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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 278)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 195)
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 98)
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Oryx     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Environment Conservation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access  
Recursos Rurais     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Intervención     Open Access  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access  
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access  
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access  
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access  
Recycling     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access  
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access  
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Regional Sustainability     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Environmental and Resource Economics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.186
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 29  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-1502 - ISSN (Online) 0924-6460
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Stepwise Investment in Circular Plastics Under the Presence of Policy
           Uncertainty

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      Abstract: Abstract The use of recycled plastics is critical in the transition to a circular economy. However, for certain types of plastics, the recycling process is economically unviable. Government-driven incentives, such as a policy imposing a minimum fraction of recycled plastics to be used in production processes of plastic goods, offer an exit from this impasse. In this paper, we study how a firm’s investment behavior is affected by policy uncertainty governing the introduction of such a regulatory measure. Specifically, we adopt a real option approach to study the two-step investment of a firm in its transition to the use of recycled plastics. A clear trade-off can be distinguished. On the one hand, investing early causes unnecessary profit losses before the policy implementation. On the other hand, a lack of investment leads to market exclusion after the policy implementation. For our case study on the use of recycled polyethylene, we find that firms plan their first investment step, so that the timing of the second investment step approximates their projection on the policy implementation time. Moreover, we find that the firm’s value is maximized when the capacity of the first investment is smaller than the capacity of the second investment.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • The Zonal and Seasonal CO2 Marginal Emissions Factors for the Italian
           Power Market

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper estimates the seasonal and zonal \({\mathrm{CO}}_{2}\) marginal emissions factors (MEFs) from electricity production in the Italian electricity system. The inclusion of the zonal configuration of the Italian wholesale power market leads to a complete measurement of marginal emission factors which takes into account the heterogeneous distribution of RES power plants, their penetration rate and their variability within the zonal power generation mix. This article relies on a flexible econometric approach that includes the fractional cointegration methodology to incorporate the typical features of long-memory processes into the estimation of MEFs. We find high variability in annual MEFs estimated at the zonal level. Sardinia reports the highest MEF (0.7189 \({\mathrm{tCO}}_{2}\) /MWh), followed by the Center South (0.7022 \({\mathrm{tCO}}_{2}\) /MWh), the Center North (0.4236 \({\mathrm{tCO}}_{2}\) /MWh), the North (0.2018 \({\mathrm{tCO}}_{2}\) /MWh) and Sicily (0.146 \({\mathrm{tCO}}_{2}\) /MWh). The seasonal analysis also shows a large variability of MEFs in each zone across time. The heterogeneity of results leads us to recommend that policymakers consider the zonal configuration of the power market and the large seasonal variability related to carbon emissions and electricity generation when designing incentives for renewable energy sources expansion and for achieving emission reduction targets.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Vertical fiscal imbalance and energy intensity in China

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      Abstract: Abstract The effective evaluation of the factors of energy intensity (EI) at the system level has become an engaging topic in the high-quality development of the economy. However, none of the existing studies have explored the relationship between vertical fiscal imbalance (VFI) and EI systematically and deeply. In this work, Chinese provincial panel data for the period of 1998–2017 are used to analyze the influence of VFI on EI by using the spatial Durbin model. Findings demonstrate an evident spatial correlation for the effect of VFI on EI, indicating that EI in local and surrounding regions can increase as VFI improves. Results are tested for robustness using different methods. Findings further show that VFI has a positive effect on EI by improving intergovernmental fiscal transfers and hindering technological innovation. The findings of this work could help the central and provincial governments of China reduce EI problems through fiscal methods.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • The Economic and Climate Value of Flexibility in Green Energy Markets

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper examines how enhanced flexibility across space, time, and a regulatory dimension affects the economic costs and CO \(_2\) emissions of integrating large shares of intermittent renewable energy from wind and solar. We develop a numerical model which resolves hourly dispatch and investment choices among heterogeneous energy technologies and natural resources in interconnected wholesale electricity markets, cross-country trade (spatial flexibility), energy storage (temporal flexibility), and tradable green quotas (regulatory flexibility). Taking the model to the data for the case of Europe’s system of interconnected electricity markets, we find that the appropriate combination of flexibility can bring about substantial gains in economic efficiency, reduce costs (up to 13.8%) and lower CO \(_2\) emissions (up to 51.2%). Regulatory flexibility is necessary to realize most of the maximum possible benefits. We also find that gains from increased flexibility are unevenly distributed and that some countries incur welfare losses.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Sustainable Power Generation in Europe: A Panel Data Analysis of the
           Effects of Market and Environmental Regulations

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate change and greenhouse gas emissions have become increasingly more pressing environmental concerns in European policy agenda. Environmental energy efficiency (EEE) has been identified as one of the main tools for fostering the sustainable energy transition. The current policy debate on the organization of energy markets focuses both on promoting higher market efficiency and environmentally sustainable production. Consequently, in this study we analyze the impact of market and environmental regulatory tools on EEE for the electricity sector of European countries using an innovative econometric technique. We conduct an empirical analysis of the dynamics of the technical and environmental performance of the electricity sectors of 18 EU countries during 2006–2014. The contribution of the present study to the literature is threefold. First, we propose a redefinition of the technology set and a new index for the productivity change feasible and consistent with the presence of bad output. Second, we decompose the productivity changes in the two main components (the efficiency gains and the technological progress), and we measure the co-joint effects of the stringency of both market and environmental policies on these two main drivers of EEE. Third, we model country heterogeneity using a Bayesian shrinkage estimator to avoid the estimates’ poolability assumption. Results suggest that the dynamic of the effects of regulations on EEE depend on the policy instrument used. Finally, the country-specific results highlight the effects of the interactions among different policy instruments and they can be used by policy makers to balance the stringency of market regulation according to the level of environmental regulation.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Liability Structure and Carbon Emissions Abatement: Evidence from Chinese
           Manufacturing Enterprises

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      Abstract: Abstract As it is known that the linkage between financial performance and environmental performance of enterprises has not obtained conclusive results, and the role of liability and its structure have not been considered yet. In view of these gaps, this paper employed the data of Chinese manufacturing firms from 2008 to 2011, to examine the impact of liability structure on enterprises’ carbon emissions abatement. The results manifest that both the relative and absolute proportions of long-term liabilities have a significant negative effect on the level value and growth rate of enterprise carbon emissions in China. Heterogeneity analysis demonstrates that enterprises in high energy consumption group have higher total carbon emissions and growth rate compared with enterprises in low and middle energy consumption groups. For enterprises of different ownership, the level of private-owned enterprises is higher and the growth rate is lower. The findings imply that policy makers should not adopt a one-size-fits-all policies to reduce firm carbon emissions.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Adoption Gaps of Environmental Adaptation Technologies with Public Effects

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      Abstract: Abstract As the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2018) testifies, the world is a long way from halting climate change, let alone reverting it. The existence of adaptation and mitigation technologies did not prove sufficient, their adoption being respectively faulted or hindered by the presence of externalities. In this work, we study how externalities, whether positive or negative, lead the system away from Pareto-dominant (social optimum) states, towards Pareto-dominated ones. We show that adoption gaps, i.e. differences between socially optimum vs current adoption shares, of both (mal)adaptation and mitigation technologies are caused by the externalities emitted. In particular, over-adoption may occur for maladaptive technologies, whereas under-adoption may occur in case of mitigation. We employ a model with two regions at different stages of development and also derive relevant considerations on possible counterproductive effects of green policies and environmental dumping.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • International Environmental Agreement and Trade in Environmental Goods:
           The Case of Kyoto Protocol

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      Abstract: Abstract The Kyoto Protocol has received much criticism for its effectiveness as well as the spillover effect (i.e. carbon leakage and competitiveness loss). This paper provides the first evidence for the effect of the Kyoto Protocol on the bilateral trade in environmental goods, which can mitigate and prevent environmental damage. Using the generalized synthetic control method, I construct the counterfactual of trading pairs with Kyoto commitment and show that the export of environmental goods by Kyoto countries increases by 29–30% after the protocol enters into force. The paper further examines the top exporters (Germany and Japan) individually and also reports positive effects. Technology transfer induced by project-based mechanisms under the Kyoto Protocol, in particular Clean Development Mechanism, is found to be the potential driving force.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Stranded Assets: How Policy Uncertainty affects Capital, Growth, and the
           Environment

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      Abstract: Abstract The paper considers stochastic environmental policy and its effects on the environment, portfolio composition, and economic growth. Capital accumulation causes pollution which is reduced by private green services and public abatement. The government subsidizes green services and taxes dirty capital albeit at a rate which may become random, causing unexpected capital write-offs. Tax jumps depend on natural degradation and environmental activism. We derive how uncertainty and political activism affect the risk premia for investors. We analyze the incentives for firms to increase the greenness of production in order to reduce political uncertainty. Stochastic taxation is shown to act as a substitute for green subsidies when uncertainty decreases in the ratio of green services to capital and agents use their green activities strategically. Tax uncertainty may trigger precautionary savings, causing additional growth and enhanced environmental deterioration.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • The More the Merrier' Evidence from Firm-Level Exports and
           Environmental Performance in China

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      Abstract: Abstract Existing literature supports that exporting firms have better environmental performance. An interesting question thereby arises: the more exports, the better' To answer this question, we develop a method to decompose firm-level pollution emissions, and empirically investigate the relationship between export intensity and environmental performance using Chinese firm-level data. Our results indicate that the answer to this question is “No”. First, OLS estimation shows that firms with higher export intensity have less pollution emissions, mainly because of smaller output scale and lower energy intensity (energy-to-labor ratio) rather than more advanced technologies. Second, we focus on PSM-DID estimation and find that only the increase in export intensity by a smaller extent is conducive to improving firms’ environmental performance. This effect is driven by decreasing energy intensity and thereby improving energy efficiency. This finding implies that firms should focus on both domestic and foreign markets, when they improve export participation. Third, those relationships are found to be heterogeneous across the firms in terms of different pollutants, ownership types, industrial sectors and provinces. In particular, mainly for private and foreign-funded firms, technology-intensive sectors and coastal provinces, increasing export intensity can improve environmental performance. Our study provides an in-depth empirical evidence on the relationship between export intensity and environmental performance in China, and provides a new insight and a better understanding for exports and environment from a micro perspective.
      PubDate: 2022-09-24
       
  • Weather-Related Home Damage and Subjective Well-Being

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate change is causing weather-related natural disasters to become both more frequent and more severe. We contribute to the literature on the economic impact of these disasters by using Australian data for the period 2009 to 2019 to estimate the effect of experiencing weather-related home damage on three measures of subjective well-being. Overall, we find little evidence of a statistically significant or sizable negative effect, on average, of weather-related home damage on subjective well-being.
      PubDate: 2022-09-21
       
  • Environmental Policy and the CO2 Emissions Embodied in International Trade

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      Abstract: Abstract As polices to curb carbon emissions are not implemented similarly across countries, a so-called “carbon leakage” may offset domestic carbon reductions at the global level by redirecting CO2-intensive production to places with less stringent environmental regulation. This article uses a standard gravity model with panel data to assess whether a tightening in environmental policy plays as an incentive to offshore highly polluting activities. Our results show no evidence of carbon leakage through international trade, as stringent environment policy leads generally to a reduction in CO2 emissions embodied in traded goods and services, both at aggregate and sectoral levels. However, we do find evidence of carbon leakage when considering imports from countries with the most stringent environmental policy, suggesting the need for economies committed to carbon neutrality targets to tackle the issue of global cooperation on climate policy.
      PubDate: 2022-09-21
       
  • Local Effects of Payments for Ecosystem Services on Rural Poverty

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper estimates the local effects of a Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES) program on income-based poverty rates in rural areas of Costa Rica between 2007–2009. Using household surveys and spatial geographic data, we are able to control for socioeconomic and geographic characteristics at the individual and census-tract level. Our results suggest that while payments did not affect poverty rates at the national level, poverty did increase in places where PES had the greatest effect on deforestation. This effect is stronger for uneducated males, who tend to work in agricultural activities. The trade-off between ecosystem services provision and poverty is not ubiquitous and, when present, could be addressed by targeting those groups that are most affected.
      PubDate: 2022-09-17
       
  • EAERE Award for the Best Paper Published in Environmental and Resource
           Economics during 2021

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      PubDate: 2022-09-09
       
  • Effects of Early Childhood Exposure to Pollution on Crime: Evidence from
           1970 Clean Air Act

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      Abstract: Abstract Past literature has shown that 1970 amendments to the clean air act (CAA) led to significant reduction in air pollution early 1970s, and that it had positive infant health consequences for the cohorts treated by CAA. Because effects of in-utero and early childhood conditions are persistent, and the health effects can remain latent for years, CAA may impact the future adult outcomes. In this paper, I investigate the impact of the CAA on the future crime. In a difference-in-differences framework, I find that the cohorts that were born in the year of the CAA’s first implementation commit fewer crimes 15–24 years later. The magnitude of this impact is about 6%. Property crimes rather than violent crimes are impacted. I also estimate that CAA reduced the ambient air pollution by 17%. These reduced form estimates suggest that a 1% reduction in air pollution reduces future crime rate by 0.35%.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
       
  • Assessing the Economic Resilience of Different Management Systems to
           Severe Forest Disturbance

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      Abstract: Abstract Given the drastic changes in the environment, resilience is a key focus of ecosystem management. Yet, the quantification of the different dimensions of resilience remains challenging, particularly for long-lived systems such as forests. Here we present an analytical framework to study the economic resilience of different forest management systems, focusing on the rate of economic recovery after severe disturbance. Our framework quantifies the post-disturbance gain in the present value of a forest relative to a benchmark system as an indicator of economic resilience. Forest values and silvicultural interventions were determined endogenously from an optimization model and account for risks affecting tree survival. We consider the effects of differences in forest structure and tree growth post disturbance on economic resilience. We demonstrate our approach by comparing the economic resilience of continuous cover forestry against a clear fell system for typical conditions in Central Europe. Continuous cover forestry had both higher economic return and higher economic resilience than the clear fell system. The economic recovery from disturbance in the continuous cover system was between 18.2 and 51.5% faster than in the clear fell system, resulting in present value gains of between 1733 and 4535 € ha−1. The advantage of the continuous cover system increased with discount rate and stand age, and was driven by differences in both stand structure and economic return. We conclude that continuous cover systems can help to address the economic impacts of increasing disturbances in forest management.
      PubDate: 2022-09-06
       
  • The Net Zero Challenge for Firms’ Competitiveness

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      Abstract: Abstract The European Union (EU) is planning to become carbon neutral by mid-century. This bold objective might have far-reaching consequences for the region capacity to remain cost-competitive, at least in the short term. Until now the decarbonization policies (e.g. ETS and renewable support) meant higher energy prices paid by households and firms: boldest targets will probably, at least in the short and medium-term, further out pressure on energy prices. To explore the impact of climate policies on European firms’competitiveness, we extend the standard analysis that links input costs and competitiveness including a Unit Energy Cost (UEC) measure. We study the UEC dynamics in different countries and industries, assessing its main drivers (prices, energy intensity, sector composition). Modelling the relationship between firms’ foreign sales and the UEC in a gravity model setup, we find that an increase in UECs reduces bilateral exports; euro-area countries show the largest negative effects. Our results strengthen the case for pursuing a stronger integration of European energy markets in order to avoid that the ambitious long-term European decarbonization targets penalize the European manufacturers. It is also important to establish a global “carbon”level playing field such as a EU-level carbon border adjustment, or other form of EU low-carbon exports support. We finally suggest to use some energy cost indicator in monitoring country competitiveness, as it happens for ULC, for example adding UEC to the Countries’ MIP prepared by the European Commission.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Temperature Variability and the Macroeconomy: A World Tour

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper uses historical monthly temperature level data for a panel of 114 countries to identify the effects of within year temperature level variability on productivity growth in five different macro regions, i.e., (1) Africa, (2) Asia, (3) Europe, (4) North America and (5) South America. We find two primary results. First, higher intra-annual temperature variability reduces (increases) productivity in Europe and North America (Asia). Second, higher intra-annual temperature variability has no significant effects on productivity in Africa and South America. Additional empirical tests indicate also the following: (1) rising intra-annual temperature variability reduces productivity (even thought less significantly)in both tropical and non-tropical regions, (2) inter-annual temperature variability reduces (increases) productivity in North America (Europe) and (3) winter and summer inter-annual temperature variability generates a drop in productivity in both Europe and North America. Taken together, these findings indicate that temperature variability shocks tend to have stronger adverse economic effects among richer economies. In a production economy featuring long-run productivity and temperature volatility shocks, we quantify these negative impacts and find welfare losses of 2.9% (1%) in Europe (North America).
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Financing Energy Innovation: Internal Finance and the Direction of
           Technical Change

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      Abstract: Abstract Achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement and of climate neutrality by 2050 in the European Union will require mobilizing financial investments towards clean energy innovation. This study examines the role of internal finance (cash flows and cash holdings) and financing constraints for innovation in energy technologies. We construct a dataset for 1,300 European firms combining balance-sheet information and patenting activities in renewable (REN) and fossil-fuel (FF) technologies and estimate the sensitivity of patenting activities to firms’ internal finance. We use count estimation techniques and control for a large set of firm-specific characteristics and market developments in REN and FF technologies. We find that patenting activities of firms specialized in REN innovation are significantly more sensitive to a shock in cash flows than firms specializing in FF innovation. Hence, our results emphasize that innovative firms in clean energy may be particularly vulnerable to financing constraints. We discuss the implications of these results for energy transition policies aiming to redirect finance towards clean energy R&D.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • The European Green Deal, Energy Transition and Decarbonization

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      PubDate: 2022-08-24
       
 
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