestock markets, these strategies are mediated by front and backstage ‘market displays’ by farmers and auctioneers which produce market price through a series of performances that are carefully spatially and temporally ordered. Specifically, these displays perform specific rural and agricultural identities, such as the ‘genuine’ or ‘good’ farmer. In creating these spatial frames, frontstage displays diminish the relevance of backstage displays that rely on abstract calculations by distant others. The paper therefore reveals the intense entanglements and socio-technical work that is required to make cattle markets function and their wider relevance for the management of livestock diseases.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T04:30:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221120543
       
  • Expelled from the garden' Understanding the dynamics of green
           gentrification in Vancouver, British Columbia

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      Authors: Daniel L Sax, Lorien Nesbitt, Shannon Hagerman
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      There is substantial evidence detailing the ecological and social benefits provided through urban greening. However, research in the field of urban green equity has revealed that these benefits are not enjoyed equitably by all residents; existing disparities in the distribution, accessibility, and experience of urban greening disproportionately affect historically marginalized communities and residents. Furthermore, green gentrification scholarship has indicated that instances of urban greening intended to rectify inequities, can contribute to or elicit shifts in property values, encouraging speculative commercial and retail investment, disrupting existing socio-spatial relationships, and threatening the housing security of residents. Although there is consensus on this general characterization of green gentrification, many questions remain concerning the relationships between urban residents engaged in small-scale urban greening and the perpetuation of green gentrification outcomes. Contributing to this line of inquiry, we present a case study of an urban farm operating in Vancouver, Canada, facing displacement due to the redevelopment of its current site. Our results from the study illuminate the contradictory position in which urban residents practicing urban greening are sometimes placed—both implicated in and impacted by green gentrification processes. We present a review of our case study to highlight the power dynamics that farm members must navigate in the effort to preserve their access to land and continue their farming practice. Then, we discuss the farm's role as a consultant for the redevelopment process, exploring how its vision, mission, and identity have been co-opted by development agents and used as a branding tool to promote and support the public perception of the redevelopment. Our findings offer insight into novel relationships between urban agriculture, large-scale redevelopment, and green gentrification. What's more, they contribute to existing discourse concerning the limitations of development processes to account for the risks of green gentrification.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-09-09T11:11:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221123134
       
  • Managing the problem of too much capital: Coal power overcapacity, migrant
           labor sacrifice, and structural problems in contemporary Chinese political
           economy

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      Authors: Xi Wang
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      China's electricity sector suffers from significant overcapacity in coalfired generation. Between 2000 and 2020, China built more than 970 gigawatts of new coal power capacity, accounting for more than 70% of all new coal capacity worldwide. Building large amounts of coal and other generation capacity has continued despite clear indicators of overcapacity before the mid-2010s. This article uses a Marxian political economy theoretical framework to assert that generation overcapacity is a symptom of China's broader problem of capital overaccumulation. More specifically, it is the result of governance choices to deal with the overaccumulation problem. In so doing, this article presents a new conceptual pathway to understanding overcapacity in the electricity sector, which mainstream discourse attributes to bad planning and mistaken economic assumptions. Through the case of Chinese coal generation overcapacity, this article advocates for examining contemporary political economy issues through the conceptual lens of overaccumulation and devaluation management—in China and beyond. It proceeds by highlighting three central features of structural problems in contemporary Chinese political economy. The first is the expression of capital overaccumulation as massive coal generation overcapacity. The second is the structural bias toward overbuilding generation infrastructure; this is due both to the bulky and long-lived nature of electricity sector fixed capital and the sector's key role in circulating capital throughout the economy. The third feature is how—given insufficient consumption demand—capital is offloaded spatially, temporally, and biophysically onto migrant contract workers. Together, these features trace governance decisions made by state entities at different scales and times to deal with the imperatives of capital while maintaining economic, social, and political legitimacy. This framework highlights the ongoing management of overaccumulation and devaluation as a core governance imperative. This imperative undergirds current class warfare, and in this case of fossil fuel capital expansion, carries grim implications for climate change.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-09-07T07:12:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221123418
       
  • El Niño without ‘El Niño’' Path dependency and the definition
           problem in El Niño southern oscillation research

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      Authors: George Adamson
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The El Niño phenomenon – and its associated phenomena El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and La Niña – have become probably the most well-known forms of natural climatic variability. El Niño forecasts underpin regional Climate Outlook Forums in many parts of the world. The declaration of El Niño conditions can unlock development aid money and El Niño events commonly receive widespread media coverage. Yet ‘El Niño’ has not always meant what it does today. The name was originally applied to an annually-occurring ocean current that affected northern Peru and Ecuador, so called because it arrived at Christmas (the Christ Child). The transition in meaning to a complex global phenomenon was related as much to commercial and geopolitical priorities as to the oceanic and atmospheric observations that underpin theories of El Niño dynamics. In this paper, I argue that scientific conceptualisations of El Niño are an example of path dependency. Badging ocean-atmosphere variability as ‘El Niño’ is unnecessary either for the advancement of science or effective disaster risk reduction; in fact, current definitions are confusing and can create problems in preparing for El Niño-related hazards, as occurred with the 2017 ‘coastal’ El Niño in Peru. This paper outlines the historical processes that led to the current conceptualisations of El Niño and suggests an alternative way of understanding ocean-atmosphere dynamics in the Pacific and beyond. It then considers the implications of this path-dependency on El Niño’s ontological politics; that is, who gets to define El Niño, and to what end.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-09-07T07:12:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221120546
       
  • Gambling with our climate futures: On the temporal structure of negative
           emissions

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      Authors: J. Daniel Andersson
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper considers negative emissions—the deliberate removal of greenhouse gases from the atmosphere by human intervention—as a future-oriented imaginary of connected social and technological order. It does so in order to examine how expectations around the development and use of negative emission technologies are managed with the help of integrated assessment models (IAMs). By treating this family of models as a case study for drawing out historical associations between the terminology of risk saturating the discourse of net-zero emissions and the modern conception of the future as an unexplored territory to be profitably colonized, the paper argues that integrated assessment modeling, as a praxis of forecast, structure and organize our experience of the future through standards of risk management and utility maximization. It concludes that to consider risk as a means of navigating between possible futures is to engage with practices that are enacted in the name of a particular understanding of how one ought to act in the face of deep uncertainty. Aside from epistemic questions of how to treat various kinds of uncertainties inherent to IAMs, of pressing concern are thus also normative questions of how its representation of environmental hazards in terms of risk are distinctively writing the contours of our contemporary forms of responsibility toward nature, each other, as well as future generations.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T06:22:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221123415
       
  • Analysis of ocean ontologies in three frameworks: A study of law of the
           sea discourse

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      Authors: Vanessa Burns
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Legal frameworks have historically used a colonial territorialist approach to governing ocean space. The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (1982) represents a theoretical departure from colonial territorialism. Instead, UNCLOS employs a functionalist logic approach that is based on principles of sovereignty and consent and uses administrative reasoning as a basis for decision-making. This paper investigates what ontological principles are employed in the development of UNCLOS and asks how these are reproduced in other frameworks. I consider whether ontologies can be extrapolated and studied as latent but agential positions in ocean law and governance frameworks and examine how they might be obstructive to the development of effective regional ocean governance. Lastly, I ask whether ontological principles can be reformed, and through what type of interventions this might be achieved. Results show that tenets of colonial territorialism persist in UNCLOS as terrestrialising practices that are reappropriated towards marine communities. Further, that there are fundamental ways in which ontological principles are obstructive to conservation goals in ocean governance frameworks. Lastly, while the structural reproduction of ontological principles between frameworks resists intervention, evidence suggests that interventionist legal mechanisms that displace anthropocentrisms may offer distinct opportunities for reform.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:16:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221110436
       
  • Freedom Rangers™ and landscapes that move people

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      Authors: Daniel Schniedewind
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Born out of long-term fieldwork in New York's Hudson Valley, this article begins and ends with reflections on a fraught attempt to conduct ethnographic research with captive chickens, paradoxically called Freedom Rangers™, living on small-scale, organic animal farms. With no available ecological and economic justifications for their confinement, I had to turn instead to animal agriculture's long-standing role in a regional landscape tradition that generates a White sense of place and personhood. Since the dawn of the colonial period, agriculture, especially animal agriculture, has constituted a powerful landscape-making assemblage in the Hudson Valley, one both deeply dependent on racial slavery and uniquely responsible for (never complete) Native displacement. Imported European farm animals and their associate organisms remade the region ecologically, enabling the proliferation of colonial settlement. Then as now, the remaking of the land is itself a site of politics and a means of realizing possible futures. Watching as Whiteness emerges along the human/nonhuman interface, I argue that meat is but one product yielded from these confined chicken bodies and that the unspectacular terror they experience on a daily basis radiates far beyond their enclosures. Addressing the persistence of settler colonialism, antiblackness, and White supremacy requires attention to a wider range of political scenes and actors than are often considered in studies of these formations. What are the banal practices and everyday affects that secure a social order' What are the possibilities for more-than-human ethnography given the violence that saturates this venerated landscape'
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-08-17T07:57:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221118525
       
  • Decolonizing conservation' Indigenous resurgence and buffalo
           restoration in the American West

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      Authors: Lindsey Schneider
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      There has been a recent surge of interest in “decolonizing” conservation and natural resource management fields. Most of this scholarship, however, speaks to colonialism on a global scale and does not address conservation within modern settler colonial states such as the United States and Canada. This project focuses on the reintroduction of buffalo (bison) in the American West as an example of how even conservation efforts that purport to include, value, and share Indigenous perspectives can ultimately uphold settler colonial relations of power. Using an Indigenous mixed-methodology approach, it interrogates the discursive construction of buffalo as “America's great conservation success story” and highlights the ways in which conservation has historically worked to support colonial projects of Indigenous erasure and dispossession. Some contemporary buffalo restoration projects seek to include Indigenous people as stakeholders and/or collaborators with unique cultural interests in buffalo, but these efforts do not always embody the material shift in power relations that Indigenous scholars have identified as a key component of decolonization. For Indigenous people, buffalo are more than a keystone species with cultural import; they are relatives whose well-being is deeply entwined with our own. For landscape-scale buffalo restoration projects to engage in decolonization, they must seek to not only repair the harm done to tribal nations through buffalo eradication but also work to support Indigenous resurgence by transforming structures of power.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-08-17T07:56:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221119158
       
  • Technical reform or radical justice' Environmental discourse in
           non-governmental organizations

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      Authors: Ellie Ritter, Gregory M Thaler
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Discourses integrate facts, frames, metaphors, and narratives to produce shared understandings of environmental problems, and these shared understandings structure environmental policy and outcomes. Recent scholarship uses new data and quantitative content analysis to identify Environmental Management, Climate Politics, Ecological Modernization, and Environmental Justice as the major discourses among global environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGOs). Such discourse classification can be intellectually and politically useful, but typologies elide variation. Understanding environmental discourse involves not only classifying major discourses, but also identifying nuances, tensions, and absences behind any typology. This study builds on recent quantitative research with a qualitative, small-N design. We selected two ENGOs identified as extreme representatives of each of the four major discourses, for a total of eight ENGOs, and we conducted qualitative content analysis of ENGO documents as the basis for critical discourse analysis (CDA), examining the principal ideas, frames, and narratives of each discourse and the relations between discourses. Our analysis identifies tensions in Climate Politics between climate justice and multi-stakeholder governance subdiscourses, and divergence in Environmental Management discourse between protection-based and market-based approaches. Linking discourse with organizational structure, we trace tensions in these categories to broader webs of power that transcend typological classifications. Qualitative case studies both deepen and challenge quantitative analyses, underlining the importance of multimethod research and enhancing our understanding of environmental discourse as a key sphere of environmental politics.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T05:01:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221119750
       
  • Regulation by impasse: Pesticide registration, capital and the state in
           Costa Rica

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      Authors: María Soledad Castro-Vargas, Marion Werner
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Costa Rica's prodigious use of pesticides, as well as the burgeoning plantation sector that these agrochemicals support, exacerbates the tensions between extraction and preservation at the heart of the country's development model. We explore these tensions through a study of the country's pesticide registry, the regulatory process to approve active ingredients and formulations for use. After nearly two decades of reform efforts, the registry is widely recognized to be non-functioning: most of the country's pesticides exist in administrative limbo and relatively few new compounds have been approved. Based on extensive interviews and in-depth policy analysis, we construct four phases of reform and use a strategic-relational approach to the state to analyze this process. We conceptualize the registry's gridlock as a form of governance that we term regulation by impasse, an arrangement reproduced through disputes within and between the cognizant ministries, juridical bodies and other regulating authorities, in relation to the shifting strategies and contexts of political economic and wider social forces. We argue that hegemony is tenuously maintained through the registry dispute itself, while revealing the deeply frayed condition of the Costa Rican development model.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T04:58:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221116742
       
  • Activism and non-activism: The politics of claiming environmental justice
           in Vietnam

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      Authors: Thai Nguyen-Van-Quoc, Ethemcan Turhan, Ronald Holzhacker
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper aims to explore how under authoritarian regimes, undergoing reform processes, divergent forms of environmental activism may emerge. Two severe cases of environmental degradation serve as our starting points: the marine disaster in the central coast of Vietnam in 2016 and the Mekong Delta's ongoing environmental degradation. While the former offers a case of rural grievances over mass fish death in Central Vietnam triggering protests on a national scale, the latter presents a continuum of environmental changes leading to serious impacts on deltaic livelihoods, albeit with no observable efforts of activism compared to the situation in other countries along the Mekong Delta. Drawing from in-depth interviews and participant observation with NGO workers in Vietnam who focus on environment and community development, we unravel the conditions, methods and rationalities behind their engagement (or lack thereof) with environmental activism in each case. We argue that the difference between the cases can be explained by tracing the process of politicising environmental grievances, taking into consideration culinary nationalism, anti-China nationalism and political opportunities under authoritarianism. Moving beyond current literature on activism under authoritarian regimes which relies mainly on institutional and/or social network approaches, our analysis helps further shed light on how contemporary environmental activism is mobilised in Vietnam from a geographically and politically grounded as well as culturally embedded position.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T06:25:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221115955
       
  • The epistemic tensions of nuclear waste siting in a nuclear landscape

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      Authors: Marissa Bell
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Canada's siting process for spent nuclear fuel, led by the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO), is frequently held within nuclear industry spheres as an exemplary siting process, designed to be inclusive, participatory, and “community-driven.” Drawing from ethnographic observations of the process as it unfolded in Southern Ontario, Canada, this paper focuses on the epistemic issues of how diverse knowledges are treated in the process, whose knowledge is valued, how such knowledges are understood, and whose knowledges are excluded. In particular, I make sense of how epistemic tensions in the process are produced by being situated within a nuclear landscape, informed by local nuclear-dominant socio-technical relations and epistemic regimes, which exceptionalize pro-nuclear Western scientific knowledges. This socio-technical constellation, I suggest, leads to careful but sometimes paradoxical negotiations of the expert/lay divide that subsequently reveals cracks in the policy foundation for inclusion of diverse forms of knowledge. While the NWMO policy framework discursively values diverse knowledges, critical lay community knowledges are often delegitimized and dismissed. Similarly, there are scalar issues in the ways Indigenous knowledges are homogenized and devalued through discursive separation. These epistemic tensions, between how knowledges should be treated in policy, and how knowledges are actually treated in practice, demonstrate clear issues of recognition justice, participatory fairness, and inclusion of diverse knowledges. The implications of this work shed light on understanding the complexities of landscape-based knowledge politics and how they might inform siting practices and technological decision-making more broadly.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T07:53:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221117947
       
  • Obliqueness as a feminist mode of analysing waterscapes: Learning to think
           with overflows

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      Authors: Irene Leonardelli, Jeltsje Kemerink-Seyoum, Margreet Zwarteveen
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, we propose obliqueness as a feminist mode to analyse waterscapes, intersecting feminist political ecology with post-human feminist scholarship. Obliqueness means cultivating attentiveness to those things and events that at first sight appear inconsequential because they do not fit with official plans or predominant (power) structures. Through a methodological focus on the continuous making-of such structures – on acts of tinkering with institutions, ideas and technologies – obliqueness notices not just how structures are reproduced, but also helps draw attention to inconsistencies, divergences and transgressions – what we call overflows. Hence, our oblique analysis of a waterscape of a village in Maharashtra, India revealed overflows to two kinds of structuring: one stemming from the infrastructural lay-out of an irrigation system, and one stemming from intersecting hierarchical relations of caste and gender. These overflows point to possibilities for being and relating beyond those that can be contained in already identified social or planned material structures. In this way, an oblique analysis expands the theoretical and political space to co-enact more equitable human-water relations in Maharashtra, and elsewhere.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T06:56:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221117725
       
  • Is ecology anti-urban' Urban ideas and imaginaries across one hundred
           years of ecological publications

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      Authors: Silvia Flaminio, Joëlle Salomon Cavin, Marco Moretti
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper investigates urban imaginaries conveyed in publications in ecology over the past century. We examine some urban ecologists’ view that urban areas have been disregarded by ecology due to negative views on cities and urbanisation. Inspired by previous work on imaginaries in social and cultural geography and political ecology, and by textual data analysis methods, we adopted a methodological framework that applies both quantitative and qualitative methods in the analysis of a corpus of 960 articles (published 1922–2018) drawn from 10 long-standing international journals in ecology. Our hypothesis is that ecology has embraced an anti-urban imaginary that is manifested in urban invisibility as well as the recurrent expression of negative ideas about cities (constituting an ‘anti-urban bias’). Our results partially confirm this hypothesis. We show that until the 1970s only a few papers were published on cities. We identify nine main themes relating to cities around which ideas about cities have been constructed (threats, pests, refuges, fragmentation, gradients, pollution, homogenisation, planetary urbanisation, and planning) and show how these ideas have been mobilised in the articles since the 1920s. We discuss the way in which these evolving ideas reflect a move from an essentially anti-urban imaginary to a more complex and ambivalent one. This shift coincides with the rise of the idea of planetary urbanisation in ecological publications, increasing recommendations regarding urban planning, and more generally, growing conceptual debates on the ecological impact of cities.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T04:15:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221115949
       
  • What limits Muslim communities’ access to nature' Barriers and
           opportunities in the United Kingdom

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      Authors: Rachael C Edwards, Brendon MH Larson, Daniel Burdsey
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Recreation in protected areas can greatly contribute to health and wellbeing, but there exist significant demographic disparities in protected area use across Europe and North America. Minority ethnic groups, in particular, are often underrepresented in protected areas due to a variety of cultural, economic, and discriminatory barriers. Muslims are one of the fastest growing minority ethnic communities in Western countries but have received little study in the context of protected areas. More research is therefore needed to understand protected area exclusion as experienced by Muslim communities. Through 14 in-depth interviews with Muslim community leaders in the United Kingdom, we explored the socio-cultural barriers and opportunities that contribute to the accessibility of protected areas for Muslims. As the majority of our participants were women, this study addresses the underrepresentation of diverse female voices in research on Muslims and leisure and foregrounds Muslim women as agents in their recreational lives. We found that a wide variety of factors can inhibit access, cumulatively resulting in several layers of exclusion. Primary barriers included a lack of inclusive imagery, insufficient facilities for social gathering, prior instances of discrimination, the perceived whiteness of protected areas, and unfamiliarity with these spaces. Several barriers related to the wilderness ideology that is embedded across many aspects of protected area marketing, design, and management as it does not embrace collectivist aspects of Muslim cultures. The level of “naturalness” associated with protected areas, however, did not emerge as a barrier. We also identified many opportunities, including the stewardship role of humans depicted within Islam. Lastly, we discuss the management implications for protected areas that emerge from our results. This research demonstrates that to foster a sense of belonging for Muslim communities, protected area managers must consider many socio-cultural dimensions of accessibility, holistically engage with Muslim communities, and embrace diverse worldviews relating to the human–nature relationship.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-08-01T07:40:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221116737
       
  • Towards a feminist political ecology of health: Mystery kidney disease and
           the co-production of social, environmental, and bodily difference

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      Authors: Nari Senanayake
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues for a more rigorous engagement with intersectionality within political ecologies of health. Building on the work of feminist scholars who explore the co-production of social and ecological differences, I examine how health improvement schemes that target practices of natural resource use concentrate value (economic and ecological) and health dividends in particular bodies at the expense of others. As part of this intervention, I draw on long-term and ongoing ethnographic research in north-central Sri Lanka. This region is an endemic zone for a mysterious and deadly form of kidney disease (CKDu) as well as the site of frenzied health improvement intervention. Specifically, and in response to scientific studies that link kidney disease to agrochemical use and drinking water, an increasingly diverse range of actors, from different branches of the state apparatus to private industries and civil society organizations, have invested heavily in reconfiguring the region’s water supply infrastructure and agrarian landscapes. Through an analysis of resident testimonies, I demonstrate that the burden of subsidizing these new “healthful” practices of water provision and agricultural production is unevenly experienced, as are residents’ abilities to adopt and maintain them over time and space. More crucially, I illustrate how schemes designed to heal turn on the production of differentiated harms, including new gendered labor burdens for poor women, and intensified agrochemical use for ecologically and economically resource-poor farmers. Developing these narratives toward a feminist political ecology of health, I demonstrate how social, ecological, and bodily differences intersect to constitute new patterns of health and harm in the dry zone. I conclude by reflecting on how this approach can explain the paradoxical effects of well-intentioned disease mitigation strategies.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-07-27T06:22:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221113963
       
  • Mobilizing ‘impermaculture’: Temporary urban agriculture and
           the sustainability fix

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      Authors: Eugene McCann, Nathan McClintock, Christiana Miewald
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper addresses the alliance between some urban agriculturalists, developers, and the local state in promoting a certain type of ‘green urbanism’ through what we call ‘impermaculture’. Impermaculture is a model of urban agriculture whereby some urban farmers approach their impermanence – the possibility of their operations being replaced by higher value developments – less as a threat to be avoided, as traditionally understood in the literature, and more as an intended modus operandi to which they are committed. We discuss how they use lightweight and portable growing containers, planter beds, greenhouses, and livestock pens to operate within and enhance contemporary regimes of development in global North cities. We identify a spatio-temporal impermanence that stands in contrast to classic understandings of sustainability fixes as either a form of greenwashing or as spatial fixes involving the sinking of capital into construction of a ‘greener’ built environment. In what follows, we develop a conceptual framework that will facilitate these contributions and provide a language for discussing cases of impermaculture in Portland, Oregon and Vancouver, British Columbia. We discuss how urban agriculture is mobilized as part of the sustainability fix in the two cities. We first demonstrate how impermaculture emerges as a means of stabilizing the fix which is always prone to coming apart, or fracturing. We then draw on two examples – goat husbandry in Portland and temporary gardens in Vancouver – to demonstrate how urban agriculturalists are embracing and leveraging impermanence. This ‘impermaculture by design’ not only marks a new form of urban agriculture in the neoliberal city but shores up and temporally rescales the sustainability fix while providing urban agriculture initiatives stability.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-07-26T06:34:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221115950
       
  • Inflammatory agriculture: Political ecologies of health and fertilizers in
           India

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      Authors: Carly E Nichols
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Across India, many farmers contend that synthetic nitrogenous fertilizers do more than impact soils, but also lead to tasteless food crops and weakened bodies more susceptible to aches, pains, and diseases. Although these complaints, long-documented across South Asia, have been theorized as embodied critiques of development or as reflecting hybrid epistemologies, there has been strikingly little focus on the potential biophysical currents that may underpin these perceptions of fertilizer harm. This paper works to fill this gap, analyzing qualitative data collected from farmers in two remote eastern Indian districts using an “integrated” political ecology of health (PEH) framework that utilizes two main approaches to examine bodily materiality and health. In particular, the framework looks at the multi-scalar political economies, cultural forms of meaning-making, as well as the visceral, affective ways that respondents come to see synthetic fertilizers as the cause of barren lands, tasteless foods, and weakened bodies. The article then deploys a critical reading of bioscientific literature to interpret respondent narratives and zoom in onto potential bio-social mechanisms that may help illuminate claims of fertilizer harm in new ways. In particular, I present evidence around how phytochemicals—literally chemicals produced by plants—may shift due to chemical fertilizer use in ways that may matter for hunger and health. Yet, not losing sight of the affective ways crops are grown, consumed, and discussed, I also highlight research examining how beliefs and perceptions measurably modify physiological responses to food in positive or adverse ways through the still ill-understood placebo/nocebo effect. The goal of such analysis is not to present a tidy conclusion to questions of fertilizer–health connections but demonstrate how a PEH that remains attentive to power, discourse, and materiality can bring disparate streams of thought together to forge pathways for transdisciplinary research and practice.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T11:38:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221113557
       
  • Lively water infrastructure: Constructed wetlands in more-than-human
           waterscapes

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      Authors: Elliot Hurst, Rowan Ellis, Anu Babu Karippal
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Water infrastructures are often living infrastructures, whose operation relies on processes involving other-than-human living beings. This article considers the materiality of waterscapes by attending to this liveliness. We argue that critical water research can benefit from situating social relations and water transformations within more-than-human worlds. Our conceptual framework brings hydrosocial scholarship into conversation with more-than-human geography. This opens avenues for interdisciplinary water research that weaves together ecology and qualitative social research. The analytical potential of such a framework is explored through an empirical account grounded in two constructed wetland projects in rural India. These infrastructural assemblages engage humans, other living beings and objects in webs of material-semiotic processes. We present three stories of intra-action that focus on particular plants, microbes and animals within these waterscapes. Our analysis highlights the crucial importance of other-than-human living beings in the production of waterscape knowledge and suggests a need to go beyond the problematisation of ‘uneven’ waterscapes. Approaching waterscapes as more-than-human collectives prompts us to consider the power relations that underpin waterscape knowledge and the politics of multispecies justice. A focus on more-than-human infrastructures opens up the possibility of interdisciplinary water research that is better attuned to the hybrid nature of social and ecological processes, as well as the politics embedded therein.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T03:14:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221113712
       
  • Multispecies storytelling in botanical worlds: The creative agencies of
           plants in contested ecologies

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      Authors: Cheryl McEwan
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper argues for engaging in multispecies storytelling with plants to better conceptualise the ethics and contested ecologies associated with biodiversity loss. It focuses specifically on proteas, the iconic species of South Africa's threatened fynbos biome, to explore the possibilities of an ethical dialogue between human and more-than-human diversities, and to consider what might be gained from understanding plants as both agentic in contested ecologies and as storytelling figures worthy of attention. The paper draws on John Ryan’s conceptualization of phytography as a way of engaging in multispecies storytelling with plants. It teases out interwoven botanic and human histories, and the ways in which iconic proteas have written themselves into the narratives of their human interlocutors in the context of European settler colonialism, conservation, floral nativism and post-apartheid nation-building. The case for phytography is developed through an examination of the corporeal rhetoric of proteas in two examples. The first concerns the Mace Pagoda, a protea that resists narratives of extinction by writing back its percipience, agency, and resilience into human stories of anthropogenic habitat loss. The second focuses on botanical traces that result from absence, specifically the non-appearance in recent years of proteas in the Cederberg area of the Western Cape. The paper suggests that absence is a form of corporeal rhetoric through which plants write themselves into narratives of rapid climate change and multispecies loss. The final section of the paper explores questions of ethics that emerge from engaging with plants as storytellers, reflects on the kinds of human-plant relationships that are possible in the context of environmental catastrophe, and examines the possibilities that phytography provides for more-than-human engagements with plant life.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T03:55:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221110755
       
  • Emotional subjectivities and the trajectory of a Peruvian mining conflict

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      Authors: Ursula Balderson
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The trajectory of socio-environmental conflicts remains difficult to predict. In the case study explored in this article, attention to the emergence of emotional subjectivities helps us better understand the timing of the conflict and the style of contestation at the site. The data are drawn from interviews and observations of the ‘dialogue table’ meetings that took place between representatives from the BarrickGold run Pierina mine in Ancash, a highland area in Peru, and the nearby village of Mataquita to try and resolve a conflict over access to water. The paper identifies three ways that the emotional climate at the site influenced the conflict trajectory. Firstly, it was heightened fear for future water availability and increased feelings of hope that the mining company could be held to account for the hydrosphere disruption that triggered the conflict. Secondly, the Mataquitans tried to elicit feelings of compassion in mining company representatives whilst the company acted to repress them, fearing that they could endanger profit-making at the site. Finally, the inconsistent behaviour of the mining company and their ad hoc Corporate Social Responsibility allocations produced a moral-emotional critique of mine behaviour and a climate of distrust within and between villages. The emotions produced by interactions between actors reduced the likelihood of a more coordinated response to the problems at the site, conveniently serving the agenda of the mine.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T06:26:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221113308
       
  • Making global oceans governance in/visible with Smart Earth: The case of
           Global Fishing Watch

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      Authors: Lauren Drakopulos, Jennifer J. Silver, Eric Nost, Noella Gray, Roberta Hawkins
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The number and variety of technologies used for environmental surveillance is expanding rapidly, making constant data collection and near ‘real time’ analyses possible. ‘Smart Earth’ describes networked infrastructures comprised of devices and equipment and signals to the human dimensions inherent to developing, deploying and putting technology and large datasets to use. In this paper, we situate Smart Earth in terms of technological products and human practices and consider the relationship between Smart Earth and global environmental governance. Specifically, we review emerging literature and present a case study of an organization founded by environmental non-profit, SkyTruth, tech industry behemoth, Google and marine conservation NGO, Oceana. Called ‘Global Fishing Watch’ (GFW), this organization builds geospatial datasets, hosts an online mapping platform where anyone with internet access can surveil various types of ocean-going vessels and shares data and map products with scientists and practitioners. Two critical points emerge through the case. First, we show that GFW expands its surveillance capacity by pursuing ‘data sharing’ partnerships with sovereign states, many in the Global South. Second, the maps and datasets produced by GFW link vessels to a ‘flag state’ while the firms, subsidiaries and financiers that may own and/or operate these vessels remain obscure – and hence so too does the political economy of oceans fisheries. GFW maps and datasets offer new approaches to tracking fishing and are advancing fisheries science. At the same time, they rely on and are only legible through hegemonic geopolitical and political–economic orders deeply implicated in industrial (over)fishing. The norms and domains of global environmental governance are expanding, but Smart Earth ‘solutions’ risk leaving the structural drivers of environmental change unaddressed.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T08:08:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221111786
       
  • Multi-species, ecological and climate change temporalities: Opening a
           dialogue with phenology

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      Authors: Michelle Bastian, Rowan Bayliss Hawitt
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Many scholars have argued that climate change is, in part, a problem of time, with ecological, political and social systems thought to be out of sync or mistimed. Discussions of time and environment are often interdisciplinary, necessitating a wide-ranging use of methods and approaches. However, to date there has been practically no direct engagement with the scientific field of phenology, the study of life-cycle timing across species, including plants, animals and insects. In this article, we outline how phenology can offer novel inroads to thinking through temporal relations across species and environments. We suggest that greater engagement with this field will enable scholars working across the humanities and social sciences to incorporate detailed studies of environmental timings which shed light on individual species, as well as wide-ranging species interactions. Following an overview of phenological research from both western scientific and indigenous knowledge perspectives, we report on a scoping exercise looking at where phenology has appeared in environmental humanities literature to date. We then offer an illustration that puts phenological perspectives into conversation with plant studies in order to indicate some of the useful affordances phenological perspectives offer, namely those of comprehending time as co-constructed across species and as flexible and responsive to environmental changes. We conclude by offering a number of further potential connections and suggestions for future research, including calling for more exploration of how environmental humanities approaches might produce critical contributions to phenology in their turn.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T11:28:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221111784
       
  • Against settler sustainability: California’s groundwater as a
           vertical frontier

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      Authors: Vivian Underhill, Sheeva Sabati, Linnea Beckett
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      California has been heralded as a beacon of agricultural production and productivity, yet its groundwater crisis is a warning of its impending collapse. In this paper, we argue that policies like California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act reinscribe the settler state, even as they aim toward environmental sustainability. Drawing from Indigenous feminist scholarship on water and frontier processes, our methodology traces settler colonialism materially and discursively through the movement of water. First, we analyze hydraulic engineering discourses at the turn of the 20th century to illustrate how racial logics were key to producing irrigation—and the broader project of white settlement—as ostensibly benevolent processes of improvement. We then highlight how turn-of-the-century legislation was central to producing agriculture as a site of accumulation by dispossession through the production of settler forms of property and relations with land and water. Finally, we consider groundwater overdraft as a vertical frontier. Thinking with water as an analytic, we study the nexus of relationships that inscribe settler water infrastructures as normative, demonstrating their role as frontier processes within a settler colonial present. Our analysis shows the necessity of dismantling settler modes of sustainability and centering and supporting Indigenous sovereignty.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T06:13:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221110434
       
  • The greening of human rights in Iran: Lake Orumiyeh, human rights, and
           environmental justice

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      Authors: A. Marie Ranjbar
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In the mid-2000s, a social movement emerged in northwestern Iran to demand increased environmental protections for Lake Orumiyeh. Once among the largest saltwater lakes in the world, Lake Orumiyeh has undergone rapid desiccation, losing nearly 90 per cent of its surface area over the past two decades. Conceptually, the aim of this article is to examine how protesters in Orumiyeh used environmental justice, both as a concept and political strategy, to make human rights claims against the Iranian state. I posit that environmental justice functions as a coded language in this political context, where it is challenging to speak openly about human rights. Drawing from environmental justice and critical human rights literature in geography, combined with an empirical and visual analysis of protests to save Lake Orumiyeh, I analyze how protesters strategically ‘greened’ the language of human rights to protect themselves from state violence. I compare two protests organized in 2010 and 2011 to demonstrate how the site of the lake was used to signify broader grievances against the state. Through a comparison of the affective tone and state response to the protests, I explicate both the importance and the limits of ‘greening’ human rights as a protest strategy. Taken together, these case studies illustrate how limiting activism to binary frameworks of the environmental or political renders invisible the multidimensional claims of protesters. My study demonstrates the importance of widening our analytical gaze to incorporate protests that register rights claims outside of the normative framework of human rights, thereby accounting for political contexts where alternative rights narratives are both strategic and necessary.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T05:41:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221108176
       
  • Connecting across difference in environmental governance: Beyond rights,
           recognition, and participation

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      Authors: Rachel N Arney, Maya B Henderson, Haley R DeLoach, Gabrielle Lichtenstein, Laura A German
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the significance of current paradigms for connecting across difference in environmental governance, with a focus on dominant practices and the erasures that occur in the process. It focuses on three core concepts and corresponding practices: rights (adhering to both persons and property, procedural, and substantive); recognition (of harms done, of those harmed, or of those deserving of special recognition); and participation (in which information, decision authority, and/or benefits are shared with affected populations). The paper begins with a literature review on the history and purported benefits of each of these concepts, the environmental arenas where they occur, and the critiques that are leveraged against them. To envision what it might look like to connect across difference differently, we situate these critiques in the literature on coloniality and use this to develop a conceptual framework for evaluating efforts to connect across difference in environmental governance. We then illustrate the application of this framework in the environmental arenas of biodiversity conservation and extractivism to crystalize through lived experiences what it means to operate inside of these paradigms and to move beyond them. The paper highlights how current paradigms for connecting across difference are deeply situated in (settler) colonial logics of hierarchies of value, state sovereignty, and Indigenous erasure. We conclude with a vision of how environmental governance can move beyond its current colonial hegemony by centering decolonial and abolition ecologies scholarship that decenters settler ontologies in favor of more radical alternatives for relating with the so-called “natural” world.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T06:18:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221108892
       
  • The new green apartheid' Race, capital and logics of enclosure in
           South Africa’s wildlife economy

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      Authors: Stasja Koot, Bram Büscher, Lerato Thakholi
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, we explore relations between race, capital and wildlife conservation in the town of Hoedspruit and its surroundings, which has developed into one of the main centres of the lucrative and rapidly growing ‘wildlife economy’ in South Africa. Behind its image as a shining ‘green’ example of wildlife-based development is a highly unequal and racialised state of affairs that is deeply unsustainable. At the core of these dynamics are private wildlife reserves, high-end nature-based tourism and gated ‘wildlife estates’, which have further consolidated land into private, mostly white, ownership. In addition to contestations about the building of a shopping mall and land claims, Hoedspruit’s wildlife economy is dependent upon black labourers who commute daily from former homeland areas. Municipal efforts to mediate this situation by building affordable housing, have been thwarted by several wealthy inhabitants and property developers. We build on Mbembe’s ‘logic of enclosure’ to argue that the wildlife economy and its ‘green’ image perpetuate and reinvent older forms of colonial and apartheid geographies of segregation, in effect creating a form of ‘new green apartheid’. While physical-geographical enclosures are at the centre of the wildlife economy, we show that they are reinforced by class and racial enclosures and ideological enclosures, the latter consisting of both the belief in the market as a natural solution for social and environmental causes and apartheid as an historical era that has now ended. We conclude that Hoedspruit serves as an important example of the regressive and unsustainable forms of development that the wildlife economy in South Africa can create.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T05:17:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221110438
       
  • Bankrolling biodiversity: The politics of philanthropic conservation
           finance in Chile

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      Authors: Clare M. Beer
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The role of philanthropic capital in biodiversity conservation is rapidly changing. Philanthropists increasingly seek to bankroll solutions to the biodiversity crisis, scaling up the size of their ambitions and gifts to help close what scientists and policymakers call the “biodiversity financing gap.” This paper interrogates the rising prominence of philanthropic capital in conservation governance, focusing on a class of actors I call “philanthro-environmentalists.” Unlike big, international NGOs and philanthrocapitalists, philanthro-environmentalists do not engage market-based, for-profit approaches to finance conservation. Rather, they engage a “dollars for policy” approach that leverages the power of their philanthropy to improve public conservation outcomes. Taking Chile as a case, I trace how a transnational network of philanthro-environmentalists is using a novel mechanism known as Project Finance for Permanence to exact substantial political and fiscal commitments from the state in exchange for substantive philanthropic support for a mega conservation initiative in Chilean Patagonia. I argue that Project Finance for Permanence targets policymaking as the primary site of philanthropic intervention, affording philanthro-environmentalists greater control over state conservation governance. Yet, I also argue that this case raises serious questions about the limits and implications of leveraging philanthropic capital to solve public environmental problems. Bridging literatures on conservation governance and conservation finance, the paper contributes new conceptual insights into the evolving dynamics of philanthropy-state relations in an age of biodiversity crisis.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T05:06:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221108171
       
  • Resonant relations: eco-lalia, political ec(h)ology and autistic ways of
           worlding

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      Authors: Audra Mitchell
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Echolalia – the repetition of words and phrases gleaned from one's environment – is often treated as a key behavioural marker of autism. Along with other perceived ‘stereotypies’, it is dismissed by Western biomedical and political discourses as disruptive, ‘meaningless repetition’ and targeted for individual and collective elimination in the context of a global ‘war on autism’. However, as this article shows, echoing is also a crucial element of Autistic ways of worlding. That is, it can be integral to forming and maintaining co-constitutive relations and ethical intimacy with other beings through distinctively resonant political-ec(h)ological relations. At the same time, echoing is a political act that can disrupt interwoven neurotypical (NT), colonial, racial and capitalist rhythms of sociality, communication and space. This insight challenges negative stereotypes about the perceived ‘lack’ or ‘impairment’ of Autistic people in the areas of relationality, intentionality and meaning-making. At the same time, it opens up a wider discussion of how Autistic ways of worlding can contribute to the creation of alternative eco-political futures. To flesh out these arguments, I draw on auto-ethnographic research based on my experience as an Autistic and Dyspraxic global political ecologist. In particular, I share elements of my experimental practice of ‘eco-lalia' – a reclamation of echoing as a form of echo-political praxis, expressed here in the form of poetry. In so doing, I argue that ec(h)olalia and other Autistic ways of worlding can contribute to nurturing robust more-than-human relations, confronting violence and creating solidarities across communities marginalized by dominant global norms of ‘humanity’.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T06:49:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221108177
       
  • Corrosive flows, faulty materialities: Building the brine collector in the
           Llobregat River Basin, Catalonia

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      Authors: Santiago Gorostiza, Hug March, Marta Conde, David Sauri
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The history of hydraulic infrastructures is plagued with failures often with catastrophic consequences. Although the agency of water in disasters has been widely documented less well known are the substances in water such as salt that may cause infrastructural collapse and harm humans, flora and fauna. In the Llobregat River Basin (Barcelona), a 120-km long pipe transports salt-saturated wastewaters produced in the potash mines of central Catalonia to the Mediterranean Sea. Conceived as a technological fix to reduce river water salinization, the brine collector started operating in 1989 and succeeded to cut by half the concentration of salts in river waters. However, as the extraction of potash salts increased the brine collector soon reached its full capacity and became prone to leaks and ruptures that poured salt-saturated flows into the rivers and adjacent lands. Moreover, the reduction in salinity achieved was not enough to prevent the need of salt-removing technology for the drinking water plants supplying Barcelona. The brine collector understood as a sociotechnical system assembling material, discursive, organizational, and institutional components proved the fragility of rules and regulations addressed to manage salt pollution in the basin. More fundamentally, the assemblage constituted by the collector showed how the interplay between private (the mining company) and public (the regional water agency) organizations has resulted in the successful shifting of impacts created by salt from the private to the public sphere in economic, health, and environmental terms.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T05:52:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221105875
       
  • Restoration as world-making and repair: A pragmatist agenda

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      Authors: Mark Usher
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The UN’s Decade of Ecosystem Restoration commenced in June 2021, with the expectation that ecological restoration will be vastly scaled-up internationally. Millions of hectares of the earth’s surface is projected to be restored, from forests and peatland to rivers, reefs and grasslands. This will transform restoration from a predominantly localized, community-driven field to a highly capitalized, professional activity. As the renowned biologist E. O. Wilson proposed, the twenty-first century certainly does look likely to be characterized by restoration. And yet, thus far, the still emerging field of ecological restoration has been dominated by the natural sciences, in both theory and practice, neglecting broader questions of how to live in and with restored landscapes. This paper contends that if restoration is to be significantly expanded over the next decade, the social sciences and humanities must be involved to ensure its purpose is given adequate scrutiny, by engaging wider publics of interest in scheme planning, design and implementation. This is crucial given the dominance of natural capital accounting in restoration, which privileges economic reasoning over alternative, more radical forms. Pragmatism, which has a substantive philosophical interest in the relationship between humans and their environment, can offer a distinctive orientation to inquiry conducive to collaboration between the natural and social disciplines. Focusing on waterway restoration in the United Kingdom, and drawing on social and natural science literature, this paper outlines a pragmatist research agenda that recognizes multiplicity in nature, advocates experimentation in human-environment relations, and foregrounds community in democratic renewal. The paper considers not only ways that pragmatism can inform restoration but how restoration can advance a pragmatist agenda for invigorating public life. This encourages scholars to think with not only against restoration, attending to composition as well as critique, as part of a political urban ecology.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T06:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221107221
       
  • Living with cows, sheep and endemic disease in the North of England:
           Embodied care, biosocial collectivities and killability

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      Authors: Lewis Holloway, Niamh Mahon, Beth Clark, Amy Proctor
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper engages with debates surrounding practices of care in complex situations where human and non-human lives are entangled. Focusing on the embodied practices of care involving farmers, their advisers and cows and sheep in the North of England, the paper explores how biosocial collectivities fabricate care around endemic health conditions in specific farming situations. Based on in-depth research with farmers and advisers, the paper examines how Bovine Viral Diarrhoea (BVD) and lameness are made ‘visible’ and become cared about, what practices are mobilised in response to an evident need to care, and how some animals are, paradoxically, made ‘killable’ in the practising of care for populations of cows and sheep. The paper discusses how the perspectives of farmers and advisers are aligned in developing practices of care for animals, although there are some tensions and differences between these groups. Advisers focus on making endemic diseases important to farmers, so that they become enrolled into taking prescribed action. However, the sets of competing priorities farmers have to address, in complex on-farm situations, along with some resistance to taking prescribed action, produces other perspectives on and practices of care. The paper concludes by emphasising the problematics of practising care in farming, showing how care for endemic disease coexists with harm to some animals and the reproduction of modes of farming which make it more likely that endemic conditions persist.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T05:55:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221105878
       
  • “Making do”: Religious segregation and everyday water
           struggles

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      Authors: Vrushti Mawani
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      I illustrate through this paper how contemporary water (in)justice results from interactions between historical, socio-political, technical, and economic relations, and how such water (in)justice is emotionally experienced and embodied. Focusing on the case of Faizalpur, a low-income Muslim neighborhood in segregated Ahmedabad, I draw on lived experiences approaches to water justice and on an emotional political ecology framework to offer a multi-scalar analysis set across urban, community, and individual scales. I show how the settlement of low-income Muslim families in Faizalpur is inseparable from both the (il)legal status of this land and the religious segregation that have shaped this city. In turn, everyday experiences of water injustice in Faizalpur are premised in contestations relating to the site's land use zoning history. I illustrate how in this contested site carefully framed requests make municipal water infrastructure possible even though such infrastructure is technically disallowed here. The careful-ness of such requests lies in skirting issues pertaining to (il)legality, instead activating other discursive categories, such as ‘humanitarian’ need: categories that possess the moral power to outweigh legal and technical arguments. I suggest that everyday experiences of water (in)justice cannot be understood without attending to the discursive power of planning terms like ‘illegality’ and ‘land use zoning’. Emotionally experienced everyday water struggles in Faizalpur, in the form of anger, trust, fear, grief, etc., need to be understood then as emotional everyday experiences of religious segregation.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T05:20:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221086481
       
  • Water for whom' Desalination and the cooptation of the environmental
           justice frame in Southern California

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      Authors: Brian F O’Neill
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The environmental justice frame is a key feature of successful grassroots mobilization against the uneven distribution of environmental problems. However, what happens when this discursive framework is questioned, that is, when features of its established definition are made to serve, rather than contest, industry' The article examines this dynamic through an ethnography of a high-volume desalination (potable ocean water) proposal. Findings indicate community groups and non-governmental organizations make normative environmental justice arguments about the high costs of desalination, community disruption, and industrial burden. By contrast, organized labor and public sector actors align with the private sector to promote desalination, using a competing series of arguments about local independence, regional responsibility, and employment. Disentangling these discourses, the author argues that claims in favor of desalination are a part of what this paper calls a cooptation of the environmental justice frame that ultimately facilitates community division in favor of a class bias for a luxury commodity. Interpreting this socio-ecological problem through a political economic lens, this research contributes to discussions about industrial infrastructure conceived within public–private partnership frameworks, calling scholars, activists, and decision-makers to attend to how environmental (in)justice politics can take on surprising meanings amid the expansion of financial capitalism.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T04:57:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221102377
       
  • Fossil neoliberalism and its limits: Governing coal in South India

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      Authors: Mukul Kumar
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Over the last three decades of neoliberalization, India's fossil fuel infrastructures have been transformed into an archipelago of coal-fired power plants and industrial ports in coastal zones. Drawing upon the case of coal infrastructures sited on the coast of south India, this article tracks processes of what I call “fossil neoliberalism”: the ways in which neoliberal modes of governance have transformed the state into an agent of market-based fossil fuel extraction. The article calls for attention to how particular technologies of governance—from disinvestment and initial public offerings to corporatized landlord ports—have reconfigured and respatialized, rather than reduced, the role of the state in processes of fossil fuel extraction. The article also analyzes how fossil neoliberalism, as an ensemble of market-based technologies of governance, is enabled by coastal zone illegalities and limited by political mobilizations.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T07:57:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221099383
       
  • From fish to fishworker traceability in Thai fisheries reform

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      Authors: Alin Kadfak, Marie Widengård
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the question of what traceability systems mean for the labour situation of fishworkers; for whom and in what respects is traceability effective, and what impact do these systems have' The limited social criteria in fishery governance is a core reason for recurrent problems of extreme abuse of fishworkers around the world, including trafficking, forced labour and so called modern slavery. New traceability systems, thus, now include social criteria to advance sustainable fisheries globally. Drawing from a Thai fisheries reform case study, we analyse how the new labour traceability system emerges and is perceived by migrant fishworkers. We base our analysis on interviews, documents and two periods of fieldwork in Thailand. We argue that labour traceability is a double-edged sword. While fishworkers have seen major improvement in limiting extreme abuse, labour traceability has a downsides of state surveillance and costs passed onto workers. Moreover, traceability does not solve underlying problems regarding the complex formalization of migrant workers, working conditions on fishing boats, freedom to change employer or the everyday vulnerability of being a migrant worker. Thus, while labour traceability has promising policy relevance for the integration of labour rights into fisheries governance, it requires contextual underpinning in migrant circumstances.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T07:57:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221104992
       
  • Experimenting with fog: Environmental infrastructures, infrastructuring
           environments, and the infrastructure of infrastructure

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      Authors: Chakad Ojani
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In coastal Peru, conservationists and scientists attend to fog as something that may be captured and transformed into water. This article draws on ethnographic fieldwork among Limeñan conservationists who tapped into this atmospheric phenomenon as an alternative water source for use in fog oasis ecosystem reforestation. As I demonstrate, experimental engagements with fog had reconfigured conservationists’ and other experimenters’ understanding about the connections between the atmosphere, vegetation, and the underground, thereby bringing into view a hitherto imperceptible environmental infrastructure of groundwater production. The infrastructural potentials of the landscape were in turn foregrounded by the conservationists through comparisons with other geographies well-known for their capacity to produce water. Against this backdrop, the article argues for renewed attention to the infrastructural as a comparative effect resulting from simultaneous fore/backgrounding. Rather than mere grounds for second-order processes, infrastructural relations can be understood as situated between foreground and background. As environmental calamities complicate the infrastructure–environment nexus, it is no longer clear what infrastructures consist of, nor what they are capable of doing. In this context, an understanding of infrastructures as comparative effects is useful for describing and speculatively amplifying potentially more sustainable infrastructural alternatives.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T07:56:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221101458
       
  • Mainstreaming ecosystem services: The hard work of realigning biodiversity
           conservation

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      Authors: Daniel Chiu Suarez
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      For over two decades, proponents of “ecosystem services” approaches have endeavored to transform the field of biodiversity conservation. In this article, I examine the work of the Natural Capital Project to show how the “mainstreaming” of ecosystem services has required not just hard work but specific forms of work performed by specific types of actors with specific sets of capabilities working through characteristic sorts of organizational contexts. I draw on key theorizations from organization studies to interpret the politics of ecosystem services and conceptualize the conditions (fragmented fields), practices (bricolage), actors (institutional entrepreneurs), and power relations (hegemonic) which have together comprised this work and underpinned ongoing efforts to realign the organizational forms and functions of mainstream conservation. I emphasize how tracing these micro-social foundations—the embedded agencies of those using ecosystem services to contextually negotiate real-world conservation interventions—is crucial to understanding the dynamics of broader and increasingly pronounced macro-institutional shifts in conservation.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T05:12:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221105153
       
  • Fall from grace or back down to earth' Conservation and political
           conflict in Africa’s “miracle” state

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      Authors: Annette A LaRocco, Emmanuel Mogende
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Since the publication of the influential text, An African Miracle, much scholarship has focused on Botswana's supposed “exceptionality” anchored in the country's economic growth and sustained democracy. Botswana's success story has proved enduring and versatile, being deployed in numerous contexts including in relation to Botswana’s status as a conservation “safe haven” in southern Africa. Many green plaudits are associated with the tenure of former president Ian Khama (2008–2018), who broke with longstanding tradition and actively campaigned against his own vice president and successor, President Mokgweetsi Masisi. Their acrimonious relationship is multifaceted but in this article, we refer to disputes over wildlife conservation policy wherein Masisi rolled back his predecessor's signature conservation policies, focusing specifically on the reversal of the hunting ban, the disarming of some anti-poaching officers, and changes in Botswana's stance in international environmental diplomacy regarding ivory and the CITES regime. We contend that Khama's conservation decisions—underpinned by lack of consultation and green violence—made Botswana a “green miracle” to outside observers while contravening the central principles of local democratic practice such as therisanyo (consultation) cherished in the country. We argue that Masisi's reversal of Khama-era positions that were unpopular with conservation-adjacent communities represents not a “fall from grace,” but rather the bringing back down to earth of policies that had alienated the local population, thus indicating the potential to pursue inclusive governance that domestically Botswana acclaims.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T05:12:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221101553
       
  • Towards the arboreal side-effects of marronage: Black geographies and
           ecologies of the Jamaican forest

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      Authors: Alex A Moulton
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The English colonial plan of converting Jamaica into a settler colony was challenged by the Maroons who established communities in the interior of the island. Living in the forests at the edge of the expanding plantation system, Maroons were feared by aspiring white settlercolonists. The zone where the plantation and white settlements met the Maroon de-facto territory became a frontier zone, where race, belonging, and freedom were contested. The Maroons inspired Black revolt and dreams of freedom, but after signing treaties ending their war against the English in the mid-18th century, the Maroons became dreaded by non-Maroon Blacks in Jamaica. Fear of the Maroons had productive and protective effects on the physical environment; the conservation of much of Jamaica's interior was one of these effects. The paper uses colonial era admissions of this fear as openings for showing how Jamaican conservation was shaped by the Maroons as spatial actors. The paper proposes conceptualizing the afforesting outcomes of marronage as arboreal side-effects, geographical and ecological consequences that are denied in foremost accounts of colonial forest conservation. The paper illustrates the importance of considering Black spatial thought, race and the geographic imaginary (Black Geographies) alongside the connections between antiblackness, the exploitation of nature, and the imperatives of ecological justice (Black ecologies). Reading Maroon practices and histories through and as Black geographies, the paper argues for a subaltern environmental history of Jamaica that affirms Black spatial agency and epistemologies. Consequently, the paper helps clarify marronage as a material-ecological as well as social-political process that is always shaped by the morphology of power and the landscape.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-31T03:29:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221103757
       
  • Water footprints and sewage management challenges in second home tourism

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      Authors: Jan Kloster Staunstrup, Anne-Mette Hjalager, Rasmus Nedergård Steffansen, Michael Tophøj Sørensen
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      While water consumption and water conservation have been issues in the discussion of sustainable tourism for many years, the residual part of the water cycle, the management of wastewater, lacks attention in tourism and planning research. This study addresses the wastewater challenges in Danish second home tourism. More than 200,000 second homes represent an important touristic resource both for owners and for short-term renters, and increasingly, the accommodation capacity is used over the whole year. Data from the building and housing register (BBR) show that only 54% of second homes are connected to public sewage and purification utilities. The remaining second homes rely on individual solutions such as septic tanks. A substantial regional variance can be partly explained by differences in the spatial layout and location of second homes, but mainly the dissimilar priorities in the responsible municipalities are the result of systemic factors following semi-privatized governance structures. The intensified use of second homes, rising ground water levels, more frequent climate incidences and EU and national quality obligations for the environmental standards of waterways and seas are and will in the future be challenges for the municipal wastewater management. A mobilization of second home owners and users to support updated wastewater infrastructures is hampered by the principles laid down in the governance structures.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:35:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221101554
       
  • Where land meets sea: Islands, erosion and the thing-power of hard coastal
           protection structures

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      Authors: Alex Arnall
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In the last few decades, hard coastal protection structures, such as seawalls and groynes, have become increasingly commonplace around the world. Conventionally, the effects of such structures have been considered within a modernist framework that evaluates the degree of human control over the land–sea interface. However, this dominant viewpoint overlooks the central role that sea defences play in the ongoing production of coastal communities, particularly in small island states. This paper responds to these issues by revealing how coastal protection structures, as contingently performed material configurations, are devised and come into being and the social relations that these structures create and influence. Drawing on empirical research undertaken on a small island in the Maldives over a period of 6 years, the paper demonstrates not only the challenges that coastal communities face in attempting to exert control over the unruly sea but also the thing-power of the protection measures themselves that are made and unmade as part of this process. These findings suggest the need for sensitivity towards the social roles and effects of hard coastal protection structures when devising approaches and policies that might see the decommissioning of such structures in favour of softer, ‘nature-based’ responses to the vitality of the non-human world. As structures with their own unique material complexities, hard defence measures are deeply involved in the production of multinatural island futures.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:32:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221101461
       
  • From “trust” to “trustworthiness”: Retheorizing dynamics of trust,
           distrust, and water security in North America

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      Authors: Nicole J Wilson, Teresa Montoya, Yanna Lambrinidou, Leila M Harris, Benjamin J Pauli, Deborah McGregor, Robert J Patrick, Silvia Gonzalez, Gregory Pierce, Amber Wutich
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Assumptions of trust in water systems are widespread in higher-income countries, often linked to expectations of “modern water.” The current literature on water and trust also tends to reinforce a technoscientific approach, emphasizing the importance of aligning water user perceptions with expert assessments. Although such approaches can be useful to document instances of distrust, they often fail to explain why patterns differ over time, and across contexts and populations. Addressing these shortcomings, we offer a relational approach focused on the trustworthiness of hydro-social systems to contextualize water-trust dynamics in relation to broader practices and contexts. In doing so, we investigate three high-profile water crises in North America where examples of distrust are prevalent: Flint, Michigan; Kashechewan First Nation; and the Navajo Nation. Through our theoretical and empirical examination, we offer insights on these dynamics and find that distrust may at times be a warranted and understandable response to experiences of water insecurity and injustice. We examine the interconnected experiences of marginality and inequity, ontological and epistemological injustice, unequal governance and politics, and histories of water insecurity and harm as potential contributors to untrustworthiness in hydro-social systems. We close with recommendations for future directions to better understand water-trust dynamics and address water insecurity.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T08:17:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221101459
       
  • Dirty work in the clean city: An embodied Urban Political Ecology of women
           informal recyclers’ work in the ‘clean city’

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      Authors: Josie Wittmer
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper investigates the ways that ‘cleaning up’ Indian cities impacts those who rely on accessing waste on city streets for their livelihoods. I focus on low-income Dalit women recyclers in Ahmedabad, India as they navigate material and discursive shifts in urban waste management emanating from the national Swachh Bharat Abhiyan and 2016 Solid Waste Management Rules, and the municipal privatization and mechanization of solid waste management practice. The study is informed by 10 months of ethnographic research and a series of interviews and group discussions with women recyclers between 2016 and 2018. Using a feminist embodied Urban Political Ecology approach, I suggest the imagining and production of the ‘clean and green’ world-class city is affecting Dalit women recyclers’ work in two ways. First, I argue that emerging cleanliness governance mechanisms and solid waste management practices are re-spatializing and masculinizing waste labour in the city. I show how spatial, discursive and temporal shifts in solid waste management are producing new challenges for Dalit women recyclers in accessing waste, intensifying their physical and financial burdens and requiring more precarious adaptations to generate daily incomes. Second, I explore women recyclers’ own clean city aspirations, expressing a desire to experience the ‘clean and green’ city and a simultaneous sense of betrayal as their livelihoods, communities and bodies are excluded from its imagining and material production. I suggest that an embodied intersectional analysis of waste labour reveals how the imagining and production of clean and sustainable ‘modern’ cities can cause damage to socially marginalized and gendered bodies as they are displaced from work and denied the substantive experience of urban citizenship in the ‘world-class’ city. Attention to embodiment thus deepens an understanding of the complexities and contradictions invoked in urban environmental governance and infrastructural transformations, informing the imagining and production of more equitable and reparative urban futures.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T04:29:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221102374
       
  • Water with larvae: Hydrological fertility, inequality, and mosquito
           urbanism

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      Authors: Tatiana Acevedo-Guerrero
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Aedes aegypti, the primary vector for dengue, chikungunya and zika, breeds mainly in stored/stagnant water and thrives in contexts of rapid urbanization in tropical countries. Some have warned that climate change, in conjunction with urbanization, could drive the proliferation of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. In Colombia dengue has been endemic since the 1990s and the country had the highest number of cases of zika virus in the world after Brazil. Studies have found that domestic stored water contributes to high percentages of the total Ae. aegypti pupal population in Colombian urban sectors. In particular, neighborhoods where water service provision is intermittent are vulnerable to mosquito-borne diseases as water is stored inside households. This article draws on archival work, interviews, and entomological literature to reflect on the ways in which rapid urbanization in the context of armed conflict, infrastructural inequality, the absence of formal jobs, and specific water laws and regulations produce water and Aedes aegypti in the city. It offers an initial attempt to theorize water with larvae by focusing on two interrelated processes. First, the historical and geographic processes that underlie the production of stored water, which despite being treated can become a place of fertility where mosquitoes can flourish. Secondly, the processes by which water, mosquitoes, pathogens, and human bodies become interrelated. This entails thinking about some homes in Barranquilla as socioecological assemblages that are dynamically produced, socially and materially.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T04:29:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221099801
       
  • Contested estuary ontologies: The conflict over the fairway adaptation of
           the Elbe River, Germany

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      Authors: Jonas Hein, Jannes Thomsen
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The ongoing fairway adaptation of the Elbe Estuary is one of the most contested infrastructure projects in Germany in recent years. After a 17-year, highly contested planning process, delayed by a number of court proceedings, the dredging works started in 2019. The dredging aimed to establish a depth of at least 17.40 m below mean sea level, permitting the port to handle larger container vessels independent of the tide. Environmental NGOs, fishers and the riverine municipalities claim that the dredging will lead to habitat destruction, terminate the fishery in the estuary, and that it violates the European Water Framework Directive. The conflict illustrates that knowledge production, political economy and power are closely intertwined and provides evidence that some planning conflicts go even deeper than this. They are ultimately rooted in different ‘estuary ontologies’, in the different ways in which nature is enacted, and in different imaginations of possible futures for the Elbe estuary and its riverine population. Based on qualitative interviews with the actors who are involved in, observe or fight against the intervention, and on a content analysis of press articles and webpages, we unravel the complex relations between political economy, knowledge production and the different performances of reality which characterize the ongoing conflict over the fairway adaptation. We relate competing narratives, knowledge claims and ontologies to the actors promoting and challenging the fairway adaptation. Finally, we identify multiple estuary realities, which are enacted by specific practices performed by fishers, port authorities and environmental NGOs.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T04:28:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221098825
       
  • Greenwashing in Palestine/Israel: Settler colonialism and environmental
           injustice in the age of climate catastrophe

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      Authors: Sara Salazar Hughes, Stepha Velednitsky, Amelia Arden Green
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Israeli innovations in “green” technology are ostensibly aimed at sustainable resource management and climate change mitigation. But sustainable development and environmental (in)justice in Palestine/Israel need to be examined through interdisciplinary perspectives that account for the broader settler colonial and neoliberal contexts in which they occur. Taking into account the historical and geographic context of Israel's scientific development, we argue that Israel's green technologies are fundamentally structured by the Zionist project of appropriating Palestinian lands. Within settler colonial analysis, environmental injustice comprises part of a broader pattern of settler domination of Indigenous ecological relations, requiring attending not to ‘equity’ in relations with the state and environment but a reckoning with settler privilege and the return of land to Indigenous communities. We analyze the use of environmental infrastructures—specifically in the areas of waste management, renewable energy, and agricultural technologies (“agritech”)—as mechanisms for land appropriation and dispossession in Palestine/Israel. Our analysis of ‘greenwashing’ as a rhetorical strategy asserts that regardless of the ecological impact of individual technologies, in Israel's settler colonial context they further indigenous dispossession and elimination and are therefore incommensurable with long-term socio-ecological resilience. Through this analysis of Israeli greenwashing, we discuss Israeli sustainability initiatives and technological innovations not as ahistorical discourses, commodities, or technologies, but as elements of a historically situated settler colonial project.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T05:03:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486211069898
       
  • Disasters and indigenous peoples: A critical discourse analysis of the
           expert news media

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      Authors: A Mosurska, A Clark-Ginsberg, S Sallu, JD Ford
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Attempts to shift the ways disasters have traditionally been managed away from authoritarian, top-down approaches toward more bottom-up and inclusive processes often involve incorporating viewpoints from marginalised and vulnerable groups. Recently as part of this process, there have been calls for greater inclusion of Indigenous peoples in disaster management. In theory, this also suggests a shift in power structures, towards recognising Indigenous peoples as experts in disaster management. However, in popular imagination and policy Indigenous peoples often appear to be caricatured and misrepresented, for instance through tropes of Indigenous peoples as custodians of the environment or especially vulnerable to environmental change. These framings matter because they can result in disaster management policies and practices that do not capture Indigenous peoples’ complex realities. However, these framings have not been analysed in the context of disasters. In this article, we aim to better understand these framings through a critical discourse analysis of how Indigenous peoples in disasters are represented in the expert news media. We identify five discourses, including a dominant one of disasters as natural phenomena to be addressed through humanitarianism and technocratic interventions. Such discourses render Indigenous peoples helpless, depoliticize disasters and are justified by framing governments and NGOs as caring for Indigenous peoples. However, we also identify competing discourses that focus on systems of oppression and self-determination in disaster management. These discourse recognise disasters as political and include discussion of the role of colonialism in disaster creation. As care emerged as a means through which intervention was justified, we conclude by asking questions of who is cared for/about in disasters and how that care is performed.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T07:37:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221096371
       
  • Endless modernisation: Power and knowledge in the Green Morocco Plan

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      Authors: Andrea Mathez, Alex Loftus
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In 2008, in the aftermath of the World Food Crisis and in a context of an unfolding New Green Revolution for Africa, Morocco launched the Green Morocco Plan to ‘modernise’ its agricultural sector, thereby making the latter the main driver for economic growth and for the alleviation of rural poverty. Yet, the technicist-productivist rationale of the Green Morocco Plan, characteristic of New Green Revolution modernisation schemes, renders any positive socio-ecological outcome unlikely. Hence, recent studies of the Green Morocco Plan have focused on its impacts on food security, inequality and environment. However, how the Green Morocco Plan's rationale is (re)produced within a given set of socio-ecological, material relations has to date attracted relatively little attention. This study, therefore, explores the power-knowledge dynamics of the modernisation discourse within the Green Morocco Plan as a driver of socio-ecological change. Bringing together insights from political ecology, critical development and agri-food studies, we show how the entangled set of ideological, material, political and technical processes embodied within the Green Morocco Plan favours a reductionist view of agricultural development as increasing yields and profits. In so doing, such a view perpetuates efforts to ‘modernise’ smallholder/family farming.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T07:03:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221101541
       
  • Infrastructuring drip irrigation: The gendered assembly of farmers,
           laborers and state subsidy programs

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      Authors: Trevor Birkenholtz
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines the relationship between the diffusion of drip irrigation technology, state subsidy programs to encourage its adoption by farmers, and gendered labor dynamics. Drip irrigation is promoted globally as a water conserving agricultural innovation that enhances water-use and productive efficiency by increasing yields with less water, while freeing up “saved” water for other uses. India leads the world in its rate of expansion and in total area. Relying on analyses of government drip irrigation policies and ethnographic field research conducted between 2015 and 2020 in the Indian state of Rajasthan, I find the successful diffusion of drip irrigation is dependent upon state subsidies, farmer adoption decisions and the availability of female labor. I engage conceptual work on water conservation technologies, and from feminist political ecology and infrastructure studies to argue: (1) the diffusion of drip irrigation is better understood as a gendered process of infrastructuring; which (2) is an ongoing process of the assembly of state subsidies, the aggregation of decentralized individual farmer adoption decisions, and the availability of on-demand, underpaid female labor; where (3) female laborers provide a “feminine labor subsidy” that produces productive efficiency gains and lends drip irrigation infrastructure its durability. Conceptualizing drip irrigation as a gendered process of infrastructuring, renders visible its emergent and gendered material politics. The conclusion discusses prospects for reassembling drip irrigation infrastructure in more materially just ways and its implications for the political ecology of water infrastructure.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T07:03:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221100386
       
  • Working with the end of water: Infrastructure, labour, and everyday
           futures of socio-environmental collapse in Mexico city

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      Authors: Alejandro De Coss-Corzo
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper analyses how everyday futures of socio-environmental collapse are constituted by the situated interactions of people and infrastructure in Mexico City. I posit that everyday futures emerge at the intersection of infrastructures as accretions of socio-environmental projects, processes, and promises, and the situated practices that specific groups and individuals deploy when engaging with them. Here, I develop this argument by analysing the labour practices through which repair and maintenance workers and engineers at SACMEX, Mexico City's public water utility, engage with infrastructures that are tensed on the edge of breakdown. To do so, I introduce the notion of ‘modes of everyday futurity’, which holds together the infrastructural conditions that enable the emergence of everyday futures, and the labour practices that enact them differentially. I show how Mexico City's hydraulic infrastructures are shaped by austerity, the demands to supply and dispose of water to deal with the historical problems of excess and scarcity, and by the specific geological and hydrological conditions of the city. I then look at how workers and engineers engage differently with these infrastructures and show how these interactions produce two distinct modes of everyday futurity: management and displacement. The former enacts a future where catastrophe has already happened but not yet fully unfolded and can only be tactically contained in uneven ways. The latter enacts one where catastrophe might be still displaced spatiotemporally through the construction of new hydraulic infrastructures which promise to reiterate urban modernity not as a dream of equal progress but one of unequal survival. Interrogating the making of everyday futures in Mexico City through these modes, I contribute to literature on futurity, temporality, labour, and infrastructure across the social sciences by theorising the role that infrastructures, and the forms of labour that sustain them, have in making plural, non-linear futures.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T12:35:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221100391
       
  • Energopower, statecraft and political legitimacy

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      Authors: Sangeetha Chandrashekeran
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper draws on the notion of energopower ( Boyer 2014) to show the foundational role of electricity in the (re)production of political power in Australia. I show how conflicts surrounding electricity have reconstituted state-market-society relations and rescaled governance. I study a series of notable national-scale interventions and argue that, through the contingent and chaotic play of events in the political sphere, market-oriented governance regimes for electricity have been weakened, and the issue of electricity decarbonisation has become ‘weaponised’ for electoral benefit. I explain how national political leadership in Australia has stepped in from a constitutionally-weak position to govern electricity under pressure for environmentally-driven adaptation. I show four statecraft techniques that reconstitute electricity in new ways: discursively linking electricity governance to socio-environmental futures; national interest framings that are weaponized for electoral gain; tactical governance through parliamentary compromise and appeasement; and jettisoning market logics in favour of state intervention. This study recognises the limits of centralized state-making under a Federalist system but shows the potential for statecraft to reshape scalar-territorial relations and strengthen the role of the central state vis-à-vis the market. Vital resources like electricity are not just struggled over but, under the right conditions, can come to shape political power. There is neither infinite potential for state rescaling through the performance of legitimacy, nor do rigid scalar hierarchies simply block reconfigurations of state power. To understand the potential for resource struggles to re-scale state power attention must be paid to the techniques of statecraft that support and undermine legitimacy.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T12:35:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221098827
       
  • Just water transitions at the end of sugar in Maui, Hawai‘i

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      Authors: Chris Knudson, Alida Cantor, Kelly Kay
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In December 2016, Hawai‘i saw its last sugar harvest on a 36,000-acre plantation in Maui. In the preceding decades, Native Hawaiians had struggled to regain their water rights from a failing sugar industry that had dewatered the island's streams for centuries. Now, with the end of sugar, Native Hawaiian and environmental groups are working to restore traditional practices and diversified agriculture—goals which hinge upon changing water management practices and rewatering Maui's streams. In this paper we combine frameworks from the water justice literature with a just transitions framework typically applied to energy landscapes in order to examine ‘just water transitions’ in Maui. By synthesizing these frameworks, we show how water-based economic transitions can address the tradeoffs and reconfigurations of infrastructure and power required for a more just future. We examine three distinct visions of water management promoted by coalitions of actors in support of different types of agricultural production systems for the island. We argue that a just water transition – that is, a move toward a more culturally, politically, and ecologically just management of water – must engage with water-specific, place-specific, and historically grounded factors including the legacies of infrastructure, water laws, and powerful agricultural interests.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T12:35:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486211052869
       
  • Jatikaran: Caste, Rats, and the control of space at the Karni Mata Mandir

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      Authors: Kyle J. Trembley
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores how multispecies relationships with a range of nonhuman actors shape and are shaped by the politics of caste and religion in the multi-caste-species spaces of the Karni Mata Mandir, a popular pilgrimage and tourist site in Deshnoke, Rajasthan that has become sensationally renowned as India's “rat temple.” However, to members of the dominant-caste Charan community, who administer and work in the Karni Mata Temple, the twenty thousand inhabitants of the temple are entirely different from rats—they are kaba, the reincarnated descendants of Charans from the lineage of Karni Mata and they are considered and cared for as kin by members of the Charan community. Charans differentiate kaba from rats through a variety of discursive and material means such as the surveillance and control of the temple's boundaries, discourses of health and hygiene, concepts of transmigration, and practices of consumption and touch. These ways of differentiating rats and kaba intersect with those mobilized by Charans in practices of caste and the exclusion of local Dalit communities from the inner temple, particularly Valmikis, who comprise the second largest population of workers employed by the temple. Drawing upon ethnographic research and insights from multispecies studies, Dalit studies, and critical race studies, this article examines interdependent, relational processes of jatikaran, or processes through which human and nonhuman bodies become reified along caste, species, and other classificatory lines at the Karni Mata Mandir.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T09:20:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221094132
       
  • Preparing the grounds for emancipation. Explaining commoning as an
           emancipatory mechanism through dialectical social theory

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      Authors: Nathalie Bergame, Sara Borgström, Rebecka Milestad
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      While there is evidence that commons have the potential to counteract socio-spatial injustices unleashed by neoliberal and capitalist forms of urbanisation, less is known about how commons lead to emancipatory change. Anchored in dialectical social theory, this article explains commoning as a mechanism through which people reproduce/transform their structural context and agency, arguing that the potential for emancipation through commoning lies in the commoners’ ability to induce processes of structural/agential transformation. Empirically grounded in interviews with urban community gardeners in the City of Stockholm, Sweden, we show that collective gardening conceptualised as practice of commoning contributes to structural change in that female volunteer labour collectivises the mandate over municipally managed public space, transforming socio-spatial relations. Yet, garden commoning proves to reproduce structural whiteness and middle-class agency in public space, fails to establish autonomy from waged-labour relations, and is unable to abolish the separation from the sources of reproduction and subsistence.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:47:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221092717
       
  • Mines, plantations, and militarisation: Environmental conflicts in
           Tinsukia, Assam

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      Authors: Sanjay Barbora, Sarat Phukan
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Two large-scale environmental disasters in Assam's easternmost district Tinsukia, raised great passion and held much traction in local print, electronic and social media platforms in 2020. The National Board for Wildlife (NBWL) granted post-facto approval for opencast mining in Saleki Proposed Reserved Forest (PRF) under Dehing-Patkai Elephant Reserve in Assam. Later, the public sector company, Oil India Limited (OIL) reported a gas leak in Baghjan that resulted in a major blowout resulting in deaths and displacement in the area. In this article, we argue that these events constitute a tragic outcome of decades of appropriation of natural resources by the oil, tea and coal industry all of which depend on obsolete technologies of extraction. We focus on how this is happening in a place that has several disaffected, marginalised people who once relied on agriculture for their livelihoods. We argue that these two events are not aberrations in the global narrative of inter-governmental concerns for climate change. Instead, we believe that they are part of a global template of re-colonisation that continued long after the formal transfers of power that occurred in Africa and Asia in the 20th century.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T06:02:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221089820
       
  • Scientific expertise and volunteer power in the Cook County forest
           preserves

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      Authors: Natalie Bump Vena
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Through a historical case study, this paper explores the political potential of volunteerism in urban natural resources management. As governments continue to rely on unpaid labor to perform essential services, volunteerism has proliferated in urban protected lands during the neoliberal era. It is therefore worthwhile to study the power that volunteers may wield at their service sites, alongside the scholarly attention already paid to the inefficacy and the inadequacy of volunteer labor. By drawing on science and technology studies literature, especially concerning the role of citizen science in activist movements, this article analyzes how volunteer stewards influenced natural resources policy in the Forest Preserve District of Cook County. A local agency, the district is responsible for nearly 70,000 acres in the county that encompasses Chicago, IL. For most of the twentieth century, forestation constituted the district's official land management policy, as leaders sought to match its ecologically diverse holdings to the agency's name. In the late 1970s, volunteers won permission from the district to begin restoring prairies in the forest preserves. Working autonomously, volunteer stewards cultivated expert credibility in the science of ecological restoration. Over several decades, they drew on their scientific authority to convince forest preserve leaders to adopt ecological restoration as the district's primary land management policy, a process culminating in the early twenty-first century. The paper also explores the fragility of volunteer authority rooted in scientific expertise, by tracking how an anti-restoration movement and, later, forest preserve staff members successfully undercut volunteer expertise in ecological restoration.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T06:36:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221087103
       
  • Modernity, landscape conquest, and the mobility politics of stilt-walking
           in Landes region, France

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      Authors: Teo Wickland
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Histories of stilt-walking in the Landes de Gascogne reveal intertwinements between mobility politics and landscape modernization. Reading these stories through a lens of “landscape conquest” centers the ongoing presence of coloniality in modernity, while highlighting the ways in which modernization produces homogeneity. This process of making every place more like anywhere else is more-than-physical. Universal landscape features, including universal mobility cultures, reproduce universal ways of thinking and relating. This depauperation enables the continual conquest of natural, cultural, epistemological, and phenomenological diversity. Conversely, landscape diversification, including the diversification of mobility cultures, could support abundant futures.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-29T07:38:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221087104
       
  • The violence of involuntary resettlement and emerging resistance in
           Mozambique's Limpopo National Park: The role of physical and social
           infrastructure

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      Authors: Kei Otsuki
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Nature conservation turns violent when it leads to enclosure, dispossession and militarisation, causing suffering among people living in the environment that is to be protected. Resettlement projects are meant to facilitate the process of repossession for dispossessed people as the proponents promise improved housing and physical infrastructure outside the protected area. While scholarly attention has been paid to the violence of dispossession, little is known about the ways in which the post-resettlement built environment turns violent for displaced people as well as people remaining in the protected area. Drawing on field research on water infrastructure in two resettlement villages in Mozambique's Limpopo National Park (LNP), this paper analyses how the violence of resettlement is entrenched in the material, ecological and political framework that shapes the resettlement project. It pays particular attention to the process by which the resettled citizens struggle with the everyday sufferings in their new built environment in order to expose how physical infrastructure and the lack thereof led to new social infrastructure, which have enabled the remaining park residents’ resistance against resettlement. The emerging resistance indicates the urgent need to pay attention to the built environment expanding outside the conservation area in order to address the violence of resettlement as well as to pursue nature conservation itself.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T05:18:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221089161
       
  • Bouncing back' Kangaroo-human resistance in contemporary Australia

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      Authors: Sophie Chao
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how human and animal agencies shape the socio-ecological lifeworlds of kangaroos as cultural icons, native wildlife, problematic pests, and commercial meat in contemporary Australia. Kangaroos’ resistance to Western, colonial ways of knowing and ordering the world fundamentally challenged the classificatory logic and foundations of early natural science. Kangaroos’ biological and behavioral resistance to domestication and farming – the traditional loci of animal exploitation – speaks to their inherent wildness, at the same time as it reveals their complicated dependence on ecosystems adapted for introduced livestock. Meanwhile, kangaroos’ resistance to government-endorsed population control programs, and the contested logic of (over)abundance that justifies kangaroo culling, both challenges and legitimates human calculations of who and what “counts” as worth conserving or killing. In tandem, the sensorial and symbolic valences of kangaroo flesh, compounded with the growing voices of animal welfare movements, generate visceral and political resistance to kangaroo meat as an unpalatable foodstuff. The article further centers the polysemic valences of kangaroos as a form of resistance to symbolic unity and coherence. Existing as many things at once, kangaroos eschew classification and treatment as any one thing. Instead, their ontology multiplies across the many epistemologies vying to determine kangaroos’ actual being and future becoming. The article concludes by assessing the opportunities and challenges of centering resistance and its diverse epistemic, vitalist, symbolic, and carnal manifestations to understand animal lifeways and deathways amidst entrenched capitalist and colonial regimes, whose reproduction depends on the production of the non-human as “killable.”
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T08:40:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221084194
       
  • An intersectional approach to neoliberal environmentality: Women's
           engagement with ecotourism at Corbett Tiger Reserve, India

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      Authors: Revati Pandya
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Research in environmentality has provided an analysis of environmentally friendly subject formation through the influence of conservation governance. Within this research, examination of subject formation from the local community perspective is also gaining attention. However, a gender perspective in environmentality research remains marginal. This study thus contributes to environmentality research by drawing on intersectional feminist political ecology to examine women's engagement with ecotourism in the context of India's Corbett Tiger Reserve. Ecotourism as a form of market-based conservation has been commonly framed as an expression of neoliberal environmentality. Neoliberal environmentality is reflected in market-centred incentives used to promote conservation and support for local people via employment in conservation-based work - a supposedly ‘win-win’ dynamic. Through ethnographic research, I provide insights into different forms of women's engagement with tourism. The analysis reveals that this engagement does not necessarily produce the environmentally friendly subject that environmentality analysis predicts. Rather, women's engagement is shaped by intersecting dynamics of caste and class and motivated by factors including but not limited to monetary benefits. This study thus questions the dominant approach to investigating neoliberal environmentality in particular, that tends to emphasise the influence of monetary incentives in producing environmentally friendly subjects.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T10:42:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221082469
       
  • The socio-ecological contradictions of land degradation and coastal
           agriculture in south India

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      Authors: C.M. Pratheepa, Rengalakshmi Raj, Shreya Sinha
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines the drivers and impacts of degradation of agricultural land in a village in a South Indian coastal delta. Drawing on insights from political economy and political ecology scholarship, it argues that there is a dialectical relation between land degradation and social inequalities, i.e. the biophysical degeneration of land is not only caused by human and environmental factors but it also generates social contradictions which further intensify both land degradation and social inequalities. The paper demonstrates, firstly, that coastal land degradation has been generated in the form of soil salinity through a confluence of the inherent environmental vulnerabilities of the region, forces of commoditization (especially those associated with shrimp aquaculture), existing social hierarchies and state policy. Secondly, it shows that social groups differentiated by caste, class and gender have experienced these changes differently. A small, relatively well-off section of the locally dominant caste landowners has benefitted from shifting from paddy to shrimp aquaculture, which is leading to a further increase in salinisation. Others have to bear the brunt of decreasing productivity of land for crop cultivation, leading them to abandon or reduce cultivation and increase dependence on non-agricultural sources of income, especially through male outmigration. Women's burden of work has increased while their capacity to earn wage-income has declined. Without any concerted state effort to either restore the land or to alleviate the widespread agrarian distress, land degradation has developed into a continuously evolving downward spiral, but one where there will still be some winners and many losers.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T10:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221079720
       
  • Tiger atmospheres and co-belonging in mangrove worlds

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      Authors: Michele Lobo, Ashraful Alam, Sumana Bandyopadhyay
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article adopts a place-based approach to explore tiger atmospheres in the Sundarbans, a transboundary environmental commons and major climatic hotspot in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta of India and Bangladesh. We argue that affective intensities of greed (lobh), fear (bhaya), respect (srodhya), trust (biswas) and empathy (karuna) sensed by the tiger subject contribute to novel theoretical as well as empirical insights into co-belonging and intersectional multispecies justice. We explore these animal atmospheres through multi-sited ethnographic research that include embodied observations, photographs, 31 in-depth interviews and focus groups with impoverished as well as racialised low-caste Hindus (Dalits/Scheduled Castes), Adivasis (Indigenous peoples) and Muslim forest-dwellers in India and Bangladesh. This attention to more-than-human geographies, animal atmospheres and subaltern stories situated in the Bengal delta unsettles macro-narratives of forest conservation and wildlife management that reduce animals to passive subjects or alternatively make them killable.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T12:22:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221079465
       
  • Contested Sovereignties: Indigenous disputes over plurinational resource
           governance

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      Authors: Isabella M. Radhuber, Sarah A. Radcliffe
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Indigenous organizations in the Andean countries of Ecuador and Bolivia originated novel proposals to pluralize sovereign arrangements through plurinational statehood. Reflecting diverse Indigenous groups’ relations with postcolonial states, these proposals created a unique basis for re-negotiating (sovereign) resource governance. Despite the constitutional endorsement of the plurinational state model however, the latest empirical evidence confirms growing state control over subsoil resources that excises Indigenous peoples from decision-making over resources. In this paper, we trace the emergence of novel agendas for sovereignty-multiplicity, showing how Indigenous agendas had anticipated the need to go beyond their rights over subsoil resources and autonomous territories. These agendas implied re-negotiating national sovereignty in light of the countries’ internal ethno-political and epistemic heterogeneity. Under nominally plurinational states however, resource governance outcomes perpetuate and normalise longstanding epistemic and power differentials between rights-bearing political subjects and Indigenous subjects. We highlight the colonial-modern bases of current sovereignty arrangements, identifying the presumptions and legal parameters that shape the dynamics between states, people and Indigenous people. Situating resource governance in relation to the concept of modernity/coloniality, we propose to (re)think sovereignty arrangements in the colonial present in light of internal heterogeneity.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T05:15:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486211068476
       
  • Relational Displacement and the Colonial Legacies of Copper Mining in the
           Kalahari Copperbelt Region of Botswana

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      Authors: Justyn Huckleberry
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Displacements are understood as having wide-ranging impacts on livelihoods and community access to resources. Using interviews and oral histories of farmers displaced by a copper mine in Botswana, the research described here demonstrates that displacement not only changes lived experiences of those who are displaced, but also has broad relational impacts by dispersing displaced people's family members and neighbors, disenfranchising farmers from their cattle and land, shifting the ways that human-wildlife conflict plays out, and creating a new and disruptive relationship between cattle farmers and the mining industry. Postcolonial and Indigenous scholars have long written about human-animal kinship and ongoing colonial and capitalist relations that weave (sometimes disparate) communities closer together or further apart. The work described here demonstrates that this knowledge allows for a clearer understanding of how displacement impacts the material and relational worlds of people and nonhumans displaced by the disruptive forces of resource development.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T01:50:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221081391
       
  • Urban oceans: Social differentiation in the city and the sea

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      Authors: Jesse Rodenbiker
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper argues that the urban and the ocean are co-constituted through relations that are unevenly classed, gendered, and racialized. This argument is empirically anchored in high-value fish maw markets in Hong Kong, New York City, and the oceanic spaces and lives therein. The global inter-urban trade in Totoaba, an endangered fish endemic to the Gulf of California, serves as a primary example of piscine capital circulation, while supporting examples engage a much longer durée of urban ocean relations. Agrarian technologies appropriated through colonial trans-oceanic trade, for instance, are shown to be precursors of Euro-American industrial urbanization, while whale bodies were crucial to urban politics of difference and producing urban spaces in 19th century U.S. cities. Contemporary fisheries on the high seas exemplify how ocean spaces remain frontiers of unfree labor and natural resource extraction that contribute to capital accumulation in global cities. Through these examples, the article details how the ocean is urbanized, how the urban is constituted through the ocean, as well as some of the differentiated social formations and socio-natural effects of urban oceanic relationships. Urban oceanic processes of exploitation, extraction, circulation, and consumption predispose marginalized people and ocean wildlife to premature deaths. Urban oceanic relations could be otherwise constituted. Towards reconstituting these relations, the paper advances a hybrid analytical framework that ungrounds the urban from terrestrial conceptual moorings through engaging interdisciplinary ocean geographies.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T03:32:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221078690
       
  • Erratum to “Negotiating power from the margins: Encountering everyday
           experiences and contestations to REDD+in Southern Tanzania”

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      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T10:04:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221079594
       
  • Regulating pests—material politics and calculation in integrated
           pest management

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      Authors: Leon Wolff
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper attempts to shed some light on current biopolitics of food and environmental security by analyzing the strategy of Integrated pest management (IPM). IPM is an ecological form of pest management that emerged in the United States in the 1950s in response to the pesticide crisis and now informs numerous pesticide legislations around the world. The paper analyzes IPM as a governmental hinge that aims to reconcile the conflicting goals of food security and environmental security. To this end, the paper makes three intertwined arguments. First, through an examination of scientific texts from the field of economic entomology, the paper shows how biological and chemical pest control methods are produced as two conflicting materialities that must be mediated. In a second step, the text shows how economically defined thresholds and cost-benefit analyzes are used to level the difference between these two materialities and make them commensurable. Finally, it elaborates how IPM aims primarily at transforming farmers’ practices. The use of chemicals in agriculture is to be reduced by transforming farmers into calculating subjects. Overall, the article aims to show how IPM, as an important element of contemporary ecological governmentality, seeks to realize positive environmental effects in the quantitative medium of economics and science.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T10:04:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221076138
       
  • AirPods and the earth: Digital technologies, planned obsolescence and the
           Capitalocene

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      Authors: Sy Taffel
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Apple's AirPods have helped forge a multibillion-dollar market for true wireless hearable devices. The article employs media geology and political ecology to argue that AirPods exemplify the Capitalocene, a time where a planetary sociotechnical system based on ecologically unequal exchange benefits a privileged minority of humans while inflicting significant harms to humans and ecosystems that will persist across inhuman temporalities. These harms are inequitably distributed and are not typically experienced by those who can afford luxury items such as AirPods. While digital technologies are often mistaken for dematerialised objects that will enable infinite economic growth on a materially finite planet, examining the flows of energy, matter, labour and knowledge required for the production and maintenance of these devices comprehensively refutes these claims. AirPods are designed to function for just eighteen to thirty-six months of daily use before planned obsolescence renders AirPods as long-lived, toxic, electronic waste. Pending ‘right to repair’ legislation should prohibit the production of irreparable digital devices such as AirPods, as the right to repair an irreparable device is effectively meaningless.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T11:10:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221076136
       
  • Fossilized conservation, or the unsustainability of saving nature in South
           Africa

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      Authors: Bram Büscher, Stasja Koot, Lerato Thakholi
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper argues that the conservation sector in South Africa is fossilized – unsustainable, outmoded and resistant to change – in two integrated ways. First, it is completely dependent on and steeped in fossil fuels and mineral extraction. The historical development of the South African economy's reliance on fossil and mineral resources provides the basis for this dependency but has since tentacularized into the very fabric of conservation and associated wildlife economies in the country. This unsustainable basis of the sector places a major stain on the ways in which South Africa's biodiversity is ‘saved’ for posterity. Second and relatedly, the social and labour relations that make up conservation in South Africa are fossilized in particularly racialized and gendered ways. This is socially unsustainable, as most of these relations are unjust and exploitative. Building on theories of fossil energy and labour relations that emphasise their everyday character, we argue that confronting the fossilized state of conservation in South Africa is necessary in and of itself, and a prerequisite for a broader societal transformation to sustainability. We conclude that the effective chances for this to happen are low, especially given the massive conservation attention on combatting rhino poaching in the last decade. This seems to have reinforced rather than alleviated the status quo.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T01:48:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486211062002
       
  • Situating climate change adaptation within plural worlds: The role of
           Indigenous and local knowledge in Pentecost Island, Vanuatu

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      Authors: Allan Rarai, Meg Parsons, Melissa Nursey-Bray, Roa Crease
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars, practitioners, and decision-makers are increasingly recognising that Indigenous knowledge can play a significant role in facilitating adaptation to climate change. Yet, adaptation theorising and practises remain overwhelmingly situated within Euromodern ontologies, and there remains limited space, at present, for plural ontologies or alternative ways of being and knowing. In this paper, and using the Pacific as our case study, we present an argument for the inclusion of multiple ontologies within adaptation policymaking. Pacific adaptation policies and interventions frequently privilege Western scientific knowledge and focus on addressing individual climate risks through technical fixes directed by foreign experts and funding agencies. They are also rooted in a policy architecture that is an artefact of colonisation in the region. Despite these obstacles, Pacific Islander responses to climate change are dynamic, and inclusive of the multiple and competing ontologies they work within, offering insights into how Euromodern and Pacific islander world views could coalesce to builds adaptive capacity and consolidate community resilience into the future. Highlights • Indigenous Knowledge plays a critical role in enabling resilience and facilitating climate change adaptation in some parts of Vanuatu • Ni-Vanuatu people employ dynamic responses to climate risks incorporating multiple knowledge systems and practises • Co-existence of different knowledge systems provide insights into factors that enable adaptive capacity and consolidate community resilience • Diverse worldviews, knowledge systems and practises with Pacific Island cultures highlights the importance of thinking about ontological pluralism within adaptation • Climate adaptation is principally founded on Western ontologies, but there is a need consider non-Western ontologies and epistemologies.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T11:14:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486211047739
       
  • Politicizing disaster governance: Can a board game stimulate discussions
           around disasters as matters of concern'

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      Authors: Kewan Mertens, Bosco Bwambale, Gina Delima
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The disaster risk reduction (DRR) community tends to treat disasters and risks in a managerial and technocratic way, thereby disregarding the highly political nature of DRR. An alternative epistemology of disasters, as “matters of concern”, is proposed and tested. Mobilizing concepts from Chantal Mouffe and Bruno Latour, this paper illustrates how DRR can be transformed into a public issue. It is argued that education and policymaking on DRR would benefit from a recognition of the hybrid nature of disasters. A serious game is used to investigate proposed epistemology. The board game simulates political decision-making on the reduction of risks due to floods and landslides in South-West Uganda. It is hypothesized that the game can generate an ideal speech scenario that fosters discussions among players and possibly even creates a space of political confrontation. Discussions during ten gameplays have been recorded, transcribed and analyzed (1) to understand how the dominant epistemology facilitates an apolitical approach to disasters and (2) to understand the process of politicization and de-politicization brought about when playing the board game in order to derive recommendations for future tools to facilitate a political appreciation of disasters. Our results indicate that participants effectively experience affects, power relations and confrontations during the game, but that a call for consensus and technical solutions is used by the players to close the discussions and move on with concrete solutions. Insights from this paper contribute to understanding why DRR is frequently treated as a technical issue in local and international disaster governance. Epistemology and approaches proposed in this paper are expected to stimulate innovative experiments towards a more political approach to DRR education and policy.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T12:40:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486211069000
       
  • ‘Without white people, the animals will go!’: COVID-19 and the
           struggle for the future of South African conservation

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      Authors: Scott Burnett
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the potential for online activism to contest hegemonic neoliberal conservation models in South Africa, using the Covid-19 crisis as a window onto discursive struggle. National lockdown measures during the pandemic sent the vital tourism sector of an already fragile economy into deep crisis. Neoliberal and militarized conservation models, with their reliance on international travel, are examined as affected by a conjunctural crisis, the meaning of which was contested by a broad range of social actors in traditional and on social media. In 30 online news videos, racial hierarchies of land ownership and conservation labour geographies are reproduced and legitimated, as is a visual vocabulary of conservation as equivalent with guns, boots, and anti-poaching patrols. Here, hope is represented as residing in the increased privatization of public goods, and the extraction of value from these goods in the form of elite, luxury consumption. In a corpus of posts on Twitter corpus, on the other hand, significant counter-hegemonic resistance to established neoliberal conservation models is in evidence. In their replies to white celebrity conservationist Kevin Pietersen, critical South African Twitter users offer a contrasting vision of hope grounded in anti-racist equality, a rejection of any special human-animal relations enjoyed by Europeans, and an articulation of a future with land justice at its centre. The analysis supports the idea that in the “interregnum” between hegemonic social orders, pathways towards transformed futures may be glimpsed as “kernels of truth” in discursive struggles on social media.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T10:34:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486211069884
       
  • The making of an uneven shore: How coastal management and housing policies
           shaped racial inequality in asbury park NJ

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      Authors: David C. Eisenhauer
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Recent work in urban geography and political ecology has explored the roots of housing segregation in the United States within governmental polices and racial prejudice within the real estate sector. Additional research has demonstrated how coastal management practices has largely benefited wealthy, white communities. In this paper, I bring together insights from these two strands of research to demonstrate how both coastal management and governmental housing policies combined to shape racial inequalities within and around Asbury Park, New Jersey. By focusing on the period between 1945 and 1970, I show how local, state, and federal actors repeatedly prioritized improving and protecting the beachfront areas of the northern New Jersey shore while promising to eventually address the housing and economic needs of the predominately Black ‘West Side’ neighbourhood of Asbury Park. This paper demonstrates that not only did governmental spending on coastal management largely benefit white suburban homeowners but also came at the expense of promised spending within Black neighbourhoods. The case study has implications for other coastal regions in the United States in which housing segregation persists. As climate change and sea level rise unfold, the history of racial discrimination in coastal development raises important considerations for efforts to address emerging hazards and risks.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T03:14:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486211069868
       
  • New political ecologies of renewable energy

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      Authors: Sarah Knuth, Ingrid Behrsin, Anthony Levenda, James McCarthy
      First page: 997
      Abstract: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The critique of fossil fuel regimes has been a foundational concern for the field of political ecology, in its drives to expose the injustices and harms of energy extractivism and its early warnings of the climate crisis. However, it is increasingly evident that renewable energy sources and their infrastructures will carry their own costs and trade-offs, and that critique, resistance and alternative movement-building are needed to forge a truly just renewable energy transition. This theme issue underlines the many ways in which political ecology is well-positioned to lead critical and engaged scholarship in support of energy/climate justice. In this introduction and survey, we draw on new research collected here to reflect on political ecology's distinctive analytical capacities and forms of praxis for this task. We argue that the collection advances political ecology's intellectual and political purchase on renewable transition in several crucial ways. These include (1) Theorizing Renewables-Driven Land Transformations, (2) Advancing Industrial Political Ecologies of Renewables, (3) Locating Power within Technical and Artifactual Politics and (4) Generating Knowledge and Tools for Just Transitions. We conclude with reflections on further pressing concerns for the field: for example, rising debates over scale, ownership and accountability models within renewable energy justice and democracy movements and critical conversations growing around renewable energy's own extraction geographies and diverse forms of racialization.
      Citation: Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T05:17:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25148486221108164
       
 
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