A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access  
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access  
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 172)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 226)
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 248)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 115)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 94)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Environment Conservation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intervención     Open Access  
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access  
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access  
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access  
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Oryx     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Recursos Rurais     Open Access  
Recycling     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Regional Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access  
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Water Conservation Science and Engineering
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2366-3340 - ISSN (Online) 2364-5687
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Groundwater Potential Zone Mapping Using an Integrated Approach of
           GIS-Based AHP-TOPSIS in Ujjain District, Madhya Pradesh, India

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Groundwater is the world’s most significant natural source for ensuring dependable and long-term water supplies. Various variables, like as population explosion, urbanization, and modernization, are putting groundwater supplies in jeopardy. The use of remote sensing (RS) and geographic information systems (GIS) to evaluate groundwater resources has become widespread. In the current research, groundwater potential zones (GWPZs) of the Ujjain district were estimated using the Integrated RS-GIS-based Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) approaches. Various thematic layers were obtained from appropriate sources, including land use–land cover, soil, slope, geology, geomorphology, drainage density, lithology, elevation, and rainfall. The AHP and TOPSIS approaches were used to assign weights to the parameters and their characteristics, and discovered that the geomorphology layer has the most influence of all. Finally, the final GWPZ map was created by combining the selected theme maps using a weighted overlay analysis in ArcGIS software. For both AHP and TOPSIS, the resultant groundwater potential (GWP) map has been categorized into five classes: very low, low, moderate, high, and very high: based on the results obtained using AHP, very low potential zone (1.78%), low (26.54%), moderate (45.76%), high (26.96%), and very high (1.48%), similarly using TOPSIS, very low potential zone (4.67%), low (24.42%), moderate (35.53%), high (32.16%), and very high (3.22%). The study’s findings can be used to create an effective groundwater action plan for the study area, assuring the long-term usage of significant groundwater resources. This research will be extremely useful to water managers in terms of long-term groundwater supply.
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
       
  • Developing a Water Treatment Filter by Integrating Slow Sand Filtration
           Technology with Polypropylene Nonwoven and Activated Carbon and Testing
           Its Performance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Scarcity of fresh drinking water has become a major concern in various parts of the world recently. Therefore, this study aimed to develop a sustainable polymer (polypropylene) and carbon (activated carbon from coconut shell) based water treatment filter. The filter was made by integrating polypropylene nonwoven fabric on the top of a two-inch layer of activated carbon and the traditional slow sand filter. The filter showed a significant reduction in turbidity, total dissolved solids (TDS), biological oxygen demand (BOD), pH, and concentration of heavy metals (HM) in the water samples collected from Turag River, Bangladesh. The reduction efficiencies were more than 85%. The higher value of reducing heavy metals, TDS, BOD, and pH might be explained by a higher particle retention and adsorption capacity of the filter due to the notable higher specific surface area of activated carbon and the pore size of the polypropylene filtration layer. The concentrations of lead, zinc, iron, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and copper were examined in which the filter showed a promising result; however, the removal efficiency of other potential heavy metals is yet to be tested.
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
       
  • Evaluating Moisture Distribution and Salinity Dynamics in Sugarcane
           Subsurface Drip Irrigation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The average sugarcane cultivation area in Iran’s southwestern farms is 12,000 hectares wherein irrigation is by the furrow method and the average water consumption is about 30,000 m3 per hectare. Therefore, the feasibility of subsurface irrigation method was examined to reduce the water consumption in this area. As records of earlier researches have shown that the subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) can be useful for the sustainable development of agriculture and conservation of the available water resources. This study applied it to cultivate two rows of sugarcane with supply pipes to report the moisture and salinity distribution in heavy-texture (clay-silt) soils. Finding the optimal conditions, as regards the drippers’ distance, discharge and frequency, irrigation time and duration and wet bulb development, is important for the subsurface drip irrigation. Besides, due to the limitations of field studies, numerical models can be used to simulate the prevailing conditions. Therefore, this study has evaluated the accuracy of the 2D HYDROS model for simulating the wetting pattern. The results were then used to determine the pipes’ best installation depth and the drippers’ distance on them. Tests were done for a dripper discharge of 1.2 lit/hr; supply pipe installation depths of 15, 20 and 30 cm; and dripper distances of 50 and 60 cm in three iterations. Results showed that the moisture content in all treatments varied between the field capacity limit and the permanent wilting point in horizontal and vertical distances of up to 60 and 90 cm, respectively, from the supply pipes. During the study period, the soil salinity increased in the 0–30 cm layer and decreased in the 30–60 and 60–90 cm depths. The highest salinity occurred at the furrow bottom and the lowest was on the ridge. Finally, considering the extension of moisture distribution and salinity in soil, the best supply-pipe installation depth and dripper distance were found to be 20 and 50 cm, respectively. Using HYDRUS 2D, the moisture distribution around supply pipes was estimated at three installation depths for an inter-dripper distance of 60 cm. To evaluate the software accuracy, a TDR (time-domain reflectometer) was used to measure the moisture content at 15 points around the supply pipes; according to the normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) criterion, the accuracy was, respectively, fair, good and fair for a 60-cm inter-dripper distance and 15, 20 and 30 cm pipe installation depths.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
       
  • Sediment Yield Modeling and Evaluation of Best Management Practices Using
           the SWAT Model of the Daketa Watershed, Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract High soil erosion rates, sediment transport, and loss of agricultural nutrients have been caused by poor land-use practices and management systems. This study mainly focuses on sediment yield modeling and evaluation of best management practices of the Daketa sub-basin using the SWAT model. Calibration and validation were done using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model in Daketa sub-basin. The coefficient of determination (R2), Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (ENS), and percent bias (PBIAS) were used to evaluate the model performance. During the calibration and validation, monthly sediment yield R2 values of 0.80 and 0.85, ENS values of 0.74 and 0.81, and PBIAS values of 0.0829 and 0.124 were obtained. The mean annual sediment yield of the Daketa watershed is 14.43 t/ha/year. Basin management scenarios were applied to reduce sediment production in the sub-basins. Four scenarios were developed such as (i) baseline, (ii) 5 and 10 m wide filter strip, (iii) waterway grass, and (iv) terraces to select the best management practices in the basin. The result shows that grassy waterway reduces sediment yield with an efficiency of 74.6% relative to the baseline scenario. Generally, the results indicated that grass waterways have a high potential for reducing the volume and velocity of runoff, sediments, and agrochemicals from agricultural catchments.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
       
  • Coupled Analysis of Seepage and Slope Stability: a Case Study of Ribb
           Embankment Dam, Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract An earth-fill dam must be stable against seepage and slope failure for its intended function to be sustained throughout its service life. This study assesses the seepage and slope stability of the Ribb embankment dam. The stability of an embankment dam is determined by its shape, components, materials, qualities of each component, and thus the forces to which it is subjected. PLAXIS 2D software was used to conduct the analyses. The analysis covers the entire dam body, including 20 m of foundation depth, and the Mohr–Coulomb criterion was used to explain the behavior of both the body and the foundation of the dam. At various critical loading circumstances, the factor of safety, the quantity of seepage through the main body of the dam, and the foundation were tested. The flow rate, pore water distribution, and location of the phreatic line were all determined in this investigation. The phreatic line has appeared beneath the dam’s toe. This suggests that the dam is not vulnerable to sloughing difficulties, which are the most common cause of dam failure downstream. According to the simulation results, the average rate of seepage through the dam’s body at normal pool level was 5.05*10–6 m3/s/m, and the average rate of seepage through the dam’s foundation was 3.00*10–6 m3/s/m. The seepage results are within the permissible range, according to Look (2014). The results of the factor of safety were deemed insufficient due to the wide range of loading situations. The factor of safety values for both static and dynamic stability analyses at the end of construction were 1.3063 and 1.2226, respectively. Static stability analysis yielded a factor of safety of 1.2604 for steady-state conditions, and dynamic stability analysis yielded a factor of safety of 1.1803. The rapid drawdown condition is analyzed with a normal pool level of 1940 m lowered to 1900 m or rapidly reduced by 57% of the reservoir water. The static and dynamic evaluations revealed that the factor of safety was 1.2021 and 1.0662, respectively. The slope stability study of the Ribb embankment dam is safe under all critical loading circumstances, according to different approved design standards: United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), British Dam Society (BDS), and Canadian Dam Association (CDA).
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
       
  • Evaluation of Hydraulic Performances Modeling of Water Distribution
           Systems and Physicochemical Water Quality Analysis, in the Case of Dangila
           Town, Amhara Region, Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The existing water distribution system was insufficient for all parts of the study town due to rapid population growth, hydraulic performance issues, and water quality of Dangila town. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the hydraulic performance modeling of water distribution systems and physicochemical water quality analysis of Dangila town using WaterGEMS and on-site and off-site water quality analyses. Sampling sizes of physicochemical water quality analysis were 240 at twelve distribution network stations from different pipes, high- and low-pressure zones using systematic random sampling techniques. The results of this study indicate that the water loss of the systems is 34%, which is very high. However, the average daily per capital water consumption was 18.1 l/c/d and the level of connections per family was 41.4%. Simulation of existing water distribution systems at nodes and pipes have 19% and 28.7% of lower pressures and velocities during peak hourly consumption, respectively. Hydraulic performances of distribution systems were evaluated by calibration and validation models of pressure, tank level, and link flow. The values of R2 during calibration and validation of pressure, tank level, and link flow were 0.98, 0.96, and 0.988%, respectively. The results of all physicochemical water quality parameters were within the acceptable limits of WHO and Ethiopia standards, except turbidity, total dissolved solid, and residual chlorine from some station during the dry and wet seasons. In general, the results of this study indicated that simulation of the hydraulic performance of existing distribution networks and water quality were inadequate.
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
       
  • Evaluation of Blue and Green Water Using Combine Stream Flow and Soil
           Moisture Simulation in Wunna Watershed, India

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Quantitative assessment of water availability using blue and green water will enhance water resource management at the local scale. Wunna watershed is a crucial water resource of the Godavari river basin. Calibration and validation are the essential procedure for hydrological modelling assessment. This current study used the combined monthly streamflow and reanalysis derived soil moisture data to estimate blue and green water availability and spatial and temporal variability using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. The Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) and percent of bias (PBIAS) were used to assess the model performance. It was found that monthly observed streamflow and soil moisture data were well simulated during calibration and validation with NSE greater than 0.50 and less PBIAS value. Blue water and green water storage has been increased from 2001 to 2016, whereas green water flow declined from 2001 to 2016. A higher amount of blue water and green water storage was observed in the southeast region except green water flow and less in the northwest area. This study promotes the use of soil moisture for sustainable water management.
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
       
  • Land Use and Climate Change Impacts on Streamflow Using SWAT Model, Middle
           Awash Sub Basin, Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Assessing the impact of land use and climate change on streamflow is important for watershed management. This study aims to examine the possible impacts of land use and climate change on the streamflow of the Jewaha catchment. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is used to simulate streamflow by integrating complex interactions between climate and land use/cover. The past land-use changes were determined by classifying the Landsat images from 1990, 2000, and 2018 with Earth Resource Development System (ERDAS) Imagine 2015. The potential of climate change impact was examined under Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 2.6 and RCP 8.5 emission scenarios for 2041–2070 time horizon with the baseline 1971–2000. Climate change scenarios over the catchment indicated an increasing trend in temperature, in both RCP 2.6 and RCP 8.5, and variability in rainfall patterns in the catchment. The average annual temperature will increase by 0.1 °C and 0.15 °C for the RCP 2.6 and RCP 8.5 scenarios, respectively. Generally, the result indicated that in the future summer streamflow highly increases due to climate and land-use change and a decrease in the dry season because of the changes in the climate variables.
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
       
  • Estimation of Basaka Lake Dilution Process and Its Neutralization Periods,
           Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Lake Basaka is a shallow saline lake in the Oromia region of Ethiopia. This study was carried out to estimate the dilution process of Lake Basaka and its maximum neutralization period to use the water resource for various purposes. Eight sampling points were chosen to reflect consideration of all possible activities that may affect lake water quality. Sampling points were taken in the dry and wet seasons of the Awash River and Basaka Lake to verify the current status of water quality in the years 2021 The water quality of Awash River showed that almost all selected parameters concentration was below the permissible limits of [20]. This indicates the water quality of Awash River has good quality. The water quality of Lake Basaka result showed that there was a higher concentration of electric conductivity, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, and sodium which indicates poor quality. The dilution of the lake with Awash River was the best alternative to neutralize the lake water and use it for different purposes. The mixing ratio of the Awash River and Lake Basaka was fixed in the laboratory. As a result, 5:95 is the best ratio to neutralize Lake Basaka. Lake Basaka neutralization period was fixed in lake water and Awash River dilution. By considering the quality and quantity of lake and River water, the lake water would be restored in a period of 4 years. The study concluded that dilution and control of external loading restore the lake in to good condition within four years.
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
       
  • Comparative Performance Evaluation of Small-Scale Irrigations by Using
           Internal Process and External Indicators on Chiro and Sewur Irrigation
           Schemes in North Shewa Zone, Amhara, Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This study ventured to evaluate the performance of two small-scale irrigation schemes in North Shewa Zone, Efratana gidim, and Kewet woreda. The schemes were Chiro with 175 ha of irrigable, 125 ha of irrigated land, and Sewur with 191 ha designed, and currently, it expands to 301 ha of irrigable. Primary and secondary data collection methods were used. Nine sample fields were selected from each irrigation scheme under their location to evaluate the irrigation water use efficiency at the field level (from the upper, middle, and lower water users). CROPWAT 8.0 software was used to estimate the crop water. The average application efficiencies were 63.36 and 69.52%, conveyance efficiencies were 82.73 and 77.94%, storage efficiencies were 77.55 and 82.22%, and the overall scheme efficiencies that were 54.07 and 53.25% were internal performance indicators at Chiro and Sewur irrigation scheme, respectively. In addition to this, the comparative performance indicator analysis, outputs per unit irrigated area of the two schemes were 3823.05 and 5568.60 US$/ha on Chiro and Sewur, respectively. The value of the output per unit command area of Chiro 3329.63US$/ha was too lower than the value of Sewur 14,737.85US$/ha. The output per unit irrigation supply for Chiro was 1.02, while in Sewur 1.93 US$/m3. Output per water consumed was 1.01 in Chiro and 1.32 US$/m3 for Sewur. The ratios of relative water supply and relative irrigation supplies were 2.33 and 2.66 for Chiro and 1.99 and 1.80 for Sewur irrigation projects, respectively. This indicates that irrigation water is not a constraint and a higher amount of water was diverted at Chiro, but the reverse is true for the Sewur irrigation scheme. The cropping intensity, irrigation ratio, and sustainable irrigated lands were 122, 7, and 51% in Chiro and 168, 100, and 158% in Sewur, respectively. To sustain the schemes, proper water and land management are mandatory.
      PubDate: 2022-04-11
       
  • Spatial and Temporal Variations of the Physicochemical Parameters of the
           Water Quality of Lake Basaka, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The water quality of Lake Basaka is currently influenced by natural and anthropogenic activities. The objective of this study was to examine the spatial and temporal variations in physicochemical water quality parameters in Lake Basaka. The water sample was collected in the dry and wet seasons for the verification of some selected parameters. Laboratory analysis was performed at the Abbay Basin Development Authority Water and Wastewater Laboratory. Statistical analysis of physicochemical parameters was used in the dry and rainy seasons during the year 2021. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to measure the significant spatio-temporal variation of the physicochemical parameters of water quality. The ANOVA results indicated that the physicochemical indicators of water quality have a significant variation with time and space. Spatial maps were also generated using the GIS (interpolation) tool to understand the spatial distribution of each water quality indicator in Lake Basaka. The result shows a high spatial variation of PH, EC, Na, F, and bicarbonate in the Abadir and Addis Ababa roadside. The temporal variation of the quality of Lake Basaka shows a decreasing trend due to the dilution of freshwater (runoff or hot springs) towards Lake Basaka. The water quality index (WQI) was used to assess the general state of the water quality of the lake for irrigation purposes. Lake Basaka’s water quality index is 103.97, indicating poor water quality in the lake. In general, this document revealed that the water status of Lake Basaka is currently not suitable for any purpose due to poor quality, as a result, the expansion of the lake becomes a great challenge for the city of Metahara and the sugar plantation of Metahara from time to time.
      PubDate: 2022-04-02
       
  • Analysis and Characterization of Hydrological Drought Under Future Climate
           Change Using the SWAT Model in Tana Sub-basin, Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Climate variability leads to hydrological extremes (floods and droughts) in Ethiopia, regardless of their intensity, duration, and frequency of occurrence. Therefore, this study focuses on the analysis and characterization of hydrological droughts under the future impacts of climate change using the SWAT model in the Lake Tana sub-basin. Future projections of climate data were obtained from dynamically reduced daily precipitation and temperatures from the CORDEX-Africa Program. The potential impact of climate change was examined under the RCP 4.5 emission scenarios for the time horizon 2011–2031, 2032–2052, and 2053–2073 with the baseline 1986–2005. For this study, the widely used modified Mann–Kendall test was run at a 10% significance level on time series data for each of the seven stations. The result of the Mann–Kendall (S) statistical test indicates that the temperature increases by 0.85 °C per decade and the precipitation increases insignificantly in all seasons. The standard streamflow index (SSFI) was used to characterize hydrological drought under historical and future climate change in the Tana sub-basin. The severity, duration, and frequency of hydrological drought were calculated on time scales from 6 to 24 months. Hydrological drought occurred in the Tana sub-basin due to climate change. This was achieved through the development of drought indices that are capable of timely characterizing and evaluating drought at different temporal scales. Assessing the future impacts of climate change on the characteristics of hydrological droughts is one of the important measures to implement sustainable water resource management and effective disaster mitigation in the sub-basin.
      PubDate: 2022-03-19
       
  • Evaluation of Conservation Tillage Methods for Soil Moisture Conservation
           and Maize Grain Yield in Low Moisture Areas of SNNPR, Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Conservation tillage is a promising tillage practice for enhancing soil moisture conservation. The objective of the study is to evaluate conservation tillage methods on soil moisture and maize grain yield in Silte and Gurage zone of Ethiopia. No tillage, one-time tillage, two times tillage, and conventional tillage methods were evaluated. The treatments were laid out in randomized complete block design with three replications for three consecutive years (2018–2020). Besides soil moisture data, selected physical and chemical soil properties were collected. Economic analysis was also computed for each tillage method to select cost effective conservation tillage methods. The result reveals, conservation tillage methods had better soil infiltration and soil moisture content relative to conventional tillage. There was no significant difference between treatments in soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and phosphorus in the top 10 cm in the Mareko site. However, except for phosphorus, significant differences (p < 0.05) between treatments in soil organic carbon and nitrogen were detected in the 10–20 cm depth. The maize yield and yield components are significantly affected by treatments at the Mareko site and not significant at Mito. The results support that conservation tillage tested in this study could contribute to the improvement of soil properties and maize yield in study sites.
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
       
  • Understanding the Impact of Spot Market Electricity Price on Wastewater
           Asset Management Strategy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Development of an advanced pumping control scheme is one of the useful methods that can be applied in operational optimisation of wastewater pumps. Optimisation of pumping control can benefit the utility by overall cost saving using different electricity pricing schemes from the energy market. As electricity prices can be varied based on the spot market in some countries such as Australia, the consideration of operating the pumps at the most favourable electricity price, when managed correctly, can offer remarkable savings. This paper provides understanding on the electricity spot price behaviour of South Australia in the National Electricity Market (NEM). Half-hourly electricity spot price data of over 22 years from January 1999 to June 2021 were analysed to investigate the key characteristics of spot prices, including seasonality (intraday, intraweek and seasonal price patterns), spiky behaviour and occurrences of negative prices. In addition, the possible impacts of other factors on electricity spot prices such as electricity demand and weather conditions on pump control were examined. Results indicate a strong relationship between electricity demand and spot price with the Pearson correlation coefficient up to R = 0.95, and extreme high spot prices tended to occur on scorching days with the maximum temperature above 35 °C when air-conditioner usage was high. This paper also explains the importance of electricity spot prices in the wastewater pump on/off operations and analyses opportunities for cost savings by including electricity spot price forecasts as an input of the smart controller to enhance the efficiency of the real-time pumping control.
      PubDate: 2022-03-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s41101-022-00132-5
       
  • Investigation of groundwater potential in quaternary undifferentiated
           geological formation in Fogera district, Amhara, Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract In Ethiopia's Amhara Region's Fogera district, quaternary undifferentiated geological formations have critical layers for groundwater potential. The recent technology of Arc GIS-Tool and RS-data has vulnerable to groundwater potential study. Five major input criteria were used to evaluate groundwater potential: type of lithology, soil, land use, slope gradient and drainage density. The groundwater potential was evaluated using just a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and analytical hierarchy process (AHP) in a GIS system. The outcome of this investigation can be categorized into three parts: good, moderate and poor, with occupied region of good 86.79 km2 (16.65%), moderate115.62 km2 (22.18%) and poor318.85 km2 (61.16%). The highest area was classified as poor potential zone, which accounted of 61.16% of the total area. The validation of the investigation has been conducted with well discharge and transmitivity of the materials in the study area. Average discharge and transmitivity values in lacustrine, alluvium and colluviums deposits are about 45.25 l/s and 285.11 m2 /d, respectively, while in basalt flow is about 1–2 l/s and2.9 m2/d in the study area.
      PubDate: 2022-02-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s41101-022-00130-7
       
  • Capacity Augmentation of Water Supply Schemes—a Case Study of
           Varkala Scheme

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Supplying water for a growing population for multiple purposes poses many challenges to the water service organisations. Vamanapuram River is the sole source of piped water supply to the Varkala region in Kerala, which is a densely populated area. Identifying an alternate source of water is the need of the hour as this source of piped water supply turns completely dry during peak summer. The present study deals with finding a solution to the problem of non-reliability of water sources in the Varkala region. The present water status of the Varkala region including ground water availability and piped connection details was initially determined by conducting field surveys and geospatial mapping. Water demand of the region is estimated by calculating water foot print. Alternate source of water supply was identified using geospatial mapping by considering minimum cost, water quality and yield. The yield of the new source was determined by calculating the runoff generated in a watershed. The runoff has been determined using the Soil Conservation Service-Curve Number (SCS-CN) method. Based on water quality test result, brackish water desalination treatment process has been proposed for the new identified source in this study.
      PubDate: 2022-01-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s41101-021-00123-y
       
  • Optimal Water Allocation Under Climate Change, Based on Stochastic Dynamic
           Programming Model Approach in Ribb Reservoir, Amhara, Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Optimal operation of reservoir policies is very important for water resource planning, development, and management, but it is very challenging and complicated when dealing with climate change impacts. The objective of this paper was to assess the future irrigation and water supply development and operation at Ribb reservoir in the face of climate change. In this study, a calibrated and validated Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to model runoff inflow into the Ribb reservoir under present and future climate scenarios. Inflow to the reservoir was simulated using hydro-climatic data. Observed and projected inflows to the reservoir were used as inputs to the stochastic dynamic reservoir operation model to optimize irrigation in reservoir release, storage, and final level pool storage. From the results of the model, the optimized release of a reservoir in the dry season, there is a shortage of water allocation to the irrigation demand in the normal operating policy. This implies the release does not meet the demand for further water supply systems in the dry season. This analysis can be used by water resources planners and managers to develop effective reservoir operation techniques with low climate change impact to increase water release both for irrigation and water supply for the local community.
      PubDate: 2022-01-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s41101-021-00125-w
       
  • Correction to: The Harmful Effect of the Hydro-Electric Dams Upstream of
           the Mekong River: Effect on the Ecosystems and Livelihoods of People in
           Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2021-11-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s41101-021-00122-z
       
  • The Anodising Industry Wastewater: Considerations of Its Treatment for
           Environmental Protection

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The anodising industry releases toxic effluents which have been treated using various technologies over the years. In this paper, we review separation, oxidative degradation and biological degradation wastewater treatment technologies for the anodising industry effluent. We also examined the suitability of these processes based on the effluent nature and composition. The objective was to synthesise the literature to ensure a proper understanding of the research progress and to highlight grey areas that require more investigative insight. It was observed in the review that the wastewater has a very low pH and is rich in heavy metals like aluminium, magnesium and phosphates and other anions. Techniques like nanofiltration, reverse osmosis and adsorption were shown to be able to effectively handle the variety of pollutant species in the wastewater (achieving pollutant removal percentage of > 90%). Oxidative and biological degradation were unsuitable for treating anodising industry wastewater albeit with a serious dearth in published literature. The major limitations of oxidative degradation processes are the non-biodegradability of heavy metals and the •OH radical scavenging of anions like phosphates, sulphates and nitrates. For biological degradation, the very low pH and high concentration of heavy metals make it unsuitable for the survival of most microorganisms. It is recommended that the improvisation of operating conditions of existing technologies and the consideration of alternative tertiary strategies of wastewater treatment to achieve zero liquid discharge and actualisation of the relevant sustainable development goals should be considered.
      PubDate: 2021-10-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s41101-021-00121-0
       
  • The Harmful of the Hydro-Electric Dams Upstream of the Mekong River Effect
           on the Ecosystems and Livelihoods of People in Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The development of hydro-electric projects of the upstream Mekong countries has been and will be inevitable and greatly impact on the downstream areas, in which the Mekong Delta is suffering a lot of losses, especially for Vietnam. The processes have been happening at the same time: the process of depleting water, for agriculture, for industry, for daily life, and people’s livelihoods. The processes, at the same time the effects that resonate with the process of climate change, cause great harm [1]. The drought has accelerated the acidification process, because the potential drought of acid sulfate soil (1,700,000 ha) will become intense, damaging the ecosystem and human livelihoods. The drought due to the construction of hydro-electric dams upstream (especially Lan Thuong River, China) makes the process of salinization with saline intrusion fierce (seawater 4 g/liter) [2]. Many, penetrating into the interior fields more than 100KM, the harm is extremely great. If they want to reduce the harm, the Mekong River Commission must ask the upstream countries to share it with the downstream.
      PubDate: 2021-09-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s41101-021-00112-1
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 34.231.244.12
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-