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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
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Journal of Threatened Taxa
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.185
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0974-7893 - ISSN (Online) 0974-7907
Published by Wildlife Information Liaison Development Society Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Unearthing calf burials among Asian Elephants Elephas maximus Linnaeus,
           1758 (Mammalia: Proboscidea: Elephantidae) in northern Bengal, India

    • Authors: Parveen Kaswan, Akashdeep Roy
      Pages: 24615 - 24629
      Abstract: Rampant environmental changes and forest destruction push elephants, both Asian and African, to explore human spaces to fulfil their dietary and ecological requirements and, consequently in shared spaces many ‘novel’ elephant behaviors come into the limelight. Elephant calf burial is reported in African literature but remains absent from the Asian context. We report calf burials by Asian Elephants in the eastern Himalayan floodplains of the northern Bengal landscape. The study area consists of fragmented forests, tea estates, agricultural lands, and military establishments. Tea estates form the majority of elephant corridors, and we explain the burial strategy of elephants in the irrigation drains of tea estates. We present five case reports of calf burials by elephants. We aimed to understand the perimortem strategy and postmortem behavior of the Asian Elephants. The major findings reflect that the carcasses were carried by trunks and legs for a distance before being buried in a ‘legs-upright-position’. We further investigated the underlying reason for calf deaths through postmortem examinations. Direct human intervention was not recorded in any of the five deaths. Through opportunistic observation, digital photography, fieldnotes, and postmortem examination reports, we suggest that the carcasses were buried in an abnormal recumbent style irrespective of the reason for the calf’s death. Through long-term observation, we further report that the elephants in this region clearly avoid the paths where carcasses were buried. We discuss and connect the literature of two distinct elephant species and also compare thanatological studies of other sentient nonhuman species.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8826.16.2.24615-24629
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Coexistence of Indian Pangolin Manis crassicaudata (Geoffroy, 1803)
           (Mammalia: Pholidota: Manidae) and Indian Crested Porcupine Hystrix indica
           (Kerr, 1792) (Mammalia: Rodentia: Hystricidae) in Purulia District, West
           Bengal, India

    • Authors: Debosmita Sikdar, Shwetadri Bhandari, Sanjay Paira
      Pages: 24630 - 24645
      Abstract: The Indian Pangolin Manis crassicaudata and the Indian Crested Porcupine Hystrix indica are subject to extensive poaching in Purulia District (West Bengal, India), diminishing their populations, and making the study difficult. Applying methodologies that include local sightings, field observations, camera trapping, and quadrate analysis, these species were observed to co-occur in rocky cavities in Ajodhya hills at several locations. Evidence for this included fresh pangolin tail drag marks, claw prints, footprints, scales, porcupine quills, teeth marks, and faecal matter in the same locations within the study area. Quadrate analysis showed that the trees housing the target prey species of the Indian Pangolin as well as the trees bearing fruits favoured by the Indian Crested Porcupine, occurred at maximum frequency within the Quadrate area. We hypothesise that pangolins and porcupines co-occupy rocky cavities for protection from poachers, who can easily break into more typical burrows and set traps in front of them. This may be an example of adaption to poaching, which demonstrates the necessity of conservation measures to alleviate severe anthropogenic pressure.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8736.16.2.24630-24645
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Avifaunal assemblage patterns in Bharathapuzha River Basin, Kerala, India

    • Authors: Pazhayattuparambil Narayanan Anoop Raj, Avadhoot Dilip Velankar, Padmanabhan Pramod
      Pages: 24646 - 24657
      Abstract: Bharathapuzha, the second largest west-flowing river in the Western Ghats, originates from the northern and southern parts of the Palghat gap and debouches into the Arabian Sea at Ponnani. This river is exposed to high levels of anthropogenic pressures. This study looks into avifaunal assemblage patterns and the factors influencing the structure of bird communities in different ecological zones of the Bharathapuzha River Basin. The syntropic birds and flocking birds contribute variations in the bird community assemblage in the river basin. For the water-dependent and water-associated birds, mudflats, water flow, riverside vegetation, and distance from the forest were found to be the influencing factors in the migratory season. The study also emphasized the importance of protecting these river-associated habitats for the conservation of birds.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8799.16.2.24646-24657
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Desmids of Brahmaputra valley, a major southern Asian river basin

    • Authors: Soumin Nath, Partha Pratim Baruah
      Pages: 24658 - 24693
      Abstract: Inadequate information on the diversity and dispersion of desmids has led to incomplete floristic data in the northeastern region of India. The present study focuses on contributing to the information on the diversity and geographical distribution of desmid in water bodies of the Brahmaputra River basin of the Indian subcontinent. During the period 2019–2022, desmid flora of 91 waterbodies were studied. Two-hundred-and-thirty-one taxa belonging to five families and 25 genera were recorded, out of which 94 were new records for the northeastern India. Desmidiaceae was the dominant family with 195 species and with 69 species Cosmarium was the dominant genus.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8347.16.2.24658-24693
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Distribution status and roost characteristics of Indian Flying Fox
           Pteropus medius Temminck, 1825 (Mammalia: Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) in
           Kurukshetra district, Haryana, India

    • Authors: Ritu Devi, Parmesh Kumar
      Pages: 24694 - 24706
      Abstract: The Indian Flying Fox Pteropus medius plays a major role in the maintenance of a healthy ecosystem and is very specific in selecting roosting sites. The present study was conducted from January 2021 to March 2022 to document the occurrence of roosting colonies, the roosting sites and the population characteristics of P. medius in Kurukshetra district, Haryana. Of the 10 roosting sites identified in four tehsils of Kurukshetra district, 60% were located close to water sources, 20% were near agricultural fields, and the remaining sites were in roadside plantations. Eight roosting sites were observed to be permanent and two were temporary. A total of 233 trees belonging to seven families, eight genera, and nine species were identified as roost trees for this species. Our survey results show that P. medius preferred (77.42%) roosting majorly on trees of the Myrtaceae family (Eucalyptus), while very few individuals (0.5%) were recorded on Phoenix dactylifera. A positive Pearson correlation between the population of the roosting bats and the roost tree characteristics such as height (r = 0.320, p <0.001), dbh (r = 0.226, p <0.001), and circumference (r = 0.293, p <0.001) was also observed. The findings of the current study revealed that P. medius prefers to roost on tall trees with large diameters at breast height, located near water bodies and agricultural fields. Protecting such large and tall trees would benefit the conservation of roosting sites of this species and its populations.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8766.16.2.24694-24706
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Avifauna of four protected areas of Terai-Arc Landscape, India:
           significant records and a checklist of species

    • Authors: Shariq Safi, Tanveer Ahmed, Junid Nazeer Shah, Meraj Anwar, Kamlesh K. Maurya
      Pages: 24707 - 24729
      Abstract: Protected areas (PAs) in Terai-Arc landscape are relatively poorly explored as far as bird communities are concerned. Here we report a checklist and significant records of birds recorded during opportunistic observations and systematic bird surveys in four PAs: Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary (2001–2004, 2006, 2008, and 2015); Pilibhit Tiger Reserve (2014–15); Valmiki Tiger Reserve (2014–17), and Udaipur Wildlife Sanctuary (2018). We have compiled a checklist of 424 species that includes 358 species in the Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary, 306 species in the Valmiki Tiger Reserve, 236 species in the Pilibhit Tiger Reserve, and 128 species in Udaipur Wildlife Sanctuary. Most species belong to the Insectivore guild (190 species, 44.8%), while the nectivorous guild was the least represented (10 species, 2.35%). A total of 9% of species in the region were either globally threatened (6 Critically Endangered, 5 Endangered, and 8 Vulnerable) or Near Threatened (19 species). Sightings of species of conservation importance have been discussed.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.7699.16.2.24707-24729
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Monitoring observations of the southernmost breeding population of
           Long-billed Vultures Gyps indicus (Scopoli, 1786) (Aves: Acciptriformes:
           Accipitridae) in the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve, India

    • Authors: S. Manigandan, H. Byju, P. Kannan
      Pages: 24730 - 24736
      Abstract: The Long-billed Vulture (LBV) population was systematically monitored across four nesting colonies in the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve (NBR) throughout three extended breeding seasons. Breeding success rates between years ranged from 83.33% in 2018–2019 and 62.5% in 2020–2021. Nesting was monitored at the cliff sites, consistent with prior research. Overall population fluctuations were minimal, varying between 21 individuals in 2020–2021, 17 individuals in 2018–2019, and 16 individuals in 2019–2020. There was an apparent impact of forest fires and other human disturbance activities, and certain proactive conservation measures are proposed to help address these. There was indirect evidence of other threats including poison baits targeting wild carnivores and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) being widely available for use in domestic livestock. The study endorses the approach of establishing vulture-safe zones, which focus on addressing the local threats. This includes raising awareness about wildfire management, controlling toxic NSAIDs availability that are harmful to vultures, discouraging the illegal use of poison-baits, and highlighting the necessity of monitoring threats posed by power infrastructure. Due to the high mobility of LBVs, all these threats need addressing through large-scale vulture safe zone work (up to 100 km radius) surrounding the breeding colonies to secure the LBV’s long-term survival. These conservation actions are urgently needed.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8700.16.2.24730-24736
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Observations on Indian Skimmer Rynchops albicollis Swainson, 1838 (Aves:
           Charadriiformes: Laridae) breeding colonies in Middle Ganges stretch,
           India

    • Authors: Kumar Ankit, Mujahid Ahmad, Vivek Ranjan, Sanjay Kumar, Syed Ainul Hussain, Govindan Veeraswami Gopi
      Pages: 24737 - 24745
      Abstract: Indian Skimmer Rynchops albicollis Swainson, 1838 is a riverine habitat specialist bird and a species of significant conservation concern. In 2020 it was up-listed to the ‘Endangered’ category of the IUCN Red List. Breeding grounds of the species are known from the major rivers of India like Ganga, Chambal, Son, and Mahanadi. We monitored breeding colonies of the species in two breeding seasons (2017 and 2018) in the middle Ganges stretch. We identified nine nesting islands and monitored a total of 111 active nests during the study period. A total of 302 eggs were counted with clutch sizes ranging 1–5 and the mean clutch size of 2.7 (±1.18 SD). We observed a 10% & 7% of hatching and fledgling success rate in 2017 and 10% & 17% in 2018, respectively. Low breeding success was probably due to the severe anthropogenic factors such as egg collection, cattle trampling, and stochastic weather events such as flooding and sand inundation by sand storms in nests. We also recorded instances of nest abandoning because of unknown reasons. This article recommends more surveys to identify new breeding colonies of Indian Skimmer in the middle Ganges and subsequently provide adequate protection to the colonies. We also recommend sensitization programs for different stakeholders to create more awareness for the conservation of this threatened species in the middle Ganges stretch.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8593.16.2.24737-24745
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Avifaunal diversity in urban greenspaces within Cotabato city, Mindanao
           Island, Philippines

    • Authors: Joan Rhea Mae L. Baes, Peter Jan D. de Vera, John Paul A. Catipay, Marian Dara T. Tagoon, Elsa May Delima-Baron
      Pages: 24746 - 24751
      Abstract: Information about the diversity of avifauna in urban green spaces in the Philippines needs to be more extensive. More so, data on birds in green spaces of the country’s Bangsamoro Region in Muslim Mindanao (BARMM) remain largely unreported. This gap highlights the need to document the avifaunal diversity in the urban green spaces of Cotabato City. Bird species were accounted for using the point count method from September to December 2021 in three different urban green spaces within the commercial center of Cotabato City. Twenty-one avian species representing 17 families were documented. Among the surveyed three green spaces within Cotabato City, Notre Dame University (NDU) has the highest species richness (N = 20), followed by PC Hill (N = 14), and Mother Barangay Rosary Heights (N = 9). Of the 21 species of birds documented, 19% are Philippine endemic, and all of these were recorded only at Notre Dame University. Data from the present study suggest the capacity of green spaces in urban Cotabato City to cater to different bird species, including the endemic ones. Since the results present preliminary data, intensive surveys can be done on these sites by future researchers. Also, surveying more urban green spaces in Cotabato City may add information on the city’s urban birds. Substantial data from these future surveys may be helpful in the urban planning of Cotabato.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8810.16.2.24746-24751
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Waterbird count at Narathali waterbody, Buxa Tiger Reserve in northern
           Bengal for a decade (2009–2019) with a note on raptors

    • Authors: Sachin Ranade, Soumya Sundar Chakraborty
      Pages: 24752 - 24759
      Abstract: This study presents insights from a comprehensive analysis of bird counts conducted at Narathali waterbody in Buxa Tiger Reserve between 2009 and 2019. Thirteen bird species were monitored, including six wintering duck species and seven resident waterfowl species. The population trends of these birds remained relatively constant throughout the study period. Additionally, the study documented raptor counts and compiled a checklist of waterbirds observed at the waterbody. These findings enhance our understanding of bird population dynamics in this significant habitat and provide valuable information for the conservation and management of the Buxa Tiger Reserve.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8452.16.2.24752-24759
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • First confirmed reproduction by a translocated female Siamese Crocodile
           Crocodylus siamensis (Crocodylidae: Crocodilia) with observations of nest
           attendance and nest-associated fauna

    • Authors: Steven G. Platt, Sounantha Boutxakittilah , Oudomxay Thongsavath, Samuel C. Leslie, Lonnie D. McCaskill , Randeep Singh, Thomas R. Rainwater
      Pages: 24760 - 24768
      Abstract: The Siamese Crocodile Crocodylus siamensis is considered one of the most imperiled and poorly-studied crocodilians in the world. Translocations (reintroductions) - often in conjunction with head-starting of juveniles - are a critical component of efforts to restore viable wild populations of C. siamensis. We here report the first confirmed nesting by a known-age, head-started, and translocated female C. siamensis together with observations of nest attendance and nest-associated fauna based on camera trap imagery. Our observations occurred in the Greater Xe Champhone Wetland Complex (GXCWC) in Savannakhet Province, Lao PDR. GXCWC encompasses 45,000 ha of seasonally inundated natural and anthropogenic wetlands, agricultural ecosystems, scrubland, and forest. While collecting eggs for incubation in May 2022, we were able to identify a unique series of notched tail scutes on a female C. siamensis as she aggressively defended a nest. From these markings we determined the female was hatched on 11 August 2012 (age = 9.75 years) and released in March 2014, approximately 3.5 km from the nest site. A game camera placed at the nest on 11 May 2022 and recovered on 5 July 2022 (34 trap nights) recorded 1724 images. These images indicated the female remained in attendance at the nest throughout the monitoring period. Camera trap imagery captured eight nest repair events and two nest defense events; during the latter the female defended the nest from village dogs. Eleven species of nest-associated fauna were recorded by the game camera, including eight and three species of birds and mammals, respectively. Our observations are the first confirmed nesting by a head-started, translocated female C. siamensis indicating these are effective conservation strategies for restoring wild populations. We also unequivocally established that head-started female C. siamensis are capable of reproducing when nine-years-old.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8755.16.2.24760-24768
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Erode Ground Gecko Cyrtodactylus speciosus (Beddome, 1870) (Squamata:
           Gekkonidae) from peri-urban common-lands of Coimbatore, India, with
           comments on habitat associations

    • Authors: S.R. Ganesh, N.A. Swaathi, Usha Ravindra
      Pages: 24769 - 24774
      Abstract: We report the Erode Ground Gecko Cyrtodactylus speciosus (Beddome, 1870), a rare, hill forest-dwelling species, from two sites in the northern periphery of Coimbatore city. These two sites, viz., Nallusamy checkdam (Site–1) and Sarkar Sama Kulam (Site–2) are lakes with remnant vegetation belts, surrounded by pastures, farmlands, and villages. From 100 hours of observations during a six-month period (April–September 2023) in these two sites, we report 14 sightings of C. speciosus including gravid females, juveniles, and subadults indicating a persistent breeding population. The encounter rate estimates ranged from 5 h (in Nallusamy checkdam; n = 10/50 h) to 12½ h (in Sarkar Sama Kulam; n = 4/50 h), averaging at about 7 h (pooled; n = 14/100 h) to get one sighting of C. speciosus. Our sightings of C. speciosus in peri-urban common lands abutting a city, calls for intensified biodiversity surveys and enhanced protections of such remnant vegetation belts, often presumed to have low or marginalised conservation values.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8749.16.2.24769-24774
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Assessment of diversity of Odonata fauna in selected sites of Purba
           Barddhaman district, West Bengal, India

    • Authors: Sulagna Mukherjee, Rabindranath Mandal
      Pages: 24775 - 24785
      Abstract: Purba-Barddhaman, a newly emerged district of West Bengal was surveyed for listing its odonate diversity. The district is located in southern West Bengal, and two major rivers, Damodar and Ajay, run through it. It also has a lot of small rivers, perineal and seasonal water bodies, grasslands, marshes, and agricultural fields, making it a great place for odonates. Five different sites of the district were surveyed by direct search and opportunistic sighting methods for a period of two years (March 2021 to February 2023) and odonate diversity was listed. We have found a total of 47 species belonging to 35 genera and six families from this district. The most diverse family was Libellulidae, with 24 species. A few major findings from this study were Macrogomphus montanus, Platygomphus dolabratus, Lathrecista asiatica, Libellago indica, and Agriocnemis kalinga. This is the first systematic study of odonates from this district, and it illustrates the value of this densely populated district for further exploration due to its high agricultural fertility.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8524.16.2.24775-24785
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • A preliminary assessment of butterfly diversity from Mekhliganj town,
           Cooch Behar District, West Bengal, India

    • Authors: Abhirup Saha, Prapti Das, Dhiraj Saha
      Pages: 24786 - 24794
      Abstract: In the present study, butterfly diversity from Mekhliganj town, which is located on the Teesta River bank of Cooch Behar District, West Bengal, India was studied. A total of 55 species of butterflies were recorded from the two study sites, out of which 22 species were observed for the first time from Cooch-Behar District, not recorded earlier. Out of these, five recorded species were legally protected under the Wildlife (Protection) Act (WPA), 1972 like Chliaria othona, Lampides boeticus, and Hypolimnas misippus. Therefore, efforts should be made for habitat conservation of the Teesta River bank.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8137.16.2.24786-24794
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Utilization of Afzelia africana Sm. ex Pers. (Magnoliopsida: Fabales:
           Fabaceae) in Nigeria and its implications for conservation

    • Authors: Samuel Oloruntoba Bamigboye, Muhali Olaide Jimoh, Falilat Abeni Lawal, Zainab Temitope Osiyemi, Charles Petrus Laubscher, Learnmore Kambizi
      Pages: 24795 - 24803
      Abstract: This study investigated the ethnobotanical uses of Afzelia africana Sm. ex Pers., a threatened tree species in Nigeria to determine the impact of uses of this species on the risk of its extinction. Ethnobotanical surveys were conducted by means of semi-structured questionnaires with the local community called Ijebu Igbo in Ogun state of Nigeria and a total of 60 respondents were interviewed from this community. Herbalists, artisans, Islamic scholars, traders, and retirees were interviewed to document their knowledge of the uses of A. africana. This study revealed that there are different uses of A. africana, among which its spiritual and medicinal uses were the most dominant. An unsustainable harvest of A. africana for these uses will aggravate the decline of its population, thereby increasing the risk of extinction. This study recommends local awareness of the indigenous people of possible ways this species can be utilized in a sustainable manner to prevent its extinction.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8582.16.2.24795-24803
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Gastrointestinal parasites of the Indian Flying Fox Pteropus medius in
           Nagpur City: a seasonal study through faecal sample analysis

    • Authors: Ruchika R. Sangale, Priya Gawande
      Pages: 24804 - 24806
      Abstract: The Indian Flying Fox Pteropus medius, among the largest Indian fruit eating bats, is commonly observed with unhurried wing beats at dusk and tends to roost during the day in sizable, noisy colonies situated on trees within bustling towns and villages. Notably, these colonies are prevalent in busy areas of Nagpur city, particularly on expansive Banyan Trees Ficus bengalensis and Pangom Oil Trees Millettia pinnata, owing to the consistent availability of fruits and flowers throughout the year. This study focuses on evaluating gastrointestinal helminth infection in fruit-eating bats during the summer, monsoon, and winter seasons in Nagpur city, Maharashtra. A total of 58 samples were collected, processed, and examined using the double sedimentation technique. Of these, 46 samples (80.01%) tested positive for Ascaris spp. eggs, with a higher percentage during the monsoon season. Additionally, during the peak summer season, a juvenile flying fox from one of the colonies was rescued in a dehydrated state, displaying crusty scab-like lesions on the wing’s anterior and posterior regions. Subsequent examination revealed the presence of the ectoparasite Macronyssus spp. on body of the juvenile Indian Flying Fox.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.7338.16.2.24804-24806
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Plagiochila javanica (Sw.) Nees & Mont. (Marchantiophyta: Plagiochilaceae)
           rediscovered from the Western Ghats after 180 years

    • Authors: M.S. Sajitha, C.N. Manju, B. Mufeed, K.P. Rajesh, K.K. Rawat
      Pages: 24807 - 24811
      Abstract: Plagiochila javanica, a widespread Asiatic member of the liverwort family Plagiochilaceae, is rediscovered from Western Ghats of Kerala, India after about 180 years of its first record from the country. The present discovery is a new record for Kerala state. A detailed description along with illustrations and images of the species are provided.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8853.16.2.24807-24811
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • A new record of genus Synedrus Graham, 1956 with description of male of
           Synedrus kasparyani Tselikh, 2013 from India

    • Authors: Mubashir Rashid, Arvind Kumar
      Pages: 24812 - 24815
      Abstract: The genus Synedrus Graham, 1956 is recorded from India for the first time. The male of Synedrus kasparyani Tselikh, 2013 is described. Additional characters and images of female are also provided.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8823.16.2.24812-24815
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Hunteria zeylanica (Retz.) Gardner ex Thwaites (Magnoliopsida:
           Gentianales: Apocyanaceae)—new addition and first genus record to the
           flora of Karnataka

    • Authors: G. Ramachandra Rao
      Pages: 24816 - 24818
      Abstract: The present study reports the new distribution record of Hunteria zeylanica (Retz.) Gard. ex Thw., tree from Karnataka part of Central Western Ghats.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.11609/jott.8798.16.2.24816-24818
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2024)
       
 
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