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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access  
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access  
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 168)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 224)
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 246)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 112)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 94)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environment Conservation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intervención     Open Access  
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access  
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access  
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access  
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Oryx     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Recursos Rurais     Open Access  
Recycling     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Regional Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access  
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

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Socio-Ecological Practice Research
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2524-5279 - ISSN (Online) 2524-5287
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • On the writing of “How spaces become places: place makers tell their
           stories”

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      Abstract: Abstract This essay describes the background research and theorizing—developing a critical pragmatism—that has led the author to collect and analyze 7 prior books of “practice-focused oral histories”. The most recent of these collections of practice stories focuses on the work of place making in three parts: first, traditional if innovative architectural and urban design and public dispute mediation practices; second, place making that deals directly with issues of racial and multi-ethnic tension in communities and cities; and third, place making centered on leveraging and enhancing the arts.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
       
  • How can the USA and China cooperate and learn from each other to reduce
           greenhouse gas emissions'

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      Abstract: Abstract China and the USA are the two leading emitters of greenhouse gases which are driving climate change. This paper explores how the two nations can cooperate and learn from each other in two key areas: transportation and renewable energy sources for electricity. Although each country has its own political, economic, cultural, and energy resource situation, many opportunities exist for moving away from fossil fuels. Cooperation could occur in a joint clean energy research institute to work on new and improved technologies, such as storage batteries, electric vehicle batteries, solar panels, green buildings, and carbon capture and storage. Avoiding trade restrictions such as tariffs on Chinese solar panels and other renewable components would be a strong sign of cooperation on climate mitigation. Cooperation on international climate agreements as happened at COP 26 will continue to be important. Exchange programs could be arranged to share experiences and ideas at the state/province and local government levels and involving think tanks, NGOs, and companies financing and developing clean energy. These exchanges can spur discussion and learning about new regulations, infrastructure, urban design, financial incentives, and technologies and how to adapt them to one’s own country. The fate of the planet may depend on cooperation between the two countries.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
       
  • When the natural pendulum swings between drought and flood, a bifunctional
           natural drainage system safeguards a mountain village’s water security
           incessantly for centuries

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      Abstract: Abstract This article showcases a long-standing water-secure village in a mountain area in China and its water safeguard system. For centuries, the village has been shielded from the adverse impacts of drought and flood and continues to be a water-secure oasis amid the water-insecure environs. The safeguard for its enduring water security is a one-of-a-kind bifunctional natural drainage system (NDS) of green infrastructures that prevents flood and harvests stormwater simultaneously during storm events and releases the stored water for subsequent, year-round use. Built by the villagers upon two ecologically wise (i.e., ecophronetic) ideas—working with the duality of stormwater and building with nature, the NDS is characterized by double highs and triple lows—high effectiveness, high robustness, low tech, low maintenance, and low impact. This extraordinary feat of socio-ecological practice is as such a strong candidate for the recognition as a time-honored example of nature-based solutions.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
       
  • Reconsidering the role of place in health and welfare services: lessons
           from the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and Canada

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      Abstract: Abstract Places—the meaningful locations of daily life—have been central to the wellbeing of humans since they first formed social groups, providing a stable base for individuals, families, and communities. In the United States and Canada, as elsewhere, place also plays a foundational role in the provision of critical social and health services and resources. Yet the globally destabilizing events of the COVID-19 pandemic have dramatically challenged the concept, experience, and meaning of place. Place-centered public health measures such as lockdowns and stay-at-home orders have disrupted and transformed homes, neighborhoods, workplaces, and schools. These measures stressed families and communities, particularly among marginalized groups, and made the delivery of vital resources and services more difficult. At the same time, the pandemic has stimulated a range of creative and resilient responses. Building from an overview of these effects and drawing conceptually on theories of people–place relationships, this paper argues for critical attention to reconsidering and re-envisioning prevailing assumptions about place-centric policies, services, and practices. Such reappraisal is vital to ensuring that, going forward, scholars, policymakers, and practitioners can effectively design and deliver services capable of maintaining social connections, safety, and wellbeing in contexts of uncertainty, inequality, and flux.
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
       
  • Enacting boundaries or building bridges' Language and engagement in
           food-energy-water systems science

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      Abstract: Abstract Scientific study of issues at the nexus of food–energy–water systems (FEWS) requires grappling with multifaceted, “wicked” problems. FEWS involve interactions occurring directly and indirectly across complex and overlapping spatial and temporal scales; they are also imbued with diverse and sometimes conflicting meanings for the human and more-than-human beings that live within them. In this paper, we consider the role of language in the dynamics of boundary work, recognizing that the language often used in stakeholder and community engagement intended to address FEWS science and decision-making constructs boundaries and limits diverse and inclusive participation. In contrast, some language systems provide opportunities to build bridges rather than boundaries in engagement. Based on our experiences with engagement in FEWS science and with Indigenous knowledges and languages, we consider examples of the role of language in reflecting worldviews, values, practices, and interactions in FEWS science and engagement. We particularly focus on Indigenous knowledges from Anishinaabe and the language of Anishinaabemowin, contrasting languages of boundaries and bridges through concrete examples. These examples are used to unpack the argument of this work, which is that scientific research aiming to engage FEWS issues in working landscapes requires grappling with embedded, practical understandings. This perspective demonstrates the importance of grappling with the role of language in creating boundaries or bridges, while recognizing that training in engagement may not critically reflect on the role of language in limiting diversity and inclusivity in engagement efforts. Leaving this reflexive consideration of language unexamined may unknowingly perpetuate boundaries rather than building bridges, thus limiting the effectiveness of engagement that is intended to address wicked problems in working landscapes.
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
       
  • When more people throw firewood into a bonfire, the flames rise higher: an
           appreciation letter to our 2021 reviewers and guest editors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-03-14
       
  • Aldo Leopold’s “Odyssey” and the development of the
           ecosystem concept and approach

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      Abstract: Abstract Aldo Leopold's essay, “Odyssey”, may have contributed to the development of the ecosystem concept and approach.
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
       
  • “Odyssey” complements “A Biotic View of Land” to bolster the case
           for a more prominent place for Leopold

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      Abstract: Abstract In “A Biotic View of Land” Aldo Leopold may have anticipated the concept of enegy flow in ecosystem ecology. As Gene Likens notes, in “Odyssey” he may also have anticipated the concept of nutrient cycles in ecosystem ecology.
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
       
  • Fifty years after the wicked-problems conception: its practical and
           theoretical impacts on planning and design

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      PubDate: 2022-03-14
       
  • An introduction and précis of the topical collection: “transforming
           ‘space’ to ‘place’ in high-density urban areas: what roles can
           landscape and urban planning play'”

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      PubDate: 2022-02-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00104-y
       
  • Complex adaptive governance systems: a framework to understand
           institutions, organizations, and people in socio-ecological systems

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      Abstract: Abstract Governance is the reason for and solution to complex problems in socio-ecological systems (SESs). Governance refers to the institutions, organizations, and people involved in and affected by socio-ecological practices (SEPs), such as research, planning, design, construction, restoration, conservation, and management. The complexity of SESs requires the ability to understand and identify how the social world produces differential opportunities, constraints, and resources across multiple levels and scales of governance systems and as a consequence undesirable SEP outcomes for social equity, human well-being, and environmental integrity. This paper presents a complex adaptive governance systems framework (CAGS-F) designed to provide guidance, organization, and basic conceptualizations of social scientific concepts and terms for diagnostic, descriptive, and prescriptive inquiry into SEPs for the purpose of improving justice and sustainability. CAGS-F is unique for synthesizing the panarchy heuristic’s focus on socio-ecological interdependence, cross-scalar, multi-causal, non-linear complexity, and change with compatible social scientific theories of multi-level institutions, organizations, and human practices. The framework works from a critical realist orientation to reveal how power and privilege embedded in institutions, organizations, and human practices produce inequitable and/or undesirable SEP outcomes. The structure of the framework employs analytic dualism to provide a way to identify where, at what level and scale, who is included and/or adversely affected, and at which point in discrete adaptive cycles across institutional, organizational, and human practices opportunities, barriers, and leverage points exist so as to optimize design, planning, programming, and implementation of SEPs or evaluate unintended and unforeseen, less than successful, inequitable, and/or undesirable outcomes.
      PubDate: 2022-01-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00101-7
       
  • Transforming air space to place: economic impact analysis for the airport
           development project of march joint powers authority

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      Abstract: Abstract There has been increasing interest in exploring the regional economic impacts of airport development projects. Many relevant studies focus on the connections between airline traffic and economic development. Few have explored the effects of the development of airport lands and facilities that transform air space to place. This study examines the regional economic impacts of airport development projects in the March Joint Powers Authority (March JPA) located in Riverside County of Southern California. The March JPA has been planning and implementing new uses for currently vacant lands, reuse of existing facilities, and joint use of the airfield facilities. This study adopts the Southern California Planning Model to trace the regional economic impacts of the March JPA’s development activities at a high level of sectoral and spatial disaggregation. The whole study proceeds in two phases. In the first phase, it estimates the impacts of development projects in their current status as it was in 2016. In the second phase, the economic impacts of a full-build out scenario by 2030 are assessed. The modeling results show that the economic impacts of the March JPA go far beyond the local area and extend to the whole Southern California region. These findings form a basis for the March JPA and local communities to learn the impacts of the development projects and to share the costs in a fair and reasonable way.
      PubDate: 2022-01-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00103-5
       
  • Three project ideas to fill research gaps in Aldo-Leopold scholarship

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      Abstract: Abstract Several important research questions in Aldo-Leopold scholarship await answers. These are (i) Did Leopold’s arresting image of a “fountain of energy” stimulate the first published energy-flow study in ecosystem ecology by Raymond Lindeman' (ii) By “beauty” in Leopold’s oft-quoted phrase “integrity, stability, and beauty,” does Leopold refer to ecosystem functionality' and (iii) Should Leopold’s forestry junket to Germany in 1935 raise concerns about Leopold’s possible sympathies with the racial and nationalist doctrines of the German National Socialist party, led by Adolph Hitler, who came to power in 1933' Answers to these questions will contribute to our further understanding and greater appreciation of Aldo Leopold’s scientific and philosophical legacy.
      PubDate: 2022-01-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00102-6
       
  • An initial survey of environmental attitudes and behaviors among the SEPR
           community

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      Abstract: Abstract SEPR authors and reviewers were surveyed to garner their attitudes and behaviors in relation to a range of environmental topics. The respondents (116) had strong agreement on many topics and, for the most part, matched their behaviors to their attitudes. The results were cross tabulated with the global regions in which people spent their childhood and where they now live. Some differences in attitudes and behaviors appear to be culturally based. Where possible the stated behaviors were compared with global and national statistics and the SEPR respondents tended to be well ahead of their compatriots in their adoption of environmentally conscious behavioral options. The next steps are discussed in relation to the relative contributions of different behavioural changes and the complexity of the relationship between attitudes and behaviors.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00092-5
       
  • “The trouble”, its maker, and Yang Gui’s confidence in “taming the
           troublemaker” with a 1962 bilateral agreement

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      Abstract: Abstract On August 15, 1962, an agreement was signed by the representatives of the Red Flag Canal users from two counties in China. Since then, it has enabled people from both counties to share canal benefits, and as such ably become a cornerstone for a peaceful canal culture between the two peoples. The agreement and its making process were both initiated by Yang Gui (杨贵), the top leader of one of the two counties who masterminded the Red Flag Canal project. In explaining his motivation, Yang Gui stated, “We are building the Red Flag Canal for posterity; we must do everything we can to save posterity the trouble.” However, just what “the trouble” he perceived was, who the troublemaker he thought would be, and why he was confident that a bilateral agreement could serve the noble goal “to save posterity the trouble”, Yang Gui did not say, neither did he leave any record. In this article, we report our aspiration and endeavor to fill this knowledge gap, and present fresh discoveries and insights we derived from examining this instance through a CPR lens—an eclectic collection of economic constructs of common-pool resources (CPRs). The article is the fourth in a mini-series on the Red Flag Canal, one of the best kept secrets in the history of socio-ecological practice.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00095-2
       
  • Implementing Aldo Leopold’s ideas through the socio-ecological practice
           of green burial: Ramsey creek preserve in South Carolina, USA

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      Abstract: Abstract Ramsey Creek Preserve in Westminster, SC has successfully implemented Aldo Leopold’s ideas of conservation through the socio-ecological practice of green burial. This article showcases Ramsey Creek Preserve’s green burial standards, born from Leopold’s ideas, and the practical and scholarly inspiration that they have yielded.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00098-z
       
  • The role of information infrastructure for climate change adaptation in
           the socio-ecological system of the Central Himalaya: availability,
           utility, and gaps

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study intends to understand and disclose the role of information infrastructure in climate change adaptation and its underlying barriers in the communities of socio-ecological system (SES) in the Central Himalaya. The study makes use of primary data in its research methodology which comprises the use of questionnaires, oral interviews, and review of relevant literature. The data were collected using a questionnaire-based survey from 85 households in 11 villages. The study results show that road accessibility and irrigation facilities remarkably influence the educational, professional, and economic conditions of the communities. The research reveals how the flow of information through television, newspapers, village elders, and mobile phones influences perceptions of climate change in a different order. Information infrastructure availability is higher with the communities having access to the road network and irrigation facilities. The study concludes that in SES a good information infrastructure is highly relevant for reducing the current and future vulnerability of SESs to climate change. The study also provides recommendations for the dissemination of information on climate adaptation that suit the needs and demands of the Himalayan SESs and thus could help to close existing information gaps and barriers.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00096-1
       
  • About the human–elephant conflict in Botswana, what did people in the
           Okavango Delta panhandle have to say from their experience'

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper assessed human–elephant conflict in the Okavango Delta Panhandle, Botswana, based on semi-structured interviews of the local residents. It further explores a sustainable alternative in which humans and elephants can co-exist. In 2019, the government of Botswana lifted the country’s 5-year hunting ban. It was a controversial policy change on the hunting moratorium. Many global conservationists argued that the change would have devastating effects on elephant populations in Africa. Local people lauded the decision as a way to protect their livelihoods. Assessment of people’s experiences is significant in identifying the socio-ecological landscape related to wildlife conservation. The data from this study are augmented by global media articles on human–elephant conflict. This paper employs a systems thinking approach in rethinking how human and elephants can co-exist and imagines the potential for a sustainable alternative through ecopedagogy.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00100-8
       
  • Reconceptualizing natural capital and sustainable use of natural capital
           through Aldo Leopold's land ethic

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      Abstract: Abstract This article reconceptualizes natural capital. It categorizes natural capital into renewable natural capital and structural natural capital, and argues for exclusion of nonrenewable natural capital (such as coal and oil) from consideration as a natural capital. It presents 10 guiding principles for sustainable use of natural capital. Both tasks of reconceptualizing natural capital and identifying guiding principles for sustainable use of natural capital are inspired by Aldo Leopold’s land ethic.
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00094-3
       
  • Insights from a novel, user-driven science transfer program for resource
           management

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      Abstract: Abstract Research results are often not easily accessible or readily digestible for decision-making by natural resource managers. This knowledge-action gap is due to various factors including the time lag between new knowledge generation and its transfer, lack of formal management structures, and institutional inertia to its uptake. Herein, we reflect on the Great Lakes Fishery Commission’s Science Transfer Program and its evolution from ‘Mode 1’ (i.e., scientists conduct research autonomously) toward ‘Mode 2’ (i.e., co-production of knowledge with practitioners) knowledge production to understand and overcome the knowledge-action gap. Six success factors and strategies and tactics used to achieve those factors were critical to the shift from Mode 1 to Mode 2: (1) dedicate funding and staff support; (2) obtain top-down commitment from organizational leadership; (3) break down silos; (4) build relationships through formal and informal interactions; (5) emphasize co-production in program and project implementation; and (6) obtain buy-in among relevant actors. By way of three project case studies, we highlight knowledge transfer approaches, products, and lessons learned. We anticipate this contribution will benefit those working on knowledge mobilization, particularly in boundary-spanning organizations, and those involved in resource program management, administration, and design; it is also intended for resource managers seeking to have their science and information needs met more effectively.
      PubDate: 2021-10-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00093-4
       
 
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