A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Tropical Ecology
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0564-3295 - ISSN (Online) 2661-8982
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Publisher Correction: Geospatial technology based morphometric analysis
           and watershed prioritization of lower Satluj basin in India for
           groundwater recharge potential

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Chir pine forest and pre-monsoon drought determine spatial, and temporal
           patterns of forest fires in Uttarakhand Himalaya

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Associated with farming practices (between 300 and 2000 m elevations), human-ignited small, and patchy surface forest fires occur almost every year in Uttarakhand (between 28°43`– 31°27` N and 77°34`– 81°02`E; area 51,125 km2), a Himalayan state of India. Using fire incidence data of 19 years (2002–2020) generated by MODIS, we analysed the factors which drive temporal and spatial patterns of fire in the region. The fire incidence data were organized by 24 forest divisions, the unit of state forest management and administration. The standardized regression model showed that pre-monsoon temperature (March to May or mid-June), proportional area of the forest division under chir pine (Pinus roxburghii) forest (positive effect), and pre-monsoon and winter precipitation (negative effect) accounted for 56% of the variance in fire incidence density (FID). The pre-monsoon temperature (warmer) and precipitation (lower) were significantly different in 2009, 2012, 2016 and 2019, the years with high FID (average 54.9 fire/100 km2) than the rest of years with low FID (average 20.9 fire/100 km2). During the two decades of warming, high FID (> 30 incidence per year /100 km2) occurred after every three to four years, and fire peaks tended to increase with time. The study suggests that effective fire management can be attained by improving pre-monsoon precipitation forecasting and targeting forest compartments with a higher occurrence of chir pine and fire-vulnerable oaks. Furthermore, since fires are human-ignited, periodical analysis of changes in population distribution and communities’ dependence on forests would need to be conducted.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Ecological niche modelling of Tecomella undulata (Sm.) Seem: an endangered
           (A2a) tree species from arid and semi-arid environment imparts multiple
           ecosystem services

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The objective of this study was to utilize niche modelling techniques and predictors, including bioclimatic, soil, habitat heterogeneity indices, and land-use land cover (LULC), to ascertain the present and potential distribution of Tecomella undulata in India. The bio-climatic variables of 2050 and 2070 timeframes were employed to forecast future occurrences. The study also examined the level of indigeneity of T. undulata and analysed the factors that impact its fundamental and realized niche. The Maxent model utilized for forecasting the distribution of T. undulata demonstrated a high level of precision, incorporating both bioclimatic and non-bioclimatic variables. The study highlights the significance of mean and maximum temperatures during the warmest quarter and month, as well as the wettest months and years’ worth of precipitation. In addition, threshold values for these predictors were calculated. In contrast to the limiting effects of climatic factors, the species in question was found to exhibit a greater degree of facilitation in response to soil conditions (including rooting conditions, nutrient availability, and salt excess), habitat heterogeneity indices (such as range, maximum, and coefficient of variance of diversity), and lLULC predictors (including urban areas, residential and infrastructure development, forested regions, and sparsely vegetated areas). As a result, this species was able to expand its range across a wider expanse of India. The Churu and Jhunjhunu districts and a transact region including Pali, Jalor, Jodhpur, Sanchor, and Barmer have been identified as the best possible locations for its occurrences. Shrinkage would begin around 2050 in all of these areas. By 2070, the Churu and Jhunjhunu regions had become significantly more fragmented, while the Jodhpur region and the surrounding areas of Barmer, Sanchor, Jalor, and Vav had grown. Specific coordinates were also identified pertains to zone of extinction, zone of re-occurrence and zone of maximum occurrence. The aforementioned discoveries enable us to ascertain the extent of land that is conducive to the growth of T. undulata across diverse ecological niches, as well as the underlying factors and critical points that impact its dispersion dynamics both presently and prospectively. This shall aid us in determining the necessity of extensive captive cultivation for the preservation of the species and its consequential ecological advantages.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Liana regeneration in the treefall gaps, at the gap edges and in the
           forest interior of a subtropical montane moist evergreen broad-leaved
           forest in the Ailao Mountains, Southwestern China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The regenerative pattern of lianas was studied across an environmental gradient from treefall gaps to gap edges to the forest interior of a subtropical montane primary forest in southwestern China. Specifically, the following questions were addressed: (1) How do the species composition, species richness and abundance of regenerative lianas change across the environmental gradients' (2) What is the regeneration mode of lianas at the community and species levels under different forest habitats' I established sample plots in each of the three forest habitats and counted all liana stems ≤ 50 cm in height or length. I found that the species composition of regenerative lianas varied between treefall gaps, gap edges and the forest interior, with light-demanding species primarily growing in the first two habitats and shade-tolerant species growing in the last habitat. PCA ordination also showed clear clustering of the plots between treefall gaps, gap edges and forest interior. The species’ distribution changed from the leftmost shade-tolerant to the rightmost light-demanding species along the first axis of the PCA ordination. The abundance and species richness of regenerative lianas were significantly higher in the treefall gaps and at the gap edges than in the forest interior. Of the 25 species recorded, fifteen regenerated only from seed, while the others regenerated from rhizomes (five species) or from stolons (five species), as well as from seed. Seed regeneration was common in the three forest habitats, while clonal growth mainly occurred in the forest interior. Result from the two-way ANOVA indicated that species, habitats and their interactions had significant effects on the regeneration pattern of lianas at the community level.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Geospatial technology based morphometric analysis and watershed
           prioritization of lower Satluj basin in India for groundwater recharge
           potential

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The morphometric characteristic of the Satluj Lower basin, which contains eight sub-watersheds, was the subject of the research study. Using a Geographic Information System (GIS), the watershed and sub-watershed boundaries, as well as stream network, were retrieved from the Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The study area includes the eight Sub-watersheds. Morphometric aspects have been categorised according to their properties, which include Linear, Areal and Relief aspects. Using Published standard equation, these parameters are assessed. Linear parameter consists of (Stream order, Stream length and bifurcation ratio etc.), Areal parameter consists of (Drainage density, texture ratio, stream frequency and length of the overland flow etc.) and Relief parameter consists of (Relief, Relief ratio, Ruggedness number etc.). There is also other watershed parameter like relative perimeter (Prel), Mean basin width (Wmb), Fitness ratio (Rf), Lemniscate ratio (K), Hypsometric integral (HI), Rho Coefficient, Drainage Intensity (Di), Infiltration number (In) and Melton ruggedness number (MRn) were used to assessment of the soil erosion in the watershed. The drainage density, stream frequency, drainage texture and length of overland flow has major impact on the groundwater recharge potential. The lower values of drainage densities show the permeable subsoil material and have scope for groundwater recharge. The results show that the Lower Satluj basin cover total area about 5969.18 km2 and having total five-stream order. The prioritization of each sub-basin was carried out based on linear, aerial and relief parameters based on their influence on groundwater and surface water runoff. Compound factor value was used to determine each watershed’s priority rank. The result of this analysis illustrated that the SW-3 has lowest compound parameter value, so it is subjected to more runoff, hence priority is given to this watershed for the development and management. The decision-making authorities can utilise the findings to plan and carry out watershed management actions towards the better practices to establish new recharge structures to enhance the groundwater recharge potential in this region.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Comparing estimation algorithms for compatible biomass models of Moso
           Bamboo

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) forest is one of the important alternative soruces in the tropical and subtropical regions. Its biomass quantification can be a basis of carbon storage estiamtion of the bamboo forest. Based on the destructively sample measurements of the moso bamboo in the Jiangsu Province in China, three forms of the model structures (controlling by sum of equation (CSE), level-1 proportional fitting distribution (L1PFD) and level-2 proportional fitting distribution (L2PFD)), and three estimation algorithms (ordinary least squares (OLS), two stage least square (2SLS) and three stage least square (2SLS)) were evaluated for identifying the best compatible biomass model. Results showed that all the three model structures solved the compatibility problems effectively. With each estimation algorithm applied, difference of the fit statistics between L1PFD and L2PFD was insignifcant. The fit statistics produced by 2SLS were slightly different from those of OLS, but fitting accuracy the latter was slightly higher, and had a more efficient estimation procedure. Thus, we recommend L1PFD model for predicting biomass for moso bamboo with use of diameter at breast height as a predictor variable. Our model will provide a reliable basis for estimating biomass and carbon stock of the moso bamboo forest in China.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • What’s in a name' The curious case of Banj oak (Quercus
           leucotrichophora)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Banj oak (Quercus leucotrichophora A.Camus) is among the most common and well researched Himalayan trees. Yet, its latin name has been a subject of confusion. Early Himalayan researchers knew it as Quercus incana Roxb. While Camus proposed Q. leucotrichophora in 1935, it was only after Bahadur (1975) gave clear justification and a need for the name change, that Q. leucotrichophora became widely used. In recent years, Quercus oblongata D.Don has come into use likely due to an error in outdated taxonomic databases. This name is incorrect and should not be used. Quercus leucotrichophora is the only correct and accepted name for banj/ban oak. The use of multiple scientific names leads to uncertainty and must be discontinued.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Livestock depredation by large carnivores in Western Himalayan region of
           Jammu and Kashmir: temporal adherence in predator’s choice

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Background Human-wildlife conflict (HWC) is a serious management problem in India where humans and wildlife share space and resources. This problem is particularly acute in the Himalayan Mountain region. As the lives and livelihoods of local residents are inextricably linked to wildlife, it is important to know the extent of damage caused by HWC to local people. Methods In this work, the pattern of HWC was assessed in the Chowkibal-Tangdhar sector of Kupwara district, Union Territory of Jammu and Kashmir, based on self-reported losses of livestock to large carnivores by local people (N = 217). Results The carnivores that were perceived by local stakeholders to be responsible for livestock depredation were identified as the Asiatic black bear, Himalayan brown bear and Common leopard. It was found that the leopards reportedly killed livestock throughout the year at the relatively low altitude zones, but black bears and brown bears reportedly killed livestock in the monsoon months at the relatively higher altitude zones. It was also reported that the leopards prefer to kill small to medium-sized livestock, but the bears had no such preferences. Conclusion This work recommends that the Forest and Wildlife Department or community-based livestock insurance schemes should practice quick and efficient compensation systems, improve night livestock shelters, and community-based supervised livestock grazing practices to reduce livestock losses due to wild carnivores.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • An insight into population structure and seasonal herd pattern of
           blackbuck Antilope cervicapra (Linnaeus, 1758) (Mammalia: Artiodactyla:
           Bovidae) in semi-arid region of western Haryana, India

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The population structure and herd pattern of the blackbucks were investigated in a semi-arid area of village Badopal, Fatehabad, Haryana, which is surrounded by human settlements and agricultural intensification. Fortnightly, 25 field visits were conducted from September 2019 to August 2020 during four different season(s) and data was recorded by Scan sampling and line transect method in morning and evening hours. Total of 1900 individuals were screened which were divided into six herd categories with six age groups of both sexes. The adult male to adult female ratio during study period was recorded 25.02 with maximum 51.10% contribution in the population from adult females. Out of the total 133 groups screened, maximum 45 groups were sighted in autumn and minimum 14 in summer and overall annual group mean was 14.54 ± 2.43 with a mean crowding of 26.39. Out of the total six herd categories sighted at the site, maximum number was 42 for harem herd (HH = 42) and minimum was 9 for female herd (FH = 9) and the species exhibited partial social organization because both herd and solitary animals were observed. On the basis of seasonal and annual means, the DMRT test revealed that the size of harem herd (HH) was statistically maximum (P < 0.05) among all other categories. It is practically difficult to make a species-specific efficient conservation plan without regular monitoring of population size and knowledge of a species' sociality. Present study provide an insight of population structure and social behavior of blackbuck among a human dominating landscape, therefore, it can be implemented for long term habitat management of this isolated fragmented population and many such small populations throughout the western Haryana.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Tree species identification in ex situ conservation areas using
           WorldView-2 Satellite Data and Machine Learning Methods: a case study in
           the Bogor Botanic Garden

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Spatially-explicit data on the species composition of forest plants can be an important tool for forest management and conservation. One specific application of these data is for identifying tropical tree species through machine learning techniques to classify satellite remote sensing images. This study aims to examine the ability to use Worldview-2 high-resolution data with various machine learning methods to identify tree species in the Bogor Botanic Garden. Eighteen species from 11 families were selected as samples representing an ecologically and taxonomically diverse data set. Using aggregated image variables, each tree species was found to have different reflectance, texture, and spectral vegetation index variable values. Cluster analysis showed that the 18 tree species could be separated into three clusters that partly reflected taxonomic relationships. Four machine learning algorithms (Support Vector Machine (SVM), Random Forest (RF), K-nearest neighbor (KNN), and Bayesian) were used to predict the species identity of pixels in the image data. A multicollinearity test using a Variance Inflation Factor method reduced the predictor variables from 54 to 9. The highest accuracy (0.96) was observed using SVM, followed by RF (0.91), KNN (0.86), and Bayesian (0.74). The implementation of high-resolution satellite imagery and machine learning for species identification in tropical ex situ plant conservation areas, such as botanic gardens is reported here for the first time.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Changes in plant diversity and community attributes of coal mine affected
           forest in relation to a community reserve forest of Nagaland, Northeast
           India

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This study assessed changes in herb, shrub and tree composition of Coal mining-affected forest (CMAF) area in relation to a community reserve forest designated as Non-affected forest (NAF) of Changki village, Nagaland, Northeast India. In all the three plant life forms, Shannon-Wiener index, Simpson’s diversity index and Margalef richness index showed higher species diversity and richness in NAF compared to CMAF while Sorenson’s index reveals a low species similarity between the sites. Pielou’s evenness was higher at NAF and a contiguous pattern was prominently distributed in both the forest. The family Poaceae, Asteraceae and Cyperaceae dominated the CMAF while Euphorbiaceae, Rubiaceae and Poaceae dominated NAF. The NAF has greater plant density compared to CMAF and the IVI shows the dominant status of native tree Terminalia myriocarpa in the Northeastern tropical forest. Weeds like Ageratum conyzoides, Bidens pilosa and Drymaria cordata were prominently distributed in CMAF while Abarema clypearia, Inula cappa and Strobilanthes coloratus has been obstructed by mining. The result imparted that the plant diversity of Nagaland tropical forests are under threat due to coal mining which has reduced the vegetation diversity and induce the loss of dominant plant species. As such, regulation of mine waste, land reclamation projects, robust forest management and bioremediation can be scientifically integrated to reduce the mining repercussion effects. Moreover, the result emphasizes the need to impart the tribal knowledge of preserving natural forest to the upcoming generations and develop conservation strategies to prevent further degradation or loss of biodiversity in this part of the Indo-Burma hotspot region.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Responses of plants to temporally heterogeneous water conditions in
           species from different ranges of habitats

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Soil moisture resources are highly spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Although temporal heterogeneous water conditions have a more common impact on plants than spatial heterogeneous conditions, very few studies have been conducted to investigate how plants respond to existing temporally heterogeneous water conditions. To address this issue, we adopted three species with different habitat ranges, including a karst-endemic species of Kmeria septentrionalis (growing in karst habitats only), a karst-suitable species of Celtis sinensis (occur in both habitats) and a non-karst species of Lithocarpus glaber (found in normal habitats only), and conducted a greenhouse experimental study at Guizhou University, Guiyang, China. This study explored the response ability and coping strategies of seedlings from various habitats by comparing the differences in growth of biomass, and physiological traits of the three species in response to temporally heterogeneous water (alternating drought and waterlogging) and temporally homogeneous water (constant moist) treatments. Compared with constant moist treatment, the first round of temporally heterogeneous water treatment reduced the growth of leaf, root, and total biomass increased the contents of osmoregulation substances, malondialdehyde, and antioxidant enzyme activities. However, the third round of temporally heterogeneous water treatment improved their late growth of biomass, and the content of physiological traits was also significantly decreased. K. septentrionalis showed a higher compensation effect in late growth by early heterogeneous experience. Typical karst species may be more able to benefit from early experience with temporally heterogeneous environments, due to long-term adaptation to karst habitats of great heterogeneity and low resource availability. The temporally heterogeneous water conditions can induce plants to produce a higher physiological response, and inhibit the current growth of plants, but can enhance the adaptability of plants to similar stress events in the later period. The ability of species to respond to temporally heterogeneous water treatment may be related to their habitat range.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Sustainable utilization and treatment of barnyard grass (Echinochloa
           crus-galli) weed biomass using vermitechnology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The present research is an attempt to manage Barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli), a common rice weed, sustainably by vermicomposting technology. Echinochloa crus-galli (EC) biomass blended with cow dung in combination: 20:80, 40:60, 50:50, 60:40, and 80:20 with two controls 100% CD and 100% EC were vermicomposted for 63 days. Earthworms could not grow well in feedstocks having higher percentage of EC. Total Kjeldahl nitrogen, total available phosphorus and total potassium in final vermicomposts were in the range of 13.6–21.5 g kg−1, 11.8–15.9 g kg−1, and 20.1–27.6 g kg−1, respectively. Respiration rate (42–98 mgCO2 kg−1 VC 48 h−1) confirms vermicompost maturity and falls within the recommended limits (< 120 mgCO2 kg−1 VC 48 h−1). Vermicomposting process reduced the weed mass by 2.20–3.03 folds depicting its effective decomposition. It was inferred from the results that this weed can be converted into nutrient-rich manure employing vermicomposting and this process facilitating the management of E. crus-galli in a cost-effective and environmentally sustainable manner.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • A rapid assessment of stubble burning and air pollutants from satellite
           observations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract For the last several years, the air quality of India’s capital Delhi and surrounding region (NCR) has been degrading to a very poor and severe category during the autumn season. In addition to the various sources of air pollutants within the NCR region, the stubble burning in Punjab and Haryana states contributes to the poor air quality in this region. The current study employs the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) active fire products and TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) products on carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations for spatio-temporal assessment of stubble burning and associated emissions. The analysis performed in the Google Earth Engine (GEE) platform indicated a nearly threefold rise in crop residue burning in November than in October, with 92.58% and 7.42% reported from Punjab and the Haryana states in November, respectively. The study highlights the availability of near-real-time remote sensing observations and the utility of the GEE platform for rapid assessment of stubble burning and emissions thereof, having the potential for developing mitigation strategies.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Differential response of graminoid and forb species to precipitation
           variability in a constructed dry tropical grassland

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Precipitation and temperature are the two major drivers of species distribution on the earth. Change in precipitation has severe effects on the species composition of all ecosystems including grassland. In the present study, we have tried to assess the effect of precipitation on two major functional groups of tropical grassland i.e. graminoid (grasses and sedges) and forbs (herbaceous flowering plants). The study was performed in three rainout shelters with three different rain doses (16T, 11T, and 8T) and one unsheltered plot (open C) with ambient rain. Each sheltered and unsheltered plot has three 1 × 1 m randomly assigned subplots of uninvaded indigenous grassland plots (NIG). The study revealed that the aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of graminoids + forbs of the tropical grassland increase with the increase in precipitation. A significant positive correlation of ANPP was found with total inorganic – N (TIN) and soil moisture (SM) and a significant negative with microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN). Regression analysis reveals that after soil moisture, total inorganic – N and N – mineralization are the major determinants for the ANPP. However, when graminoid and forb species are studied separately, graminoids showed a positive response to increased precipitation while forbs did not show such a response. Indicating that the major contributor to the ANPP response toward precipitation increase is graminoid species in a dry tropical grassland. The study indicates the sensitivity of Indian grassland to the change in rainfall quantity, as studied forbs species decrease in both low and high precipitation. Showing that in tropics, forbs species may extinct as of their narrow range of tolerance due to precipiation change, in turn affecting the biodiversity of the area. This is the new possibility of research for researchers around the world. Moreover, to draw any conclusion a detailed study considering the nature of resource acquisition, root length, root architect, and competitive behavior among graminoids and forbs must be done separately, in relation to the precipitation.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Distribution patterns of meiofauna and free-living nematodes in beaches of
           a remote tropical South Atlantic Island (Trindade, Brazil)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Characterizations of meiofauna, as well as of Nematoda assemblages, are rare in oceanic islands due to logistical difficulties and, until now, no study on the vertical distribution of this fauna has been conducted in these environments. Therefore, this study shows vertical distribution patterns in the meiofauna community and Nematoda assemblage on two beaches with different sediment characteristic (volcanic and carbonate) of Trindade Island, a remote oceanic island in the Atlantic Ocean. Samples were collected in December 2014 at Príncipe and Portugueses beaches in three intertidal zones (high, mid-, and low) at two sedimentary column depths (0–10 and 10–20 cm). Overall, meiofauna was comprised of seven major groups, with Oligochaeta (57%) and Nematoda (12%) as the most abundant. Higher density and richness of meiofauna and Nematoda assemblage were found at Portugueses beach with the carbonate sediment. Nematoda assemblage was mainly comprised of non-selective deposit-feeders, with a total of 27 genera and 12 families; Cyatholaimidae and Xyalidae were the most abundant and had the highest diversity. Composition and density of meiofauna and Nematoda assemblage showed similar vertical distribution where the surface layer (0–10 cm) presented lower densities. Sediment characteristics (grain size, sorting, and composition) were primarily responsible for the regulation of the structure and distribution of meiofauna and Nematoda assemblage in Trindade Island beaches.
      PubDate: 2024-02-24
       
  • Performance evaluation of canal irrigation system at the tertiary level of
           Upper Ganga Canal using remote sensing

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This study underscores the critical importance of assessing the performance of the Upper Ganga Canal (UGC) and its minors, Harchandpur and Naserpur. The UGC serves as a lifeline, providing water for both agricultural and non-agricultural purposes in the region, making it vital for food security, rural economies, and environmental sustainability. The uniqueness of this study lies in its comprehensive evaluation of the efficiency of UGC using a multifaceted approach, encompassing meteorological data, field observations and remote sensing. The monetary aspects of the irrigation system performance, which were often ignored in previous studies, have also been included in this study. The study, conducted from 2012 to 2018, assesses various performance indicators. The findings reveal that the capacity of UGC to meet peak irrigation requirements highlights the potential for increased crop production. However, it also demonstrates a concerning decreasing trend in the availability of water, driven by rising non-agricultural water demands. Several performance indicators, such as relative irrigation supply (RIS), relative water supply (RWS), depleted fraction (DF), and crop water deficit (CWD), expose inefficiencies in the system, especially during the sugarcane growth period. Despite supplying ample water, sugarcane exhibits a water deficit, possibly due to the annual maintenance closure of the UGC. This calls for a revision of irrigation scheduling to address changing agricultural practices. Future research can expand this work to include climate change impact assessment, economic analyses, advanced technologies, and socio-economic factors. In summary, this study provides critical insights into the performance of UGC, highlighting the need for modernization and equitable water distribution to meet evolving agricultural demands while addressing the challenges of decreasing water availability and the changing climate.
      PubDate: 2024-02-22
       
  • Impacts of climate change on the distribution of Phyllanthus emblica Linn
           across Southeast Asia: identifying critical variables that determine the
           distribution of a medicinally important tree

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The demand for the fruits of Phyllanthus emblica, an important tree species with a long history of medicinal use, has risen tremendously in recent years. The rapid decline in the distribution of the species can be attributed to habitat loss, climate change, invasive species, extensive harvesting, and various other anthropogenic disturbances. In the present study, we modelled the potential habitat distribution of Phyllanthus emblica (Indian gooseberry) across Asia. The current and future climatic scenarios are predicted using Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) and the latest climate model Shared Socio-economic Pathway (SSP). The model constructed using Representative Concentration Pathway had the mean value of Area Under Curve (AUC) 0.970 and 0.975 for the Shared Socio-economic Pathway. The study indicated that some of the highly suitable habitats in Asia could become unsuitable and climatic variables combined with human activities could significantly impact species distribution in near future.
      PubDate: 2024-02-20
       
  • Dendrochronological studies in the western Himalaya: opportunities,
           challenges and prospects

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Numerous studies involving tree rings have been conducted in the Himalayas on a wide variety of species for paleoclimate reconstructions. Each species responds differently to precipitation and temperature variability in different ecological settings. Therefore, an improved understanding is required to reconcile the mechanisms behind the different responses of tree growth with changing climate regimes. The review is focused primarily on the studies undertaken in the field of dendrochronology in the western Indian Himalayan region (WIH) and explores the relationships between climate and forest response. The study embraces a dual strategy by surveying the literature of tree-ring studies conducted in WIH and using metadata to synthesize results and their global implications. Our review reveals that 553 years (A.D. 1452–2004) long tree-ring chronologies from high altitudes in WIH have indicated anomalous higher tree growth in the recent past strongly associated with warming trends over the region. Correlation and response function analysis between tree-ring widths and climatic parameters have shown a significant negative correlation with pre-monsoon March–April–May (MAM) temperature and a positive correlation with precipitation during the same period in the region influenced mainly by Indian summer monsoon (ISM). However, a positive correlation with winter months’ temperature has also been observed owing to the availability of water from snowmelt due to increased warming trends. Of all the potential datable tree rings, Cedrus deodara was the most studied tree species followed by Pinus spp. while Betula utilis was the least studied.
      PubDate: 2024-02-20
       
  • Socio-economic differences control species composition of urban gardens in
           a metropolitan area of Argentina

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Human population is becoming increasingly urbanized, and in this context, private gardens (home gardens) constitute an important component of urban biodiversity and provide access to ecosystem services. This study aims at identifying spatial patterns to understand the socio-ecological processes that influence the urban landscape. In our study, we analyze private gardens in one of the main urban agglomerations of Argentina to understand whether socio-economic structure or spatial distribution is more strongly influencing the species composition of private gardens. We selected 50 gardens from the urban area of Gran San Miguel de Tucumán. We surveyed the sociodemographic characteristics of garden owners and we performed vegetation censuses in each of the gardens. In the survey, we also evaluated the main mechanisms of plant acquisition. We used the species composition of each garden to perform a non-metric multidimensional scaling, which reflected the botanical distance between gardens. We used Mantel tests to correlate these botanical distances with the geographic and socio-economic distances between gardens to determine which variable controls the ecological attributes of the garden. To spatially characterize the socio-economic level, we used data from the national population census. The species composition of the gardens is more strongly associated with socioeconomic conditions than with geographical distance. The exchange of species is the main method of obtaining plants. Our study permits understanding how socio-economic structure influences the construction of private gardens, which are important components of the landscape and urban ecology. Our results could be explained by the willingness to belong to certain socio-economic groups but also by the interchange of propagules, which may reinforce social ties. Our results highlight the importance of addressing social issues to understand private decisions and design strategies toward a fair distribution of urban vegetation services.
      PubDate: 2024-01-03
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.192.20.240
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.192.20.240
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-